OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS


 

Welcome to
Preble County, Ohio
Genealogy & History

Mililtary Records
Source:
History of Preble County, Ohio
with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches
H. Z. Williams & Bro., Publishers
1881

CHAPTER XIII.

PREBLE IN THE WAR OF THE REBELLION

20TH OHIO INFANTRY 93RD OHIO INFANTRY
22ND OHIO INFANTRY 112TH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY
35TH OHIO INFANTRY 191ST OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY
39TH OHIO INFANTRY 5TH INDEPENDENT CO. OF SHARP-SHOOTERS
47TH OHIO INFANTRY 5TH INDEPENDENT CO SHARP SHOOTERS
50TH OHIO INFANTRY 156TH OHIO NATIONAL GUARD
54TH OHIO INFANTRY 2ND OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALRY
69TH OHIO INFANTRY 5TH OHIO CAVALRY
73RD OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 1ST REGIMENT OHIO HEAVY ARTILLERY
75TH OHIO INFANTRY 2ND REGIMENT OHIO HEAVY ARTILLERY
81ST OHIO INFANTRY 8TH OHIO BATTERY
81ST OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 5TH REGIMENT U. S. COLORED TROOPS
86TH OHIO INFANTRY 27TH REGIMENT U. S. COLORED TROOPS
87TH OHIO INFANTRY THE SQUIRREL HUNTERS


FORTY-SEVENTH OHIO INFANTRY

     The regiment was one of the first supplied by the Buckeye State.  Its organization was completed at Camp Dennison, August 13, 1861.  Thirteen nationalities were represented in it, and Frederick Poschner, jr., a native of Hungary, formerly an officer in the Prussian army, was elected its colonel.  General Rosecans was commanding in West Virginia then, and the Forty-seventh was here made ready for war.  September 24, the brigade advanced on Big Sewell mountain, encamping on an opposite peak to the rebel fortifications.  While here the soldiers suffered almost beyond description.  The heavy and continuous rains swept away bridges and rendered roads impassable, so that the supplies were nearly all cut off.  On quarter rations, without clothes and tents, their earlier experiences of warfare were painful in the extreme.  On the thirtieth of December, 1862, the regiment embarked on steamers for Louisville and Memphis.  Here they became a part of the expedition against Vicksburgh.  In the march that ended at Walnut Hills, behind Vicksburgh, May 18, 1853, many prisoners were captured from General Loring's forces.  On the nineteenth and again on the twenty-second, Colonel Perry led an impetuous assault on Cemetery Hill.  Each time he gained a footing close under the works, and held it for a time.  The loss, however, was severe.  Soon after the Forty-seventh was dispatched after Johnston's forces.  It had a part in the attack and capture of JacksonColonel A. C. Perry was made provost marshal, and his regiment destroyed the rebel fortifications and the railroad track about the city.  Afterward we hear of it honorably, in Vicksburgh, Memphis, Germantown, Corinth, Iuka, and Tuscumbia.
     October 21, 1863, the regiment arrived opposite Chattanooga, adn three days after the whole army advanced and opened the battle of Chickamauga.  Following this battle the Forty=seventh was made a part of the force sent to General Burnside's relief at Knoxville, and on January 30, 1864, joined an expedition against Rome, Georgia.  March sixth of the same year, three-fourths of the men re-enlisted, and on the twenty-fifth of April after a month's furlough, they re=assembled, to a man, at Camp Dennison, and on the third of the following month were again in the army at Stevenson, Alabama.  In the Atlanta campaign that followed, this regiment bore no inferior part.  November 15th saw them off with Sherman's army in its memorable "march to the sea."  On Monday, December 13th, the assault on Fort McAllister was made, the Forty-seventh in the advance.  At the successful issue, it was found that the colors of this regiment were the first planted upon the fort.  On Christmas, Savannah was occupied.  Shortly after followed a march through the rebel capital to Washington, which ended in a participation in the grand review.
   When the Forty-seventh entered the field, it numbered eight hundred and thirty men; at the end of the Atlanta campaign only one hundred and twenty remained.  It was subsequently reinforced by four hundred drafted men and substitutes.  It served as a part of the "army of occupation" till August 24th, when the men were paid off and discharged, having served four hears two months and nine days, and in all the slave States except Texas, Florida and Missouri.

FIELD AND STAFF.

Lieutenant Colonel John Wallace
Assistant Surgeon Gilmore

COMPANY D.

COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.

Captain John Wallace.
Second Lieutenant Joseph L. Pinkerton

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.

Sergeant Edward N. Bernard
Sergeant Henry N. VanDyke
Sergeant William H. McWhinney
Corporal Ebenezer B. Elliott
Corporal Joseph G. Sloan
Corporal Israel Brown
Corporal William F. Ramsey
Corporal James B. Wilson
Drummer John Pierson
Wagoner William Marshall 

PRIVATES.

Ballinger, Jacob
Bedell, Joseph
Bistick, John H.
Brown, James L.
Brown, William J.
Bushman, William M.
Cook, Asa
Cook, John
Cook, Thomas M.
Dinkelbeyer, Elias
Douglas, William A.
Fay, Stephen
Fleming, William
Goldsmith, Samuel F.
Gorden, John
Graham, Benjamin F.
Hamilton, William R.
Highland, William
Hill, Jerome
Hoffman, John
Magaw, Theopholus M.
Magee, James C.
Marshall, James
McBurney, William J.
McClanahan, James
McCracken, Samuel
McQuiston, John C.
McQuiston, Philander
Miner, William M.
Park, Andrew B.
Parker, Andrew J.
Porter, James B.
Potts, Robert
Ramsey, James B.
Ramsey, Joseph
Sayres, George S.
Sliver, Isaac U.
Smith, William H.
Troth, Augustus I.
Weed, Jonathan P.
Wilson, Solomon C.
 
< Chapt. XIII - 39th Ohio Infantry >

< Chapt. XVI - 50th Ohio Infantry >


 

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