OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

 

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ROSS COUNTY, OHIO

BIOGRAPHIES

The following biographies are extracted from:
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio
By Henry Holcomb Bennett
Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902
Source #2 - A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio
Vol. II.
Published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago & New York 1917

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ADAM HAMM is a native of Seneca county, Ohio, where he was born March 1, 1855.  His father, Valentine Hamm, was born in Germany and emigrated with his wife to Ohio about 1845.  He settled at first in Seneca county, where he had taken a lease, and there he lived for some twelve years.  In 1857 he removed to Ross county and located in Huntington township, where he purchased a farm of 300 acres.   The children born of the first marriage were Hartman J., of Chillicothe; Sophia, wife of R. Shiller; Adam, Frederick and Martin, the two last living in Fayette county.  Frederick is one of the stockholders in the M. Hamm Company of Washington C. H., one of the large acid phosphate manufacturing concerns of Ohio.  He also owns a fine farm near Washington C. H., which he superintendents, and he has entire charge of the sales department of the above named firm.  Martin  is the originator of M. Hamm company, starting in several years ago with nothing, and it is to his industry, intelligence and wise management that the success of the concern is due.  The mother of these five children died and the father in 1866 took Catherine Ringwalt for his second wife.  By this union there were two children, of whom John died and William lives in Chillicothe.  Although Valentine Hamm's principal occupation was that of farming, he also did work as a carpenter, besides following the business of threshing and sawmilling.  His death occurred in 1896.  His son Adam remained at home until he was about twenty-seven years of age, assisting his father in the business of the farm.  In November, 1882, he was married to Sarah P. Smith, whose people were early settlers of Ross county.  They went to housekeeping in Chillicothe and Mr. Hamm engaged in the sawmill and threshing business.  After following this exclusively for four or five years, he rented what is known as the Augusta farm, where he spent one year.  He then became a land owner on his own account, buying the 175 acres acres where he now lives, to which he has since added two farms of 65 and 125 acres respectively.  This property he acquired principally by his own exertions and he placed upon the farms all the improvements they contain.  HE owns and operates a threshing machine, corn shredder and clover huller, being the employer of more help than any man in the neighborhood.  Mr. Hamm is an extensive fruit raiser and has a young peach orchard containing 6,000 trees.  He is completing one of the finest dwelling houses in the neighborhood and all his surroundings give evidence of thrift and prosperity.  Mr. Hamm is a member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Bourneville and of the Methodist Episcopal church.  He and wife have been the parents of nine children, of whom Charles and one other died in infancy.  Those living, and all still at home, are Sophia, Frederick, Louis, Ada, Ethel, Martin and Clarence.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

WILLIAM G. HAMM, D. D. S., of Chillicothe, was born in Huntington township, Ross county, Ohio, on November 7, 1875.  His parents were Valentine and Catherine (Ringwald) Hamm, who came from Germany to Ross county in youth, the father being but twenty-one years old.  The latter was twice married,  Dr. Hamm's mother being his second wife.  The first marriage resulted in five children, whose names are as follows:  Hartman, employed in the mechanical department of the Baltimore & Ohio shops at Chillicothe; Mrs. Sophia Schiller, a widow residing in Bourneville, Ross county; Adam, a well-to-do lumberman and stock dealer at Bourneville; Frederick a farmer near Washington C. H., Ohio; Martin, engaged in manufacturing commercial fertilizer at Washington C. H.   Dr. Hamm has a full brother, named John, who died in youth, and there were no other children by his father's second marriage.  Dr. Hamm was educated in the schools of Ross county and Chillicothe, after which he entered the university of Cincinnati.  In this institution he took an academic course and also studied chemistry.  Subsequently he matriculated in the Ohio College of Dental Surgery, a department of the university, where he completed a course in dentistry.  He received from his alma mater a certificate of honorable mention, the next prize to the gold medal.  June 1, 1899, he opened up for practice at Chillicothe and already ahs established a good patronage.  The doctor is a member of the Ohio State Dental society, and an alumnus of the Ohio State Dental college as well as the University of Cincinnati.  He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Modern Woodmen and the Improved Order of Red Men, of which he is secretary.  April 25, 1899, Dr. Hamm was married to Anna Margaret, daughter of the late Philip Uhrig, a manufacturer and prominent citizen of Chillicothe.  Mrs. Hamm was educated in the public schools, the high school and the Business college of Chillicothe.  The Doctor's politics are strongly republican, an inheritance from his father, who was with the party from its very organization.  The religious affiliations of himself and wife are with the Salem Evangelic Lutheran church, of which they are attentive members.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

THE HANAWALT FAMILY -This name, since so well known, first became familiar in Ross county during the second decade of the nineteenth century. The stock originated in Germany but the American branch was derived from settlers in Mifflin county, Pa., who reared a family of children including one by the name of George Hanawalt The latter had three sons, Henry, George and John, all of whom came to Ross county, but at different times. When Henry reached manhood he married a Pennsylvania lady named Mary Chah, with whom he set out for the West and eventually located in Union township, Ross county. After a short, sojourn there he settled permanently in Concord township, three and a half miles south of Frankfort, where he resided until the time of his tragic death. It seems that on returning one day from the village of Frankfort he attempted to ford the north fork of Paint creek while it was swollen by freshets, and was washed from his horse and drowned, the body being found a week later near Musselman's. Henry Hanawalt had four sons and two daughters, all dead except Hester, youngest daughter, who is now Mrs. James McColly, of Illinois. There are now no direct descendants of Henry living in Ross county. George Hanawait, his brother, married Margaret Parchel and made his migration from Pennsylvania to Ross county in 1823. For a year or two he lived near what is now Anderson's Station in Union township, afterward spent many years in labor at Slate Mill and finally located in Concord township where he worked on farms until his death in 1882.  George had six children, two of whom died in infancy, those growing to maturity being Caleb, Christopher, Elizabeth and Sarah. Caleb grew to manhood in Ross county, married here and subsequently removed to Indiana where he now resides. Elizabeth married James Baber, with whom she located in Madison county, Ohio, where she spent the remainder of her life and where her descendants now Reside.
     Sarah became the wife of Jacob Strayer, removed to Franklin county, Ohio, and there her descendants are still found. Christopher, who was born in Mifflin county, Pa., August 20, 1821, was only two years old when his parents came to Ross county. He is now a venerable and much respected citizen of Frankfort, of which he is the oldest living resident, having been there continuously since 1836. October 28, 1840, he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Frank and Mary (Goldsberry) Speaks, who were early settlers from Virginia. By this union there were ten children, seven sons and three daughters: Joseph, Mary, George, Benton, Ollie, Samuel, Francis, Elizabeth, Pearly and Raymond. All of the foregoing are living with the exception of Mary, the eldest daughter. Christopher Hanawalt, father of this family has led a long, industrious and in every way exemplary life. He is now eighty-one years old and during all that time has never used tobacco in any form or indulged in intoxicants. He learned the blacksmiths trade in early life and followed that useful calling until five or six years ago, when he retired from active business. John Hanawalt, third of the brothers who came from Pennsylvania, settled at Bourneville in Twin township where he worked during life at the tailor's trade. He first married a Miss Acton, member of an old Ross county family, by whom he had four children: Mary, Jane, Betty and Sally. By his second marriage with Mary, daughter of Christian Hill, he had seven children: Millie, Joseph, ChristianJohn, George, William and James, the latter residing in Chillicothe. George Hanawalt, son of Christopher Hanawalt, mentioned above, was born in Frankfort, Ohio, in 1849. After reaching manhood he began farming, which he followed until 1882, when he embarked in the business of handling imported horses and continued the same for five years. Since that time he has been dealing extensively in cattle, of which he sells thousands of head every year. These cattle he imports from the neighboring state of West Virginia and sells principally in the Ohio markets. In 1870 Mr. Hanawalt was married to Martha A., daughter, of David and Sarah (Mallow) Coyner, member of one of the substantial and long established families of Ross. county. Of the four children resulting from this union, David C. is a government meat inspector at Salt Lake City, Utah; Sarah M. died in infancy; Ollie Lee is the wife of Harry Green, of Washington Court House, .Ohio, and Carl E. is at borne.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JAMES M. HANEY, deceased, was born in Buckskin township, Ross county, November 11, 1872. His father, Henry Haney, was a Canadian, born in 1830, who emigrated to Chillicothe. and followed railroading for a business. He commenced as a section band and when he left the company's employment he had risen to the position of superintendent of construction. Having accumulated some funds by his industry and saving, he bought a tract of 108 acres of land in Buckskin township as an investment. In 1858 he married Elizabeth Duey and took charge of the Steve Wilson farm which he managed for a couple of years and then removed to the Hardin place.    After a residence there of three years he occupied the place which he had purchased and farmed it for eight years or more. After a subsequent residence of six years on the McClain farm in Concord township, Henry Haney bought the place of 406 acres, where he lived until the time of his death in 1885. His six children were Mary A., Sarah J., Henry, John (deceased), Edward and James M. The last mentioned, the subject of this sketch, remained at home until his marriage to Olive Baum, which took place December 30, 1896. They kept house for three years, when removal was made to the old home place where Mr. Haney had charge of the farm. He had two children, John B. and Plessa M.   Mr. Haney was a member of the lodge of Modern Woodmen, "No. 4,065, and of the Red Men's lodge, at Frankfort.
| Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

ROBERT HANNA, of Gillespieville, was born January 5, 1829, in Harrison county, Ohio. His parents were Matthew and Mary (Orr) Hanna, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio, both born in 1805. Matthew was the son of James and Ann (McCullow) Hanna, the latter of whom came to Harrison county after her husband's death, and died there. Matthew came to the State at an early day and lived in various counties, finally reaching Jackson county where he died in 1857 at the age of fifty-two. His wife survived him until 1891, when she died at the age of eighty-six. The latter's father, Robert Orr, was a native of Ireland who came to America about the year 1780. Ann Huston, whom he subsequently married, came over in the same vessel, though at the time they were not acquainted with each other. Robert Orr came to Harrison county, Ohio, at an early age and remained there until his death in 1858, at the age of ninety-one. He had a family of nine daughters, whose ages averaged eighty years at time of death. Matthew and Mary (Orr) Hanna had twelve children, of whom six are still living. These are Robert, Zipporah, James, William T., Matthew and Watson. Robert Hanna, who is the subject of this sketch, was reared on a farm and came to Ross county in 1846. Since then with the exception of four years, he has always voted in Liberty township of that county. He has always followed farming as an occupation and owns about 200 acres of land. Though a charter member of the Republican party, he has never been an office-seeker, but for some years has held the position of school director. In 1855, Mr. Hanna was married to Eliza J. Corken, daughter of Thomas and Bebecca (Jones) Corken, and granddaughter of Robert Corken, a native of Ireland, who came to Ross county about the year 1798.
     Robert Corken married Grace Mason, a native of Maryland, and both of them died in Ross county. Thomas Corken lived until the age of ninety-four years, and his wife was about seventy when she died.
     His sister Rachael lived ninety-seven years, and another sister named Jane reached the age of eighty. Robert and Eliza Hanna have a family of eight children. Of these Orr C. is a traveling salesman; Mary H. is married to William A. Jones; Thomas Mason is an extensive farmer and stockdealer; Samuel E. is a farmer of Fayette county; Rebecca is the wife of Morris Jones, of Ross county; Candace is the wife of Elting S. Du Bois, of Jefferson township; Ethel is the wife of J. Walter Dixon, a dentist of Cedarville, Ohio.  Matthew Elting Hanna was educated at West Point and is now in Cuba. He is school commissioner of the island and author of the Cuban school law, serving in General Wood's staff. He is a man of fine talents, excellent education and has been of great service in Cuba, both to the people of the island and the government of the United States.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

THADDEUS S. HANSON, of Harrison township, was born in Ross county, Ohio, September 30, 1874. His father, Greenbury Hanson, was a son of Samuel and Rebecca (Waterman) Hanson, the former a native of Wales and the latter of Virginia. They went to Kentucky in 1798 and in 1800 located in Harrison township, Ross county, on a farm which, has ever since been in the family. Samuel Hanson died there at the age of eighty-three and his wife's, death took place in her eighty-fourth year. They had a family of twelve children, their son Greenbury obtaining the homestead and spending his whole life there. He owned 300 acres of land in Ross county and 520 in Kansas; held nearly all the township offices and was also an infirmary director. May 9, 1860, he was married to Margaret, daughter of George and Margaret (Snyder) Hough, the former of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio, who spent their lives in Ross county, the father dying at the age of fifty-seven and the mother when sixty-eight years old. Greenbury Hanson and wife had a family of nine children, including: Florence, wife of D. W. Clymer; Jessie E., married to John W. McGee; Lillian E., now Mrs. Floyd McNeal; Nellie E., wife of Charles Rothe; Thaddeus S. and Grace B. Thaddeus S. Hanson grew up on the old home place and was educated in the common schools of his district. He now has charge of the homestead, consisting of 300 acres of land, and is a breeder of Jersey red swine and Shorthorn Durham cattle. He has been assessor and treasurer of his township and is a member of the Improved Order of Red Men. On May 17, 1899, he was married to Alice, daughter of William Yaple, who is mentioned elsewhere in this work.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

  MRS. SARAH ELIZABETH HARMOUNT.  On account of the splendid character of the people who have lived there one of the most interesting homesteads in Ross County is that occupied by Mrs. Sarah E. Harmount in Deerfield Township.  Mrs. Harmount is a granddaughter of the original settler there, and she and her family reside in a commodious two story house,  surrounded by a large lawn shaded with beautiful trees.  It was on this farm that Mrs. Harmount was born April 24, 1841.  She is a daughter of the late JOHN WESLEY TIMMONS, who was born on part of the same farm Mar. 4, 1806, a son of Stephen and Milla (Brown) Timmons.
    
The founder of the family here was Rev. Stephen Timmons, who was born in Worcester County, Maryland, Aug. 6, 1769.  His father, Thomas Timmons, was born in Maryland of English ancestry.  Thomas Timmons was a member of the Episcopal Church, and was one of the very early opponents of the institution of slavery.  The maiden name of his wife is thought to have been Mary Clarkson.
     Rev. Stephen Timmons
was reared in the Episcopal faith, but in 1791 joined the Methodist Episcopal Church and was soon appointed leader of two classes.  Not long afterwards he was licensed to preach, joined the Methodist Conference, and was assigned in 1795 to the Northumberland Circuit.  In 1798 he came to the Northwest Territory, arriving in Chillicothe in October of that year.  Chillicothe then had one hewed log house occupied by Dr. Edward Tiffin, who afterwards became the first governor of the state.   All the other buildings in the town, few in number, were cabins built of round logs.  Rev. Stephen Timmons as the pioneer circuit rider visited all the few white settlements then to be found north of the Ohio River, and even carried his missionary efforts into Kentucky.  Some of the civilized Indians would go before him and others followed behind to cover up his tracks.  This was in 1803.  Meeting an object of charity on one of his trips he gave her his last twenty-five cents, and when he alighted from his horse waiting to cross the river there lay at his feet fifty-cents.  HE made the second trip West in 1799 bringing White Brown with him to prove his statement about the new country.  Rev. Enoch George came as far as where Lancaster now stands on his first trip.  He returned east.  There he recited in glowing terms the wonderful charms of the Scioto Valley.  Among others who were influenced by his words of praise of this western country was White Brown.  It is largely on the strength of this missionary's work that White Brown came to Ross County with his family.  No history of Ross County has ever been written without honorable mention of White Brown, since he did much in the early days to make Ross County what it is.  Rev. Stephen Timmons married a daughter of this pioneer Ross County settler.  On his return east Mr. Timmons joined the Maryland Conference and preached at different places until December, 1801.  In that year he returned to Ross County, accompanying a part of White Brown's family.  While he himself rode a horse other members of the party were in a wagon drown by four horses driven by a trusted slave.  The minister's belongings were in a wooden chest carried on the wagon.  This chest is now preserved at the home of his granddaughter Mrs. Harmount.  Mr. Timmons' father had given him $200 and with this he purchased a tract of land in what is now Deerfield Township.  This land is now a part of the Harmount farm.  In those early days about the only demand for corn was from the settlers who had not yet had time to raise a crop.  Rev. Stephen Timmons erected as his first home a cabin 16 by 16 feet of hickory logs.  In that he and his bride commenced housekeeping.
     In the year 1804 there arrived in Ross County a colony of people from Maryland.  There were seventy of them, the poorest of the poor, oppressed Marylanders.  They drew up at the door of Rev. Mr. Timmons.  These Marylanders had brought all their possessions in a cart drawn by a pony.  Mr. Timmons took it upon himself to assist each of these families to secure homes in the wilderness.  The land had not yet been surveyed, and much of it was owned by the State of Virginia.  Under his own direction and by his assistance four cabins were built for the new settlers, and with his gun he supplied the newcomers with large quantities of wild meat, and took other steps to assist them until they could raise a crop.  In the meantime the improvements were continuing on his own farm, and in a few years he had a large tract under cultivation.  The early settlers of Ross County owe a great debt of gratitude to this sterling man of Christ.  In spite of the fact that he constantly gave away great quantities of his yearly produce, he prospered.  What he did not give away outright he sold on easy terms to the poor.  When a stranger came to him to buy corn he first inquired whether the purchaser had money to pay.  If the man said yes, Mr. Timmons would then tell him of some one who had corn to sell.  He kept his own corn for such as did not have the money.  Thus he confined his dealings almost entirely to the poor.  While his own health was not good, and that prevented him from holding regular pastorates, he found much opportunity to preach the Gospel.  He was unable to endure the heavy hardships placed upon the circuit rider of the time.  Those early preachers made journeys on horseback lasting for days and months, encountered all kinds of bad weather, swam swollen streams, and in his time he saw much of that very kind of service.  From time to time Rev. Mr.
Timmons
added other tracts of land until he was owner of upwards of 800 acres in Ross County and as much more in Pickaway County.
     His death occurred in 1849, at the age of eighty years.  Thus came to a close one of the most fruitful lives ever passed in Ross County.  In March, 1802, he married Milla Brown, daughter of White Brown.  She died in 1832.  He afterwards married Mrs. (Cartwright) Comberford, a relative of the famous pioneer missionary and evangelist,  Peter Cartwright.
     John Wesley Timmons, son of Rev. Stephen Timmons, inherited a part of the old home farm, and spent his active years engaged in general farming and stock raising.  He owned land in Pickaway County and 900 acres in Henry County.  He died at the age of seventy-three.  He was first married to Sarah Brown by the Rev. Reuben Rowe on Jan. 13, 1831.  She was removed by death about six years later and he then married Ann Elizabeth Prior.  This marriage was performed by Rev. William S. Morrow on May 1, 1838.  Miss Prior was a student in the old seminary at Chillicothe about 1834, and while there she had united with the Methodist Episcopal Church.  At the death of her parents she came into possession of 500 acres of land.  For his third wife John W. Timmons was married Apr. 30, 1865, to Margaret Clifford, the ceremony being performed by Rev. T. J. Phillips.
    
The three children of his first wife died in their youth, one of them living to the age of twelve years.  By the second marriage there were nine children.  The three now living are Sarah Elizabeth, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.  One son, Samuel Prior died in Andersonville Prison and something more than passing mention should be made of him.  When eighteen years of age he enlisted in Company A of the First Ohio Regiment.  He was born Oct. 2, 1842, in Deerfield Township of Ross County, and enlisted Sept. 1, 1861, at Clarksburg, Ohio.  Soon afterward he was promoted to first sergeant.  At the Battle of Stone River he received a flesh wound on his arm.  Sept. 19, 1863, while in the Battle of Chickamauga, he was shot through the left leg just above the knee joint, and subsequently captured.  He was removed to Atlanta, then to Richmond, then to Andersonville, where he perished of starvation Sept. 16, 1864.  He united with the Methodist Episcopal Church when sixteen years of age, and left home with a strong faith in God, believing that He would care and provide for him.  As to his life and character as a man and soldier his colonel wrote of him as follows:  "I recollect your brother very well and his quiet gentlemanly manner early attracted my notice, and each day of his two years' service with the regiment gave perfect satisfaction and fresh proof of his worth as a man and a soldier.  I never knew him to be guilty of an immoral word or action.  As first sergeant of Company A his books were neat and well kept, and his reports and accounts prompt and accurate.  He was strict and reliable in the performance of every duty.  In few words, he was a good soldier and good man, brave, prompt, conscientious, obedient.  It affords me pleasure to bear testimony of his merits."  His remains lie in grave No. 8914 at Andersonville.  His letters home while in prison were always cheery and hopeful, still trusting the Lord to guide and protect.  He said in one: "I am trying to make the best of my condition possible and to keep up my spirit," and of comrades and self he also said: "We are doing as well as could be expected, yet are longing, looking and praying for the day of our release."
     Another of the sons of John W. Timmons was also a soldier.  He was John Wesley Timmons, Jr., who served his country in the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, enlisting when but nineteen years of age.  He was also a Christian boy - and man.  He was an excellent soldier, performed all his duties as a mature man with promptness and fidelity.  He died at Circleville, Ohio, Aug. 26, 1881.
     John Wesley Timmons, Sr., was a man of great influence and excellent judgment, and many people came to him for help and advice when in trouble.  His house was noted as a home for the afflicted and needy.  He was a firm and active supporter of the church, held different offices such as class leader, circuit steward, etc., and gave liberally of his own means to church causes.  At quarterly meetings he was in the habit of giving a public invitation for entertainment at his home.  As many as fifty guests were entertained around his dinner table, and usually from twelve to fifteen spent the night in that hospitable household.  It was said of him while living that "he was a man among men and esteemed as a man among men."  At his funeral Rev. Zachariah Wharton among other things said that "his word was as good as the dollar."
     John Wesley Timmons lived on a part of the farm where he was reared until September, 1849, and then moved to the vicinity of Clarksburg, where he spent the rest of his days.  During a part of his life he filled the office of justice of the peace.  His second wife Ann was a perfect helpmate.  Her last work was one of unselfish devotion.  She went to the Gettysburg battlefield in order to nurse a half brother of her husband who had been wounded and who died on the battlefield, and she brought his body home.  While at Gettysburg she cared for many other wounded soldiers, and one of them wrote home to his friends that "no one knew the good she had done while there."  In three short weeks after returning from his mission of love she was laid away in the family burying ground.  The remains of herself and husband have since been removed to the township cemetery at Brown's Chapel.  Ann Elizabeth Prior was born near Clarksburg, though across the line in Pickaway County Mar. 9, 1817.  Her parents were Samuel T. and Emily (Nickols) Pryor.
    
 A daughter of these worthy parents, Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Harmount grew up in the old home at Clarksburg, attended the public schools there and was also a student in the Female College at Springfield.  In 1861 she married Robert Simpson Harmount, son of George B. and Anna Mary (Baughman) Harmount.  On May 2, 1864, three years after their marriage, Mr. Harmount enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, being in the 100 days services.  His father, George Harmount, was a carriage builder by trade and a pioneer in that occupation in the City of Chillicothe.  It is said that the first body for a stage coach ever made in that city was his handiwork.  From Chillicothe he removed to Williamsport, where he spent his last days.  Robert S. Harmount learned the trade of carriage and wagon builder from his father and as a young man located at Clarksburg where he conducted a carriage factory a number of years.  After his marriage he removed to the Harmount homestead in Deerfield Township, eleven miles from Chillicothe, and was actively occupied with farming until his death at the age of sixty-nine.
     Mr. and Mrs. Harmount reared six children:  Louetta May, George P., Anna E., Timmons, Robert S. and Ralph.  Louetta by her marriage to George C. Blue has two children, Samuel Francis and Charles.  George married Martha Briggs.  Anna, now deceased, married Wade J. Byerly.  Timmons married Ida L. Wilkins, and their six children are Nellie, Harry, Arthur, Annie, Pryor and Mary.  Robert married Addie Goodbar, and the four children that bless their union are Marie, Robert, Joseph and Catherine.  Ralph married Rebecca Layton, and has three children, Gilbert, Harold and Forrest.  Mrs. Harmount has seven great-grandchildren.
     Thus the declining years of Mrs. Harmount are spent with the solace and comforts supplied by her children and her many grandchildren.  She has always been a reader, keeps up with current history, and has many things to occupy her mind at the delightful home where she lives.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JAMES VANSE HARNESS, one of Ross county's most substantial farmers, comes of ancient and honorable lineage on both sides of the house. His paternal great-grandfather was the first white man who settled on the south branch of the Potomac river in Hardy county, W. Va. The descendants of this pioneer, who was of German origin, became numerous and influential in that portion of the mountain state. Among them was John G. Harness and his son, Charles E., the latter born in Hardy county, October 8, 1814, and the eldest of his father's family. In 1842, he came to Ross county and settled in Liberty township, where in due course he became very prosperous as a farmer and landowner. In addition to the usual agricultural feature, he embarked in cattle-raising on a large scale, making a specially of the famous Shorthorns at the time they were coming into prominence and were most valuable. He was successful in his ventures and accumulated some 1,400 acres of land in Ross county besides considerable holdings in West Virginia. He married Mary Vanse, who was born in Jefferson township, Ross county, in 1824. Her parents, James and Eliza (Harness) Vanse, came to Ross county in an early period of its history and here spent the remainder of their days. Mr. Vanse was one of the most extensive and prosperous farmers of his day, conducting operations on an unusually bold plan and owning a great deal of land. Charles E. and Mary (Vanse) Harness had nine children, including: Lillie, Ella, Mary, Kate, Charles E., John M. and James Vanse. Mrs. Harness died July 11, 1895; her husband still resides in Liberty township where he settled so many years ago. Their son, James Vanse Harness, was born on the old home place September 13, 1864, receiving his education principally in a private school taught by Professor Poe in Chillicothe. Prom his earliest boyhood he has been connected with farm work and management, a love for which he had inherited from a long line of ancestors. He has charge of the 250 acres now constituting the home farm and an equal amount of land owned by himself, which was formerly part, of the old homestead.. He has shown judgment and good management in the operation of these large landed interests and few farmers of his age are better informed in the practical affairs of agriculture. In political doctrines Mr. Harness is of the Democratic persuasion, but he is in no sense an office-seeker and never allows politics to interfere with business. Neither is Mr. Harness a club man in a general way, his fraternal connection being confined to membership in the order of Elks in Chillicothe.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JACOB HARPER was born in Concord township, Ross county, February 9, 1849. His father, Elon Harper, was born in Pendleton county, W. Va., about 1819, being a son of Jacob Harper, whose birth occurred in Virginia about the year 1832. The latter removed with his family to Ohio, first settling in Fayette county where he remained a few years and then went to Missouri. He spent the rest of his days in that state, his death occurring while hack on a visit to relatives in Fayette county, Ohio. His son Elon received hut a limited education and grew to manhood in the counties of Fayette and Ross. He learned the blacksmith trade, but followed it only irregularly as he made farming his principal occupation. His wife was Barbara, daughter of David and Elizabeth (Michael) Ross, who were among the first settlers of Ross county, coming here form Maryland. Elon Harper died in 1881, his wife surviving him but a short time and passing away in 1882. They had a family of ten children, of whom seven are living and all in Ross county. Among them is Jacob Harper, the subject of this sketch. He received the ordinary education in the common schools of Concord township, and upon his arrival at full age became a farmer, like his ancestors before him. In 1875, he was married to Lydia, daughter of Thomas Ware, of Frankfort, and the union resulted- in the birth of two children, whose names are Edna and Corda. Mr. Harper is a, member of the Masonic order, being connected with the Frankfort lodge, No. 326.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

WILBUR P. HARPER was born in Buckskin township, Ross county, in 1855. His father, Caleb Harper, was a native of Delaware who in 1829 settled in Ross county on the farm where his son now resides. The family was one of the oldest in the East and took part in all the stirring events during the settlement of the coast states. Caleb Harper is still living near where he first located in Buckskin township so many years ago and has followed farming and stock-raising all his life. He raised a family of seven children. His son Edward joined Company D, Eighty-ninth Ohio regiment, during the civil war and died of fever in Tennessee while serving his country, October 1, 1863. Wilbur P. Harper, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the schools of Buckskin township and the- business of his life has been farming and stock-raising. His specialty has been the feeding and fattening of stock for the market In 1879, he was married to Alice, daughter of Daniel Kline, of Buckskin township, who died in 1883.   Mr. and Mrs. Harper have eight children, whose names are Denbur, Louie (wife of William Harper), Dwight, Mary, Valley, Ethel, Millie and Teddy. Mr. Harper has been trustee of Buckskin township for six years and was candidate for county commissioner in 1900. He is a member of the order of the Modern Woodmen of the World.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

CHARLES C. HATFIELD, M. D., of Kingston, Ohio, is a native of Pickaway county born October 21, 1867.  His parents were Arthur A. and Elizabeth (Bazler) Hatfield, natives of Ohio, the former of Pickaway and the latter of Ross county, both born in the year 1843, and married in the county of Pickaway.  In 1861-65 the father was a soldier in the Forth-fifth Ohio regiment, afterward re-enlisting in the Forty-third, serving three years and a half in the western army under General Sherman.  He was wounded in the battle of Missionary Ridge, which resulted in his honorable discharge from the army.  Both parents are still living, he being a well-to-do farmer in Pickaway county.  
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

WILLIAM J. HAYNES, a merchant engaged in business at Richmond Dale, and one of the enterprising citizens of that community, is a native of Pike county, Ohio.  He comes of pioneer stock, the founder of the family in Ross county having settled at Chillicothe in 1798 about the time the county was officially organized.  This early comer left a son named George Haynes, who like his father, was a blacksmith by trade and ironed the first bridge built across the Scioto river in Ross county.  He owned a large farm in the vicinity of Hopetown, now in the possession of George Smith, of Chillicothe, and there he spent his last days.  He married Isabelle Nicholls, who became the mother of five sons and six daughters, seven of whom are still living, and the youngest reached the age of forty years before there was a death in the family.  One of these five sons was John Haynes, born in Chillicothe in 1843, who adopted farming as his occupation and settled in Pike county, Ohio, being at present a resident of Omega.  He married Rose Ann Cissna, a native of Piketown, Ohio, by whom he had seven children:  Isabelle, William J., C. E., Jennetta, Cornelius, O. C. Dell and John, Jr.  William J. Haynes second of the children in order of birth, grew up on his farm, and, in addition to the usual course in the common schools, attended the Normal university, at Lebanon, Ohio.  After finishing his education he was engaged in farming until 1892, when he embarked in the mercantile business with William A. Maxwell.  This partnership continued for one year and a half, after which Mr. Haynes was in business alone for two years.  He then purchased the business of Stultz & Snyder and organized the new firm of Stultz & Haynes, which was dissolved by mutual consent after one year's continuance. when he entered into partnership with Roscoe Dixon, of Richmond Dale, which firm still continues.  They do an extensive business in the handling of posts, ties, tanbark and other merchandise.  Mr. Haynes served as township treasurer five years and has been postmaster of his home town since 1897.  He is a member of Garfield lodge, No. 710, of the order of Odd Fellows.  In 1885, he was married to Jennie M. Davis, of Richmond Dale, by whom he had four children, J. Scott, W. Ward, Clifford C. (deceased), and Clarence P.  Mrs. Haynes to Ella M. Drummond, of Ross  county.  The family are connected with the Methodist Episcopal church.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902
JOSEPH A. HEAD, who resides near Fruitdale, Ohio, and is one of the enterprising business men of that locality, comes of a family which was among the earliest settlers of Highland county. Both himself and his father, John Head, are natives of that county, and there he grew up to manhood. His education was mainly obtained in his native county, though he also attended school in Pike county. After reaching man's estate, Mr. Head went over into Ross county in search of an opportunity to procure a livelihood. He selected Bainbridge as a location and was engaged in the mercantile business there for a number of years. He met with success in his financial undertakings and became both prominent and popular as a citizen of Paxton township. In 1885, he removed to his place near Fruitdale, in Paint township, which has since been his residence. In March, 1868, Mr. Head was married to Sarah C., daughter of William Ogle, member of a family long and favorably known in Paxton township. The fruits of this union were two children, of whom Effie B. is the wife of C. S. Iseman, a farmer of Paint township, and Alice H. married Rev. J. W. Blair, minister of the Methodist Episcopal church at Richmond Dale. Mr. Head is quite prominent in politics on the Democratic side and made the race for county commissioner as the nominee of his party. He has served as trustee and justice of the peace of Paint township and is regarded as a safe adviser by his political associates. Mr. Head is a Knight Templar in the Masonic order and a communicant of the Methodist Episcopal church.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

EUGENE HEMMEGER, M. D., a popular young physician of Adelphi„ Ross county, whose success both personally and professionally gives promise of a bright future, was born in Washington county, Ohio, September 10, 1874. He is a son of Alfred and Abbie (Warren) Hemmeger, the former a successful farmer in Washington county, who died in 1883. His widow still resides in Washington county. Dr. Hemmeger was reared on the farm, attended the district schools and finished his literary education at the Marietta township high school, where he was graduated in 1891. He had early made up his mind to become a physician and had already done some reading in that line, and thus was fitted for entrance into the Starling Medical college, at Columbus, Ohio. He devoted himself assiduously to study in that popular institution, and received his degree with the class which was graduated in 1895. When Dr. Hemmeger obtained his diploma he was in his twenty-first year, and he lost no time in getting to work in the profession which he had chosen for the employment of his life. He selected Laurelville, in Hocking county, as his location and there "hung out his shingle," to use the vernacular of young professionals. After one year's trial there, he decided to make a transfer to Adelphi as a more inviting field for his professional activities. He came to that place in 1896 and since then the scene of his operations has been in and around the pretty little capital of Colerain township. The doctor is a gentleman of pleasing address and popular manners which, added to his professional acquirements, have enabled him to become firmly established in his adopted home. He is also social in his disposition and gratifies his longings for fraternal fellowship by membership in the local lodges of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias at Adelphi. Dr. Hemmeger was married in 1896 to Clara Miller, of Washington county, and they have two children, Mary and Francis.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JOHN MCCOY HENNESS, a retired farmer residing at Frankfort, and Union veteran with an unusually creditable military record, has been long and favorably known in that part of Ross county. The founder of the family in Ohio was William Henness, who married Nancy Bernard in Virginia, subsequently came to Ross county, settled in Union township and there began the cultivation of a leased farm. They were but little behind the vanguard of the earliest settlers, as the time of their arrival is placed in the year 1800. To this couple were born eight children, all long since dead, named as follows: Mary, wife of Scott Finley; Martha, wife of Joseph Beard; a daughter who married Aaron Mowbray; William, Stephen, Zachariah, James and Levi, the latter killed at Kenesaw Mountain. The parents, who lived to unusually advanced age, found a final resting place in the Baptist cemetery near Frankfort. Zachariah, sixth of this family, was horn in Ross county in 1816, and in early youth learned the cooper's trade, which he worked at during much of his subsequent life. He married Sally Ann McCoy, a native of Ross county and daughter of John McCoy, took possession of the McClintick farm in Union township and lived there for the next twenty-seven years. Besides farming and cooperage he did considerable work with a threshing machine, of which he had charge a number of years. In 1867, he went to Seymour, Champaign county, 111., where both himself and wife ended their days, he when eighty-two and she when eighty years old. Their children, nine in number, were named as follows: John M.; William B., of Piatt county, Ill.; James A., of Champaign county, Ill.; Margaret, wife of W. D. Earl, of Illinois;. Jane, wife of Thomas Cain, of same state; Ann (deceased), wife of Benjamin Miller, same state; Edmund, of Champaign, Ill.; David, of Ross county, and Charles, of Illinois. John McCoy Henness, eldest of the family, .was born in Union township, Ross county, March 22, 1842. When nineteen years old he enlisted in Company C, Eighty-first Ohio infantry, and went to Missouri by way of Cincinnati and St Louis for the purpose of joining his command, which was located in that state.  The regiment underwent the necessary drilling, did some marching back and forth to different Missouri points and in 1862 was placed aboard steamer at St Charles for shipment to Pittsburg Landing, arriving in time to take part in the bloody battle at that place. While in Missouri, Mr. Henness had been accidentally wounded and after the Tennessee battle was in the hospital for a few days, received a furlough, and came home. After reporting for duty at Camp Dennison, he was assigned to a local corps in Cincinnati and remained there until August, during which time the corps was sent to Cynthiana, Ky., where it engaged General Morgan. He was then sent to his regiment at Corinth, Miss., in time to take part in the noted battle at that place. His regiment remained in that locality until the spring of 1863, when they were sent to Pulaski, Tenn., where they remained doing guard duty until the spring of 1864. Mr. Henness had re-enlisted January 1, 1864, in his old company in Tennessee, which was ordered to Chattanooga in May. During the following summer, he participated with his command in the famous Atlanta campaign, during which he took part in twenty-two fights, large and small, among the battles being Kenesaw Mountain and Oostenaula river. In the latter, Mr. Henness and one of his companions, while making a charge, succeeded in capturing all the officers and eight men of one company. He was in the battle of Atlanta, July 22d, and later, while occupying the trenches, made a capture of two more of the enemy's soldiers. During a sharp engagement on August 28, Mr. Henness received two bullet shots through his hat, grazing his head, and though a close call no damage was done. After the surrender of Atlanta, Mr. Henness went with his command in Sherman's world-famous "march to the sea," which commenced about the middle of November and ended on December 21, by arrival at Savannah, Ga. After a long rest at this place, the veteran army again took up its line of march in February, 1865, through the Carolinas. In the battle of Bentonville, N. C, Mr. Henness received a gunshot wound in the muscle of the right arm, which disabled him for duty, but he marched right along with his regiment. At Goldsboro, the first news was received of those two momentous events, the surrender of Lee and the assassination of Lincoln. From that point, the march was continued on to Washington, where Mr. Henness took part in that event, never to be forgotten by a Union soldier, the grand review of the great armies before their final retirement to private life. The "muster out" and honorable discharge took place at Louisville, Ky., July 13, 1865, after which Mr. Henness came directly home. He enlisted as a private, filled all the intermediate positions, and quit the service with a commission as lieutenant. He married Sarah E., daughter of Levi and Nancy Cory, and located in Twin township, where Mr. Henness had charge of a toll gate and did teaming. After various removals to different places in the neighborhood, the family finally settled down on a place bought by Mr. Henness in Concord township. Mrs. Henness died in 1889 and the family, after remaining on the farm until November 1, 1900, removed to Frankfort. Mr. Henness was the first rural mail carrier in Ross county and is at present in charge of Route No. 1. His children, six in number, are, Charles M., died in infancy; Cora, wife of Lott Acton, of Concord township; Lulu (deceased) ; Edna, at home; Alpha McCoy and Anna, died in infancy. On May 18, 1902, Mr. Henness was married to Mrs. Frank Roberts, of East Liverpool, Columbia county. Quite a little romance is connected with this wedding. Mr. Henness became acquainted with his bride in 1865, after he came home from the war, having served in the same company with her father, W. W. Merrill, who at that time lived at East Monroe, and at whose home Mr. Henness visited for a short time. A strong friendship was formed at that time, but they drifted apart, married, and never saw each other again for thirty-six years, until 1901. In the meantime, however, their helpmates had died, and the friendship formed in early life was renewed and culminated in their marriage.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JAMES HENRY is a native of Union township, Ross county, born January 15, 1858. His parents were Robert and Julia (Merriman) Henry, the former of whom emigrated from Ireland when seventeen years old to come to Ross county, and settled on Big Walnut creek. Soon afterward he bought a small farm in Union township, where he lived while he worked at his trade of millwright. In 1859, he removed to Yellow Bud, in Ross county, where he died at the age of forty-eight For about eight years during the latter part of his life he held the office of justice of the peace. It was about the year 1840 that he married Julia Merriman, whose parents were among the first settlers of Ross county. They had ten children, of whom Nancy, Silas, Laura, Catherine and Mattie are numbered with the dead. Mary J. is the wife of Milton O. Watts, of Circleville; Emaline is married to Silas Watts, of. Union township; Robert is living in Hebron, Ohio; Lizzie is the survivor of twins, her sister Mattie having died. The mother died on April 3, 1890. James Henry, who was the fifth in birth of the children, has remained at home all his life. He was educated in the school at Yellow Bud and learned the carpenter's trade. On January 31, 1878, he was married at Chillicothe to Miss Kate Ebenhack, of Union township. This union resulted in the birth of four children, Charles, Silas, Elizabeth and Arthur. Mrs. Henry died on August 29, 1895.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

THOMAS HENSON, stock-dealer and meat merchant at Clarksburg, has divided his life and business between Ross and Pickaway and is well known in both counties. His ancestors were Virginians, the first of them to become Ohio settlers being Charles Henson and wife, who came down the great river in the early part of the nineteenth century and found a home in Pickaway county. Their eldest son, James, whom they brought from Virginia, grew to manhood in Pickaway county and worked on farms for monthly wages as a means of livelihood. While thus engaged he married one of the neighborhood girls, named Julia McKinney, with whom he located on a farm near Williamsport and there spent the next twenty years. At the end of that time he took charge of a hotel in Williamsport, which he conducted until the time of his death, his wife then purchasing a small farm near town to which she removed and spent the remainder of her days. Of their twelve children, George P., Lettie, Henry, Clinton and Charles have passed away. Those living are Nancy and John, of Columbus; Thomas, subject of this sketch; Frank, of Williamsport; Millard and Oliver (twins) of Pickaway county; and William, of Columbus. Thomas Henson, third of the children, was born in Pickaway county, Ohio, near Williamsport, November 5, 1844. In early manhood he married Mary Wiley and conducted the hotel in Williamsport for two years, after which he was engaged for twenty years in general merchandising. By his .first marriage he had five children, of whom only Frederick and Thomas C. are living. Mr. Henson's second wife was Missouri Ater, and after this marriage he located on a farm where he spent five years, then removed to Clarksburg, in Deerfield township. Since then his business has been buying and selling stock, conducting a meat market at Clarksburg in Ross and New Holland in Pickaway county and managing his farm. Mr. Henson is a member of the Christian church and of Clarksburg lodge, No. 721, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Missouri Ater, Mr. Henson's present wife, belongs to a famous family well deserving of more than a passing notice. The progenitors came from Germany and settled in various eastern states during the eighteenth century. George Ater, founder of the Ohio branch of the family, married Mary Boyer, located in Virginia near the Potomac river, and reared a family of seven sons and two daughters. About 1799 he left Virginia with his nine children, crossing the mountains to the Ohio river and descending that stream to the mouth of the Scioto. Going up to Chillicothe, these immigrants later found their way up Deer creek and took possession of an Indian village near what is described in the legend as a "round prairie." There George Ater reared his family and eventually a considerable settlement of pioneers grew up around the place. The names of his sons were Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Samuel, Thomas, Jones and William, all of whom subsequently served in the war of 1812 and received from the government land warrants which they located in Deerfield township of Ross county. Abraham, eldest of these sons, was born January 22, 1776, and married Charity Eveland April 3, 1799, the same year he came to Ross county. Among their children was a son named David, who married Mary A. Harrington, and these were the parents of Missouri Ater Henson.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

CHAUNCEY A. HERTENSTEIN, lumber merchant, of Chillicothe, was born near that city on a farm in Green township, on January 15, 1874. His parents, both of whom are still living, are George and Matilda (Stauffer) Hertenstein, the former a native of Germany, while the mother was born in Ohio. They were married in Ross county, which has been the scene of all the events of their lives, the father being a well-to-do farmer and possessor of extensive properly interests; while their two sons, Wesley and Chauncey A., are partners in the lumber business. Chauncey A. Hertenstein was reared to manhood on the parental farm in Green township and educated in the public schools, supplemented by a course in the Chillicothe business college. In March, 1900, he and his brother Wesley started in business together, handling all kinds of building material, and they have already established a fine trade. March 14, 1896, Mr. Hertenstein was married to Margaret Herrnstein, daughter of George J. Herrnstein, formerly a lumber merchant in Chillicothe, now retired from active business. Her mother was Catherine Brehm, who, like her husband, was of Ohio birth and is still living. Mr. Hertenstein is a member of the recently organized fraternity called the Knights of the Ancient Essenic Order, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

EDWARD LANDOLIN HESS, for twenty-two consecutive years the efficient and popular manager of the telephone company at Chillicothe, is a native Ohioan of German parentage. His father, Landolin Hess, was born in Germany, June 28, 1819, and in early manhood joined the tide of emigration to America- On arriving in the United States he selected Chillicothe as his abode and there spent the remainder of his days engaged in working at his trade as cabinetmaker. In September, 1846, he was married to Mary Anna, daughter of Christian and Elizabeth Lind, natives of Germany who came over in 1836 and two years later settled at Chillicothe. Mr. Hess died in 1864, but his widow and seven children survive. Of the latter, Mary Ann, the widow of Joseph Brosemer, resides in Columbus, Ohio; Elizabeth, wife of John Schroth, and Christian live in Chillicothe; Jacob F. is a citizen of Cincinnati, while Margaret S. and Peter G. reside in Brooklyn, New York. Edward Landolin Hess, fourth in age of the living children, was born in Chillicothe June 8, 1858. He obtained a common school education and in 1880 entered the employment of the Central Ohio Telephone company as acting manager of their interests at Chillicothe. From that day to this Mr. Hess has held this position regardless of changes in ownership which have converted the old organization into the Central Union Telephone company. Nor is it too much to say that during all these years he has so discharged his duties as to retain the full confidence of his different employers and gain the good will of the company's numerous patrons. He has so thoroughly mastered all the details of the telephone business and become so well known to the public who patronize the instruments that he has become a valuable man in his position. Mr. Hess has his nation's fondness for fraternal fellowship and gratifies it by membership in various associations, including the Modern Woodmen of America, Catholic Order of Foresters and Benevolent Order of Ignatius. January 9, 1883, he was married to Josephine, daughter of Charles Rudmann, who came to Ross county in 1852. This union resulted in the birth of three children: Olandolin Ernest, Petronella Mary and Paul Edward.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JACKSON HESTER was born in Buckskin township, Ross county, January 28, 1844, son of Charles M. and Mary (Christian) Hester, the former a native of Buckskin township in 1810. The father and mother of Charles M. Hester were Pennsylvanians, who came to Ohio at a very early period, first settling at Chillicothe and then removing to Buckskin township. The father, Henry Hester, served through the war of 1812 and bore his share of all the pioneer hardships in the West. Charles M. helped on the farm during summers and attended subscription school in the winter time. After marrying, he went to housekeeping on his own place, where he remained until 1850, when he sold out and bought the place where his son Jackson now resides. He was a farmer, but worked some at the carpenter's trade. Both himself and wife are now numbered among the dead. They had seven children in all, of whom three died in infancy, and Sarah Ann's death occurred after her marriage to James Grieves. The living children are Washington, Jackson and Lucinda, who is the wife of William Grieves. Jackson Hester received his education in the schools of the district, and was in his seventeenth year when the civil war broke out. On May 1, 1864, he enlisted at Chillicothe in Company I, One Hundred and Forty-ninth Ohio infantry, under command of Captain Rhodes. They were mustered in at Camp Dennison and sent from there to Baltimore, at which place and other points they did guard duty. They participated in the battles of Monocacy, near. Frederick, Md., on July 9, 1864, and in several smaller engagements. The command returned to Baltimore, went from there to Washington and back to Camp Dennison in September, 1864, where they were mustered out. Immediately thereafter, Mr. Hester went to his home and resumed his duties on the farm. In 1877, he married May Hixon, a native of Ross county of German descent. He continued to live and do business on the old home place of 250 acres which he inherited from his father. Besides general farming, Mr. Hester operates a sawmill and thresher. He is a member of Prater post, G. A. R., at Bourneville, and his political affiliations are Democratic. To Mr. and Mrs. Hester were born four children, whose names are Allen, Mary, Harley and Daisy, all at home and unmarried.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

TAYLOR HESTER, long connected with agricultural affairs in the township of Buckskin and Concord, is a descendant of early settlers in Ross county. As far back as 1804, Capt. Henry Hester migrated with his family from Pennsylvania to Ohio and located on land in Buckskin township. He was a millwright by trade and some time after arriving in Ross county concluded to remove to Chillicothe as a better point for obtaining business in his line. While resident there he was swept off by the cholera plague which devastated southern Ohio cities in 1832-33. Captain Hester was the father of three sons and one daughter, the latter of whom married and went to Indiana, while the others remained in Ross county and reared families. Zaccheus Hester, the oldest child, was born in Pennsylvania December 15. 1803, and hence was less than a year old when his parents reached Ross county. After arriving at maturity he was engaged mostly in farming, but also devoted considerable time to the management of a grist mill. May 26, 1826, he was married to Margaret Hixon, born July 19, 1808, and daughter of Timothy Hixon, a Virginian who was among the earliest arrivals in the county. Zaccheus Hester died July 19, 1878, and his wife September 24 of the same year. They were the parents of six sons and three daughters: Daniel, born October 4, 1827, and died March 23, 1883; Sarah, born April 25, 1830, and died December 2, 1893; Rebecca, born June 2, 1833, now the wife of Michael McGough of Ross county; Rose Ann, born August 25, 1835, now living in the West; Timothy, born August 21, 1840, and died March 11, 1866; John W., born July 1, 1844, lives in Jackson county, Ohio; William J. and Taylor (twins), born March 28, 1847, the former died June 11, 1870; Joseph A., born November 23, 1849, now living in Ross county. Taylor Hester, who with his twin brother, was the seventh born of the children, was born in Buckskin township, Ross county, Ohio, March 28, 1847. His adult life has been spent as a farmer in Buckskin township, where he lived until 1897, and after that in Concord township, which is the place of his present residence. He was sixteen years old when John Morgan made his famous raid through Ohio, but took his gun like the older men and volunteered to help repulse the invader. November 25, 1869, Mr. Hester was married to Margaret, daughter of John and Lydia (Ross) Cadwallader, the former a native of Wales and the latter a Virginian, who came to Ross county with the first rush of settlers. Of the two children resulting from this union, Lucy Bell became the wife of M. T. Devine of Frankfort, and Charles Hester, the eldest, who is a farmer by occupation, was married January 1, 1902, to Ada Andrew of Greene county, Ohio. The father is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and also connected with the Masonic fraternity.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JOHN W. HICKEL, one of the younger generation of Ross county farms, is a worthy citizen of Concord township. The founder of the Ross county branch of the family was an old Virginian by the name of George Hickel, who early learned and all his life pursued the honorable and useful trade of shoemaking. He married in his native state and soon after joined the great tide which was moving westward in search of new homes. He located in Colerain township and there resumed his trade as shoemaker, from the proceeds of which he supported his family in comfortable style for those days until his death. Of his six children, the only ones living are Martin, who resides in Concord township, and Catherine, the wife of H. Goldsberry of Deerfield township; the names of the dead are Jacob, Betsey, Christopher and Devault. The last mentioned remained at home until he reached manhood when, in connection with one of the brothers, he rented a farm in Concord township which they cultivated together and shared equally in the proceeds. In due time his thoughts turned to matrimony and as a helpmeet he selected Lucinda Goldsberry, of Ohio, taking his bride home to the farm where he had been living and which he had recently purchased. Devault Hickel was an industrious and progressive farmer, while his wife was a prudent and saving housekeeper, so between them they established a comfortable home and obtained a fair measure of success on their farm. They reared and provided well for ten children, all of whom are living except Etta M., the latest born. The names and locations of the others are as follows: Mary, wife of Leopold Dinkier of Deerfield township; Margaret, at the old home place; Laura, now Mrs. Preston Via of Virginia; John W.; Anna, married to William Seitz of Concord township; Alice, wife of Allison Hyer of Concord; Jennie, married to Samuel Gregory of Union township; William and Amanda at the old homestead. The father died in 1893 and the mother in 1894. John W. Hickel, fourth in the list of children, was born near Frankfort, Ross county, October 11, 1857. He grew up on his father's farm and was trained to habits of industry while acquiring a knowledge of all the details of farming, under the excellent supervision of his paternal instructor. Mr. Hickel remained at the old homestead until the time of his marriage to Minnie M. Keller, of Chillicothe, which occurred July 29, 18.97. Immediately after this event, the newly wedded couple went to live at the place which has since been their residence, and where Mr. Hickel carries on general farming and stockraising.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

CHARLES D. HIGBY was born in Richmond Dale, Ross county, in 1843, son of the late Sylvester N. Higby, one of the most prosperous and influential farmers of Franklin township. The latter was a native of Jefferson county, Ohio, born on September 19, 1819. Being left an orphan in extreme youth, he spent most of his boyhood with his sisters in Cleveland. After reaching maturity he embarked in the mercantile business at Richmond Dale and so continued for several years. Eventually he sold this business and located on a farm in Franklin township, which he managed until his death on December 31, 1885. He held various official positions, including school director, justice of the peace and treasurer of his township, fulfilling all their duties with scrupulous fidelity. November 10, 1842, he was married to Hannah, daughter of Charles and Elizabeth (Hayes) Davis, and by this union had seven children: Charles, subject of this sketch; Mary, the wife of Marcus Boggs; Julia, who died at the age of three years; Rose, wife of Ira Harris; Kizzie; Joseph, who married Jennie Foster; and Laura, wife of H. C. Downs. The mother of these children died on December 29, 1893, at her home in Higby, aged sixty-nine years and six months. Charles D. Higby, the first born of his parents, received his education in the common schools of Franklin township. He was approaching his eighteenth year, when tie great civil war commenced, and on November 20, 1861, he became a soldier of the Union. He cast his lot with Company F, of the Fifty-third Ohio infantry, going in as a private, soon being made a corporal, then sergeant and eventually becoming quartermaster sergeant, which position he held when mustered out on August 25, 1865. Mr. Higby participated in all the fighting and marching of his regiment from Shiloh to Bentonville, N. C, where the great drama practically closed. Among the more notable of the battles in which he took part with his command may be mentioned Pittsburg Landing, Corinth, La Grange and Moscow (Term.), Holly Springs and Wallace Mills (Miss.), besides many minor skirmishes and severe engagements. On June 17, 1864, he was wounded at Kenesaw mountain by a gunshot in the ankle, which injury kept him out of the service about sixty days. After his return from the war, he engaged in farming in Franklin township, which business has absorbed most of his attention ever since. From 1882 to 1885 he served as traveling deputy collector of internal revenue. He has occupied several small township offices, including that of treasurer, which he has held «for the past sixteen years. He has also been postmaster at Higby since 1886, a position which his father held for several years prior to that time.  Since 1880, in addition to his other business affairs, he has conducted a general store at Higby. In 1872, Mr. Higby was married to Mary L. Crow, of Jefferson township, and they have five living children: Hattie D., now Mrs. Hiram A. Smith of Waverly, Ohio; Mamie B., Hannah D., Charles D. and James O. Mr. Higby has extensive fraternal connections, including the Mystic Circle, Odd Fellows and Free Masons, being a member of the Commandery in the last order. He belongs also to the patriotic organization of the Grand Army of the Republic and to the Methodist Episcopal church.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

EDGAR A. HIGBY, a progressive and prosperous farmer of Franklin township, is a member of a family connection long and favorably known in Ross county. They were represented in the pioneer settlement of the county and through all the stages of its history have been identified with its social, commercial and business development. Their talents and industry have been mostly felt in agriculture, nearly all of them being farmers and landowners. John W. and Sarah M. (Norton) Higby were the parents of Edgar A., whose birth occurred in Bourneville, Ohio, February 14, 1862. Unusual care was bestowed upon his early, education. Besides the ordinary course in the common schools, he was sent to a private and select school at Richmond Dale, which was followed by a term in the academy at Gambier, Knox county. In addition to all this, Mr. Higby entered the commercial college of A. D. Wilt at Dayton, O., where he was graduated in 1883. Since leaving school he has devoted his attention entirely to farming and has met with gratifying success in all of his operations. He has charge of 284 acres of land, which he cultivates by up-to-date methods, the general farming being supplemented by profitable stock-raising. Mr. Higby is well informed in agricultural matters and aims to keep thoroughly posted concerning the latest improvements and discoveries in that great industry. He is a Republican in politics but contents himself with voting and wastes no time running after office. January 23, 1895, he was married to Luella J. Davis, of Richmond Dale, daughter of Ambrose Davis, a well-to-do farmer of Jefferson township. They have one son, Earl Norton, born February 14, 1896.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JOSEPH H. HIGBY is a native of Franklin township, Ross county, born December 14, 1857. His parents were Sylvester N. and Hannah (Davis) Higby, the former born in Jefferson county, Ohio, September 19, 1819. Mrs. Higby, born in 1824, was the daughter of Charles and Elizabeth (Hayes) Davis, who settled in Franklin township at an early period and there spent the most of their married life. The father died in 1837, and the mother subsequently married Horace Crookham, with whom she lived until her death in 1865. Sylvester Higby and wife had seven children, of whom Joseph H. was sixth in order of birth. The father died on December 31, 1885, leaving a fine estate comprising several hundred acres of land. His life was one of useful activity and his success the result of unwearied industry directed by sound judgment. He held the offices of township treasurer, school director and justice of the peace. He was an Odd Fellow and Mason of the 32d degree. His wife survived him about eight years, dying on December 29, 1893, at her home in Higby, aged over 69 years. Their son Joseph H. was educated in the common schools of his native county and spent four years at the Wesleyan university at Delaware, Ohio. After leaving school he worked as civil engineer on various, railroads for about three years. In 1882, he settled down to farming near the old homestead and has ever since followed this pursuit. August 3, 1892, Mr. Higby was married to Jennie E., daughter of John C. Foster, of Franklin township. Mrs. Higby's father is descended from one of the earliest of Ross county's settlers, has always lived in Franklin township and became one of its most prosperous farmers, owning between 500 and 600 acres of land. He married Mary E. Foster, of Pike county, by whom he had seven children.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

APOLLO HILL of Ross county was born in Mason county, W. Va., on August 17, 1857. He is the son of Jonathan Hill, a West Virginia farmer, who married Maria Stephens about the year 1852, and by her had ten children, of whom three died in infancy. The others are Rankin J., Apollo, Linza, Byrd, Laura M., David and Oma. The fourth child, Byrd Hill, lives at Point Pleasant and is now a state senator of West Virginia. The father died on March 19, 1881, but the mother still fives on the old home place. Apollo was educated in the common schools of his native state and remained at home until mature manhood. While visiting in Ross county, Ohio, he met Miss Kate Baum, and their acquaintance resulted in marriage on March 22, 1883. This lady is a daughter of George Baum, who came from Pickaway to Ross county some time in the 1840's. After marriage, Mr. Hill took his bride to the West Virginia home and settled down to housekeeping in Mason county. After six years spent in this place, a removal was made to Meigs county, Ohio, and this, at the end of two years' sojourn, was followed by another change which took them to Ross county. There they found a permanent abode, where Mr. Hill has ever since been engaged in general farming and stock-raising. They have a family of three children, Howard, Davie and Laura C, all of whom are at home.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JOHN C. HINTON, one of Ross county's substantial farmers, is the son and grandson of pioneers and may be considered one himself, as Ohio was still quite a young state at the time of his birth. His grandfather, Thomas Hinton, supposed to have been from Maryland, came into Ohio by way of Kentucky and settled in Colerain township with his wife Deborah and children. The family records do not give exact dates, but these pioneers came during the last quarter of the eighteenth century, when the country was still full of wild animals and wilder Indians. Thomas Hinton entered a half section of land for a company and kept 109 acres for himself, which have ever since, been retained by his descendants. He cleared a patch built a cabin and subsisted for several years after the manner of those days, gradually improving his land until he had a fairly good farm on which he spent the remainder of his days. The youngest member of the family was named Elias, and was only two years old when his parents arrived in Colerain township. He grew up like other pioneer children amid scenes of wild splendor, learning habits of hardihood and endurance, became a great hunter, served for a while as a teamster during the war of 1812, and in after life held various offices, including those of justice of the peace and township trustee. He was a good business man and accumulated considerable property during his long life, being supposed to be about eighty-three years old at the time of his death. In early manhood he married Susanna Cox, member of one. of the neighboring pioneer families, and by her had a family of eight children, of whom the only ones now living are Andrew and John C. Hinton. The latter was born in Colerain township June 10, 1824, and was reared in the log cabin built by his grandfather. He grew up on the farm, was trained to hard work, remained at home until he was twenty-one years of age and then decided to take a wife. The lady of his choice was Hannah Leasure and to her he was united in matrimony in the year 1845. Mr. Hinton is fond of telling that he only had one dollar at the time of his marriage and this he gave to the preacher for performing the ceremony. But he settled down to hard work and soon had, not only a good home, but a surplus property which he has continued to add to during life until he finds himself in very comfortable circumstances, owning.257 acres of land well stocked and improved. Mr. Hinton has lived at his present place since 1846, during which time he has been steadily engaged in general farming and stock-raising, meeting with unusual success in his operations. Though Democratic in his politics, he leaves the office-seeking business to others, contenting himself with the discharge of his duties as a voter, and the only official position he has held is that of township trustee, which he filled about ten years. Like the Hebrew patriarchs of old, Mr. Hinton has been blessed with a large family of children, his first marriage resulting in twelve: Lucretia, Andrew, Mary, Elias, Jesse, Susanna, Lewis, Mergeline, Cyrus J., Edward, Willard and George. Three of this number, Lucretia, Mary and Susan are dead. The mother died in March, 1879, and in April, 1881, Mr. Hinton married Mahala Wilson, a Ross county lady, by whom he has five children: Mazie, Carrie, Ira, Myrtie and Alma. Both himself and wife are devout members of the United Brethren church, in which he has long been a prominent and enthusiastic worker. In fact, Mr. Hinton has belonged to this church for sixty years, during which time he has worthily filled its official positions of various kinds, such as class leader, steward and trustee.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JOHN HIRE was born in Concord township, Ross county, in 1835. Both his father and his grandfather were named Michael and both were Virginians by birth. The grandsire and wife joined the procession which was wending its way to the west in search of homes; arrived in Ross county early in the nineteenth century, and selected Concord township as the place of their future abode. He secured land, the clearing and cultivating of which was the arduous occupation of all his working days. With him from Virginia came his son Michael, a small boy at that time, and after the arrival in Ohio other children were born, including nine altogether. The junior Michael grew to manhood in Ross county and followed in the footsteps of his father as a life-long farmer. He selected as his wife Mary, daughter of Abraham Roseboom, an old resident of Ross county. From this union came seven children, of whom only three are now living. These are John, Mary (wife of James Lockard of Concord township), and Abraham. John, the oldest of these children, became a farmer as soon as he had finished his schooling, and his operations have been confined to Ross county, with the exception of three years spent in the neighboring county of Pickaway. During the year 1864 he helped to fight off Morgan during the raid of that famous guerrilla chieftain into Ohio. He was married in 1858 to Mary Catherine, daughter of Henry Arnold, of Pickaway county. They have four children, of whom Eva Ann and Charles Alva, the oldest and youngest, are dead; Luella is the wife of Charles Sturgeon, of Concord township; and Benjamin is a resident of Pickaway county. Mr. Hire is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

ALEXANDER L. HODSDEN is a native of Delaware county, Ohio, born October 9, 1826. His father, Stephen Hodsden, of New York state, came to Ohio at an early period and settled in Ross county; taught school for a while, and, after his marriage to Mary Junk, was presented by the latter's father with about 100 acres of land in Delaware county, to which he removed with his wife. The latter being ill with consumption, it was deemed best to bring her back to Ross county in order that she might have the care of her parents, but she died at the old home in April, 1831. She left two children, of whom James M. was killed at the battle of Stone River and Alexander is the subject of this sketch. By a second marriage of the father, there were four children, of whom Emeline is dead, Steven and Josephine live in Porter county, Ind., and Clinton was killed at Kenesaw Mountain. Meantime the  father had removed to the state of Indiana and was residing there at the time of his death. Alexander was taken by his grandparents after his mother's death, and continued to live with them until he was twenty-six years old. On February 1, 1853, he was married to Maria Augustus and settled with his bride on a farm which he had purchased during the previous year. This place, consisting of 201 acres, contained at the time an old log house with two rooms and a slab floor, into which the newly married couple moved and commenced housekeeping. Later on, as prosperity visited them, the shabby cabin gave place to a comfortable frame house and the farm was from time to time supplied with all necessary improvements. In those days it was not so easy to obtain a good education as it is now, and Mr. Hodsden had few advantages of this kind in early life. Later on, at his own expense, he paid. tuition to obtain the benefit of special lessons. During the civil war he had a rather interesting military experience. In 1863, a company was organized in Union township which was called the Home Guards, and of this Mr. Hodsden became a member. This company was later attached to the Ohio National Guards, including the Twenty-seventh regiment from Ross county and the Fifty-fifth battalion from Clinton county. These troops were levied for what was called the hundred days' service and were intended for guards at various important points on the railroads and as reliefs for the regulars in the field. After the Ohio command was mobilized at Camp Dennison, in May, 1864, they were ordered to Maryland, where they were assigned to guard duty at different places. The "hundred day men," as they were called, had rather spirited expediences during the campaigns of 1864 in the valley of Virginia, Maryland and along the line of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. It was in June of that year that General " Jube" Early commenced his famous march "on to Washington." The "hundred day men" were posted at various points on the railroad north of Martinsburg, and when Early's vanguard approached, consisting of McCausland's cavalry, there were numerous brushes between these forces at the block-houses. Finally, when Early's army reached Frederick, Md., a force of 4,500 Union troops confronted him at what is known as Monocacy Junction hard by the city. Among these troops was the command to which Mr. Hodsden belonged, and on the 9th of July, 1864, they took part in the severe battle fought between the forces of Early and General Lew Wallace. . Later, the "hundred day men" were in Virginia, where they had a brush with Guerrilla Mosby at Berryville on the 14th of August. Mr. Hodsden's regiment returned to Ohio and was mustered out on August 30, 1864, their term of enlistment having expired. They did valuable service for the Union cause during their brief but adventurous experiences in the East. After the war, Mr. Hodsden resumed his work of farming and stock-raising. On April 20, 1901, he lost his wife by death. This estimable lady was the mother of ten children, of whom James M., Elizabeth and Missouri have passed away. Mary is the wife of Benjamin F. Willis, of Kansas; Josephine and Thomas J. are at home; Augustus lives in Columbus, William F. in Nebraska, John A. and Stephen in Chillicothe. Mr. Hodsden has been a member of the school board, road supervisor, and was for some time an active member of the Grand Army of the Republic. He has been a member of the Presbyterian church for about fifty years. Though now seventy-five years old, he has the appearance and vigor of a much younger man.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

CHARLES HOYT, M. D., of Chillicothe, is a native of the Dominion of Canada, born January 20, 1854.  Both father and grandfather were named Nason and they were New Englanders by birth, the earlier ancestors of the family having emigrated from England to this country in 1635.  Nason Hoyt, the Doctor's father, was a farmer by occupation, who removed from N. Y., where he passed the remainder of his days and died at the age of sixty-eight.  He married Susan Webster, of New Hampshire, and during the many subsequent years they lived together they were always highly esteemed as devout church members and worthy citizens in all respects.  Dr. Charles Hoyt was the youngest of their eleven children.  He finished the course prescribed in the schools of Chautauqua county, N. Y.., and then engaged in teaching, occupying his leisure hours in the study of medicine.  Subsequently, he went to Cincinnati and entered the Pulte Medical college, where he pursued the regular course.  In due time he was graduated from this institution and formed a partnership with his brother, Dr. William Hoyt, for the practice of medicine at Hillsboro, Ohio.  In the spring of 1880, he removed to Chillicothe, where he has since resided and practiced alone.  Dr. Hoyt has collected a choice library of standard works embracing the greatest of the medical writers at all periods, and he is a diligent student of the learning therein contained.  He allows nothing to pass which promises improvement in his professional knowledge or is calculated to keep him abreast of the times in modern discoveries.  He is a member of the American Institute of Homeopathy, of the International Hahnemannian association and the Ohio State Medical society.  He has been president of the Chillicothe Board of Trade and prominently identified with the business interests of the city, and is now president of the Merchants' association in Chillicothe, and president of the Chillicothe & Hillsboro Traction company, a scheme for the union of two towns by an electric railway system.  Dr. Hoyt is a member of and active worker in the various divisions of the Masonic order in Chillicothe.  September 6, 1883, he was married to Helen E. Will, a native of McArthur, Ohio.  The results of this union have been two children, whose names are Loy and Donald.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JOHN M. HOUSER, of Ross county, Ohio, is a native of Loudoun county, Va., where he was born about thirty miles from Washington City, on January 18, 1816. He was the son of Michael Houser, born in 1760, and grandson of Abraham Houser, who came from Germany and settled in Virginia in 1758. There was a legend that Abraham had been king of a small province in the old country, but however this may be, he devoted himself to farming after reaching the soil of the Old Dominion. He married a Miss Minear, by whom he had eleven children, and died in Virginia in 1806. All of these children are long since dead and even the names of some are now forgotten by the family. Michael, the oldest of the children, was married in Virginia in January, 1788, to Amy Tenant, by whom he had twelve children. In 1817, accompanied by a brother, he came to Ohio and settled near Bourneville. Six of his children died in infancy, others reached maturity, but the only one now surviving is John M., the subject of this sketch. The father farmed after he reached Ross county and died in March, 1818, his wife passing away in the same year. After the death of his parents, John M. Houser, then an infant two years old, was taken in charge by his sister, who cared, for him until he reached the age of sixteen. He learned the blacksmith trade which he made a means of livelihood for many years afterward. In connection with this, however, he carried on farming in a limited way and between the two met with a reasonable share of success. August 26, 1841, Mr. Houser was married to Alethe Henry, and they settled down in Lattasville, which was their home for forty-eight years. Of their four children, William R. and Hugh H. are dead; Carrie is the wife of Capt. Caleb Core and John L. is a resident of Illinois. Mr. Houser is a Republican in politics and a member of the Presbyterian church. His wife died on March 25, 1889, since which time he has been living with his son and daughter.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

HARRY G. HOWARD, a popular and promising young attorney of Chillicothe, comes of old English stock long located in Ross county. James Howard, founder of the Ohio branch of the family, was an Englishman by birth who emigrated to Virginia, and after some years spent in that state became a settler of Ohio in 1808. He established himself in Ross county as a manufacturer of spinning-wheels, an article of prime necessity in those pioneer days, and made a good living out of this useful occupation. He became a man of some prominence in his community, held the position of township trustee, and died in 1863, leaving several children. Among the latter was a son named John, born at Chillicothe, in December, 1821. He grew up in his native city, learned the saddler's trade, followed the same until some time during the civil war, then went into the undertaking business and continued that until 1892. In that year he retired permanently from business, and with his wife, who was a Miss Liet of New York state, is leading a quiet life in Chillicothe. He has four children: Charles H.; Horace, of Tucson, Ari.; John, of Chillicothe, and James W., of Cleveland. Charles H. Howard was born in Chillicothe, May 18, 1848. When a young man he became a railroad employee and rose to the position of division superintendent on the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. In 1897, he removed to Cincinnati, where he has since resided. In 1871 he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Charles Aid, an old resident of Chillicothe. She died in 1900,. leaving two children, Harry G., and Edna, wife of William T. Tibbits, of Chicago. Harry G. Howard was born in Chillicothe, January 11, 1875, grew up to manhood in his native city and was graduated in the city high school with the class of 1893. Shortly thereafter he became a student in the office of Hon. Albert Douglass of Chillicothe for the purpose of familiarizing himself with the law. Subsequently he matriculated at the Cincinnati Law school and after a two years' course in that institution received his diploma with the class of 1896. Without delay he entered upon the practice of his profession in Chillicothe and has continued the same to the present time with fine promise of future success and a brilliant career. Mr. Howard is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and secretary of the lodge in Chillicothe.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

O. M. HOWSER, principal promoter of the Chillicothe, Mt. Sterling & Columbus electric line, and long prominent in business circles of Ross county, comes of strong and sturdy ancestral stock. There is no better blood in the world than that known as Holland Dutch, and it was a pair of these liberty-loving people who originated the Howser family in Virginia, through which offshoots' have come to other states of the Union. William Howser, son of these immigrants, was born in Loudoun county, Va., in 1809. His father dying when he was quite young, he was taken in charge by his uncle Christopher Howser, who reared him with affectionate care and looked after his early education. William attended school at Leesburg, the principal town in Loudoun county, and one of his classmates was Robert E. Lee, who afterward became so celebrated as the commander of the army of Northern Virginia. After leaving school, William made himself master of the shoemaker's trade and thus equipped joined the army of "movers" who were then seeking homes in the West. He settled at Lancaster, O., and soon thereafter married Naomi Warfield, Ohio born of Irish descent, with whom he went to housekeeping and prosecuted his trade as a means of support. After several years at this place a removal was made to Concord township in Ross county, where the head of the family continued his calling as a shoemaker. In 1857, still another move was made, this time to Pickaway county, where shoemaking was temporarily abandoned for management of a farm, which continued for two years, when the father permanently located at Clarksburg, Ross county. He lived to the advanced age of eighty-six years, but up to some eight or ten years before his death he continued to work at his shoemaker's trade, showing his old industrious habits to the last. Though considerably younger than he, his wife died eighteen years before him. This worthy couple became the parents of nine children. Christie A., wife of Josiah Henness, of Greenfield; Margaret J., married to Charles Brown of Clarksburg; Elizabeth E., wife of George W. Farlow, Clarksburg; Rosa (deceased) ; William R., died in the Andersonville prison in 1863; O. M., subject of this sketch; Jennie, wife of J. M. Boven of Clarksburg; Mary A., of Greenfield. O. M. Howser was born in Ross county, Ohio, near Frankfort, June 3, 1847, finished the school course at Clarksburg and afterward studied law with Judge Safford in Chillicothe. Deciding, however, not to follow a professional life, he turned his attention to commercial pursuits as more congenial to his tastes. For seventeen years he was engaged in the boot and shoe business, after which he traveled two years for the Hocking Valley manufacturing company, of Lancaster. Mr. Howser is one of the principal promoters of the Chillicothe, Mt. Sterling and Columbus Electric railway line, being vice-president and director of the company. He has held the office of justice of the peace for thirteen years continuously and does considerable real estate business. He is quite prominent in Freemasonry, holding membership in Heber lodge, No. 501, at Williamsport, and Chapter No. 4 and Commandery No. 8, of Chillicothe. He also belongs to Odd Fellows lodge, No. 721, at Clarksburg, and in all the affairs of his fraternities is attentive and active. He was married October 18, 1876, to Hannah Wilkins, born and bred in Deerfield township, with whom he has since lived most happily at Clarksburg.  They have five children: William M., Ellen T., Jeanette, Delia and Ward. The family attend the Christian church.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JOHN J. HUGHES, who farms a handsome body of land in the eastern part of Scioto township, is one of the representatives farmers of Ross county.  He is of Virginia parentage immediately, but farther back owes his origin to England.  From that country, some time during the eighteenth century, came John Hughes and two brothers, who purchased large tracts of land in Virginia and became men of importance in their day.  John married Mary Jeans and reared a family of seen children:  John, James, Livingston, William, Betsy, Mary and Eliza.  John, the eldest of these, was born in Albermarle county, Va., in 1812.  He remained at home until his eighteenth year, after which he resided some time with an uncle and then went to Alabama, where he was employed as an overseer.  This continued for three years, followed by his return to Virginia and marriage to Elizabeth Proffit, with whom he settled on a farm in Nelson county and there spent the remainder of his days.  He had ten children, one of whom died in infancy, the others being John J., William, Alex, Robert, Jack, Henry, Anna, Lucy and Louisa, all of whom live in Nelson county with the exception of Henry, who is a resident of Augusta county.  John J. Hughes, eldest of these children, was born in Nelson county, Va., Dec. 25, 1847.  He remained with his parents until his twenty-first year, after which he spent a year in Kentucky doing day labor on a farm.  Returning to Virginia, he was married to Susan Sauls, July 25, 1872, began farming in his native county, and lived there until 1888.  In that year he came to Ross county and located on the farm in Scioto township which he has since managed with success.  The real estate which Mr. Hughes manages amounts to 300 acres of excellent land, which is cultivated by the most approved methods and kept in first class condition.  Mr. and Mrs. Hughes have ten children: Emma (living in Madison county), Betty, Nannie, Susie, Lucy, John, Wirt, Mack, Isaac and Dick.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

LUTHER B. HURST, treasurer of Ross county, is a native of the same, born on his father's farm May 28, 1869.  His parents were Gen. Samuel H. and Mary (Trimble) Hurst, the former being well known as a business man of Chillicothe and the present postmaster of that city, a soldier during the civil war, an ex-department commander to Ohio Grand Army of the Republic, and one of the leading politicians of his section.  Luther B. Hurst was educated in the public schools of Chillicothe, and remained with his father on the farm until he was twenty years old, when he entered the employment of the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern railway company.  He retained this position until November, 1894, when he resigned to accept the appointment as deputy treasurer.  Within three years after entering the office, he was himself elected treasurer of Ross county by a majority of 769, leading the entire Republican ticket in that county.  He was a member of the Ohio National Guard from July 3, 1892, until the company was mustered into National service, at the beginning of the war with Spain, when Mr. Hurst became a member of the Seventh Ohio volunteer infantry and was commissioned first lieutenant of Company H.  His experience as a business man led to his appointment, and the ability for the service which he displayed resulted in his promotion to the post of ordnance officer of the regiment.  He was mustered out with his regiment at Columbus in November, 1898.  In 1899, Lieutenant Hurst was again elected treasurer of Ross county and he is now serving his second term.  He is popular and successful in business affairs as he is in war and politics.  He is one of the principal stockholders of the National Wagon company of Chillicothe, of which he is secretary and a director.  In April, 1889, he was married to Caroline R. Wolf, a native of Chillicothe and daughter of George L. Wolf, deceased a prominent citizen who filled various responsible positions in the county.  Mr and Mrs. Hurst have two children, Ruth Mildred adn Arthur Trimble.  Mr. Hurst is prominent in Masonry, being a Knight Templar, and is a member of Chillicothe lodge, No 52, of the Order of Elks.  He and wife are members of the Walnut Street church of Chillicothe.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902    

GENERAL SAMUEL H. HURST,  a distinguished Union soldier and holder of many civic positions of high responsibility, is descended from one of the pioneer families of Ross county.  Among the army of immigrants westward bound during the early years of the nineteenth century was a young Marylander by the name of Levi Hurst.  He was born about 1770, learned the brick-mason’s trade in his youth, and about 1790 was married to Sophia Bradley, also a native of Maryland.  In 1800 he came to Ross county and settled in Chillicothe, and about a year after his arrival he purchased land in Union township to which he removed in 1801.  From that time on he followed farming as an occupation until his death, which occurred in 1857, his wife surviving until 1860.  They were the parents of ten children, all of whom grew to maturity: James, Maria, Hooper, William, Levi, Samuel, Thomas, Matilda, John N. and Sanford.  The latter died in early manhood but the others married and reared families.  James and Thomas went to Missouri, Samuel and William settled in Indiana, and Maria, who married William Fennimore, also became a resident of the last mentioned state.  The others remained in Ross county and bore their full share in its subsequent development.  Hooper Hurst, third of the children in consecutive order, was born in Maryland in 1794, came with his parents to Ross county, there grew to manhood, and received such education as was afforded by the country schools of those days.  Being of frail constitution, he was unequal to the arduous farm work then in vogue and contributed his share towards the incipient civilization by performing the teacher’s task.  In early manhood he went to Scioto Salt Works, now Jackson, Ohio, and there met with and married Elizabeth James, a daughter of Maj. John James, proprietor of the Salt Works and a leading man in that vicinity, being a member of the Ohio legislature for several terms.  It was in 1818 that his marriage took place and six years later he returned to Ross county with his wife, settled on a Union township farm and there remained until his death in 1848.  His wife survived him many years, her death not occurring until 1873.  Hooper and Elizabeth Hurst reared a family of five sons and five daughters, all of whom reached manhood and womanhood respectively.  Their names, in order of birth, were Julia, Nancy, James, John R., Dennison, Samuel H., William F., Louise, Emily and Elizabeth.  Of these children four are still living in Ross county, including Mrs. Nancy Betts, John R., Samuel H. and Louise Abernathy.
     Samuel H. Hurst was born in Union township, Ross county, September 22, 1831.  After the usual educational routine in youth, he taught school a year or two and then entered the Ohio Wesleyan university, where he was graduated with the class of 1854, working his own way through college.  After his graduation he resumed and continued for three years the occupation of teaching school.  At the same time he devoted all his leisure hours to reading elementary works on the subject of law with a view to preparing himself for practice of that profession.  During the winter of 1854-55 he was superintendent of schools at Jackson, Ohio, but continued his legal studies intermittently until his admission to the bar in 1858.  He entered earnestly into this new work, devoted himself assiduously to the practice, and was speedily rewarded with public recognition.  In 1859 he was elected city solicitor and this was followed in 1860 by election to the probate judgeship of Ross county.  This career, so auspiciously begun, was interrupted by the startling events of 1861.  A few months after the opening guns of the war were fired, Judge Hurst resigned his position on the bench and became captain of Company A, Seventy-third regiment Ohio volunteer infantry.  In June, 1862, he was promoted to the rank of major of this regiment; served as such until the spring of 1864, was then promoted to the lieutenant-colonelcy, and in June of the same year received a commission as colonel.  With this rank he commanded his regiment throughout the Atlanta campaign and Sherman’s immortal “march to the sea,” a military achievement which no soldier who participated in it will ever forget.  In March, 1865, Colonel Hurst was brevetted brigadier-general and he was mustered out in the latter part of July, lacking forty days of having served four years.  At the battle of New Hope Church Colonel Hurst was severely, and at first reported mortally, wounded by a gunshot in the head.  At the conclusion of hostilities, he returned to his farm in Union township and engaged in fruit-growing, a business for which he developed both taste and adaptability.  In 1869 he was appointed internal collector for his congressional district and served six years, still continuing his attention to fruit-growing, while residing at Chillicothe.  General Hurst has been especially prominent and efficient in all matters relating to agriculture, especially the horticultural branch of that great industry.  As a recognition of this fact, he was in 1886 appointed the first state dairy and food commissioner of Ohio and served eighteen months in that capacity, eventually resigning to accept the director-generalship of the Ohio Centennial exposition held at Columbus in 1888.  For six years he was a valuable member of the State board of agriculture, acting as the special representative of the horticultural industry, though proving in every way a potential friend of the farmer.  He was mayor of Chillicothe in 1861-2, and in January, 1900, was appointed postmaster of that city entering upon the duties of his office March 1, in the same year.  Jan. 1, 1867, General Hurst was married to Mary C. Trimble, a native of Kentucky, who died in 1875 leaving four children, three of whom are living:  Luther B., county treasurer of Ross county, Madge and Mary.  In 1876, General Hurst married Mrs. Frederika Hanby, of Chillicothe, by whom he has two children, Edith and Carl W., the latter a clerk in the postoffice.  General Hurst is a member of the Chillicothe post, Grand Army of the Republic, and a past department commander of the department of Ohio.  As a public speaker he is well known throughout the entire State.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 - Page 529

JAMES R. HURTT, deceased, was born in Deerfield township, Ross county, Nov. 3, 1825.  His father, Thomas Hurtt, was a native of Maryland who came to Ross county in 1806 and settled in Deerfield township.  Those were the pioneer days and most of the State of Ohio was then either but sparsely inhabited or still a wilderness.  Thomas Hurtt purchased 120 acres of land, on which he constructed a rude log house so common in those days, and there he and his family spent many years of their lives.  He married Tamsey Noble, who became the mother of one son, named Thomas, and died in giving him birth on Jan. 13, 1813.  Afterward he took a second wife, Anna Hood, which union resulted in five children, whose names are Nelson, John W., Louisa, James R., and Margaret.  Their mother having died  on Dec. 6, 1828, Mr. Hurtt was again married, to a Miss Whitton, to whom were born Jane, George  and Willis.  The father spent his life, up to the time of his death, in the same neighborhood where he had made his beginnings at his first entrance into the county.  James R. Hurtt, the subject of this sketch, was the fourth of his father's second family of children.  He attended school a while, but at the early age of ten was sent to Williamsport to learn the trade of a saddler.  He was so occupied until the age of eighteen, when he peddled clocks for a while and later was in the mercantile business at Clarksburg and Bier.  Jan. 30, 1849, he married Lavina D. Junk, a native of Ross county and member of one of the old families.  The result of this union was one child, who was born July 11, 1852, and died May 23, 1890.  After marrying, Mr. Hurtt bought 79 acres of land, to which he removed and later added various improvements.  About 1871 he sold that place and purchased the 120 acres on which he spent the remainder of his days.  An additional 100 acres was bought later, which was improved in various ways, including the erection of a substantial frame house.  Mr. Hurtt held the office of justice of the peace for about 15 years, also served as constable and held many minor positions of trust.  He was a republican in politics a member of the Pleasant Valley grange, and belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church.  He died May 29, 1897, since which time his widow, Mrs. Lavina Hurtt, has continued to manage the estate.  She is assisted in this work by her grandson, Emory Hurtt, who resides with her and looks after much of the outdoor business.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 - Page 531

 

 

JOHN E. HYER a representative of the younger element among Concord township farmers, comes of a family long settled in Ross county.  Far back in the pioneer days, a quartet of brothers named Hyer crossed the mountains of Virginia and made their way to Ross county about the same time.  William, one of these brothers, remained single and left no representative to perpetuate his name; Rude and Michael took wives and reared families; and Daniel, who located in Concord township, married twice.  By his first marriage, Daniel Hyer had three children: Elijah, Ellen and Fountain, and by his second marriage, to Polly Laninger, there were nine children: George, Frederick, Newton, Mary, Elizabeth, Martha, Julia, Nancy and Susan George Hyer, eldest of the second family of children, was born in Concord township and after reaching manhood adopted farming as an occupation, which he followed in Ross county until 1882 and then removed to Fayette county, where he at present resides.  In early manhood he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Abram and Sarah Arrowhead, old residents of Ross county.  Five children resulted from this union: Addison, a farmer in Fayette county; John E., subject of this sketch; Emma Ollie, wife of Charles Grimes, of Pickaway county; and Edgar, also of Pickaway.  John E. Hyer was born in Concord township, Ross county, Ohio, in 1862.  He received the usual education in the district schools and when he grew up entered into the business of farming, which has been his life-long occupation.  Oct. 16, 1887, he was married to Julia, daughter of Charles Dick, Pickaway county, by whom he has two children: Roy and Ivorene.  Mr. Hyer is a member of  the Knights of Pythias fraternity.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 - Page 531

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