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Mahoning County, Ohio
History & Genealogy

Biographies

Source:
20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio
and Representative Citizens -
Publ. Biographical Publ. Co.
Chicago, Illinois -
1907
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Mr. & Mrs. George Warhurst

GEORGE WARHURST

Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Publ. Biographical Publ. Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 819

 

 
Thomas H. Wells

THOMAS H. WELLS

Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Publ. Biographical Publ. Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 469

 

  CALEB B. WICK, one of the leading citizens of Youngstown, who for years has been closely identified with its most important commercial interests, belongs to one of the most honored pioneer families of the Mahoning Valley.  He was born Apr. 24, 1836, at Youngstown, and is a son of the late Col. Caleb B. and Maria Adelia (Griffith) Wick.  The early history of the Wick family may be found in the sketches of Col. Caleb B. Wick and his brother, Hugh Bryson Wick, appearing elsewhere in this book.
     Mr. Wick completed his education in the schools at Youngstown and began his long and successful business career as a clerk in the Mahoning County Bank, when he was 17 years of age.  By the time he was 23 years old he had risen to the position of cashier of this institution and served as such until 1862.  His association as a member of the banking firm of Wick Brothers & Company, at Youngstown, gave him an acknowledged standing and he soon became interested in other financial enterprises, these including the founding of the first bank at Sharon, Pennsylvania, under the name of Wick, Porter & Company.  In connection with his large financial operations, Mr. Wick early became interested in the building of railroads and was a very important factor in the organization and completion of what is now the Pittsburg, Youngstown & Ashtabula Railroad, having been one of the incorporators of the company.  He still retains his position on the directing board of this road and is the only surviving member of the original board.  He was the first president of the Youngstown & Sharon Steel Railroad Company.
     For the past half century Mr. Wick has been largely interested in real estate in this section, being a large holder and the owner of iron and coal properties.  His commodious offices are located at Nos. 404-405 Dollar Bank Building, Youngstown.  His beautiful home is situated at No. 524 Wick avenue.
Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Publ. Biographical Publ. Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 502
  COL. CALEB WICK, whose long, eventful and useful life was almost entirely spent in Youngstown, may well be classed with that band of notable men, whose patriotism, energy, ability and integrity ushered in the conditions which have resulted in the wonderful development of this city along every line.  Caleb B. Wick was born Oct. 1, 1795, in Washington County, Pennsylvania, and was the eldest son of Henry and Hannah (Baldwin) Wick.
     Henry Wick
came, through several generations of Americans, and most worthy residents of Long Island, from an English ancestor.  His father and his grandfather were born and reared at Southampton, Long Island, where his birth took place Mar. 19, 1771.  On Dec. 11, 1794, he married Hannah Baldwin, who was a daughter of Caleb Baldwin, a prominent resident of Morristown, New Jersey.  In Washington County, Pennsylvania, Henry Wick went into business and carried on merchandising until 1801, when he followed his father-in-law to Youngstown, Ohio, then in its infancy.  Here Henry Wick Established a home and re-embarked in business and in the following year brought his family here, Caleb B. being then in his seventh year.  A successful and honorable business career followed, Mr. Wick's store on the southeast corner of the Diamond, on the corner of Federal and Phelps streets, being a landmark for over forty years.  He died Nov. 4, 1845, and was survived by his wife until 1849.
     Henry Wick and wife were the parents of twelve children, all of whom have passed away.  One of the sons, the late Henry Wick, a capitalist of Cleveland, resembled in character, as well as in name, Youngstown's honored pioneer citizen.
     Caleb Baldwin Wick was given the best educational advantages that the little town of Youngstown afforded, and received an excellent business training under his father, one which equipped him for a mercantile business of his own.  In 1815, in association with Dr. Henry Manning, he embarked in a general mercantile business at Youngstown, his stock including drugs, and from this beginning grew the city's large drug business, it being the first departure in this line of all this section of Western Reserve.  When Mr. Wick retired from mercantile pursuits, in 1848, he was the oldest merchant in this city.  He was interested in the various industries which gave employment to his fellow-citizens, encouraged the influx of capital and proved his public spirit by investing much of his own.  In 1846, in association with other men of means, he erected the first of the great rolling-mills which formed the nucleus of the extensive plant of Brown, Bonnell & Company, one of the main industries of he Mahoning Valley.
     For many years of his life, the late Caleb Baldwin Wick was known as Colonel Wick, a title given him in 1822, as colonel of the First Regiment of Ohio State Militia, with which he had been connected as an officer since 1817.  He served as township clerk and trustee, and as postmaster of Youngstown under the administration of President William Henry Harrison.  To the developing of the educational and religious influences of his city, Col. Wick was a large contributor, not only of his means but of his time, which was always a valuable asset.  Many of the present well-developed charities of the city had their inception under his fostering care, and many a struggling enterprise was placed upon a sound basis through his helpfulness.  This honored and beloved citizen passed from this life June 30, 1865, being survived by a number of his children and by his second wife, whose death occurred in 1887.
     Col. Wick was first married Jan. 1, 1816, to Rachel Kirtland, who was a daughter of Jared Kirtland, of Poland, Ohio.  Two children of this marriage are deceased, and Mrs. Wick died in 1820.  On Nov. 3, 1828, Col. Wick married, second, Maria Adelia Griffith, who was born at Caledonia, New York.  Of this marriage ten children were born, seven of whom reached maturity.  Two of his sons, Caleb B. and Henry K., rank with the leading business men of Youngstown.  The former is largely interested in real estate, coal and iron, and ahs offices, as has his brother, Henry K., at Nos. 404-405 Dollar Bank building, Youngstown.  Henry K. Wick is president of the great coal firm of H. K. Wick & Company.  Both brothers have handsome residences on Wick avenue.
Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Publ. Biographical Publ. Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 474
  HENRY WICK, president of the Witch Hazel Coal Company, at Youngstown, is an old and experienced man in this line of business, one with which he has been identified for about forty years.  Mr. Wick was born at Youngstown, Ohio, May 13, 1846, and is a son of Hugh B. and Lucretia G. (Winchell) Wick.
     After completing his education, passing through the common and High Schools at Youngstown, Mr. Wick, at the age of 22 years, entered into the coal business as the owner of a coal mine in Youngstown township.  During the whole period of active business life he continued to be connected intimately with coal interests, and still retains the presidency of the Witch Hazel Coal Company, although practically retired.
     On Nov. 4, 1869, Mr. Wick was married to Mary Arms, and they have three children, viz.:  Hugh B., Mrs. W. J. Sampson of Youngstown, and Myron Arms.  The eldest son, Hugh B. is vice president of the Elyria Iron and Steel Company, of Elyria, Ohio, and resides with his family at that place.  The resides with his family at that place.  The youngest son, Myron Arms, is secretary and treasurer of the Youngstown Furnace and Supply Company.
     In addition to his coal interests, Mr. Wick is a director of the Dollar Savings and Trust Company, of Youngstown; treasurer and member of the board of directors of the Washington, Ohio, Lumber and Box Company, of Hoquiam, Chehalis county, Washington.  Having spent his whole life at Youngstown, Mr. Wick has been more or less prominently connected with the various beneficial agencies which have brought about the progress and prosperity of his native city.
Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Publ. Biographical Publ. Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 638
  HENRY K. WICK, who is president of the large coal firm of H. K. Wick & Company at Youngstown, was born in this city Aug. 31, 1840, being one of ten children born to Col. Caleb B. and Maria Adelia (Griffith) Wick.
     Col. Caleb B. Wick
was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, Oct. 1, 1795, and died at Youngstown June 30, 1865, having passed nearly the whole of his life in Mahoning County, and having been largely interested in most of the important industries that were established in this section during his life time.  His father, Henry Wick, was born in Long Island March 19, 1771, and at the age of 23 years married Hannah Baldwin, a daughter of Caleb Baldwin of Morristown, New Jersey.  After some years of mercantile life in Washington County, Pennsylvania, Henry Wick came to Youngstown, Ohio, in 1801 and here engaged in a mercantile business.  His son, Col. Caleb B. Wick, followed in his footsteps and was also interested in the iron industry which has done so much to develop this section.  Colonel Wick was twice married.  Both of the children born of the first marriage are deceased.  On Nov. 3, 1828, he married Maria Adelia Griffith, a native of Caledonia, New York.  All of their children reached maturity.
     Henry K. Wick attended the public schools of Youngstown and laid the foundation of a good education which is later augmented through lessons learned in the school of experience.  In 1856 he entered the business world as a clerk in the Mahoning National Bank.  In the succeeding fifty years he has been interested in many branches of industry and for the last thirty-eight years has given special attention to the coal and iron industries, being president at this time of H. K. Wick & Company, coal dealers.  His offices are located at No. 404-405 Dollar Bank building.
     Mr. Wick married Millicent R. Clarke, a daughter of Daniel T. Hunt, of Rochester, New York.  The family resident is a very handsome structure located on Wick avenue.  Like all other members of the Wick family in Youngstown, Mr. & Mrs. Wick are attendants of the Memorial Presbyterian Church.  The subject of this sketch is a Republican in politics.
Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Publ. Biographical Publ. Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 462
  HENRY BRYSON WICK.  In recalling the men to whom Youngstown is indebted for its material prosperity, the late Hugh Bryson Wick is immediately brought to mind, for he was a very important factor in its development for many years.  His long and busy life was mainly devoted to this section, which benefited by his business sagacity and public spirit  Mr. Wick was born at Youngstown, Feb 5, 1809, and died Apr. 22, 1880.  He was a son of Henry and Hannah (Baldwin) Wick,  The Wicks were of English origin, settling originally on Long Island, New York.
     Mr. Wick's parents came to the Mahoning Valley as pioneers from Washington County, Pennsylvania,  For many years they were closely identified with the business and social interests of this section and when they passed away they left memories of honorable, useful and virtuous lives.  They reared a large family and almost all of these became prominent in some walk of life.  They were Caleb Baldwin, Thomas Lupton, Betsy, Lemuel Henry, Jr., Hugh Bryson, Hannah, Matilda Lucretia, John Dennick, Mary Ann, Thomas Lupton (2) and Paul.  The last survivor of this notable family was Henry Wick, Jr., who was a resident of Cleveland.
     Hugh Bryson Wick began his remarkable business career as a merchant in 1828, opening a store at Brookfield, Trumbull County, where he remained for ten years, during a portion of which period he had business interests also at Lima.  In 1837 he removed to Lowellville, where he conducted a business for two years, coming to his native place in 1839 to enter into business competition here.  In1846, with his brothers, Caleb B. and Paul Wick, Henry Heasley, Dr. Henry Manning, William Rice and other capitalists.  Mr. Wick built a rolling mill and opened a store, the latter being managed by the late Paul Wick and continued as a business under the management of Paul and Hugh B. Wick until 1855.  This rolling-mill enterprise was the nucleus around which developed the immense works of Brown, Bonnell & Company.
     Probably the late Mr. Wick was best known as a financier, having been prominently identified with the H. B. & H. Wick Banking Company of Cleveland, and, after 1857, with Wick Brothers & Company, Bankers, at Youngstown.  He had large coal and other interests, was a director in the Mercer Mining & & Manufacturing Company, the Shenango & Allegheny Railroad Company and many other successful interprises.  He was essentially a business man and seldom undertook responsibilities unless he clearly saw his ability to bring them to a successful issue.  With other members of his family, and also individually, he stood for years at the head of great combinations of capital and industry,  and during the many years of such prominence enjoyed unlimited confidence and universal esteem.
     On Oct. 30, 1832, Mr. Wick was united in marriage with Lucretia G. Winchell, who was born Sept. 5, 1813, at Wallingford, Ct., and was a daughter of Orrin and Laura C. Winchell.  Being left an orphan when young, Mrs. Wick was reared in the home of her uncle, Dr. Charles Cooke, at Youngstown.  Her death occurred on April 27, 1892, when in her 79th year.  Of the ten children of Hugh B. Wick and wife, four survive, viz.:  John C., Vice president of the Dollar Savings & Trust Company, whose sketch appears in this work; Lucretia H., wife of William Scott Bonnell, president of the Mahoning National Bank, of whom biographical mention will be found elsewhere in this volume; Henry, president of the Witch Hazel Coal Company, residing at No. 416 Wick avenue, and Emily W., residing at No. 315 Wick avenue, widow of the late John M. Bonnell, of whom a sketch may be found on another page of this work.
     From early manhood the late Hugh Bryson Wick was a consistent member of the First Presbyterian Church of Youngstown.  He was a willing and liberal contributor to all regulated charities.  Although he belonged to a family which took a more or less important place in the city's varied interests and thus commanded a large measure of public attention aside from his individual prominence, he was notably simple and unassuming, to the close of his life being a practical business man who liker best to stand before his fellow-citizens on his own merits.  He was a man who was devoted loved in the domestic circle, was trusted and revered by a large number of personal friends and was admired and respected by his fellow citizens.
Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Publ. Biographical Publ. Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 508
  JOHN C. WICK, vice-president of the Dollar Savings & Trust Company, of Youngstown, is one of the most prominent business men of this city, as well as a member of one of the oldest families whose representatives have been foremost in developing the resources of this section and have contributed in a very large degree to Youngstown's commercial
prosperity and importance.  He was born Dec. 9, 1836, at Youngstown, and is one of a family of ten children born to his parents, of whom four survive, the others being: Lucretia H., wife of William Scott Bonnell, president of the Mahoning National Bank, a notice of whom appears elsewhere; Henry, president of the Witch Hazel Coal Company, residing at Youngstown; and Evelyn W., widow of the late John M. Bonnell, a separate sketch of whom also appears elsewhere in this volume.
     Hugh Bryson Wick, the father of our subject, was born at Youngstown, Feb. 5, 1809, when the future city consisted of only a few scattered houses and stores.  In 1828 he engaged in business as a merchant at Brookfield, Trumbull County, where he continued until 1837.  He then removed to Lowellville, where he conducted business for two years.  In 1839 he returned to his native place, and from that time until his death, which occurred Apr. 22, 1880, he was very prominent in the business world of Youngstown, being actively engaged in the iron industry, also as a member of the H. B. & H. Wick Banking Company of Cleveland, and, after 1857, as a member of the banking firm of Youngstown, known as Wick Brothers & Company.  He also had large coal and railroad interests.
     In October, 1832, he married Lucretia G. Winchell, who was a native of Connecticut, born Sept. 5, 1813.  Her death occurred Apr. 27, 1892, when in her 79th year.
     John C. Wick attended the common schools at Youngstown and continued his education in the public schools of Cleveland. Ohio.  His first experience in business was obtained as an employe of the H. B. & H. Wick Banking Company of Cleveland, with whom he continued from 1856 to 1859.  He then returned to Youngstown and entered the bank of Wick Brothers & Company. in which he subsequently acquired an interest.  On August 1, 1894, it was organized as a national bank, becoming the Wick National Bank, with the subject of this sketch as president.  Mr. Wick continued as the head of this institution until July, 1906, when the bank was merged with the Dollar Savings & Trust Company, of which he became vice-president.  Mr. Wick is also vice-president of the Ohio Iron & Steel Company, and is also identified with the Morgan
Spring Company and other important industries.
     Mr. Wick married Caroline H. Bonnell, a daughter of the late William Bonnell of Youngstown, a biographical sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work.  Mr. and Mrs. Wick are members of the Presbyterian Church.  They have a beautiful residence at No. 410 Wick avenue.  Mr. Wick is a Republican in politics.
Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Publ. Biographical Publ. Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 551
  PAUL WICK, was the youngest son of the family of twelve children born to Henry and Hannah (Baldwin) Wick.  He was educated in the old Youngstown Academy, which stood on the site of the present public square.  His first business enterprise was in the joint operation of a coal mine with his brother, John D. Wick.  Later he was associated with other members of the family in the management of a mercantile establishment at Cleveland and still later devoted his attention to the developing of the resources and extending the trade of Youngstown.  He was one of those who laid the foundation for the great iron industry; which has spread the fame of Youngstown throughout the world.  Until 1866 he was concerned in a mercantile business at Youngstown as senior member of the firm of Wick & Goble.  He then turned his attention to private banking, organizing the firm of Wick & Goble.  He then turned his attention to private banking, organizing the firm of Wick Brothers & Company, a banking house which has continued to the present time, having safely passed through every commercial crisis and gaining strength with each succeeding year.  Mr. Wick continued to be the head of this business until his death, which occurred June 13, 1890.  He was also interested in the Ohio Iron & Steel Company and the Paul Wick Real Estate Company.  In 1846 he was married to Susan A. Bull, a native of Vermont, who died in Youngstown in 1852, aged 56 years.  To this marriage six children were born, among whom may be mentioned Myron C., George D. and Fred Wick, prominent business men of the city of Youngstown in 1852, aged 56 years.  To this marriage six children were born, among whom may be mentioned Myron C., George D. and Fred Wick, prominent business men of the city of Youngstown, and Harriet, the widow of John S. Ford.  In 1885 he was married second to Mrs. Margaret L. Haney, of Youngstown.   In his political sentiments Mr. Wick was always a stanch adherent of the Republican party, spirit and large business interests, was more or less influential in shaping public movements in Youngstown.  He served for some yeas as a member of the city council and for nineteen years was a member of the board of education.  In church membership he was a Presbyterian, but his religion was wide enough and broad enough to cover other denominations, and in the dispensing of his charities he knew neither creed, color nor condition.  Like most men of affairs, he was a man of practical views, but he was also keely alive to all that is beautiful and elevating in life.
     John S. Ford is survived by his widow and one daughter, Helen, who reside in a beautiful home at No. 509 Wick avenue.  Mrs. Ford is a member of the Presbyterian Church, to which Mr. Ford also belonged and in which his Christian character was most highly appreciated.
Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Publ. Biographical Publ. Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 923
  JOSEPH WILLIAMSON, one of the leading citizens of Youngstown, Ohio, who has now retired from business activity, belongs to one of the old and influential families of this part of the county.  He was born on the old Williamson farm in Youngstown in 1827 and is a son of Pyatt Williamson, and a grandson of Joseph Williamson.
     Joseph Williamson
came to Mahoning County in the spring of 1800, and cleared a tract of land, then bringing his family here from Washington County, Pennsylvania.  Pyatt Williamson, the father, was born in Youngstown township, Mahoning County, in 1801 and was one of the most prominent farmers and stock raisers in the county.  At the time of his death he was the owner of 225 acres of fine farm land.
     Joseph Williamson, the subject of this notice, was reared on his father's farm and acquired his education in the old pioneer school house of Youngstown township.  Early in life he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked in connection with farming.  He was married in the fifties to Belinda Detchon, a daughter of Elijah Detchon, one of the old settlers of Boardman township, Mahoning County.  Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Williamson:  Warren P., manager of the Youngstown Carriage and Wagon Works; Martha A., and Mary B., who are twins.  Politically, Mr. Williamson is a Republican.  He is a member of the Central Christian Church.
Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown & Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens - Publ. Biographical Publ. Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 921


Geo. C. Wilson


Mrs. Geo. C. Wilson
 
 

GEORGE C. WILSON

(Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown and Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens, Publ. by Biographical Publishing Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 651)

 

 
B. F. Wirt

HON. BENJAMIN F. WIRT

(Source: 20th Century History of Youngstown and Mahoning Co., Ohio and Representative Citizens, Publ. by Biographical Publishing Co. - Chicago, Illinois - 1907 - Page 501)

 

NOTES:

 

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