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Hopewell Twp. -
THOMAS BALTZELL, farmer, Tiffin, was born July 22, 1815, in Frederick County, Md., son of Charles and Elizabeth (Creidler) Baltzell, natives of Maryland and of German descent.  Charles Baltzell died in Maryland, and in 1837 his widow came to Ohio, bringing her only son.  Thomas, with her; she died in 1857.  Thomas Baltzell was a successful farmer, but in 1881 he retired from his farm, moved to Tiffin and bought a house on Clay Street, where he now resides.  He was married, in June, 1844, to Caroline Souders, the fifth born in the family of six children of David Sauders natives of Frederick County, Md.  To Mr. and Mrs. Baltzell, were born ten children:  Charles D. married to Mallie Butler; Henry C. married to Kate Pennington (have four children: Carrie, Henry, Willie T., and Bessie); Nettie; John T.; Flora C., Clara B., married to J. C. Royer (have one child), Helen); Ida B., and Jesse M.  One son enlisted in the late war of the Rebellion when but twenty years of age and served until the close of that struggle.  They are all members of the Presbyterian Church.
(SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 854)
Big Spring Twp. -
NICHOLAS BAKEIS, farmer, P. O. Adrian, was born in Big Spring Township, this county, son of Joseph (a farmer) and Jane (Jenning) Bakeis, natives of Belgium, former born Mar. 7, 1820, latter born May 25, 1825; they were married Feb. 25, 1845, and were the parents of twelve children, six of whom are now living: Joseph, John, Nicholas, Frank, Andrew and LewisJoseph Bakeis, the father of this family, died June 5, 1885, aged sixty-five years, two months and twenty-nine days.  Our subject, along with his brothers, is managing the homestead farm, comprising 152 acres of good land, where the family has resided nearly forty-three years.  They are all members of the Catholic Church at St. Nicholas.
(SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886.)

Eden Twp -
BAKER FAMILY.
   Among the well known pioneer families of Seneca Co., and of Eden Twp., was the Baker family of four brothers: Franklin, Thomas, John and Richard, and four sisters:  Mary Baker, Sophia Stearns, Lucretia Arnold, and Ann Knapp.  They were the children of Judge Samuel Baker¸ a native of Branford, Conn., and a descendant in the fourth generation of Thomas Baker, who settled at Milford, Conn., in 1639, whence in 1650 he removed to East Hampton, L. I., which town he represented in the Colonial Assemblies of New York and Connecticut.  During the invasion of New York by Burgoyne..  Samuel Baker, then a boy of thirteen, was captured by Indians, taken to Burgoyne’s camp and sold to a British officer.  He was released by the surrender of Burgoyne’s army, and afterward enlisted in Col. Marinus Willett’s regiment and served until the close of the war.  He was one of the first settlers in Steuben Co.; was for many years first judge, and one of the most prominent citizens of that county.  Franklin and Thomas Baker came to Eden Township in 1822.  Franklin entered the farm known as the Umsted farm on the Kilbourne road, where he resided until his death in 1831.  Thomas entered the farm adjoining, and there lived until his death in 1863.  Samuel Baker, and Mrs. C. Y. Brundage, of Eden Twp., and Mrs. Albert Ewer of Tiffin are children of Thomas Baker.  His widow, Sarah B. Baker came to Seneca Co. with her father, Col. Boyd, in 1821, and since 1863 has resided in Tiffin.  John Baker came soon after his brothers and settled upon the farm on Rock Creek upon which he died in 1876.  Mary Baker, with her husband, Joseph Baker, settled in Scipio Twp. In 1822,  Mr. and Mrs. Stearns settled on Rock Creek in 1828.  Ten years afterward Mr. Stearns died, and his widow married the late William Fleet, and soon afterward died.  John B. and George W. Stearns, two of the largest farmers of Scipio Twp., are the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Stearns.   Mrs. Knapp and Mrs. Arnold removed to Garden Grove, Iowa, where they now live.  Richard Baker, the youngest of the four brothers, came to Seneca Co… in 1835, and purchasing several small farms made the fine farm of 400 acres upon which he resided until 1871, and which is now owned by his son, Grattan H. Baker.  In 1836 he was married to Fanny Wheeler, daughter of Grattan H. Wheeler, who was a member of Congress, and for many years a State Senator from Steuben Co., N. Y., and grand-daughter of Captain Silas Wheeler, who, in April, 1775, enlisted in Capt. Thayer’s company of Rhode Island Volunteers; was at Bunker Hill; with Arnold  in his terrible march through the forests of Main and Canada, to attack Quebec; was captured in the unsuccessful attack on Quebec, in which Montgomery was killed and Arnold wounded, and kept a prisoner and in irons until August, 1776, when he was exchanged.  He again entered the army; was again captured and taken to Ireland, whence he escaped to France through the aid of Henry Grattan¸ the Irish orator and patriot, after whom he named his only son.  In 1871 Richard Baker removed to the farm adjoining Melmore, on which he now resides, with his wife, whom he brought to what was then little more than a wilderness almost fifty years ago.  Time and fortune have dealt kindly with them both.  With six sons and twenty grandchildren, into their family, death was never come.  Notwithstanding the weight of seventy-seven years, Mr. Baker is still erect, vigorous, strong, self-reliant, but kind and tender-hearted.  For years his class in the Methodist Sunday-school (of which church he and his wife have been members for more than forty years) has been the infant class into which no child was too small to enter, and from which no child was ever willing to go.  Of the six sons of Richard and Fanny Baker, Silas is a farmer in Dickinson Co., Kas.; Frank, a lawyer in Chicago; Job, a farmer in Wyandot Co.; Grattan H., a farmer, and the owner of the old homestead; Ralph, a farmer at Garden Grove, Iowa, and Richard W., still at home.  Richard Baker brought to his farm, in 1837, thirty pure Spanish merino sheep, the first brought into Seneca Co., and probably the first in northern Ohio, and has been one of the most successful wood growers, as well as one of the best grain farmers in the county.
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SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 846)

HENRY BALBIAN.  The city of Tiffin, Ohio, is the home of some of the most flourishing industries of Seneca county, and the place of residence of those whose energy and ability control these enterprises.  One of the leading business citizens of Tiffin is Henry Balbian, whose connection with the Tiffin Woolen Mills has existed since 1899, and he is a worthy representative of that class of large-brained, progressive and public-spirited men without whose business acumen and advanced ideas many lines of trade would become entire inactive.
     By birth Mr. Balbian is a German, his residence in the United States dating from the day of the assassination of President Garfield, in 1881.  He was born in Rhein-Pfalz, Bavaria, Germany, Mar. 13, 1860, and was given good educational opportunities, studying for a time in an academy in Heidelberg.  His father, Gustave Balbian, is a native of the same place, and still resides there, at the age of eighty years, venerable and respected.  For a long period he was a prominent and prosperous woolen manufacturer, and it was in his father's mills that our subject acquired his thorough knowledge of the manufacture of woolens.
     When Mr. Balbian reached the city of New York he was but twenty years old, but he was already a skilled workman and very soon he entered upon a business engagement in Lisbon Falls, Maine, where he was superintendent of mills, at a salary of five thousand dollars a year, this connection lasting for four years.  His next business association was in Philadelphia, where he managed a large mill for six years, leaving there to assist in the starting of a new plant at Louisville, Kentucky, which he successfully and satisfactorily managed for the succeeding three years.  In the fall of 1892 he returned to the north and became the manager of a mill at North Vassalboro, Maine, remaining with that concern until 1897, when he went to Cleveland, Ohio, there taking charge of the largest plant of its kind in America.
     The fertile brain of Mr. Balbian was continually busy, seeking out new methods, projecting new plans and preparing for a permanent future for himself.  In 1898, in connection with his brother Frederick, he bought the Vassar Woolen Mills and the electric-light plant in Vassar, Michigan, this large enterprise now being under the superintendency of Frederick Balbian.  Mr. Balbian still had expansive ideas, and in 1899 he came to Tiffin, Ohio, and considered the advisability of purchasing the old Tiffin Woolen Mills, a plant which had been idle for some years.  Mr. Balbian, with the business ability which has always distinguished him, finally determined to take charge of this plant, which formerly had not been successfully conducted, and to put in improved machinery, apply his own enlightened methods of management and to endeavor to make this a valuable and paying property.  This he has done, and now the industry is one of the leading ones of the city, employing a very large force of workmen and attracting a great volume of trade.  The output of the plant consists of all classes of woolen goods, and in connection with the mills Mr. Balbian conducts a large tailoring establishment.  His methods are practical, because he is a practical man.  He understands every detail of his work and knows just where to expand and where to economize and still to keep his goods up to the standard he has led the trade to expect.
     Henry Balbian was married on Oct. 3, 1882, to Miss Lena Ellen Batz, who was born in Connecticut, and they have three daughters, namely: Lillian May, Lena Ellen and Anna Matilda, all well educated young ladies and fitted for the best social circles in Tiffin.  Mr. Balbian was reared in the Lutheran Church, and his wife is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church.  In politics he votes more for the man than in the interests of any party, while fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias and has attained the thirty-second degree in Masonic order.
     Mr. Balbian is one of the substantial citizens of Tiffin, and his beautiful home, on Milmore Street, is the center of a genial hospitality.  He is liberal and public-spirited and takes pride in the progress of this city being ever ready to assist in all enterprises which promise to be of benefit.  He is recognized as a leader in all matters of business, and is always at home where shrewdness, and clear-headedness and sound judgment are brought into play.  As manager of the Tiffin Woolen Mills he has shown his ability and skill, having a large capacity for work himself, and possessing those qualifications which enable him to manage large forces of men without friction.
Source:  A Centennial Biographical History of Seneca County, Ohio - Publ. by Lewis Publishing Company - 1902 - Page 662
Bloom Twp. -
ISAAC S. BALDWIN, farmer, P. O. Bloomville, was born Dec. 10, 1838, in Republic, this county.  His parents, Nathan and Matilda Baldwin, natives of Cayuga, N. Y., settled in this county in 1835, and after living three years on their farm in Scipio Township moved to Republic, where Nathan Baldwin carried on a wagon shop until his death, Sept. 3, 1849.  Mrs. Baldwin kept her family together until they grew to manhood and womanhood; their names are George H., now a resident of Ionia County, Mich.; Isaac S.; Rush P., who served three years during the late Rebellion as a member of the Twenty-fifty Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry and Ninth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and Mrs. Addie S. Chittenden, a resident of Republic, this county.  Our subject was married, Feb. 7, 1861, to Miss Ellen Krilley, who bore him the following children:  Eliza, William and two deceased.  Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin moved to Ionia County, Mich., and there developed a farm.  Mrs. Baldwin subsequently returned to Republic for medical treatment, and there died July 2, 1872.  Our subject then also returned to this county, and here married, Mar. 5, 1873, Mrs. Emily J. Brown, of Bloom Township, the widow of William Brown (by whom she had one daughter, Wilhelmina), and who was born in Bloom Township Feb. 9, 1838, daughter of Butler and Mary (Boyd) Munsell.  To this union were born Nettie and Nellie (twin).  Freddie and Jesse.  Mr. Baldwin has a farm comprising eighty acres of well-improved land, which he has cleared up and developed within the lat ten years.  He is a supporter of the Democratic party; has served his township as assessor three terms and is a citizen highly respected by all.  Mrs. Baldwin is a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church.
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SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 732)
COLONEL BALL - After whom the fort and Spencer's town were named, was present at the great Whig celebration, at Fort Meigs, in 1840, where a friend of mine saw him for the last time.  He was six feet high, well proportioned; his hair was gray and bushy; he had a florid complexion and wore side whiskers; he had gray eyes, thin lips, heavy jaw, a loud, clear voice, talked scholarly and lived with his family in Richland county at that time.  He was a powerful man and walked very erect.  Before his hair turned gray it was of auburn color.  His entire make-up exhibited great force of character and energy.
     Clinton township has an excellent market, is well watered, enjoys the privileges of the city of Tiffin with her schools and otherwise, while the land is in a high state of cultivation and very valuable.  Splendid farm houses in all directions indicate the general prosperity of the people.
     As already mentioned, the township was organized in June, 1820, and the first election was held on the 15th of June, 1822.  The population of Clinton, including Tiffin, in 1840, was 2,195; in 1850 it was 4,330; in 1860 it was 6,041; it increased to 7,174 in 1870, and in 1880 it was 1,701.  Tiffin, in 1880, has 7,882 inhabitants, which , added to the township, makes 9,583.
     Tiffin proper, in 1840, had 788 souls; in 1850, 2,718; in 1860, 3,992 and in 1870, 5,648.
Source:  History of Seneca County : from the close of the Revolutionary War to July, 1880 : embracing many personal sketches of pioneers, anecdotes, and faithful descriptions of events pertaining to the organization of the county and its progress Springfield, Ohio: Transcript Print. Co., 1880
JACK W. BARRACK was born July 28, 1833, in Lyocming county, Pennsylvania.  In 1834 his parents moved to Ohio and settled near the base-line in Crawford county.  His father's name was John and his mother's maiden name was Jane Dunlap.  The father was a carpenter by trade, and when John W. was big enough to learn a trade, he helped his father at his work and became a carpenter.  The family lived on a farm and conducted that also at the same time.  John W. married Miss Catharine Shoemaker on the 17th of June, 1857.  They had nine children, of whom six are living.  Mr. Barrack was elected treasurer of this county of 1877 and re-elected in 1879.*

Eden Twp. -
JOHN W. BARRICK, farmer, P. O. Morris, was born Jan., 1817, in Frederick Co., Md., son of George Barrick died in Maryland, and in 1846 his widow came to Ohio and settled in Eden Twp., this county, where she died in 1858.  Their children were six in number:  William, Catharine (Mrs. Dean), Margaret (deceased), John W., Mary C. (widow of Mr. Shriner) and Albert.  Our subject was united in marriage, in 1839, with Catharine S. Devilbiss, by whom he has seven children: George W., married to Elizabeth Ogden; Simon F., married the first time to Martha Burnside (by whom he had one child, Howard; and the second time to Ella Kemp, by whom he has one daughter, Bertha); Margaret, wife of A. Cox; Virginia R.; Alice A.; Mary C.; and Walter, married to Sarah Kemp.  Mrs. Barrick died in 1881.  Our subject, in 1846, moved on the farm where he has since lived, and which was partly improved.  He has been very successful; has served as assessor, assistant assessor, and as school director.  He is a member of the Reformed Church of Tiffin.
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SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 847)

Adams Twp. -
ROBERT M. BARTLETT, lumber dealer, P. O. Green Spring.  The paternal grandparents of the subject of this sketch were Samuel and Elizabeth (Kating) Bartlett, natives of Maine, who came to Ohio during the war of 1812, and in 1826 settled in this county, where they died.  Their son, Oliver L. Bartlett (the father of Robert M.) was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, in 1819, and was married, in Seneca County, in 1844. to Hannah E. Warner, who was born in 1826, in Berkley County, Va.  (Her parents were natives of Virginia, where her father died, his widow and family coming to Seneca County, Ohio, about 1833, and here Mrs. Warner died at the age of seventy-eight years.)  Oliver L. Bartlett began farm life in this county, where he improved many acres of land.  In 1844 he removed to Sandusky County, Ohio.  There he continued farming, reading law in leasure hours, and in a few years he commenced the practice of law in his neighborhood.  In 1860 he was admitted to the bar, and in 1862 he moved to Green Spring, Ohio, where he opened a law office.  He acquired a large practice in the courts of Lucas, Sandusky and Seneca Counties, and continued in the practice of law until his death, which occurred in 1882.  His son, Robert M. Bartlett, subject of this sketch, was born October 9, 1847, in Sandusky County, Ohio.  Early in life he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for several years.  In 1882 he entered into partnership with C. R. Smith, and purchased the sash, door and blind factory in Green Spring, Ohio, which he still continues to operate in  connection with a large lumber yard, etc.  He was married, August 27, 1875, to Miss Mary Franks,  a native of this county, and this union has been blessed with three children: Harry, Bert and Fred.  Mr. Bartlett  has three sisters and two brothers.  He is a man of business ability, and active in public improvements and enterprises; was mayor for one term.
(Source:  History of Seneca County, Ohio - Publ. 1886)
Adams Twp. -
SIMON P. BEMISDERFER, merchant, Berwick was born in Franklin County, Penn., June 12, 1841.  His parents, John and Christian Bemisderfer, were natives of Franklin County, Penn., where they were married and remained until 1876, at which item they came to Wyandot County, Ohio, and in 1882 moved to Kansas, where they reside at present.  Our subject was married, Mar. 7, 1867, to Emma L. Zigler, born in Wyandot County, Ohio, Dec. 25, 1847, a daughter of Jacob and Mary Zigler, natives of Adams County, Penn., and who in a very early day came to Wyandot County, Ohio, where they still reside.  The union of Mr. and Mrs. Bemisderfer has been blessed with seven children: Annie M., John J., Estella C., Loring L., Bertha E., Harvey O., and Lula M.  Our subject who is a miller by trade, came to Ohio in 1862, and on Aug. 12, same year, he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and First Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, participated in several battles, and was mustered out of service June 12, 1865.  After returning home he served as clerk in a store at McCutchenville, Ohio, for a short time; then engaged at farming until 1880, when he sold his farm and moved to Berwick, where he has since engaged in mercantile business.  July 1, 1881, he was commissioned postmaster, which office he still holds.  Mr. Bemisderfer has met with a fair degree of success in all his business enterprises.
SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 988
Adams Twp. -
E. D. BEMENDERFER, senior member of the firm of Bemenderfer & Co., manufacturers of sash, doors and blinds, manufactory located on High and West Man Streets, Attica, was born in Stark County, Ohio, May 18, 1842, son of Samuel and Christine (Funk) Bemenderfer, natives of Virginia and Ohio, respectively, and of German descent.  The father of our subject who settled in Venice Township, this county, in 1842, and who was a successful farmer, died in 1884; of his eight children, seven are now living, all residents of Seneca County except Jacob, who is now in New Mexico.  The family are members of the Lutheran Church.  Our subject was reared on the farm, and after receiving a common school education attended the academy at Republic, and in early life taught school.  In 1866 he embarked in the manufacture of handles and rakes, which in 1874 was merged into his present business.  The building is two stories high, nearly seventy feet square, and the firm employ fifteen men, and manufacture about 1,000,000 feet of lumber annually.  Mr. Bemenderfer was married, in 1867, to Mary Jane, daughter of John Koller, and of German descent, by whom he has two children: Esther and Harry.  Mrs. Bemenderfer is a ember of the Baptist Church.  Mr. Bemenderfer is a Prohibitionist in politics, and a member of the I. O. O. F.  He is now in the town council.
SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 1016
Adams Twp. -
W. K. BEMENDERFER, farmer, P. O. Attica, was born on the farm where he now resides, in Venice Township, this county, Apr. 2, 1851; son of Samuel Bemenderfer, who served in most of the township offices, moved to Attica in 1872, and for ten years previous to his death led a retired life; his widow now resides in Attica, Ohio.  Our subject, the seventh in a family of eight children, was educated in the district schools of his native county and has followed farming all his life.  He is now owner of eighty acres of well-improved land.  He was united in marriage, in 1873, with Susan, daughter of Jacob and Mary (Murray) Hoke, former of whom, of German descent was a miller, farmer, and an early settler of Venice Township, this county.  To our subject and wife ahs been born one child, Effie May.  Mr. Bemenderfer has acted as school director of Venice Township.
SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 1017
WILLIAM P. BENNEHOFF, farmer, P. O. Bellevue, Huron County, was born August 20, 1842, in Lehigh County, Penn.  His father, Solomon Bennehoff, a native of Lehigh County, Penn., married Ana Rader, and they came to Adams Township this county, in 1843, where Mrs. Bennehoff died in 1855.  In 1858 Solomon Bennehoff located in Scipio Township, this county, where he remained until his death, which occurred June 17, 1884, in his seventy-eighth year.  The subject of this sketch, the third in a family of eight children, received his education in the schools of the home district.  December 25, 1871, he married Miss Barbara Ellen Royer, a native of Thompson Township, this county, and a daughter of Samuel RoyerMr. and Mrs. Bennehoff have resided in Thompson Township ever since their marriage.  Their children are Calvin Arthur, who died at three years of age; Anna M.; Jennie T. and Jessie Irena.  Mr. Bennehoff held the position of clerk of Thompson Township from 1875 to 1880, discharging his duties faithfully, and to the satisfaction of the people.  He and his wife are members of the Reformed Church.  In politics he is a Democrat.
Liberty Twp. -
AMANDUS BETTS, railroad contractor, P. O. Bettsville, was born July 9, 1843, son of Daniel Betts.  He received such an education as could be secured in the common schools, and August 22, 1862, enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, serving in the Eastern army and discharging his duties faithfully until June 19, 1865, when he was discharged with the rank of sergeant.  Feb. 13, 1870, he was married to Mrs. Phoebe (Rosenberger( Halter, who was born in Liberty Township, this county, Jan. 15, 1844, daughter of Nicholas Rosenberger.  By her first husband, Mrs. Betts has one son - Milo - now residing at Liberty Township, this county; by her second marriage she has one daughter - Lottie  born July 14, 1871.  Mr. Betts for several years was engaged in farming, and dealt largely in grain.  He is the owner of one of the most beautiful farms and picnic grounds in Branch County, Mich.  In 1876 he commenced contracting with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company for supplying all kinds of lumber and ties, since when he has done a very large business; has also large contracts with the Lake Shore, O. C. and Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroads.  Mr. Betts is a member of the K. of H. and of the chapter, a member of the G. A. R. and the I. O. O. F., of Bettsville; also a member of the K. of P., Lodge No. 147, and the F. & A. M., Lodge No. 336, at Fremont, Ohio.  He is prominent in lodge matters, having filled the highest positions in the subordinate lodges, and been representative to the Grand Lodge.
(SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886.)
Liberty Twp. -
MICHAEL BETTS, farmer, P. O. Bettsville, was born in Center County, Penn., Jan. 3, 1809; son of John and Barbara (Boyer) Betts, who moved to Wayne County, Ohio, in 1821, and to Liberty Township, this county, in 1832, locating on Section 3, where the father of our subject caused to be laid out the twenty-one original lots of Bettsville in 1838.  John Betts was the father of six children: John (deceased), Michael, Mary (Mrs. Daniel Martin), Sarah (deceased wife of Abraham Borough), Daniel, in Bettsville, Ohio, and David, in Fremont, Ohio.  Michael Betts was married, April 20, 1850, to Catharine Bish, who was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, April 13, 1821, and is the daughter of Henry and Mary (Zirkel) Bish, natives of Virginia, but early and prominent settles in Fairfield County, Ohio.  To our subject and wife have been born five children:  Irena D., Henry A., Isaiah F., Salome E. (deceased) and Mary C.  Mr. Betts followed the mill-wright trade for about thirty years in various States.  He was active in township affairs, and took a leading interest in securing the Pennsylvania Railroad through Bettsville, and in the various enterprises for the good of the people he has always been among the foremost.  He and his wife are members of the Evangelical Church.
(SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886.)
LEWIS C. BIRK, proprietor of harness shop and livery stable, Bloomville, was born June 19, 1854, in Bucyrus, Ohio, where his parents, john G. and Hannah Birk, still reside.  At fourteen years of age our subject began learning the trade of saddler and harness maker.  He married, June 19, 1876, Miss Carrie Kirgis, who was born on the farm in Lykens Township, Crawford Co., Ohio.  Mr. and Mrs. Birk located in Bloomville, this county, in May, 1878, and he at once established a shop where he manufactures a general line of harness, saddles, etc., and keeps a full stock of whips, brushes, robes, blankets and horse furnishing goods.  This is the only place of the kind in Bloomville, and one of the best and most complete shops in Seneca County.  In March, 1884, Mr. Birk the best and most complete shops in Seneca County.  In March, 1884, Mr. Birk established a livery stable in Bloomville, building a new barn and furnishing it with throughout, and, as he believes in the old adage that "what is worth doing at all is worth doing well,"  has made it one of the bets liveries in the county.  Mr. Birk is a member of the K. of P.
SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 732
JACOB BLACK, farmer, P. O. Adrian, was born in Clinton Township, this county, May 3, 1828; son of Jacob and Sarah Black, natives of Maryland, who were married and first settled in the East, thence in 1827 moving to Tiffin, this county, and from there to Wyandot County, Ohio, where Mrs. Black departed this life in 1863; Mr. Black lived among his children until his death which occurred in 1877.  Our subject was united in marriage, Nov. 11, 1852, with Elizabeth Miley, born in this county, Mar. 8, 1838, daughter of John and Magdalena Miley, native of Virginia, who settled in Seneca County, Ohio, about 1828, and here remained until their death.  Mr. Miley dying in 1874 and his wife in 1856.  Our subject and wife are the parents of four children, of whom two are now living: John H., born Sept. 1, 1853, and Albert F., born Sept. 28, 1862; the deceased are Emma A., wife of Frank Johnson, and an infant.   Mr. Black owns 173 acres ell-improved land.  Mrs. Black is a faithful and consistent member of the United Brethren Church.
Loudon Twp. -
AUGUST E. BLESSING, dealer in furniture, Fostoria, was born in the province of Wurtemberg, Germany, Aug. 17, 1854; son of Michael and Margaret (Frosch) Blessing.  He was educated in his native land, and at age of fourteen, immigrated to America, locating in Cleveland, Ohio, where he served an apprenticeship of three years at cabinet-making, finishing in the establishment of Hardt & Malone.  In 1873 he went to Medina, Ohio, where he worked at his trade up to 1880, when he located in Fostoria in the furniture business, and has occupied his present elegant quarters, in the "Foster Block," since March, 1883.  He occupied two floors and basement, which are filled with the largest stock and latest designs in furniture to be found in the city.  Mr. Blessing married, Oct. 8, 1879, Sarah C., daughter of James H. and Jane (Hervey) Green, of Medina, Ohio, and by her he has one child, Jennie M.  He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.  He is a member of the I. O. O. F. of P., and R. A.  Mr. Blessing is one of the live enterprising young business men of the city.  Politically he is a Republican.
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SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 890)
Bloom Twp. -
EDWARD P. BLISS, merchant, Bloomville, was born in Ledyard, Cayuga Co., N. Y., July 1, 1833.  His father, Parley Bliss, was drowned in Cayuga Lake, June 29, 1834; his widowed mother, Mrs. Polly Bliss, came to Scipio Township, this county, in 1835.  Her our subject grew to maturity, receiving his education in the school of the home district.  At eighteen years of age he began life for himself as clerk in a dry goods store, an occupation he followed until he embarked in business on his own account in 1857.  He carried on a store in Republic, Ohio, until 1859, when he located in Bloomville, and established a store, well known to all of the older inhabitants, in the old Hunsicker Block.  In 1863 he purchased the hotel building opposite, in which he carried on the store in connection with the hotel for about ten years.  In 1873, in partnership with John T. Reid, he built the Commercial Block in Bloomville.  This block was the beginning of the improvements of the town, and in still one of the best business buildings in the place.  Mr. Bliss at once located in the store which he still occupies in this block, and has here the oldest dry goods establishment as well as the oldest business house, carried on continuously by the same proprietor in Bloomville.  He has a full line of dray goods, boots, shoes, hats, caps, notions, etc., and has built up an extensive trade, which he continues to hold above all competitors.  Nov. 16, 1854, Mr. Bliss was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Krilley, who died Sept. 12, 1873, leaving four children: Melvin O., Malcolm E., Willie H. and Ginnella.  Mr. Bliss married, on second occasion, Dec. 2, 1874, Miss Nancy E. Turner, who died Apr. 1, 1875.  He afterward married, June 7, 1877.  Miss Eliza A. Andrews, a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church.  Mr. Bliss is a lifelong Republican and takes an active interest in public affairs.
(
SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 732)
Adams Twp. -
ENOCH BOLIN, farmer, P. O. Clyde, Sandusky County, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, May 2, 1826, and is a son of George and Mary (Pearce) Bolin, natives of Virginia and Maryland respectively, and who were married in Columbiana County, Ohio, moving to Wayne County, and from there to this county in 1832; they died in Thompson Township, this county, at the ages of ninety and eighty-seven years respectively.  George Bolin was drafted in 1812, and served six months in the war of that time.  Of their family of ten children, seven are now living.  Enoch Bolin purchased his land in Adams Township this county, in 1853, and has resided upon it ever since.  He was married, Sept. 14, 1851, to Miss Polly Kestler of Adams Township, this county, a native of Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Kestler, who settled in this county about 1833; they had eleven children, of whom only two survive.  To Mr. and Mrs. Bolin has been born one daughter, Amanda J., now the wife of Jacob Wagner who resides upon and operates the farm owned by Mr. Bolin.  Mr. and Mrs. Wagner have one daughter named Della Rebecca. 
(SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886.)
Thompson Twp. -
JOHN BOLIN, farmer, P. O. West Lodi, was born August 5, 1838, in Thompson Township, this county; a son of George and Mary Bolin.  He now owns the old family homestead, where he was born and brought up.  He married Miss Mary Snavely, November 30, 1865, and they have two daughters, Emma Jane and Elmira and one son - Enoch.  Mrs. Bolin is a member of the German Baptist Church.  Mr. Bolin is a life-long Democrat, and a leading and highly respected citizen of Thompson Township.
(SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886.)
GEORGE R. BOSWORTH, retired farmer, P. O. Green Spring, one of the early and highly respected pioneer citizens of Adams Township, Seneca Co., Ohio, was born in Chelsea, Orange Co., Vt., Apr. 4, 1800, son of Nathaniel and Mary (Ranney) Bosworth the former born in Rhode Island Apr. 12, 1753, the latter in Connecticut, June 24, 1757; they married in Chatham, Conn., and there remained until after the Revolutionary war.  Nathaniel Bosworth enlisted in the first regiment that was organized under Gen. George Bosworth enlisted in the first regiment that was organized under Gen. George Washington, serving his country eight years, and was in the last regiment when it was disbanded; four years of his time he served as commissary for Washington's family.  He was captured by the British three times, and the last time was placed on board a British prison ship; he and four others deserted from the ship, and, venturing to swim across the North River, three of the party reached the shore, but the other two were less fortunate and sank beneath the waters.  After the war Mr. N. Bosworth returned to his wife and children at Chatham, and remained there some years; thence he moved to Lebanon, N. H., where he and his family resided nine years, then moved to Chelsea, Vt., and in 1806 to Berlin, Vt., where the parents spent their remaining days; the mother died Aug. 11, 1841, and the father, Mar. 11, 1844; they were the parents of eleven children, only two of whom survive: Florella Richardson (aged ninety-five years) and George R.  The subject of this sketch, in 1824, went from Berlin to Albany, Vt., where he was united in marriage, Nov. 5, 1827, with Lucy Delano, born May 25, 1803, in New Hampshire, daughter of Moses and Lydia (Baker) Delano, both deceased.  To our subject and wife were born seven children: Lillis and William Franklin, living, and Solon, Sidney, Orpha, Mary and Frederick, deceased.  Aug. 9, 1834, Mr. Bosworth and family came to Adams Township, this county, and settled on the farm where he now resides.  Mrs. Bosworth departed this life Aug. 5, 1849, and Mr. Bosworth was afterward united in marriage Jan. 10, 1850 with Adaline Franklin, born Apr. 20, 1810, in Herkimer County, N. Y., daughter of Daniel and Ruth (Rounds) Franklin, both deceased.  Mr. and Mrs. Bosworth have acted the part of parents toward Emma Childs, taking her when eight years of age, and rearing her to womanhood.  Mr. Bosworth is a carpenter by trade, but has been engaged most of his life in farming.
(SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886..)
JACOB O. BOWLUS, merchant and postmaster, Kansas, was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, Dec. 22, 1837, son of David and Nancy (Holloway) Bowlus, natives of Frederick County, Md., who settled near Fremont, Ohio, in 1822, where they died at an advanced age.  They were the parents of six children: Rohanna (wife of Daniel Shook, residing near Fremont, Ohio); Margaret (deceased wife of Greenbury Burdette; she left a family near Fort Clinton, Ohio,  Rebecca (deceased), H. A. (a merchant in Melrose, Ohio), Louisa (wife of James Hiett, a merchant in Fremont, Ohio), and Jacob O.  Our subject was engaged in farming until 1865, when he embarked in merchandising in Kansas, Ohio, where he has since remained.  For a time he was in partnership with his brother, but has been sole proprietor of the large and commodious store now occupied by him since 1879.  Mr. Bowlus was married, in 1861, to Miss Sarah E. Deemer.  No children have been born to this union, but Mr. and Mrs. Bowlus have an adopted daughter - Mamie E.  Mr. Bolus is a member of the encampment, Kansas Lodge I. O. O. F., also of the K. of P. of Kansas, No. 183.  He was appointed postmaster of Kansas, Ohio, in 1872.  He is a man of prominence, and is held in the highest esteem by the people of the community in which he lives.
(SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886..)
Bloom Twp. -
JAMES BOYD (deceased) was born Jan. 31, 1805, in Centre County, Penn,.  His father, Thomas Boyd, moved to Ross County, Ohio, in 1813, and thence to Bloom Township, this county, in Apr. 1822, where he cleared up a farm and resided until his death in 1847.  James Boyd married Miss Eliza Steele, who died leaving two daughters: Elizabeth, wife of George Saumaker, of Watson Station, Ohio, and Mrs. Emily Everett, who died in San Francisco, Cal., in Nov., 1871.  Our subject married, on second occasion, Miss Mercy Smith, who was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., reared at Hadley, Mass., and came to Scipio Twp., this county, with her widowed mother and brothers about 1835.  To this union were born three children: James T., Ethan C. and Ellen E.  To this union were born three children: James T., Ethan C. and Ellen E.  Mr. Boyd died July 14, 1865.  Mr. Boyd ended a useful life, Nov. 11, 1871, at his homestead on Honey Creek, this county.
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SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 733)
Bloom Twp. -
JAMES H. BOYD, farmer, P. O. Bloomville, was born July 24, 1842, in Bloom Township, this county.  After attending the schools of the district he completed his education under Prof. Aaron Schuyler at Republic.  While at that school he enlisted, Sept. 25, 1861, in the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and took part in many of the historical engagements of Virginia and the southeast.  He received a severe wound in the right shoulder at the battle of Resaca, Ga.; re-enlisted with his regiment and served until the close of the war, being discharged, July 20, 1865.  He bore the distinguished part in the service and rose to the rank of captain of his company.  Returning home after the struggle he adopted agricultural pursuits.  He was married, Oct. 10, 1867, to Miss Virginia E. DeWitt, eldest, daughter of the well known pioneer, William DeWitt, of Bloomville, Ohio.  They have since resided on their pleasant farm of 175 acres.  Their children are Smith DeWitt, Mary Alice, James Everett, and Carrie Eoline.  Mr. Boyd is a Republican in politics.  He has served his township as assessor and assistant United States marshal, and took the census in 170 in Bloom, Venice and Reed Townships, this county.  Mr. and Mrs. Boyd are members of the Presbyterian Church.
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SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 733)
Big Spring Twp. -
PETER BRAYTON, farmer, P. O. Carey, Wyandot County, one of the first settlers in Big Spring Township, this county, was born in Crawford (now Wyandot) County, Ohio, Feb. 7, 1825, son of Elijah and Anna (Holebrook) Brayton, natives of Vermont where they were married and lived for a few years thereafter; thence they moved to Fremont, Ohio, in 1814, and from there to Huron County, Ohio, about 1816, and later to Wyandot County where they remained until about 1831, when they came to Big Spring Township, this county, settling on what is known as the Indian Reserve, and here they resided until death, Elijah Brayton dying in 1868, his wife in 1851.  Our subject has been twice married, the first time Jan. 1, 1845, to Mary Ogg, born in Wyandot County, Ohio, Aug. 17, 1826, daughter of Kinsey and Eliza Ogg, natives of Ohio (both now deceased), and to this union were born six children, five now living: Josephine, wife of John Foulk; Jesse; Emily J., wife of Joseph Crislip; Lafayette; Tefronia, wife of Maj. B. Bright; Newton is deceased.  Jesse has been twice married, first time to Sarah Boucher, by whom he had one son and one daughter, and second time to Lilla Montgomery, who was born him one son and one daughter.  Mrs. Brayton died Aug. 1, 1871, deeply mourned by her husband, family and a host of friends; she was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Mar. 19, 1872, Mr. Brayton was again married, this time to Hannah Little, born in Hancock County, Ohio, Oct. 31, 1838, daughter of Solomon and Rachel Little, former of whom, a native of Virginia, died in July, 1864, latter, born in Harrison County, Ohio, is still living.  One child, now deceased, was the issue of our subject's last marriage.  Mr. Brayton owns 640 acres of good land.  He was a member of the Ohio National Guards during the late civil war, enlisting June 29, 1862, in Company C, Forty-ninth Regiment; was detailed for guard duty at Johnson's Island, and received an honorable discharge, Aug. 12, 1862, and returned home.  He subsequently provided two substitutes at a cost of $350.  He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Politically Mr. Brayton is a stanch Republican.
(
SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 716)
NELSON L. BREWER was born in Washington county, Maryland, September 17th, 1832; graduated at Heidleberg in 1855; was admitted to the practice in 1858, and immediately located in Tiffin. *
SHARON WICK'S NOTE:  Nelson Brewer can be found in the 1870 Census - Seneca Co., Ohio - 1st Wd. Tiffin - Film Series M593 - Roll 1266 - Page 331 with wife Harriet, children - Julia, Edward, Wallace and Belinda Lance and 80 year old Amaza Chidester.
He can again be found in the 1900 Census - Seneca Co. - Clinton Twp. in Film Series T623 - Roll 1320 - Page 79 - He his near the bottom of the page and it is very hard to read.
He can again be found in the 1910 Census - Seneca Co - 1st Wd. Tiffin - Film Series T624 - Roll 1229 Page 41 at 300 Market Street - Dwelling 19 Family 20 - aged 77 with his wife Harriet aged 71 - It is listed as his 2nd marriage
He is again listed in the 1920 Census - Seneca Co. - 1st Wd. Tiffin - Film Series T625 - Roll 1431 - Page 152 as Nelson A. Brewer aged 89 with his wife Harriet M. Brewer aged 81.  They are at 300 East Market Street in Dwelling 178 Family 203 living with John C. Pearson his son-in-law and Grace C., (Nelson's daughter) and their son John B. (Nelson's grand-son)
Bloom Twp. -
CONRAD BRINER, farmer, P. O. Bloomville, was born Nov. 8, 1830, in Baden, Germany.  His parents, John and Sophia Briner, came to America and settled in Bloom Township, this county, May 1, 1852.  Here they purchased a home where they resided until their death.  John Briner died, Aug. 28, 1878; his widow, Dec. 18, 1881, each aged eighty-two years.  Their eight children were Mrs. Catherine Sitsler, residing in Germany; Susan (deceased); Jacob, residing in Logan County, Ohio; Conrad, Henry and Elizabeth, living in Bloom Twp.; John, residing in Pittsburgh, Penn., and Adam, a resident of Hardin County, Ohio.  Our subject received an excellent education in his native language in Baden, and coming to America with his parents he has resided here ever since.  He was married, Nov. 15, 1857, to Miss Anna Hunsicker, born in 1824, daughter of Michael and Hannah Hunsicker.  Her parents moved from Montgomery County, Penn., to Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1837, and thence to Bloom Twp., this county, in 1842, and subsequently to Canada.  Mr. and Mrs. Briner's children, Ida, (Mrs. Reif), Marsin, Adam, Adam, Jacob, William, Josephine and Frank are intelligent and industrious, occupying high positions in society.  Mr. Briner is a member of the Reformed Church; Mrs. Briner, of the Mennonite society.  They have been very successful through life; starting with but small means, they have accumulated a comfortable competency, and own a fine farm of 280 acres.
(
SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 733)

Eden Twp. -
JAMES H. BRINKERHOFF, farmer, P. O. Melmore, was born Mar. 17, 1819, in Gettysburg, Adams Co., Penn.; son of Hezekiah and Jane (Kerr) Brinkerhoff, natives of Pennsylvania.  Hezekiah Brinkerhoff came to Ohio in 1834,,, and settled in Seneca Twp., this county, where he purchased land, made a home for his family, and there remained until his death in 1847.  Of his ten children six are now living:  Alexander W., Sarah J., Margaret M., John N., George F. and James H.  Our subject who received his education in his native State, taught school after coming to Ohio.  He was reared on a farm, and has followed agricultural pursuits as an occupation.  Mr. Brinkerhoff was twice married; first, in 1843, to Esther McGeehan, who bore him one child: Robert A., married to Flora Stewart (have two children).  Our subject was married on second, Oct. 23, 1852, to Sarah A. Marquis, and to this union were born two children: Nelson M., married to Mary F. Burns, and Elizabeth, wife of G. A> Bassett.  Mr. Brinkerhoff is one of Eden Township’s thorough-going farmers and good business men.  Politically, he is a Republican.
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SOURCE No. 2: History of Seneca County, Ohio containing a History of the County, Publ. Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co., 1886. - Page 847)

HENRY BROHL was born in the city of Bonn, on the Rhine, on the 10th day of November, 1831.  He attended the academy and university at Bonn, and before he had time to graduate he left his native city and country; he came to America and settled in Sandusky City in the spring of 1861.  Mr. Brohl had also applied himself to the mercantile business while he lived in his native city, and when he removed from Sandusky City to Tiffin in 1855 he entered into copartnership with E. T. Abbott in the business of wholesale grocers.  He continued in this firm until in 1857 he entered into partnership with Robert Crum in Tiffin in the sale of groceries and liquors.  The business was conducted by this firm until 1865, when Mr. Brohl opened a saloon, which he has conducted successfully ever since.  In 1856 Mr. Brohl was married to Miss Catharine Krautz, of Sandusky City.  This union was blessed with seven children, who are all living.  He was elected to the school board in 1877. *pg* 334
Big Spring Twp. -
S. P. BROSEMER, farmer, P. O. New Riegel, was born in Big Spring Township, this county, Oct. 28, 1846, son of Landelin and Elizabeth Brosemer, natives of Baden, where they were married; they immigrated to America about 1832, and here settled on the farm where our subject now resides in Big Spring Township; thence they moved to New Riegel and there remained until Mrs. Brosemer's death, May 4, 1881, caused by a team of horses running away.  Landelin Brosemer was born Sept. 8, 1803, died July 25, 1885.  Our subject was united in marriage, Apr. 9, 1869, with Mary Thiel, born in Seneca County, Ohio, in December, 1851, daughter of Matthias (deceased) and Anna Thiel, and by this union have been born ten children, nine now living: Matthias, Stephen, Charles, Henry, Joseph, Leo, Anna, Otto and Louie A.; Andrew is deceased.  Our subject owns eighty acres of good land.  HE and his family are members of the Catholic Church.

(Source:  History of Seneca County, Ohio - Publ. 1886 - Page 716)

ALEXANDER BROWN (Brown & Guernsey) was born in Perry County, Ohio, May 27, 1832; admitted to the bar in 1864, located first at Perrysburg, Wood, county, Ohio, and then to Fostoria in the fall of 1872.
Source:  History of Seneca County : from the close of the Revolutionary War to July, 1880 : embracing many personal sketches of pioneers, anecdotes, and faithful descriptions of events pertaining to the organization of the county and its progress Springfield, Ohio: Transcript Print. Co., 1880
Adams Twp. -
DR. J. L. BROWN, Green Spring, was born in Onondaga Co., N. Y., and is a son of Charles and Anna (Phelps) Brown, of New England birth and descendants of Plymouth colonists.  His grandfather, Gen. John Brown, was a distinguished soldier of the Revolutionary war; his father served in the war of 1812, and the Doctor himself was in the late war of the Rebellion.  His father and mother went to New York with their parents when but children, and were there reared and married.  In 1832 they removed thence to Ashtabula Co., Ohio.  Both are now deceased.  Dr. Brown is the youngest of a family of six children.  The father being a teacher by profession, each of his children, under his instruction, received their first educational training.  The Doctor attended school at the Jefferson Academy until he was eleven years old, then continued his studies at Austinburg Institute, in Ashtabula Co., working for his board with the family of a dairyman, where, night and morning, he milked seven cows and drove them to pasture a distance of two and one-half miles, studying at nights by the light of a bark fire.  At the age of twelve, at the request of his mother, he was taken into the family of Rev. Mr. Austin, a Presbyterian minister, there to be educated for the ministry of that denomination, and he remained about one year.  At the age of thirteen he entered a drug store for a term of five years.  When fifteen years old he taught his first term, thus aiding himself in furthering the great object of his life, the practice of medicine.  At the age of eighteen he attended his first course of medical lectures.  At twenty the Doctor was united in marriage with Miss Mary McIntyre, and soon after marriage he came to Fort Seneca, Seneca Co., Ohio, and there began the practice of medicine, with a fortune of $1.70 as the sum of his worldly possessions.  He continued practice in Fort Seneca for eight years, and in the fall of 1859 removed to Green Spring.  The following winter he graduated from the Cleveland Medical College, and pursued his profession until the winter of 1862-63, when he enlisted as a volunteer surgeon in the One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry stationed at Winchester, Va., where he continued until June 17, 1863, when he was taken prisoner at the battle of Winchester, Gen. Milroy being in command.  The Doctor was then sent to Richmond with other prisoners, and confined in the historical prison “Castle Thunder,” under grave charges preferred by the rebels.  These charges not being sustained, after nineteen days of dungeon life, he was removed to Libby prison and put on equal footing with other prisoners of war.  Here he was kept seven months and twenty-two days.  At the expiration of this time he was exchanged, and returned to his regiment in Virginia, where he was appointed post surgeon, having to report monthly to Washington the sanitary condition of all hospitals from Martinsburg, Va., to Harper’s Ferry.  This arduous duty Dr. Brown performed until the troops were all returned from these points to Richmond and vicinity.  He then returned to his home and family at Green Spring, and soon after recommenced his profession.  Previous to the war he was pronounced anti-slavery man.  With his father and his brother, the late Hon. O. P. Brown, he made addresses throughout a large portion of this State, urging the people to vote and work for the freedom of the slave.  As a “boy orator” the Doctor gained a wide reputation, nor did his work consist in talk alone, for while the celebrated “underground railroad” was in operation he assisted many a poor negro to gain his liberty.  The Doctor is a firm supporter of the principles of the Republican party.
(Source:  History of Seneca County, Ohio - Publ. 1886 - Page 700)
JACOB BUNN was born June 6, 1847, in Thompson (Seneca County).  He graduated at Heidelberg college in 1870, and was admitted to the bar the year following, when he located in Tiffin.  He was elected probate judge of Seneca county in the fall of 1878.
SHARON WICK'S NOTES:
1870 Census - Seneca Co., Ohio - 1st Wd. Tiffin - Film Series M593 - Roll 1266 - Page 339 - Flenner Boarding House - Dwelling 444 - Family 493 -
Jacob Bunn age 24 b. Ohio - Was there the same time as J. K. Huddle who is in these biographies of Seneca Co., Ohio
1880 Census - Seneca Co., Ohio - Thompson - is an Elizabeth Bunn aged 72 yrs. living with her daughter.  C/b Jacob's mother?
1880 Census - Seneca Co., Ohio - 4th Wd. Tiffin - Film Series T9 - Roll 1054 - Page 228
Dwelling 57 Family 61 -
Hezekiah Groff age 68; Julia age 65 - wife; Jacob T. Bunn age 32 - Son in Law - Lawyer; Laura age 29 - daughter; Della Watson age 30 - boarder - Clk in Drug Store; Flora Watson age 23 - Boarder - Clk in Drug store; Ruth Guifford age 20 - servant.
1900 Census - Seneca Co., Ohio - Tiffin - Film Series T623 - Roll 1320 - Page 163 -
28 Monroe Street - Dwelling 324 Family 328 -
Julia Groff age 80 Head - Widowed; Edward age 48 - Son - Werner, Alice age 32 - Niece; Jacob F. Bunn age 5_ - s-in-law b. June 18_8 - Widowed.
1910 Census - Seneca Co., Ohio - Film Series T624 - Roll 1229 - Page 143 - 270 Millmore street - Dwelling 170 - Family 175 -
Jacob F. Bunn age 62 - 2nd marriage - Lawyer; Eugenia age 49 - Wife - 2nd marriage; Catharine Horton age 17 - step-daughter; John Planck? age 53; Cora Planck? age 59; Maggie Emick age 25 - servant; Jacob Y___ger age 60 - Servant.
 
* SOURCE:  History of Seneca County : from the close of the Revolutionary War to July, 1880 : embracing many personal sketches of pioneers, anecdotes, and faithful descriptions of events pertaining to the organization of the county and its progress
Springfield, Ohio: Transcript Print. Co., 1880, 717 pgs.

 

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