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1882)

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Caleb Wick
COLONEL CALEB B. WICK.    The name of Wick has been identified with Youngstown from a very early day.  One of the first, if not the first, minister of the gospel of any denomination who held religious services in the infant settlement, and was for many years afterwards pastor of the Presbyterian church, and who there solemnized a marriage as early as November, 1800, was Rev. William Wick, an uncle of the subject of this memoir, and elder brother of his father, Henry Wick who came in 1802 and was one of the earliest merchants.
     The family is of English origin.  An early ancestor in the United States was Job Wick, of Southampton, Long Island, New York.  He was married, as appears by a family record, to Anna Cook Dec. 21, 1721.  They were the parents of eleven children, of whom Lemuel, born Apr. 16, 1743, was the ninth.  Lemuel was married to Deborah Lupton about 1763.  They were the
parents of five children, of whom William, the pioneer minister above named, born June 29, 1768, was the third, and Henry, the pioneer merchant, born Mar. 19, 1771, was the fourth.
     Henry removed, while a young man, from Southampton, Long Island, to Washington county, Pennsylvania, and was there married Dec. 11, 1794, to Miss Hannah Baldwin, daughter of Caleb Baldwin, of that county.  They were the parents of eleven children, of whom Caleb Baldwin Wick, born Oct. 1, 1795, was the eldest.
     Henry Wick was engaged in mercantile business in Washington county, Pennsylvania, after his removal there.  He first came to Youngstown in 1802, probably at the instance of his father-in-law, Caleb Baldwin, who removed there about 1799.  A deed on record shows that on Apr. 29, 1802, Henry Wick purchased of John Young the square bounded on Main (now West Federal), Hill (now Wood), Phelps, and Hazel streets, and a lot of thirty-seven acres outside of the town plat for $235.  He erected buildings for residence and store, commenced mercantile removed his family, then consisting of his wife and four children: Caleb B., Thomas L., Betsey, and Lemonel, in the spring of 1804 to Youngstown.  He died November 4, 1845.  Mrs. Hannah B. Wick, his widow, died Apr. 10, 1849.
     Caleb B. Wick was in the ninth year of his age when he came to Youngstown.  The settlement at that time, as he related in his after years, consisted of only a few scattered log cabins.  On the ground now occupied by the main part of the city the timber had been burnt off by the Indians, and there were only bushes and thick bunches of hazel.  Wild deer were frequently to be seen running where are now the most populous and active business streets.
     He received such an education in the ordinary branches as was attainable in the schools of that day, and at times assisted his father in his store and other business.  In the fall of 1815, in partnership with the late Dr. Henry Manning, he commenced a country store, connecting with it a drug store, the first in this part of the Reserve.  This store stood on the north side of West Federal street, next west of the (present) large store building of E. M. McGillin & Co., in a frame building now occupied by J. F. Hollingsworth as a stove and hardware store.  He continued in partnership with Dr. Manning in this building about ten years.  He continued the mercantile business in another building, next east of the present Excelsior block, part of the time without a partner, and at times with different partners until 1848, when having been a merchant for over thirty years he retired from that business, being then the oldest merchant in business in Youngstown.
     During his active life he was honored, at different times, by election and appointment to positions of public trust and honor.  On June 2, 1817, having been elected by the company to the office, he was commissioned by Governor Worthington, lieutenant of the Third company, First battalion, First regiment, Fourth division Ohio militia, and qualified by taking the official oath before Hon. George Tod, judge of the common pleas.  On Sept. 3, 1818, he was commissioned captain of the same company.  On Mar. 22, 1822, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the First regiment, and in the fall of the same year colonel of the regiment, which office he held for a few years.
     In 1820 and again in 1824 he was elected township clerk of Youngstown, and subsequently was elected trustee, and held other township offices.  During the exciting Presidential campaign of 1840 Colonel Wick was an active supporter of General Harrison, and on Nov. 17, 1841, was commissioned postmaster of Youngstown, which office he held until Mar. 10, 1843, when, not being a supporter of President Tyler, he was removed.
     After retiring from mercantile business, in 1848, he did not enter into any active business, but devoted his attention to the care of his estate, which had become large.  He died June 30, 1865, aged nearly seventy years.  At that time he was, and since the death of Colonel William Rayen, in April, 1854, he had been, the oldest citizen or resident of Youngstown.
     He was married, Jan. 1, 1816, to Miss Rachel Kirtland, daughter of Jared Kirtland, of Poland, Ohio.  They were the parents of two children, one of whom, Henry K., for some time a merchant of Youngstown, died at about the age of twenty-two years; the other died in infancy.  His wife died in 1820.  He was again married, Nov. 3, 1828, to Miss Maria Adelia Griffith, of Youngstown, formerly of Caledonia, Livingston county, New York.  They were the parents of ten children, seven of whom - Rachel K., intermarried with Robert W. Tayler, late first comptroller of the United States Treasury; Hannah B., intermarried with Charles D. Arms, of Youngstown; Laura E., Caleb B., Henry K., Charles E., and Eliza M. - are now living.

    
His character as a citizen and in his various relations to the community is sketched in an obituary notice, prepared shortly after his death, by one who knew him well, from which we make extracts:
     In social life, as a citizen, a neighbor, and a friend Colonel Wick was liberal, kind, and warm-hearted.  In his house everyone felt at home, and his hospitality knew no limit.  Indulgent to his own family in social joys, and cheerful to the last, he had great delight in the society of the young as well as the old.
    
He united with the First Presbyterian church of Youngstown, on profession of faith, on Apr. 6, 1835.  For more than thirty years he had been known as a Christian man, devising liberal things for the church of his choice.  He had been an invalid for several years, but his end came suddenly.  and though it came with little warning, yet he was awaiting the summons from on high and peacefully fell asleep.
Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown and Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Vol. I - Publ. by Biographical Publishing Co. - Chicago, Illinois
1907 - Page 438

James Williams
 


Almyra Williams

JAMES WILLIAMS was among the pioneers of Canfield township, and bore with fortitude the experiences of pioneer life.  He enlisted in the army during the War of 1812, immediately after Hull's surrender, and served at first lieutenant.  He married Mary Smith.  The names of their children were James, Rebecca, Elizabeth, Banner, Nancy, and Rachel.  Rebecca (deceased) married Jacob Bower; Elizabeth married Almedius Scott, and resides in Canfield; Banner married first Clarissa Lew, and second Margaret McDaniels, and resides in Canfield; Banner married first Clarissa Lew, and second Margaret McDaniels, and resides in Canfield; Nancy the wife of Ormon Dean, resides in Lordstown; Rachel married John Porter, and resides in Palmyra, Portage county.
Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown and Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Vol. I - Publ. by Biographical Publishing Co. - Chicago, Illinois
1907 - Page 109
   

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