OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

 

OHIO
SCIOTO COUNTY
History

CHAPTER XVII

PORTER, CLAY AND HARRISON TOWNSHIPS
.... Pg. 312

PORTER TOWNSHIP

THE FIRST SETTLED

     This township has the honor of being the first settled in Scioto County, claiming Sam'l Marshall, Jno. Lindsay, Isaac Bonser, Uriah Barber, as its first settlers.  Lindsay and Bonser married daughters of Mr. Sam'l. Marshall.  Mr. Marshall first settled on Congress land, but after making considerable improvement left it and leased a school section, and made excellent improvements and secured the land.  Porter Township has an Ohio River front of fully ten miles, and has also the fertile valley of the Little Scioto within its borders for a distance of five miles, and at the point it then turns north, is but a trifle over two miles from the Ohio River.  At its junction with the latter it has a wide and fertile bottom, extending some two miles back, on account of quite a large bend in the Little Scioto, about one mile from its mouth.  From its long river front and the peculiar richness of the soil, its prolific yield and ease of cultivation, that part of Scioto County embraced within the limits of what is now Porter Township rapidly settled.  For many years it kept the lead in population, and at this day, with the exception of Portsmouth, which now covers Wayne Township, it has the largest population of any township in the county, with Bloom ranking as a good second, and Brush Creek not far behind.
     In the year 1840, Porter had a population of 1,013; in 1850, 1,674; in 1860, 1,873; in 1870, 1,965; in 1880, 2,274.  These gains or increase in population have not been great since 1850, but it has been a steady one, and better the last decade than the two decades previous, showing a more enterprising spirit.  The wealth of the township is pretty evenly distributed among its inhabitants, and while not as  great in proportion to some has a better average to the citizen.

AREA AND VALUATION.

 

WHEN FORMED.

 

EARLY SETTLERS.

     There are the names of many of the old pioneers of Porter Township entered among the list of old settlers given in the history of Scioto County, and among those who ere born here, or came in childhood's days and are let living are:  Madison Price, Elias Marshall and Levi Smith, of Sciotoville; Jonathan Hurd, James Littlejohn and Theodore Bliss, of Wheelersburg; and Isaac Fullerton, and John Baccus.  Among the oldest couples living are:  Mr. and Mrs. Gibbens, Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Hurd, all of whom are over eighty years of age, with the prospect of several years more of a quiet and peaceful life.

ITEMS OF INTEREST.

     Porter Township was named after the son of Major Porter Wheeler.  The first election was held in 1803, at the house of Samuel Marshall, Sr., and after the organization at the house of Jesse Marshall.
     William Price
kept the first tavern, just below the mouth of the Little Scioto.
     William Morrison was the first wagonmaker in Porter Township.
     The Baccus School-house, the first in the central portion of the township, away from the river, was erected in 1816.  Walter Beloat was its first teacher.
     The first church was erected in 1817, and was under the charge of the Rev. Rufus Cheney - Free Will Baptist.
     The first public school built was on the property of Daniel Young.  Jesse Y. Whitcomb and John Young were teachers.
     At their first Fourth of July celebration, at Major Samuel Bonser's, a cannon was used made out of a Gum-tree, strongly strapped with iron bands.  It was made by Samuel B. Burt.
     Jesse Marshall
opened the first store in Porter Township in 1812, at the point now known as Wait's Station.  It was before the township was organized, and was known for some years as the Vinton Price place.
     William Brown started the second in the front room of his house in 1835.  These were the only two stores in the township at that time.
     The Portsmouth Branch of the Cincinnati, Washington & Baltimore Railroad enters the western side and passes through the northern part o f the township for some seven miles, and the Scioto Valley Railroad, from Sciotoville, southeast about eight miles, to the southern boundary of the township.  Wheelersburg is on the latter road, and Wait's Station is on the branch.  Sciotoville is the dividing point of the two roads, one going northeast and the other southeast from that village.

ANOTHER CHANGE.

     The county commissioners made another slight change in the boundary line of the township in 1836, and the last.  It reads:
     "Whereas, William Montgomery having made application to be attached to the township of Porter, upon examination of the said application, and upon due consideration of the same, it is Ordered, That the said Wm. Montgomery be attached to the township of Porter, beginning in the line between sections 23 and 26 in township No. 2, range 20, fractions where Hale's Creek crosses said line, and thence up the creek, with the meanderings thereof, until it strikes said line again, so far to include within the limits of Porter Township the said William Montgomery. " Dec. 7, 1836.

SCIOTOVILLE.

     Sciotoville is not the oldest town in the township, but at this time it has the largest population.  IT lies at the mouth of the Little Scioto, on its west bank, and on the bank of the Ohio River, and is the converging point of the Scioto Valley and the Portsmouth Branch of the C. W. & B. railroads.  It has become quite noted as a manufacturing point, its principal production being fire brick and tile.  Its location is high and dry, and it has both valleys to give it a generous support.  It is handsomely laid out, nearly due north and south, some six miles from Portsmouth, and may be said to be a thriving and growing town.  It first came into existence and was laid out in 1841, being surveyed Jan. 25, and 26 by J. Riggs, for Messrs, Jas. Taylor, Jr., and Chas. Moore.  The record of that survey was recorded Feb. 18, 1841.
     The town site of Sciotoville has a history.  The original purchaser of the plat was Colonel Edwards, who located the property, a fractional section, paid one-fourth the purchase money down as required, received his patent, and then turned around and sold it out in small lots, cash down, and left for Kentucky.  Those who could not pay the Government their share of the three-fourths left lost their land.  The Government subsequently made up to those who were alive in 1820.
     The village was named after the Little Scioto River, which flows into the Ohio on its eastern border.
     The first residences put up after the platting of the village were by Madison Price, Uriah Bonser and Jacob BonserWm. Brown's residence was already there and his store, which opened, as before mentioned, in 1835.
     Elias and Luther Marshall opened the first store after it was laid out, under the name of Marshal Bros.  IT was a grocery store and was located on lot No. 31.  A few months later Elias bought his brother out and added dry-goods, in fact keeping a general store, which he continued for many years.
     Bonser & Correll started the first wagon shop;  Wm. Courtney, the first blacksmith shop, and David F. Upp, the first shoe shop.
     Dr. White came in the year 1846, and was the first resident physician.  The first hotel was erected in 1843, with Madison Price landlord and proprietor.
     In the early part of the year 1847 Messrs. Taylor, Decker & Co. put up and ran the first iron foundry, but had the misfortune to have it burned down the same year by act of an incendiary.  The flouring mill and edgetool manufactory was run by Elias Marshall and erected in 1851.  This constituted upon to that time its business interests.  
    
The postoffice was established in 1844, and James Bynn was appointed Postmaster.  He was succeeded by Elias Marshall until 1852, since which time it has changed hands several times.  James H. Holliday is the present Postmaster.  Registered letters are sent but it is not yet a money-order office.
     An effort was made in 1877 to make Sciotoville, an incorporated village, but there was enough opposition started to defeat the plan.  The town is growing and has now a population of nearly 800, and its manufacturing interests are developing fairly.  There have been several additions to the village, the last in 1868, being three additions besides the original plat.  They also conformed to that plat by being lad out at right angles, the streets running north and south, and east and west, or nearly so.

ITS BUSINESS INTERESTS, 1883.

     Oregon Eakins, dealer in dry-goods, groceries and notions.
     Walter Beloat, dealer in Dry-goods, groceries and notions.
     Dr. Halderman & Co., dealers in drugs and medicines.
     Sciotoville Saw-mill and Lumber Co.
     G. W. Salladay, dealer in groceries, etc.
     L. Marshall, proprietor of Marshall House.
     L. Marshall, drugs and medicines.
     J. D. Mathiott, proprietor of Mathiott House.
     A. Brase, tin, stoves, hardware and house-furnishing goods.
     Alfred Yost, cigar manufactory and dealer in tobaccos.
     August Cook, wine and beer saloon.
     Adam Ault, blacksmith, wagon-maker and wheelbarrow manufacturer.
     George Batterson, harness-maker
     Wm. Nickels blacksmith and horseshoer.
     Wm. Duveneck wagon manufacturer.
     Gus. Zuicker, blacksmith and horseshoer
     Geo. M. Marshall physician and surgeon.
     S. S. Halderman, physician and surgeon.
     Marten Taylor, physician and surgeon.
     Mrs. D. Westwood, milliner and dressmaker.
     Henry Meeks, brick-layer
     Richard Goodrich & Son, plasterers and cistern builders.
     Levi Smith, carpenter.
     L. Marshall, Justice of the Peace and Mayor of Sciotoville.
     Mrs. Alma Hitchcock, milliner and dressmaker.
     John Taylor, barber.
     Sciotoville Saw-mill and Lumber Co.'s store.
     Henry C. Sheward, shingle manufacturer.

     Scioto Lumber Company was established in 1875 by  M. J. & J. W. White.  They deal in all kinds of sawed lumber, shingles and lath, and the output of their mill is 2,000,000 feet annually and can turn out 15,000 feet daily.  Located on the river, their boats land at their dock and load up, and the railroad switch runs into their yard.  The logs are purchased up the river and  floated down, West Virginia and Kentucky furnishing a large part of them.  Oak, walnut, and all kinds of hard timber are purchased.
     Fire-Brick Manufactory - This enterprise was started in 1861 by Reese Thoms.  He commenced in a small way in an old building which had been used as a saw-mill.  He managed it so successfully that after holding the trade for four years other persons were induced to embark in it.  In 165 Messrs. Watkins, Porter & Co. started another yard.  The demand for brick being very great, Farney, Murray & Co. opened the third yard, and named it the Salamander.  These yards continued until 1870, enlarging the area of their trade, and building up each a splendid business.  The above year the three firms consolidated under the firm name of the Scioto Fire-Brick Company, which it still retains.  From the small beginning of Mr. Thomas has arising one of the largest establishments of the kind in the State.  The out-put is 32,000 brick daily, and gives employment to several hundred men and teams.  It is now an incorporated company with a capital of $100,000.  Its officers are:  President, Russell Tewksberry; Secretary, Samuel Reed; Superintendent, C. P. Loyd; Bookkeeper, Chas. Erlich.  Chas. Turner, Manager, and John J. House, Storekeeper.

WHEELERSBURG.

     Wheelersburg is a thriving village located near the center of the township, north and south, and is the oldest settled in the township.  It was first settled about 1820; was named Concord and laid off by the Rev. Daniel Young and his brother, John Young, being surveyed by Samuel Cole, June 15, 1824.  Its present name of Wheelersburg was given it in honor of Major Wheeler, an early settler, a noted Indian fighter, and a soldier in the war of 1812.  Besides the turnpike road which passes through it, called the Portsmouth pike, the Scioto Valley Railroad depot is within about one-quarter of a mile of the village.  It is pleasantly and even handsomely located not far form the bank of the Ohio, and is the official headquarters of the township, it being the only voting precinct.  It has a population of about 500; is a thrifty, enterprising place, with some neat residences, good business houses, and a growing manufacturing interest.
     The town of Concord remained as such about two years after it was platted, or up to 1826, when its name was changed to Wheelersburg.  In 1822 Daniel and John Young erected the first cotton factory.  The machinery was first put up in Greenupsburg and brought from there to Portsmouth, being run by David Gharky and his partner from the year 1818.  In 1822 Mr. Gharky, having become sole proprietor, sold the machinery to the Young Brothers and went out of business in that line.  The Messrs. Young erected their buildings in what was then Concord, and on the corner of what is now Broadway and Center streets, where the Gerding House now stands.  It was sold in 1835 to Edward Cranston, who moved it to its present site and changed it into a woolen-mill.  The first and only Postmaster of Concord was John Young.  He removed from the State, and Samuel Gould was appointed in October, 1826.  Its name was then changed to Wheelersburg, and Mr. Gould was the first Postmaster after the change of name.  He held it a number of years and was succeeded by Seymour Pixley.  Since then there have been other changes until the Postmaster at this time is H. T. Hall  The first school-house built in the village was in1822, and John Young was the first teacher who taught within its limits.

THE BUSINESS OF 1883.

     The business interests of Wheelersburg in 1883 show a prosperity that is encouraging.  It has three churches and three schools, three general stores, one hotel (the Gerding House), one grocery store, three blacksmith and wagon shops, one blacksmith shop, one saddlery and harness store, one tailoring establishment,  one boot and shoe shop, one undertaker, one woolen-mill, one tile factory, two flouring mills, one cabinet shop, one saw-mill, one express office (Adams), two carpenters, two physicians.
     The woolen-mill above referred to was purchased by Edward Cranston from Daniel Young in 1835, who continued to run the mill by horse-power.  Jeremiah Cranston, son of Edward, became a partner in 1848.  The mills are now owned by the son, the father being deceased.  They are now manufacturing jeans, flannels, blankets and yarns.  It is the oldest woolen-mill in Southeastern Ohio.
     The Tile Manufacturing Company of Wheelersburg was started Apr. 28, 1871, the incorporators being L. Salladay, Jeremiah P. Osborn and J. P. Merrill.  They secured a practical workman and business man in the person of Wm. Denis for Superintendent.  Jan. 1, 1883, Mr. Denis made a proposition to the owners to purchase the remainder of the works, he having before purchased an interest in all the adjoining States, ships as far south as Louisiana, and the largest manufacturing interest in the town.  His son, Wm. H. Denis, is now a partner, and the business is conducted by Wm. Denis & Son.
     The assessed valuation of the chattel property of Wheelersburg in 1882 was placed at the handsome sum of $132,193.

SOCIETIES.

     Western Sun Lodge, No. 91, A. F. & A. M.., is a flourishing order, which holds its meetings weekly, at the northeast corner of Broadway and Center streets.  The membership numbers fifty in good standing.  The officers the present year are:  S. M. Osborn, S. W.; H. Eakman, J. W.; Geo. Marshall, S. D.; L. Salladay, J. D.; T. Prather, Treasurer; Jas. Baker, Secretary, and Joseph Rogers, Tyler. 
     Orient Lodge, No. 337, I. O. O. F. - This order is one of long standing and has a hall of its own, located on the corner of Broadway and Center streets.  The lodge is out of debt, and their hall, which is handsomely finished and furnished, is paid for as well as the building.  Their meetings are held every Saturday night, and they have a membership of thirty-eight in good standing.  The present officers of the lodge are:  Henry Beeler, N. G.; Walter Beloat, V. G.; Jerry Scranton, Secretary; Sidney Patton, Treasurer.

WAIT'S STATION.

     is on the Portsmouth Branch of the C., W. & B. Railroad, about ten miles northeast of Portsmouth.  It was named after Benjamin Wait, a native of Vermont, who settled in the county in 1814.  The station was located by the railroad company in 1851, and Benj. F. Wait, son of Benj. Wait, appointed station agent, which he held some nine months, when the station was removed nearly one mile east to a place named Slocum, and was there kept by Joshua McStry.  A postoffice was established and the first Postmaster was Dennis Emory.  Emory resigned and Thos. M. Carroll was appointed.  Then John Ashley succeeded him after two years, and the office was vacated during his term.  The station and the postoffice, which was re-established, is still called Wait's Station and Postoffice.  Joshua McKinstry was appointed station agent in 1871, and was also appointed Postmaster, and in connection keeps a grocery store.  While the location is still at Slocum the name of station and postoffice is called "Wait's," as above.  Mr. McKinstry was born in Athens County in 1816; came to Scioto County in 1851, and to the station in 1862.  The town of Wait's has ten families within its limits, and one church, size 24 x 34 feet, owned by the denomination of Free-Will Baptists.  This covers the hamlets and the business interests of Porter Township except farming and stock-raising.  There are many fine farms and orchards in the township, and, as a class, the farmers are all well-to-do, and unencumbered with either debt or despondency.

SCHOOLS.

     Porter Township has eight school districts, or sub-districts, but in reality it might be called thirteen, as it takes that number of teachers.
     The Sciotoville District, No. 1, is a neat and substantial brick structure of four rooms, the grounds covering about half a block on Market street, in the town of Sciotoville.  The Principal of this school is Prof. P. F. White; Mrs. Emma Duvendeck  has charge of room No. 2, Miss Luella Meeker of No. 3, and Miss Frankie Beloat of room No. 4.
     Sub-district No. 2 is on the turnpike, about two and a half miles southeast of Wheelersburg.  It is a new frame building, and the school the coming winter has been placed in the hands of Miss Ida Oronton, a successful teacher.
     Sub-district No. 3 is a frame structure located on the October River, at a point called Hayport.  The teacher is Sam'l. Barrett.
     Sub-district No. 4 is on the Sciotoville and Webster Turnpike, some two and a half miles from the former place.  Frame building, with J. H. Mooney as instructor.
     Sub-district No. 5 - This school is situated on Dogwood Ridge, on the Wait's Station road leading from Wheelersburg, and one and a half miles from the latter place.  L. H. Moseman has been secured as teacher.
     Special School District, No. 6, is located at Wheelersburg.  It is a handsome brick structure of four rooms, pleasant grounds, with three rooms occupied.  Prof. Aaron Grady is Principal; Geo. Osborn has charge of room No. 2, and Miss Searls of room 3.
     Sub-district No. 7 is located two and a half miles southeast of Wheelersburg, on Lick Run.  The building is of frame, and Miss Jennie Camp has been secured as a teacher.
     Sub-district No. 8 is one and one-fourth miles west of Sciotoville, on the turnpike leading to Portsmouth.

CHURCHES.

     The Porter Free-Will Baptist Church was organized Sept. 6, 1817, in a school-house on Ward's Run, near the residence of Benj. Wait, by Elder Rufus Cheney and others.  Eli Kelsey was Clerk.  Transient services were held occasionally, and Revs. David Dudley and Markus Kilborn held services as they passed through.  Rev. R. Cheney was the first preacher of this denomination in Scioto County, in the year 1816.  The present minister is the Rev. J. H. Carr.
    
The Little Scioto Quarterly Meeting was organized May 18, 1833, at the hose of Solomon Monroe, in Harrison Township.  The ministers officiating were the Revs. Harry Branch, Jas. M. Shurtleff and Sam'l Low.  The church was represented at the meeting from Porter, Madison and Harrison townships, the delegation from Porter being Benj. Wait, Benj. Dean; Harrison, Aaron Pool and Ephraim Low, and for Madison, James Low.  Porter members numbered thirty-seven Madison twelve, and Harrison seven.  At that time the Free-Will Baptists had no church buildings of their own in the county.
     The Free-Will Baptist Church, of Wheelersburg, was organized May 17, 1851, by the Rev. Isaac Fullerton.  The present pastor is the Rev. H. J. Carr; Trustees, Jas. Littlejohn, T. J. Gibson, and one vacancy.
     The Free-Will Baptist Church, of Sciotoville, was organized Feb. 20, 1857, the Rev. Isaac Fullerton being its first pastor, and Lafayette Clifford, Silas Candill, and Thos. Marshall the Trustee is now in charge, with Frederic Ranshahouse, Jesse Purdy and Aaron Stockham, Trustees.
     The Methodist Episcopal Church, of Wheelersburg, was organized in 1822, by the Rev. Daniel Young.  The original members were:  John Young, Hannah Gould, Josiah Merrill and wife, and John Hurd and wife.  The next minister was Rev. De Lay, who preached at the house of Mrs. Hannah Gould.  Their first church was built in 1838, which has been recently torn down, and a new church building is now in the course of erection, to be completed by Christmas, at a cost of $4,000.  The church is in a flourishing condition under the earnest and able pastorate of the Rev. Geo. Cherington.   The present Trustees are A. Grady, Wm. Duis and Jas. L. Taylor.
    
The Baptist Church, of Wheelersburg, was organized in 1879 by I. N. Clark.  The first minister in charge was the Rev. J. H. Roberts.  The church ahs grown and prospered, and is now under the pastoral charge of the Rev. A. K. Murphy.  The Trustees are Harris Dodge, Levi Smith and Jno. C. Malone.
    The Sciotoville Christian Church was ...
    The Methodist Episcopal Church,  of
    The Zion Church, German Methodist Episcopal, was..
    The Church of the United Brethren was...
    Catholic Church - This church was organized in 1846 by the  

TOWNSHIP OFFICERS.

     The township officers for 1833 were:  Trustees, Pattengale, Bonser and Powers:  Clerk, Wm. Enslow; Assessor, Mr. Cole; Treasurer, Mr. Hall; Constables, Patton, Thompson and Williams.
    
For 1883, half century later, they are:  Trustees, Wm. Reif, Jas. Pucker, and Geo. A. Osborn; Clerk, Jas. H. Halliday; Treasurer, C. W. Ehrlich; Assessor, Jno. W. Merrill; Justices of the Peace, Thos. M. Correll, Luther Marshall and Smith Littlejohn; Constables, Wm. Fullerton, and one vacancy; Notary Public, Luther Marshall.  Politically speaking the township of Porter is Republican.

BIOGRAPHICAL:

C. M. ALBERT
S. D. ARGO
JOHN S. BACCUS
GEORGE BAHNER
JOHN HATCH BARRETT
JOHN F. BASHAM
WALTER BELOAT
SAMUEL BONSER
ADOLPH BRASE
BENJAMIN J. BRATT
JOSEPH S. BROWN
BENJAMIN E. CRANSTON
FRANK E.CRANSTON
JEREMIAH CRANSTON
HORATIO N. DAVIDSON
MICHAEL DELABAR
WILLIAM DUIS
MINERVA C. (CORRELL) FARNEY
CHRISTOPHER FLANAGAN
HENRY FRISCHE
JACOB F. FRITZ
REV. ISAAC FULLERTON
FREDERICK GABLER, JR.
JAMES GIBBENS
FREDERICK GINHIEMER
GEORGE GLEIM
FRANK M. GLIDDEN
AARON GRADY
FRIEDRICH GRIVER
JOHN J. HOUSE
MRS. FRANCES (LASSER) HUDSON
REZIN R. KENNEDY
SMITH S. LITTLEJOHN
CHARLES P. LLOYD
JAMES M. MONTGOMERY
JAMES J. MOORE
E. POWERS
THOMAS POWERS
GEORGE RIFE
EDWARD ROWLEY
JOSHUA WHEELER *
LEVI WHEELER
HANS C. WILLIAMSON
FREDERICK WOOLFORD

CLAY TOWNSHIP.

 

ORGANIZATION

 

OFFICIAL.

 

THE RICHEST TOWNSHIP.

 

CHURCHES.

 

SCHOOLS.

 

BIOGRAPHICAL.

JOSEPH BIERLY
FRANK A. BIHLMAN
PHILLIP BLUM
JOSEPH BRIGGS
MILTON BUCK
CHARLES CHICK
AMOS SPENCER COLE
WILLIAM DORMAN
JOHN F. DROEGE
LEONARD ECK
HENRY CLINTON FEURT
JOHN D. FEURT
GEO. FISHER *
NICHOLAS GABEL
JACOB GEIS
JOHN W. HOGAN
WILLIAM HUMM
SAMUEL J. HUSTON, SR.
MILTON JOHNSON
WILLIAM F. LAWSON
WILLIAM MAPLE
GODLOB MORITZ
AARON NOEL
MICHAEL J. NOEL
P. W. NOEL
HENRY PETERS
CHARLES PLAG
JOSEPH ROCKWELL
JOHN M. SALLADAY
MARTEN SHERER
PETER SOMMER
JOSEPH WIGET
CHARLES E. WOLFE

HARRISON TOWNSHIP.

OVER ONE-FOURTH CENTURY LATER.

 

ITS ORGANIZATION.

 

OLD PIONEERS.

 

BOUNDARY CHANGES.

 

THE DIXON MILL.

 

HARRISONVILLE.

 

BUSINESS, ETC.

 

OFFICIAL.

 

CHURCHES.

 

SCHOOLS.

 

THE SCHOOLS OF 1883.

 

BIOGRAPHICAL.

ROBERT H. COBURN
JOHN L. DANIELS
NOAH DIXON
CASSIUS EDMUNDS
NATHAN B. GILLILAND
CAPTAIN HENRY LANTZ
JOHN T. MILLER
WILLIAM MINFORD
DANIEL W. TITUS
JOHN M. VIOLET
 

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