OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

 

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ROSS COUNTY, OHIO

BIOGRAPHIES

The following biographies are extracted from:
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio
By Henry Holcomb Bennett
Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902
Source #2 - A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio
Vol. II.
Published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago & New York 1917

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JAMES E. ECKLE, a resident of Frankfort, is a native of Fayette county, Ohio, born Feb. 28, 1871.  His father was John Eckle, a native of Virginia, who came to Ohio in 1826 when a young man and settled in Ross county.  He afterwards removed to Fayette, but later returned to Ross county, in which he has since resided.  When the civil war commenced, he enlisted in the Seventy-first Ohio volunteer infantry, with which he served for three years.  His health was broken by his army service to such an extent that he never entirely recovered.  He married Mary Jane English, a native of Ross county, who died in 1874, leaving five children.  James, the youngest of these, is the subject of this sketch.  He was educated in the common schools of Ross county, and when he reached manhood commenced life as a farm hand and employee in a diary.  He followed this occupation until 1897, when he located in Frankfort and entered the livery business, which he still continues.  Mar. 4, 1897, Mr. Eckle was married to Essie McCollister, daughter of John McCollister¸ an old resident of Ross county.  They have an only child, whose name is John.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 454

SAMUEL EDGINGTON, veteran of the civil war and successful farmer, is descended from one of the pioneers who was identified with Ross county almost from the time of its organization.  His grandfather, John Edgington, came from his native state of Virginia as early as the year 1800 and located in Huntington township.  There he cleared land, built a house and reared a family.  His son Robert was born on this homestead place in 1811, and in due time became a farmer, which pursuit he followed throughout life.  His death occurred in 1862, just one year before that of his father, who survived until 1863.  Robert was the father of Samuel Edgington, whose birth took place in Huntington township in 1842.  He received the principal part of his education in the old Baptist school which was at that time one of the institutions of that locality.  Samuel had just reached the age of eighteen when the civil war cloud burst over the country with all its dire possibilities.  Like many other youth, both North and South, he hastened to take sides in what was to prove the event of all their lives.  Looking around for a congenial organization, young Edgington selected Company I, Eighty-first regiment Ohio infantry, in which he was duly enlisted.  The command was mustered in at Camp Dennison and saw its first service under Fremont in Missouri.  It was part of the mighty force which afterward joined in the great battle of Shiloh, or, it is often called, Pittsburg Landing.  Subsequently, Mr. Edgington took part of with his regiment in the Atlanta campaign and participated in the severe fighting before the city.  Mr. Edgington received his discharge from the army at Camp Chase, Ohio, in October, 1864.  In April, 1866, he was married to Jane Ralston, descendant of a family which dates its residence in Ross county from the latter part of the eighteenth century.  Her father, Robert Ralston was born in Huntington township in 1798 on a place settled by Benjamin Ralston, one of the earliest arrivals from Virginia.  Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Edgington have two children, of whom Robert remains with his father and Allan is farming in Ross county.  Since his retirement from the army, Mr. Edgington has devoted his life exclusively to agricultural pursuits, including the raising of stock and fruit.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 455

ALBERT L. ELLIS, superintendent of the city schools at Kingston, Ohio, was born in Vinton county, Ohio, Jan. 15, 1849.  His parents were Edward W. and Amanda (Crumbaker) Ellis, both natives of Muskingum county, Ohio.  The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood days on a farm, attending the district schools in season, and after acquiring an education sufficient to teach he took up that profession and taught his first term in 1869.  This he keep up for several years, teaching in the winter and attending school during his vacations.  He first entered the Ohio university at Athens, and later the National Normal university at Lebanon, and graduated in the scientific course from that institution in 1874.  He was then selected as superintendent of the Kingston schools and after successfully handling them for four years, he decided to return to his Alma Mater and complete the classical course in that excellent institution, graduating in 1880.  He was then selected as the superintendent of the Blanchester schools, where he remained four years, and in 1885 was again chosen as the superintendent of the Kingston schools, and it is creditable to note that he has been continued at their head ever since.  Under his able management the schools of Kingston are in excellent shape and rank as second to none in Ross county.  Mr. Ellis spends much of the time during his vacations, of late years, in managing his fine farm of 150 acres near Kingston.  This affords him much needed rest and recreation and invigorates him for his scholastic work.  On May 1, 1873, Mr. Ellis was married to Hattie M. Orr, daughter of Jeremiah and Maria (Kelley) Orr, old and respected residents of the vicinity of Chillicothe, where Mrs. Ellis was born Dec. 1, 1854, and where she was reared, attending the district schools, also the Chillicothe high school, and later the National Normal university at Lebanon.  After returning from Lebanon, she successfully taught for several years.  Mr. and Mrs. Ellis have had two children, Romney J., who died in infancy, and Albert Dane, born Oct. 2, 1889, and now a student in the Kingston schools.  Both Mr. Elis and wife are active members of the Methodist church, both are teachers in the Sunday schools and Mr. Ellis takes great interest in the Epworth League and its grand work.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, having attained the Knight Templar degree.  Mr. and Mrs. Ellis stand high socially and are classed among the first families of the county.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 455

  HUGH FRANCIS EGAN.  A native son of Ross County, Mr. Egan has for a great many years been known as a editor and newspaper publisher and has made himself and his paper valuable factors in the growth and development of the little city of Adelphi.  In addition to publishing and editing the Adelphi Border News, which is recognized as the home paper for a large number of subscribers not only in Ross but adjacent counties, he is owner, publisher and editor of the Ohio Red Man, the official organ of the Improved Order of Red Men in Ohio.  He also conducts an extensive job printing plant, and has one of the most completely furnished offices in Southern Ohio.
     Born in the City of Chillicothe, Aug. 24, 1856, Hughes Francis Egan is a son of Joseph and Sarah A. (Savage) Egan.  His parents were of humble Irish birth, and like many people who came from that country in the middle years of the last century they had to work hard for all they ever got or enjoyed.  The maternal grandfather of Mr. Egan was quite active in the early days in Chillicothe and held a number of commissions of trust.  The Egan family came by sailing vessel to America and settled in Chillicothe in 1850.  Joseph Egan, who was a native of Limerick, married Miss Sarah Savage in Chillicothe in 1852.  He was for several years a laborer and then became a gas plumber.  He was a man of but moderate education, but was industrious, careful and a man properly honored in his community.  He did his share toward maintaining his church, the Catholic, the parochial schools and other local institutions.  His death occurred at the age of eighty-four.  His wife, who was born in County Cork, Ireland, died in 1869 at the age of thirty-five.
     Hugh Francis Egan, who was one of a family of ten children, had to assume certain serious responsibilities connected with making his way in the world at an early age.  He attended both the parochial and public schools of Chillicothe, and at the age of fifteen entered the office of the old Advertiser to learn the trade of printer.  He remained in that office until 1883, and then removed his family to Adelphi and bought out the Adelphi Border News, a weekly paper which had been founded in 1879.  Mr. Egan confesses to many hard struggles and ups and downs in his early career as a newspaper man.  He finally gave to Adelphi a paper of which that community is proud.  It is a wide circulation not only in Ross County but in Pickaway, Hocking and Fairfield counties.
     In September, 1874, Mr. Egan married Sarah T. Bennett.  They have reared and educated eight children, five sons and three daughters.  All are married now.  The sons all learned the trade of printing with their father, and four of them are now working at the trade.  A brief record of these children is a follows:  Hugh B. Egan who was born in Chillicothe, is a printer by trade, and is married and lives in Columbus; Sarah, born in Chillicothe married, at Adelphi, Elgernon Flannigan, a farmer; Joseph Henry, who is a barber by trade and is married and living in Adelphi; Carolyn Egan, born in Chillicothe,  was married in Adelphi to Hugh L. Reedy, a clerk in the United States mail service, and they live in Columbus; George W., born at Adelphi, is married and lives in Columbus, where he is a salesman; Mary M., born at Adelphia, married William H. Barton, principal of the Adelphi schools; Edward, born in Adelphi, is a printer and is married; Robert, born at Adelphi, is also a printer.  All the children received their education in the public schools.
     Mr. Egan was reared in the faith of the Catholic Church.  While a resident of Chillicothe he was identified with several religious, civil and military organizations, and has always enjoyed the confidence of his fellow men in every position of life.  He served as mayor of Adelphi for twelve years and was clerk of the township board of education and board of trustees for twelve years, and was also for several years a councilman and member of the local board of education.  He was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Ross County Memorial Commission by appointment from James M. Cox, governor of Ohio, Sept. 4, 1914.  Through these positions, as editor of the leading paper, and as a private citizen, he has done much to build up and promote the welfare of his home locality.
     He is particularly well known not only in Ohio but throughout the country for his work in the Improved Order of Red Men.  He joined that order of June, 1895.  In 1897 he represented Corn Planter Tribe in the Great Council of Ohio and continued as representative until 1901.  He was then elected Great Junior Sagamore of the Great Council of Ohio, and in 1902 was elected Great Senior and in 1903 became Great Sachem.  That high post he filled with credit until May, 1904, when he presided over the Great Council at Mansfield.  He has also represented Ohio in the Supreme Great Council of the United States and in the national body has served on several important committees.  Mr. Egan has been a member of Adelphi Lodge of the Knights of Pythias for fifteen years, and formerly held membership in the Modern Woodmen of America.  At Adelphi he superintended the construction of the Knights of Pythias Fair and Carnival, and helped make the local lodge of Knights of Pythias highly successful.  
     Mr. Egan deserved much credit for the establishment of the Adelphi Banking Company, in which he has held the position of secretary to the board of directors since it was founded.  He has a beautiful modern home, and has also employed his taste and experience in supervising various public buildings at Adelphi, including the Opera House.  Though now in his sixtieth year, Mr. Egan is found at work from morning until night and when questioned on that matter he is disposed to ascribe to hard and constant work what measure of success he has attained in the world.
Source #2 - A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio - Vol. II. - Published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago & New York 1917 - Page 532

MARTIN ENDERLIN, trustee of Scioto township, is a contribution from Germany to the citizenship of Chillicothe.  His father, John Martin Enderlin, became involved in the revolutionary troubles of 1848 which resulted in a loss to Germany of many of its bravest men, like Carl Schurz, and the consequent benefit to the United States, as most of them sought refuge here.  The elder Enderlin went so far as to raise a company of soldiers for the revolutionary cause, but, as his side was unsuccessful, he was forced to flee and in 1852 made the ocean voyage to this country.  He located at Chillicothe, where in 1854 he was joined by his wife and eight children.  He trade was that of a tailor, which he followed in Chillicothe for several years in connection with the grocery and saloon business.  His death occurred July 16, 1897, his wife surviving him only a few months and dying November 18 of the same year.  Five of their children are living and three of them are residents of Chillicothe.  Augustus, the eldest of the sons, came over with his father in 1852 to avoid enforced military service in the German army, and died in this country July 1, 1860.  Martin Enderlin was born in Germany, July 10, 1841, and was brought to this country by his mother when thirteen years old.  As soon as he reached competent age he became an apprentice in the confectionery business and followed that for several years.  In 1861 he joined Company A, Twenty-second regiment Ohio volunteer infantry, with which he served during his term of enlistment.  After his discharge, Mr. Enderlin spent six months at Indianapolis and then went south, where he followed his occupation in various cities and states, from Kentucky to South Carolina.  While at Nashville he was engaged in the three days’ fight between Hood and Thomas.  In the latter part of 1865 he returned to Chillicothe, where he worked in a bakery for a year, subsequently spending a year each in Waverly and Jackson, Ohio, and finally settling at Chillicothe in the grocery business with his father.  In 1871, he lived a couple of months in the Canadian city of Montreal, but not liking the prospects returned to the United States and spent the subsequent eight years at Oil City, Pa.  Coming back to Chillicothe in 1879 he has since made his home in that city, engaged in various occupations.  In 1885, Mr. Enderlin was elected city marshal of Chillicothe.  He served one term in that office, and was also a member of the sanitary police force for three years.  Apr. 7, 1902, he was elected trustee of Scioto township on the Democratic ticket, receiving a majority of 283.  He was married at Nashville, Tenn., in 1865, to Jane Butler of that city, and of their six children five are living:  John, of Chillicothe; Mary, wife of James Tannehill, of Pittsburg; Lizzie, wife of James Shears, of Chillicothe; Ellen, married Edward Eddinger, of Chillicothe, and died Oct. 22, 1898; Richard and Barbara, residents of Pittsburg.  Mr. Enderlin is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 456

HEZEKIAH ENGLAND, for many years a farmer of Huntington township, is one of the little army of civil war veterans who did so much of Ross county’s glory in the days of the country’s need.  He was born in Hocking county, Ohio, Nov. 15, 1835; in childhood lost both of his parents by death, and when about twelve years of age came to Ross county to live with uncles in Huntington township.  Sept. 8, 1859, he was married to Deborah Cockerell and shortly after “set up housekeeping” on a small farm, by the cultivation of which he was making a living and doing fairly well at the outbreak of the civil war.  Aug. 13, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Company G, Eighty-ninth regiment Ohio volunteer infantry, which served fro awhile in West Virginia and shortly after the battle of Stone river was sent to re-enforce General Rosecrans at Nashville, Tenn., where it arrived Feb. 7, 1863.  From there it moved to Carthage, and shortly after joined Rosecrans’ main army at Murfreesboro.  It next joined in the movement against Bragg, at Tullahoma, and entered its first battle at Hoover’s Gap, where it had a taste of war at its worst.  A Chickamauga the Eighty-ninth was in the hottest of the fight and suffered severely in killed, wounded and prisoners.  During that fearful engagement, Mr. England was struck in the left ankle by a minie ball and received a wound which completely disabled him, in addition to which he was struck four times by balls which fortunately were spent.  HE lay on this field of carnage, surrounded by all its ghastly horrors, for eight days before he received medical attention.  He was first spent to the hospital at Bridgeport, Tenn., and subsequently to Nashville, from which place he was furloughed home on sick leave.  After a rest from November until March, he went to Camp Dennison, where he was operated on, and May 4, 1864, was discharged from the service on account of disability, since which time he has lived continuously at his home in Ross county.  By his first marriage he had nine children, of whom the living are Elizabeth, wife of James Edgington, Jr.; Delilah, wife of Charles Bruff, and Peter.  The mother died in 1889, and on Oct. 20, 1900, Mr. England married Elizabeth, widow of Paul Hammond, and daughter of William Wendell.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 457

JOHN ENGLAND, stock dealer and general farmer in Scioto township, is also one of the successful fruit growers of Ross county, where he has been known in horticultural circles.  His grandfather and namesake came to the county early in the nineteenth century, and, as he used often to say, with all his worldly goods tied up in a pocket handkerchief.  Before his death, however, this poor immigrant had accumulated several hundred acres of land and considerable town property.  The names of his children are thus given in the family register: Milo, Jesse, George, Lorenzo, Elizabeth, Manda and Sydney.  Both himself and wife died when seventy-nine years old and were interred on the same farm where they settled on first arriving in the township.  Lorenzo, the fifth of their children, was born in 1818 on the place in Scioto township, where his widow still resides.  He estimated that his attendance at school altogether would not exceed a period of three months, but he was an earnest students all his life and so added to his store of knowledge as to be considered in after years one of the best informed men of the township.  Though his main business was that of farming he had other interests, being one of the owners of the old Schlegle & England toll pikes, and for a short time also he conducted a brickyard.  He married Sarah Darby, by whom he had the following named children:  A. Warner, Alice and Demetrius, deceased; John, subject of this sketch; Thomas J., of Madison county; Scioto, deceased; James L., of Missouri; Effie, Emma and Ella, deceased.  The father died in 1871 and his widow resides on the old home place in a commodious brick house which was erected by her sons for her comfort.  John England, fourth of the children, was born in Ross county, O., Mar. 2, 1849, on the Scioto township farm where he now resides.  July 4, 1872, he was married to Mary, daughter of Jacob and Barbara Esterly, of Chillicothe, and after two years’ residence in that city they removed to Columbus, O.  He was a practical brickmaker by trade and during his stay of about eighteen months at the Ohio capital he was employed in his regular line of work.  In due time he returned to his estate in Ross county and took up his abode in an old log cabin which, however, he replaced some years later with a modern dwelling, up-to-date in all its finishings and equipments.  Mr. England is both a practical and progressive farmer, believing in having the best that is going and in keeping abreast of the times in all respects.  He raises fruit on an extensive scale, having an orchard covering 10 acres containing the larger varieties and four acres devoted exclusively to small fruits.  HE is an authority in this line, being regarded as one of the best informed of the county’s horticulturists.  Mr. England has held the position of road supervisor for sixteen years and was formerly a member of the school board.  Of his four children, Dorothy and Emma have passed away, Katie C. is at home, and Thomas T. is living in Scioto Township.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 458

GEN. JOHN CLAY ENTREKIN was born near Kingston, in Ross county, Feb. 11, 1844.  His father, John Entrekin, was born Apr. 8, 1809, at Kinnickinnick, in Green township, Ross county.  He was a member of the first board of infirmary directors of the county, was also captain of a militia company and served in a Home Guard company in Pettis county, Mo., in the civil war.  His parents were Col. John and Nancy (Crouse) Entrekin.  Col. John Entrekin, the grandfather of John C. Entrekin, was born on the “Hall farm” on Willoughby run on the Cashtown road, afterward famous as the place where the battle of Gettysburg began, in Adams county, Pa.  He commanded a company of cavalry in the war of 1812 and served for twenty years as an officer of the Ohio militia, becoming a colonel of the Second regiment.  He was at a time of his death an associate judge of the Pickaway county in the latter part of his life.  He served as a member of the house of representatives from Ross county in 1819 and 1820.  His father, William Entrekin, married Elizabeth Hall at Gettysburg, Pa., and with his family afterward removed to Huntington county, Pa., and afterward, in the spring of 1798, to Ross county, Ohio, to what is now Hopetown, where in 1800 Elizabeth, his wife, died and was buried on a hill a short distance east of the residence of John Umstead.  At that time all the county north from Chillicothe to the lakes was a vast wilderness inhabited by Indians alone.  William Entrekin’s parents were Scotch covenanters who emigrated from Dumfriesshire, Scotland, in consequence of religious persecutions, to North Ireland, and from there to Pennsylvania.  They had formerly lived on the “Entrekin water,” a branch of the Nith river near the pass in the mountains known as “Entrekin pass,” a description of which is contained in Crockett’s “Men of the Mosshaigs.”  John C. Entrekin’s grandmother on his father’s side was Nancy, the oldest daughter of John Crouse, who came from Maryland to North Carolina shortly after the Revolution and emigrated from there in 1798 to Kinnickinnick, Ross county, where he operated a mill for many years.  He served as a private in Capt. Jacob Reazin Beall’s division of troops known as “The Maryland Flying Camp in the American Revolution,” from June 1, to December 1, 1776, and was in the campaign in which the British captured New York City.  The mother of John C. Entrekin was Frances Moore Entrekin, who was born on Black Water, Green township, Ross county, May 20, 1812.  Her parents were Joseph and Hannah Davis Moore, who came to Ross county in 1809 from the western part of Huntington county, Pa.  Joseph Moore was of Scotch ancestry.  For many years he kept on the main road leading north from Chillicothe to Columbus the “Rising Sun Tavern,” and had the honor of entertaining Henry Clay, Gen. W. S. Scott, the Siamese Twins and many other public people.  He served as a quartermaster during the war of 1812, and his brother Samuel  was killed by the Indians in western Pennsylvania during the Revolutionary war.  His wife, Hannah Davis, was of Welsh descent and was claimed to be of the same family in Pennsylvania as the mother of Gen. U. S. Grant and Jefferson Davis, many of the connection residing near Philadelphia.
     John C. Entrekin
on August 12th, 1862, at the age of eighteen, enlisted for three years in Company A, of the One Hundred and Fourteenth Ohio Volunteer Infinity, and was with his regiment the entire time.  He was in the battles of Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, siege of Vicksburg, Graham’s Plantation, Yellow Bayou and the siege at fort Blakely, Ala.  He very nearly escaped honorable wounds, but on the 9th of April, 1865, the very last day of the war, he was wounded twice at Fort Blakely, and was, in consequence, honorably discharged at New Orleans, June 8th, 1865.  After his return to his home, he entered the Ohio Wesleyan university, and graduated in the classical course in 1867.  For two years he was engaged in teaching, and from 1869 to 1870 he was professor of mathematics in the Central Wesleyan college of Warronton, Mo.  During that time he read law and was admitted to the bar in the circuit court of Warren county, Mo., in January, 1870.  Directly after, he returned to Chillicothe, and in September of that year was admitted to the bar of Ross county.  He began the practice of law in the office of Judge T. A. Minshall, afterward of the supreme bench, and remained there three years in which time he built up a good business.  He has since practiced successfully and has been connected with much of the important litigation which has been conducted in the courts in his parts of the State.  He has a keen, analytical mind, a comprehensive knowledge of the science of jurisprudence and never loses sight of any point of vantage ground which may advance the interests of his clients.  He has always taken a great interest in political affairs.  Even as a boy he was active in the Fremont-Dayton campaign, and when he attained his majority, he allied himself with the Republican party and voted for Abraham Lincoln in 1864, while stationed at Morgan’s Bend, Louisiana.  In January, 1872, he was appointed city solicitor of Chillicothe to fill a vacancy, and he was elected to the same office in 1872 and re-elected in 1874 and 1876.  He was a candidate for prosecuting attorney of Ross county in 1872 before the people, but was defeated by 60 votes, although he ran 200 ahead of his ticket.  In 1875 he was elected to represent Ross county in the house of representatives, to serve two years.  He was a candidate for re-election in 1879, but was defeated by a small majority by Hon. Wm. H. Reed, a very popular Democrat.  A month later, Senator Allison Brown died, and Mr. Entrekin was nominated as his successor in the sixth senatorial district and was elected by 1,500 majority over Hon. Milton McCoy.  He served two years.  In 1885 he was again a candidate for the house of representatives and elected by 500 majority over Dr. Nathaniel Potter.  During this term he was chosen speaker of the house.  While in the legislature he voted twice for John Sherman for United States senator and for James A. Garfield and Stanley Matthews for the same office.  He was twice a candidate for nomination for congressman in this district, but was defeated.  His service in the various official positions to which he has been called has been marked of the people whom he represented, and as one of the law makers of Ohio he has borne a conspicuous and honorable part.  He enlisted in the Ohio state militia on June 8, 1873, as a private in Company A, but was at once elected lieutenant of the company, after which he was elected and commissioned captain.  On June 21, 1876, he was elected colonel of the sixth regiment, Ohio National Guards, to which position he was three times re-elected, serving in all fourteen years.  During this time he performed the most arduous and important service for the state, as in 1878, the time of the great railroad strike at Newark, Ohio, when the military aid was invoked to quell the riotous men.  He was called on to defend the city building and the Music hall in Cincinnati at the time of the riot when the court-house was destroyed in April, 1884.  He had his regiment on the field within ten hours after notification of the trouble had been received.  He was also in command of his regiment at the time of the strikes in the Hocking valley coal regions and in Jackson county.  As commander of the sixth regiment, Ohio National Guards, Col. Entrekin was a prominent factor in suppressing the disturbance.  In commanding his troops, he displayed firmness, tempered by justice, power, limited by discretion, and military force was used only to protect life and property.  His course commanded the respect of his troops and the admiration of all, and increased the confidence of the public in the military forces of the country.  In 1892, he was appointed by Governor McKinley to the position of judge advocate general on his staff, and re-appointed in January, 1894.  He is now on the retired list of military officers of Ohio with rank of brigadier-general.  He was appointed by Governor Foraker in November, 1889, a member of the board of trustees for the Central state asylum for the insane, at Columbus, and served two months, but the senate refused to confirm any of Governor Foraker’s appointments, and his successor was appointed by Governor Campbell.  In the councils of his party, General Entrekin has been very prominent and his opinions have been received with much respect and consideration.  He served two years on the Republican state central committee, 1882-83, and has served annually as a delegate to the county, district and state conventions, while for twenty years he has been a member of the Ross county executive committee.  In 1892, he was elected a delegate from the Eleventh congressional district to the national convention at Minneapolis, and cast his vote for William McKinley, as did all the other delegates; and he was chairman of the congressional convention at Athens, which nominated the delegates to represent his district in the Republican national convention at St. Louis in 1896.  He was an active worker for the party during the last presidential campaign and delivered many addresses in support of the dominant measures of the tariff and sound money.  He is a logical, fluent and forceful speaker, and his addresses leave a lasting impression upon his auditors.  He served as chairman of the committee on resolutions in the Republican state convention at Toledo, in June, 1897.  He was appointed collector of internal revenue for the Eleventh district of Ohio, by President McKinley, in July, 1897, and is still the incumbent of that position.  He is a Mason and an Odd Fellow and has passed all the chairs of both lodges; is a member of the Elks, and an honored comrade of the Grand Army of the Republic.  General Entrekin was married July 15, 1875, at Chillicothe, to Mary F. Bethauser. They have two children, Helen G., and John C., Jr., both grown.  John C., jr., is now deputy collector under his father in this district.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 459

CHARLES Z. ERDMANN, merchant tailor, of Chillicothe, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, January 27, 1860.  His father, Zachariah Erdmann, is a native of Germany who came to America in early manhood and worked at his trade as tailor's cutter, first in New York city and later in Cincinnati.  He remained in the latter city until 1868, when he removed to Chillicothe and engaged in merchant tailoring in partnership with Martin Maule.  The connection lasted only one year, after which Mr. Erdmann continued business alone for many years.  In 1886, his son Charles Z. was taken into full partnership by his father and Z. Erdmann & Son has been the title of the firm ever since.  The business house is located at No. 12 W. Second street, where they have a full line of seasonable goods and give employment to about thirty-five people.  This is the largest and most popular merchant tailoring establishment in the city of Chillicothe.  While living in New York city, Zachariah Erdman was married to Maria Lippert, also a native of Germany.  They had a family of ten children, nine of whom are still living.  Of these, Bertha is now married to Adam Falter, a farmer of Ross county; Katharine Elizabeth, unmarried, is her father's housekeeper; the third child in order of birth is Charles Z., the subject of this sketch; John F. is a physician and surgeon of New York city, married to Georgia Therese Wright of Providence, R. I.; Frederick married Cordia Lee Klinkinbeard, of Winchester, Ky., and is cutter for a merchant tailoring house in St. Louis; Frank Richard married Myrtle Hill, of Chillicothe, and is employed as cutter for Z. Erdmann & Son; Gustavus Adolphus is a traveling salesman for E. R. Hawkins & Co., of Philadelphia, living at St. Louis and married; Edward is a stockholder in and secretary of the C. L. Bailey Grocery company at Marietta, O., and William is employed at Cleveland and draughtsman for the Gary Iron and Steel company.  Charles Z. Erdmann was educated in the public schools of Chillicothe, learned the tailor's trade under his father's directions and took special instructions in Cincinnati in the art of cutting.  He has always been employed in the father's business and since 1886, as previously stated, has been a full partner in the firm.  January 19, 1898, Mr. Erdmann was married to Carrie, daughter of Henry and Helena Sulzbacher, of Chillicothe.  They have two children, Helena Maria and Elizabeth May.  Mr. Erdmann is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Blue Lodge, chapter, council and temple, and the Mystic Shrine of Columbus.  He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias, B. P. O. E., and United Commercial Traveler's association.  The family are attendants of the First Presbyterian church.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

FRANK P. ERVIN is a native of Buckskin township, Ross county, where he now resides and has spent all his life.  His father, Peachy Ervin, was born in Augusta county, Va., and came to Highland county, O., in 1831, when only ten years of age.  In 1846 he removed to Ross county and settled in Buckskin township, two yeas afterwards locating on the homestead where his son Frank, now makes his home.  Nov. 10, 1842, he married Nancy Lyle, whose father came from Virginia to Highland county in 1815, and by her had three children.  One of this is Rev. William A. Ervin, pastor of the Rockwood (Tenn.) Presbyterian church.  Another son, Rev. J. N. Ervin, is pastor of the Presbyterian church at Dayton (Ky), and professor in the Lane seminary.  Frank P. Ervin, the third son and subject of this sketch, was born and reared on the old homestead where he now lives,,, his education being obtained at the Salem academy.  After leaving school he took charge of the farm business, which he has managed with success.  In 1876, Mr. Ervin was married to Rusha A., daughter of J. C. Pricer, member of one of the oldest families in Paint township.  The union resulted in the birth of five children, Floyd D., Charles K., Clyde, Harly, and Ruth.  Floyd D. Ervin, the oldest son, is a veteran of the Spanish-American war.  In 1898, on the very day he was graduated from Salem academy, he enlisted in Company E of the Fourth Ohio regiment.  This command went to Camp Thomas, thence by way of Newport News to Porto Rico, being four days on the water; took part in the subsequent campaign on the island, participated in two skirmishes and remained there about three months.  They returned to the United States by way of Jersey City and Washington, being received by President McKinley and give a warm handshake by that great and good man.  From the capital the troops proceeded to Columbus, where they were mustered out of service on Jan. 20, 1899.  shortly after returning from the war, Floyd Ervin secured a position as traveling salesman for a wholesale grocery firm of Dayton, O., and has retained that ever since.  The entire family are members of the Presbyterian church.  Frank P. Ervin has been a member of the board of trustees of the church at Greenfield, and president of the board; his father was deacon of the church for twenty-five years and elder for the same length of time, making fifty years of service as a church official.  In 1896, Frank P. Ervin was elected one of the township trustees and since then he has been twice re-elected.  He has been a member of the school board for sixteen years and is president of the board of education of Buckskin township.  He is a member of the Royal Arcanum and his son Floyd belongs to the orders of Woodmen of the World and the Redmen.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 464

ISAAC STUART EVANS, late a resident of Buckskin township, was one of the representative farmers of Ross county, as well as a most estimable citizen in every respect.  He was the only son by the third marriage of Isaac Evans, one of the oldest settlers in the county and long identified with its agricultural interests; was born and bred in Buckskin township and educated at the old Salem academy, and married Emma Parrett, member of the old family of highly honorable lineage, daughter of Henry and grand-daughter of Frederick Parrett, the latter a native of Virginia who came to Ross county in 1806.  The great-grandfather of Mrs. Evans emigrated from Switzerland to Virginia in 1730.  Her father, Henry Parrett, was twice married, the second wife being Lydia Ann, daughter of Peter Stout, one of the early settlers of Fayette County, and also great-grand-daughter of John Eyer, who came to America with William Penn.  The ancestors of Mrs. Evans were connected with the early settlement of the colonies and afterwards bore their full share of the dangers and privations incident to the Revolutionary war.  The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Stuart Evans resulted in the birth of three children, whose names are Anna Jean, Dean Peoples and Mary Cornelia.  Mr. Evans died in1899, much lamented by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances.  He was a man of much force of charter and looked upon as one of the most substantial of Ross county's citizens.  He stood at the front as a stock-raiser and all-around farmer, being up-to-date in his methods and quick to avail himself of the latest improvements.  For eleven years he was an elder in the Presbyterian church at Greenfield, and his widow is a devout worshipper in the same congregation.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JAMES M. EVANS, M. D., of Clarksburg, has been a practicing physician in that locality over fifty years and has presided at the birth of more than two thousand Rose county citizens.  His residence embraces a period of over three-quarters of a century, during which time he has been in touch with all the movements which made for the county's growth and development.  The doctor's ancestors were Pennsylvanians.  Grandparents Richard and Mary Evans first located in Kentucky, but later concluding that the Scioto valley household goods to Highland county, O., where they made their home until death.  About the same time that Richard Evans arrived, his father, with three other sons, also came into Highland county and bought a large tract of land on Clear creek.  Richard and Mary Evans had several children and among the number a son named Isaac.  In due course he married Jane Morton, of Ross county, and went to farming on part of the family estate.  In 1826, they removed to Ross county and settled near South Salem where they reared their children and eventually found their graves.  Isaac Evans was one of the promoters and principal contributors to the South Salem academy, which afterward became such a popular institution of learning.  By his first wife he had six children, all of whom are dead except Dr. James M. Evans.  The second wife of Isaac Evans was Mary Wallace, whose six children are all dead with the exception of Richard S., who lives at Hillsboro, O.  By a third marriage with Jane Pepples, Isaac Evans had two children, Angeline and Isaac S., who also have passed away.  This patriarchal citizen, with such a numerous household, was noted throughout life as a church worker, being a Presbyterian elder and for twenty-five years superintendent of the Sunday School.  He was also a life long friend of education, contributing liberally of his means in that behalf, and retaining his interest in all good causes until his death in 1875.  James M. Evans was born in Highland county, O., Feb. 2, 1824, and was deprived of a mother's care at a very early age.  He had the benefit of a good education at the South Salem academy and later studied medicine with Dr. Israel Evans at Rising Sun, Ind.  This was followed by a course of lectures at the Cleveland Medical college, after which he spent a year as assistant to his brother in Clarksburg.  Later he matriculated at Starling Medical college in Columbus, and there obtained his coveted diplomas in 1850.  In the same year Dr. Evans began practice at Clarksburg, in Deerfield township, where he has since lived.  He keeps up to date in his profession, not being afraid to adopt new methods of treatment if approved by his judgment, and congratulates himself on being very successful with numerous cases of pneumonia by application of modern remedies.  The doctor has always been a religious man and a member of the Presbyterian church since he was sixteen years old.  May 25, 1852, he married Emily P. Yates, by whom he had four children:  Mary E., John T., Chaning and an infant deceased.  The mother died in 180, and April 17, 181, Dr. Evans married Eliza J. Caldwell, whose children - were James E., Orin Chester, Eldora C. and Edwin C.  The second wife dying, the doctor's third alliance was with Mrs. Mary Brown, widow of r. P. Brown, whose death occurred several years after marriage.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

  JAMES MILTON EVANS, M. D.   A life prolonged beyond ninety years in always an interesting spectacle.  When with long years have been combined splendid service to humanity, a helpful and inspiring character, then such a life commands admiration and respect.
     Ross County has in the person of Dr. James Milton Evans of Clarksburg one of its oldest citizens and most venerable men.  He was born in Highland County, Ohio, Feb. 26, 1824, and is still living in the enjoyment of good health and his mental faculties at the age of ninety-two.  His father was Isaac Evans, and his grandfather was also a native of Ohio and settled in Highland County at a very early day.  The grandfather improved a farm on Clear Creek, where he resided until his death.  Isaac Evans subsequently removed from Highland County and settled in Buckskin Township of Ross County, where he was engaged in farming until death claimed him.  The maiden name of his wife was Jane Norton, who was born in Buckskin Township.  Her six children were Juliet, Cynthia, John B., Samuel R., William D., and James M.  A remarkable part of the family record is that all of these sons except William became successful physicians.
     Dr. James M. Evans grew up on his father's farm.  He attended the rural schools of Buckskin Township and was also a pupil at the noted South Salem Academy.  In his twentieth year he taught a term of school in Highland County, also a term in Ross County and two winter terms in Boone County, Kentucky.  While teaching he carried on his medical studies at Rising Sun, Indiana, under his uncle, Israel Evans.  The winter of 1848-49 he spent in attending lectures in the Cleveland Medical College and the following winter at Starling Medical College in Columbus.  Graduating from Starling in the spring of 1850, Doctor Evans is one of the few physicians of Ohio still living who took their first cases ten years before the war.  HE began practice about the time some of the most important aids to modern medicine were discovered.  He began practice in the Clarksburg community, and continued actively for fully sixty-five years, and in that time his name was pronounced as a benediction in hundreds of homes in which he had served so well and faithfully.  In 1885 he retired from active practice, but in the past thirty years he has been frequently called upon in consultation and even now some old friend or neighbor asks his advice and services in a professional capacity.
     During the high tide of his career Doctor Evans states that his cures were usually not malignant cases of this dread disease.
     Doctor Evans was three times married.  In 1852 he married Emily Pryer Yates, who was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Blue) Yates.  At her death in 1860 she left four children named Mary E., John T., Isaac C., and Milton.  For his second wife Doctor Evans married Eliza Caldwell, a popular teacher in the public schools.  At her death she was survived by three children named Eldora C., Edward and Orin C.  For his third wife Doctor Evans married Mrs. Mary Brown, widow of Richard Brown.  Doctor Evans joined the Presbyterian Church when a young man, but there being no church of that denomination in Clarksburg, he subsequently became an active member of the Methodist denomination.
     The doctor's oldest daughter, Mary, married William J. Mossbarger, son of Samuel and Eleanor (Cherrington) Mossbarger.  To Mr. and Mrs. Mossbarger were born seven children who grew up named Arthur T., Emily E., Milton C., Hugh S., Melva E., John S., and Willie L.  Arthur Mossbarger, of these children, married Arlene E. Dawson, and has a son named Owen W.  Milton Mossbarger married Olive Betty and has a daughter named Betty Louise Melva Mossbarager is the wife of John Dawson and their two children are Virginia M. and John Milton.  ~ Source #2 - A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio - Vol. II. - Published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago & New York 1917

GEORGE FARABEE, of Gillespieville, was born in Liberty township, Ross county, Ohio, on Apr. 27, 1856.  His parents were Dr. Thomas and Sophia (Dresbach) Farabee.  The father came from Pennsylvania and lived in Ross county until his death.  George Farabee was reared in Ross county and educated in the public schools.  Oct. 20, 1888, he was married to Rachael, daughter of Jeremiah W. Drummond.  The latter was born in Ross county in 1830, being a son of Benjamin and Mary (Cox) Drummond, and died in 1900.  He married Rachael W. Ratcliff, daughter of Simon and Rachael (Dixon) Ratcliff, and had eight children, of whom four are living.  These are Stella, wife of Samuel Du Bois, of Liberty township, Ross county; Smiley, of Circleville; Walton, of Liberty township; and Rachel, who is the wife of George Farabee.  Mrs. Farabee was reared by her aunt, Ruth Ratcliff, who was born in that portion of Ross which is now Vinton county, Ohio, in 1826, and died on July 16, 1892.  Mr. Farabee and wife have two children, Pauline E., born Dec. 21, 1898; and Ruth R., born Sept. 3, 1900.  Mr. Farabee has held the office of trustee of Liberty township.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 466

GEORGE W. FARLOW, veteran of the civil war and retired farmer residing at Clarksburg, can look back over a life well spent both in the cause of his country and his county.  His ancestors were long settled in Delaware, from which state his grandparents, Archy and Sarah (Brown) Farlow, came in 1815 to add their strength and resources to the pioneer forces which were rapidly filling Ross county.  They settled on a farm two miles west of Clarksburg, which the husband and bought some time previously, but he died within a month or two after reaching the county.  His widow, however, continued to live on this place until she also died, leaving five children, all of whom have since departed this life - Benjamin, Abigail, Mary, George and Marion.  Benjamin, the eldest, remained at home until his marriage to Margaret Dennis of Ross county, with whom he lived several years on the old home place, and who became the mother of two children, George W. and Jane, the latter marrying John Timmons of Missouri and subsequently dying.  Mrs. Farlow died in August, 1839, and her husband took a second wife in the person of Sophia Adams, with whom he lived on the home place until 1850, when he moved to a farm in the same township which he had recently purchased.  The children by this second marriage were William R., of Indiana; Sarah A., of Illinois; Wingate T., of Indiana; and Irvin, who died in infancy.  The mother died in 1853 and the father's third marriage was to Elizabeth Godfrey shortly after which event he removed to Illinois, spent a couple of years in that state and returned to Ross county, where he died in 1877, his widow still occupying the old homestead.  Benjamin Farlow spent his whole life in agricultural pursuits and was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church.  George W., only son of Benjamin and Margaret (Dennis) Farlow was born in Deerfield township, Ross county, July 19, 1839, and sixteen days afterward he lost his mother by death.  The infant, thus bereft of a mother's care, was taken in charge by his grandmother Farlow, who reared him with tender solicitude until he reached manhood's full estate.  About that time, the civil war was in progress, and young Farlow became a soldier of the union in Company E, One Hundred and Fourteenth Ohio regiment of infantry, which was drilled at Marietta and sent to Memphis, Tenn.  There the command was attached to the Thirteenth army corps, with which it went to Vicksburg, took part in the battle of Chickasaw Bluffs and later in a severe engagement at Arkansas Post.  Later they moved to the rear of Vicksburg, about Thompson's Hill and Black river, until a union was effected with Sherman's forces, incidental to which movements were many severe skirmishes and minor engagements.  Mr. Farlow afterward went with his regiment of Louisiana and up the Red river, coming back from this expedition to Mississippi for a prolonged stay and then on to Pensacola and Mobile.  After a nine days' siege at the latter city, the command was sent to Texas and mustered out.  Finally reaching home by way of Columbus, Mr. Farlow engaged in farming until 1869, when he married Elizabeth E. Howser and lived at the old home place until a year ago, when they removed to Clarksburg.  There Mr. Farlow is living a quiet and retired life after many years of work as a farmer and stockraiser.  He has two children, Archy M. and Margaret; the former living at Barlow, Ohio, and the latter at home.  Mr. and Mrs. Farlow and Miss Margaret are attendants at the Methodist Episcopal church.  Mr. Farlow's brother, William R. Farlow, has a very creditable military record, which deserves mention in any history of Ross county.  Born in the old homestead in Deerfield township, Mar. 10, 1843, he was only eighteen years old when he enlisted in Company C, Seventy-third regiment Ohio infantry, with which he served gallantly in the engagements in Virginia, including Bull Run.  At that battle he was wounded and taken prisoner, but was subsequently paroled and came home by way of the national capital.  In May, 1864, he organized a company for the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Ohio regiment, of which he was elected captain, and served for three months, being mustered out at Columbus.  After returning home, Captain Farlow married Mollie McCrum, with whom he settled on a farm in Deerfield township and after two years went to Indiana where he now resides.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 467

FERGUSON FAMILY: - James and Rachel (Walker) Ferguson, with their children Margaret, William, James and Matthew, came from county Antrim, Ireland, in 1750, and settled in that part of Hamilton township, Cumberland county, which is now in the bounds of Hamilton and St. Thomas townships, Franklin county, to the west of Chambersburg, Pa.  James Ferguson, Sr., was ensign of Capt. Joseph Armstrong's company of rangers in active service on the frontiers of Cumberland county, Pa., in 1755, during the French-Indian war.  He, and his children, attended the famous Rocky Spring Presbyterian church near Chambersburg; he died in October, 1772.  His wife died in 1791, and in the same year their children divided his land in Franklin county.  The children are now to be mentioned.  A daughter Margaret married William Dixon in 1780, who, dying in 1784, left two children, Catharine and Rachel.  In 1782 Catharine married Humphrey Fullerton, in Franklin county, and moved to Chillicothe, O., in 1804.  Her mother, Margaret, followed her to Chillicothe in 1805 with her daughter Rachel, who afterwards married Judge William Wilson and died in 1860 in Newark, O.  Margaret lived in Chillicothe at the northwest corner of Paint and Fourth streets, where she died in 1835, and is buried in Grandview cemetery.  William, son of James Ferguson, served in the Revolutionary war, married Sarah Liggett in 1776, moved to Somerset township, Washington county, Pa., in 1796, and died in Monongahela City, in 1833, aged eighty-seven years.  James Ferguson, Jr., married Margery Denny in Franklin county, about 1776, was one of the justices of the county, one of the first trustees of Rocky Spring Presbyterian church, and dealt largely in real estate.  He served in the Revolutionary war.  He moved to Chillicothe in Oct. 1798, and his real estate transactions in Ross, Pickaway and Highland counties were numerous and important.  He was one of the nine justices of common pleas in 1798 in Chillicothe; headed a petition signed by the five trustees of the Presbyterian church in Chillicothe, addressed to the territorial legislature in 1801, asking permission to make a lottery to erect a house of worship; was one of the incorporators of Chillicothe on Jan. 4, 1802, and one of the six members of its first "select council."  He was one of the early merchants of Chillicothe and the affairs of the firm of Ferguson & McFarland, composed of himself and William McFarland, husband of his daughter Margaret, were dissolved and wound up by the latter on May 1, 1803.  He died on September 11, 1806, and his remains now rest in the McFarland lot in Grandview cemetery.  He left a will in which he names his children:  James; Margaret, wife of Wm. McFarland, she died in Chillicothe, February 8, 1832; John; Rachel, wife of Judge John Thompson, she died in Wilkinson county, Miss., October 20, 1853; and Creaghead, one of Chillicothe's early merchants who died of yellow fever in New Orleans about 1820.
     Matthew, another son of James, Sr., enlisted in Capt. John Williams' company of the first battalion of Cumberland county militia, Flying camp, Revolutionary war, in 1777; was at the battles of the Brandywine and Germantown and afterwards acquired the title of Captain.  He was a pewholder and member of Rocky Spring Presbyterian church, married Ann Chesnut in 1782; bought land in Paxton township, Ross county, east of Bainbridge, on June 21, 1802, and early in 1806 sold his farm in Pennsylvania, and with his wife and eight living children moved to Green township, settling on Black Water creek, about one mile west of Kingston.  "The Pioneer Record County" says he was "the first distiller" in the county.  He accumulated by deed and patent about 1,000 acres of land.  On April 13, 1810, he was commissioned one of the three first justices of Pickaway township, Pickaway county; on May 31, 1811, he with Wm. Caldwell, Michael Brown and John Entrekin were elected and on August 7, 1811, were ordained and installed ruling elders of Mt. Pleasant church.  About the year 1831, feeling the infirmities of his eighty-two years, and realizing the necessity for activity in the church, he retired from the active duties of the eldership, his nephew Mathew Ferguson, who was installed July 10, 8131, taking his place.  The session, loath to lose the advantage of his wisdom, counsel and advice, insisted that he reconsider his intention; but he remained firm in his determination to be relieved and to  hand over the burden to younger men.  At that session meeting, probably held June 11, 1831, his advise to them was: "Brethren, take care of the flock.  Feed the sheep.  The preacher will take care of himself."  He died on Nov. 2, 1848, aged ninety-nine years, leaving surviving him as wife and these children: William; Ann, wife of his nephew, Matthew Ferguson, Jr.; Margaret, wife of William Cushing, and Jane unmarried.  His wife died Dec. 24, 1851, aged eighty-seven years and twelve days.  They and their children, John, Rachel, Matthew and Margaret, are buried in Mt. Pleasant grave yard.  Their children were: James, born June 28, 1783, died November, 1805; John, born November 21, 1784, died April 7, 1813; Rachel, born July 1, 1786, died June 17, 1845; William, born Aug. 16, 1788, died Jan. 28, 1865; Catharine, born Oct. 15, 1793, died May 14, 1813; Matthew, born Feb. 13, 1795, died May 3, 1813; Ann, born August 13, 1798, died Feb. 3, 1882; Jane, born Aug. 16, 1800, died Apr. 16, 1861.
     WILLIAM FERGUSON, the fourth child of Matthew and Ann Chesnut Ferguson, was born in Franklin county, Pa., and was about eighteen yeas of age when his parents settled in Green township.  He was one of the first merchants, the first resident merchant, the first postmaster and a member of the first council of Kingston.  On the morning of Sunday, Aug. 23, 1812, he and his younger brother, Matthew, enlisted in Capt. John McNeal's company of cavalry, Ohio militia, and went to the famous war of that year from Mt. Pleasant church.  The company consisted of about 50 men and served until Oct. 14, 1812, when it was discharged.  On Aug. 26, 1813, he joined Mt. Pleasant Presbyterian church, of which he was one of its first trustees to hold property in Kingston, in 1837, and from which he was dismissed on Apr. 13, 1849, to the Central Presbyterian church of Cincinnati, O.  On Dec. 2, 1816, his father bought from Thomas Ing and wife, lot No. 30, in Kingston, at the northwest corner of the Maysville and Zanesville turnpike road and Ing street.  Here he built his store and house; removed from his father's farm about the year 1818, opened his general merchandise store and kept "bachelor's hall."  Here he lived after marriage and here all his children were born.  He made trips to Philadelphia, Pa., on horseback and his purchases were brought across the mountains in large Conestoga wagons.  On April 22, 1819, he took out at Chillicothe the first license issued to any resident merchant of Kingston to vend merchandise in that town.  He took out his last license on Oct. 19, 1825.  On Sep. 10, 1822, the office of McCutcheonsville or McCutchen's tavern in Pickaway county, adjoining Kingston, where the stage coach stopped, was opened and he was appointed postmaster.  The name of the office was changed to Kingston Dec. 12, 1825, and he retained the postmastership until Apr. 25, 1835, through the presidencies of James Monroe, John Quincy Adams and into that of Andrew Jackson.  In politics he was a Whig.  "He was the first postmaster in Green township."  On Jan. 8, 1824, he married Eliza Crouse, the youngest child of John and Catharine Umsted Crouse of Green township.  In 1833 he completed a brick building, fitted out with machinery, and ran for several years a flour mill, also a woolen mill, both on the northeast one-fourth of section 20, which his wife received as part of her share of her brother Jeremiah's estate.  He sold this property to his brother-in-law, John Crouse, Jr., in 1846.  On Apr. 5, 1834, he was elected one of the first councilmen of Kingston, which was incorporated as a village early that year.  On Jun. 28, 1834, he, with Henry May, Jr., and John M. Brown, as trustees of the Presbyterian congregation in the town of Kingston, the first trustees of the Mt. Pleasant Presbyterian church to hold land in Kingston, received a deed of lot No. 5 in Duncan and Logan's addition.  The lot was on the westernmost side of the main road to Lancaster about 264 feet north of Sassafras alley, was 66 feet wide and 165 feet deep to Mulberry alley.  The trustees of Mt. Pleasant church deeded this lot on Nov. 26, 1858, thus showing they were one and the same organization.  About the year 1837 he closed his business in Kingston and in the December of that year sold his store and dwelling in Kingston to Robert T. Coburn, taking a mortgage for the purchase money, which mortgage was foreclosed in 1844, and on Aug. 24, 1845, he deeded the property to Henry May.  After he had disposed of his store and dwelling in 1837 he settled on the farm in Pickaway township, which his wife received from her father, on Congo creek, about a mile and a half north of Kingston.  Here he farmed extensively and also dealt largely in cattle.  His place was a second regular stop for large droves from Chillicothe to the eastern market, the first stand being at McConnell's in Ross county, and the third at Wilson's in Pickaway county.  In September, 1848, he moved to Cincinnati, O.  By the year 1852 he had disposed of the land in Pickaway county, which he inherited from his father, to William Raub and George Holderman, and in that year the farm on Congo creek was sold to John and William Entrekin.  He dealt largely in real estate in Ross and Pickaway counties, and especially in Kingston lots.  In the autumn of 1855 he moved to Alleghany City, Pa., and while a resident of that place, died in Cincinnati, O., at the home of his son Matthew and was buried in Spring Grove cemetery near that city.  His wife died in Baltimore, Md., June 9, 1889, and is buried beside him.  His children were:  Ann Catherine, born Mar. 30, 1825, married July 22, 1854, to Edward Arthurs, died Oct. 31, 1895; John Crouse, born Mar. 13, 1827, died Oct. 21, 1849; Matthew, born Feb. 1, 1829; Sarah Jane, born June 30, 1834, married Biddle Arthurs, died Sept. 3, 1860.  His son, Matthew resides in Baltimore, Md., but spends the summer months at his country residence at Kinnikinnick, part of the home place of his grandfather, John Crouse, Sr.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

JUDSON O. FERNEAU, a prosperous farmer of the South Salem neighborhood in Ross county, comes of an ancestry whose fountain source was Holland with an intermediate stage of development in old Virginia and later lodgment in Ohio.  He is a son of Joseph and grandson of John Ferneau, the latter being an emigrant from the Netherlands to the Old Dominion while the Revolutionary war was in progress.  In 1812, he joined the tide of emigration which was then setting strongly toward the Ohio valley and located with his family in Ross county.  His son, Joseph Ferneau, married Elizabeth McCoy, member of a family long and favorably known in Fayette county, Ohio.  He adopted farming as his vocation and pursued it steadily until his death in1891.  His only child was Judson O. Ferneau, who was born and reared in Buckskin township and educated in the district schools.  In 1893, he was married to Anna, daughter of George Wolfe, a native of Germany.  Like his ancestors before him, Mr. Ferneau is interested in tilling the soil, his line being general farming and stock-raising.  The farm owned by him near South Salem, in addition to its agricultural value, possesses an historic interest.  According to tradition it was there that the first sermon was preached north of Marietta, at the time when there were no churches in that region and but few preachers, even of the itinerant class.  The farm of Mr. Ferneau is also pointed out as the scene of a famous reencounter which took place in the long ago between one Duncan McCarty and certain hostile Indians with whom he came in contact.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 ~ Page 467

The FISHER FAMILY: - The progenitor of this numerous and well known family emigrated from Germany and settled in Pennsylvania during the latter half of the eighteenth century.  There, about the year 1774, a son was born to him, named Jacob, who was destined to become the founder of the Ohio branch of the Fisher family.  The parents of Jacob Fisher went from Pennsylvania to Virginia, where in early manhood he married Barbara Kyle.  There is a family tradition that the young husband, when about twenty-five years old, rode on horseback to the wilds of Ohio to "spy out the land" and ascertain the feasibility of establishing a home for himself.  As the story goes, he bought land in Concord township, put in a crop and then returned to Virginia for his wife and child.  However this may be, it is definitely ascertained that Jacob Fisher and wife became residents of Ross county as early as 1800 and that from them have descended a numerous progeny.  Jacob's life was devoted to the clearing and cultivating of his acres of Concord township, where he lived until his death about the year 1865.  He outlived his wife many years, though the exact date of her death is not recorded.  Among their children was a son named John, who was born soon after his parents reached Ohio.  He grew to manhood in Concord township and spent all the days of his life in the same locality.  When he reached the marriageable age he selected as his life partner Phoebe Briggs, daughter of a neighbor and early settler.  John Fisher died about the year 1859, his wife surviving him several years.  They became the parents of seven sons and two daughters, named in order of birth, Samuel, Clinton, Joseph, George, John Bunyan, Charles, William Sarah and Hannah.  George Fisher, the fourth of the sons above enumerated, is still living, the sole survivor of that family of children.  He was born in 1832 and has followed the occupation of farming from the time of his arrival at manhood.  In 1855, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Elijah Rowe, a prominent man of Concord township.  They have living three sons and two daughters, as follows:  Louise, the wife of William H. Thomas, of Roxabell; James, a farmer in Concord township; William A.; Flora B., wife of Joseph Irvin, of Highland county, Ohio; and Isaac, a farmer in Concord township.  One son died in infancy and Francis Marion, a bright and promising boy, was cut off by pneumonia at the age of twenty-two.  William A. Fisher, third of the above mentioned children, was born November 13, 1859, in Concord township.  He received his education in the common schools at home and at the Normal school at Lebanon.  He adopted teaching as a profession and followed that occupation for seventeen years.  He was ambitious to become a doctor and studied medicine for a while, but circumstances over which he had no control prevented him from finishing his course.  In 1897, he embarked in the undertaking business at Frankfort, carrying a large supply of furniture as a side line, and has continued this venture up to the present time.  In 184, he was married to Jessie E., daughter of John M. Ware, a prominent citizen of Frankfort.  She died in 1892, leaving four children:  Glenn D., Lee H., Edith L. and Elizabeth J.  In 1897, Mr. Fisher chose a second wife in the person of Elizabeth S., daughter of Merritt Jamieson, of Concord township.  Mr. Fisher's religious affiliations are with the Presbyterian church and his fraternal connections with the Masons and Woodmen of the World.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

AMOS M. FISHER is one of the nine children of Jacob and Eleanor (Wilson) Fisher, of Ross county, the date of his birth being March 15, 1862.  The family in America started from Philip Fisher, who emigrated from Germany and first settled in Pennsylvania, going from there in 1777 in Virginia.  In the spring of 1799, his son Jacob, who was then twenty-five years old, rode on horseback to Ohio, with a view to finding a home in the wilderness.  He spent the spring and summer in cultivating a patch of corn near the site of Chillicothe and in the fall returned to Virginia for his wife and child.  He purchased two hundred acres of land in Concord township, built a rude log cabin and moved in with his wife and child.  These events occurred in the early part of the year 1800, and the Fishers became one of the hardy first families who bore the burdens and dangers of settling the Scioto valley.  Their experiences were similar to those of many others - a life of hard work and privation in the lonely wilderness, surrounded by many dangers, yet not devoid of rude pleasures.  In the course of years, the pioneer hewed and grubbed himself into possession of a fine farm, and by degrees the family were enabled to surround themselves with the comforts of civilization.  The head of the family was called away to the war of 1812, and while he was serving his country his wife and children underwent much anxiety, besides positives danger from Indians.  It was customary for the women of the neighborhood for miles around to assemble at night in a nearby fort, in order to insure protection from possible forays by the red men.  Jacob Fisher died in 1866, somewhat over ninety-two years old, and his wife expired in her seventy-eighth year.  They reared a family of four sons and five daughters, all of whom have passed away.  The youngest of the family, named after his father, Jacob Fisher, was born February 23, 1819.  His earliest recollections were of the log cabin in which he was born and the log school house with its puncheon floors and slab benches.  In those days farm boys had little opportunity to get book learning, their attendance at school being limited to rainy days in the working season, and the severe weather of winter.  When he became of age, Jacob Fisher was married on June 3, 1841, to Eleanor, daughter of John H. Wilson, who came from Kentucky and was an early settler of Ross county.  They had nine children:  Mary E., born April 8, 1842, died in 1861; William B., born September 23, 1843, married and living at Harrison, Ohio; Absalom M., born October 16, 1845; Albert H., born July 14, 1847; John E., born April 18, 1851; Naomi, born August 30, 1854, died December 2, 1887; Cary W., born January 1, 1859; Amos M., the subject of this sketch.  The golden wedding of the parents was celebrated on June 3, 1891, and was a joyous occasion largely attended.  Jacob Fisher, the venerable father, passed away in 1897, just one hundred years after the birth of the eldest brother.  His widow survives at the age of eighty-two.  Their son Amos M., who was the youngest of the children, remained at home all his life, being educated at the district school and at Lebanon, Ohio.  October 23, 1901, he was married to Maud, daughter of William F. and Patience Metcalfe, of Twin township, Ross county.  They reside on the old homestead of 166 acres, which Mr. Fisher bought after the death of his father.  He raises stock on an extensive scale and is regarded as one of the most successful breeders in the county.  He makes a specialty of swine, dealing exclusively in the Poland-China breed, and during the past year attracted general attention on account of the numbers of superiority of his fine stock.  Mr. Fisher's political affiliations are Democratic and his fraternal connections are with the Masonic order and Knights Templar at Chillicothe.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902

THE FOSTER FAMILY: - The founder of this numerous and influential family in Ohio was the Rev. John Foster, who came from near Cumberland, Md., and settled in what is now Pike county in 1796.  He died in January, 1800, leaving eight children, of whom there were six sons and two daughters.  Among the former was one who became the Rev. John Foster, No. 2.  He was born Mar. 3, 1771, and died Aug. 22, 1839, in Madison county, Ohio, while on a visit to some of his children.   Of the latter there were ten in all and among the number was Thomas C. Foster, born July 2, 1813, in Ross county.  He spent his whole life in Franklin township and died there Dec. 18, 1882.  His wife was Jane E. Davis, member of one of the pioneer families of the township, who died July 12, 1852, leaving six children.  Of these, Martha was born July 31, 1840; James C., May 3, 1842; Hannah, born Sept. 4, 1844, and died Feb. 25, 1893; John, born Jan. 4, 1847; William, born Sept. 16, 1850, and died Feb. 14, 1874; George, born June 21, 1852, and died June 23, 1881.  Major James C. Foster, the oldest son in the above mentioned list, was educated in the public and private schools of his native county.  Shortly before the civil war he spent a term at a private military school in Chillicothe, and the experience acquired there proved valuable in the years immediately succeeding.  On Oct. 17, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company F, Fifty-third Ohio infantry, being made first sergeant at the organization.  Jan. 1, 1802, his services and abilities were rewarded by promotion to the second lieutenancy, and in the following September he was transferred to Company I.  On June 3, 1863, he was commissioned as captain of Company A, Fifty-ninth regiment of colored troops, which had recently been called into service.  On June 18, 1864, he was given a commission as major of that regiment, in which capacity he served until the close of the war, being in command of the regiment for several months.  Major Foster participated in the battles of Shiloh Falling Timbers, Tupelo, Brice's Crossroads and the siege of Corinth.  At the battle of Brice's Crossroads, near Guntown, Miss., June 10, 1864, Captain Foster was placed in charge of the skirmish line, composed of his own and another company.  They made a heroic fight until dark, when, all the troops retiring in the direction of Ripley and the lieutenant-colonel being totally disabled by a wound, he assumed command of the regiment, from which he was not relieved until the following September.  During his long army service, Major Foster was often detailed on important special service.  During the winter of 1862-3 he was a member of the general court-martial, and he served on courts of inquiry, as chief of pickets, and in other responsible positions, which showed his high home and for a time attended a commercial school at Cleveland, after which he settled down to a farmer's life near his birthplace, where he still resides.  Sept. 7, 1869, he was married to Emma, daughter of James and Mary Davis, who died Aug. 2, 1872, leaving one child, Daisy D., born Jun. 7, 1870, who is now the wife of H. J. DuBois, of Pike county, Ohio.  Oct. 19, 1875, Major Foster was remarried, his second wife being Mary D., daughter of Joseph I. and Jane D. Vause.  This union resulted in the birth of four daughters and three sons, all of whom are living:  Ada C., born Mar. 16, 1877; J. Vause, born Apr. 29, 1879; Jean M., born July 16, 1881; Harry L., born Mar. 14, 1884; James C., born Nov. 25, 1887; Mary H., Dec. 19, 1889; and Sallie, Sept. 13, 1894.  The Major has filled various township offices and at the fall election in 1901 was chosen representative in the Ohio general assembly from Ross county, receiving 5,239 votes to 4,531 for Robert L. Irvin, his opponent.  He is a prominent member of the Grand Army of the Republic and has been commander of Joseph Climer, post, No. 6,092, at Omega, Ohio, ever since it was organized in 1883.  He also holds membership in the other patriotic organization devoted exclusively to Federal officers and called the Loyal Legion.  His ancestors were mostly Methodists, but the Major has no church affiliations.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 - Page 477

FOSTER

Source #2 - A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio - Vol. II. - Page

FOSTER

Source #2 - A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio - Vol. II. - Page

JOHN FRANCIS, of Gillespieville, Ohio, was born in Ross county, Aug. 4, 1826.  His parents were John and Susannah (Wycoff) Francis, both natives of Virginia, who came to Ross county in 1799 and Fannie Francis, of Virginia, who came to Ross county in 1799 and settled in what is now Liberty township.  They spent the rest of their days there and had a family of eleven children.  Of these, John Francis was born in 1796, came to Ohio with his parents and lived and died a farmer.  He left a family of eleven children, of whom eight are living.  Their son John, who is the subject of this sketch, grew up on the farm and was educated in the common schools.  Farming has been his life's occupation and he owns a good bit of land, but for about thirty years he has lived a retired life at Londonderry.  Mr. Francis has never been an office-seeker but has held the position of township trustee and school director.  In 1848, he was married to Rebecca Hinshaw, by whom he had one child that died in infancy.  The mother also died, and Mr. Francis, on Aug. 22, 1888, and married to Mary F. Timmons, daughter of Azariah and Charity (Dixon) Timmons, both natives of Ross county, who had ten children, of whom six are living, the father dying in 1887, and the mother in 1878.  By this marriage Mr. Francis has one son, Chancey J., who was born July 28, 1890.  Mr. Francis is a member of the Christian church while the wife affiliates with the Society of Friends.  The grandfather of Mr. Francis cut the first white oak tree ever felled by a white man on Londonderry flats.  He also brought the first wheat into that section, having it sent from old Virginia on the Scioto river.  When the boat reached the point where the state dam is now situated, it sprang a leak and had to be taken out and dried.  This wheat proved very costly in the end, but his neighbors helped to cut it and he divided with them, giving each one a teacupful of the grain, which was cut with sickles and knives.  The grandmother of Mrs. Francis made the first bed-cord of Indian hemp.
Source #1 - The County of Ross: a history of Ross County, Ohio by Henry Holcomb Bennett - Published by S. A. Brant, Madison, Wis., 1902 - 478

NOTES:

* Portrait in Book

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