OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

 

Jackson County, Ohio

Veterans of the
Revolution


(Source: History of Jackson County, Ohio
by D. W. Williams  - Vol. I.
The Scioto Salt Springs - Jackson, Ohio 1900)

     Many of the first settlers were veterans of the Revolutionary War, but no complete list of them is in existence.  A few old pension papers are on file at the Court House, and the declarations in them are given a place here:

WILLIAM CLARKE declared October 16, 1820, that he served in the Revolutionary War as follows:  In the First Virginia state regiment of artillery three years; was in a battle against the British at Hampton, the regiment commanded by Thomas Marshall; was in North Carolina when Colonel Bluford was defeated.
THOMAS CRAIG declared October 17, 1820, that he served in the Revolutionary War as follows:  In the First regiment, under Colonel Rollins, Second company, commanded by Captain Richard Davis, of the Maryland line, and that he has received a pension and that the certificate is No. 10780; that he enlisted in the year 1776, and was taken prisoner at Fort Washington, and was not discharged till 1784.
WILLIAM DARBY declared June 26, 1821, that he served in the Revolutionary War as follows:  That he served as drummer in Captain Davis' company until he, Captain Davis, was killed; then in Captain Carbery's company, that Colonel Hoobly commanded; when he was discharged he belonged to General Wagner's division, and that he served five years and ten months during the Revolutionary War in the Pennsylvania line on Continental establishment.
JAMES DAWSON declared October 6, 1820, that he served three years and seven months in the Thirteenth Virginia regiment of regulars, and was in battle against the Indians at the town of Coshocton, on the Muskingum river, in the state of Ohio; also in battle against the Indians at the mouth of White Woman's Creek; also in battle on Big Beaver, and many others.  He has many descendants in the county.
JOHN EXLINE declared May 19, 1825, that he served as a private soldier in the Revolutionary War, in the Virginia Continental line, for the term of eighteen months; that he was enlisted in Hampshire county, Virginia, in the year 1781, by Captain Thomas Waiman, in whose company he served until after the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown, at which he was engaged as a besieger in said company.  After the surrender to Washington by Cornwallis, at Yorktown, this deponent and the company, with a detachment of about 800, he thinks, moved off and pressed on to Cumberland Court House, where they remained during the winter succeeding said surrender.  In the spring they were marched to Savannah, in Georgia, or near the same, at a place called Widow Givens.  He was marched to Georgia in a company commanded by Captain Beverly Roy, the whole detachment under Colonel Posey; a stop for a time at a place called Eleenegantown, after which he came to Charleston, South Carolina, where he remained until he was marched to Cumberland Court House, again, when at the expiration of his eighteen months he received an honorable discharge under Gen. Charles Scott, and Colonel Posey.  The discharge was signed by said Scott.  He states he does not now remember the number of the company and the regiment, but believes the Colonel's name was Gist.
HENRY HUGHES declared June 26, 1821, that he enlisted in the year 1779 for eighteen months, in a company commanded by Captain John Andrews, which said company belonged to a regiment commanded by Colonel Hawes of the North Carolina line, on the Continental establishment; was in the battles of Guilford Court House, Camden, Eutaw Springs, and in several other skirmishes; was wounded at the battle of Camden, and that he was discharged from the service in the year 1781, by Major Snead, at Salisbury, North Carolina.  A grandson of this man now lives in Franklin township.
JAMES HULSE declared June 26, 1821, that he served in the Revolutionary War in the Virginia Continental line, for the term of three years, for which he received a bounty in land from that state; that he enlisted at Shepherdstown, Virginia, in the company commanded by Captain Abraham Shepherd, and served under him in the Twelfth Virginia regiment.
SETH LARRABEE declared June 29, 1821, that he served in the Revolutionary War as follows, to-wit:  That he was enlisted for three years at Windham, in the state of Connecticut, on or about the month of January, 1777, under Captain Nino Elderkin, belonging to a regiment commanded by Colonel Herman Swift, and that he continued to serve in said company in the service of the United States in the Continental army, against the common enemy, until about January, 1780, when he was honorably discharged at Morristown, New Jersey, about the month of December, in the year 1781.  He was again enlisted at the town of Windham, in the state of Connecticut for three years under Captain Joseph Throng, belonging to Colonel Thomas Swift's regiment.  He continued in said regiment to serve against the common enemy for the term of three years, when he was honorably discharged at West Point.  He served in the whole six years on Continental establishment against the common enemy; was in the battles of Germantown and Monmouth.
THOMAS OLIVER - The last survivor of this band of heroes was Thomas Oliver, whose remains lie buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery.  The people of Jackson held a celebration July 4th, 1843 and two old veterans were brought to town and placed on the state during the exercises.  They were James Dawson and Thomas Oliver.  The latter lived until February 23, 1844, and was 80 years old at the time of his death.  His son by his second wife, Hiram Oliver, has furnished us with the following data concerning hem:  "My father, Thomas Oliver, was a native of Maryland.  He was born May 10, 1763, on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay.  His father died when he was 14 years old, and he then went to live with his Uncle David Loffland in Loudon county, Virginia.  He remained with him about three years, when he enlisted in the Revolutionary army.  He joined the Sixth Virginia regiment, commanded by Colonel Muhlenberg.  This was in 1779.  He enlisted for seven years, or for the war, and when the war was ended he was discharged, having served three years and seven months.  For this service he was pensioned in 1834, getting a pension of $80 a year.  He was married  three times.  His first wife was Sarah Edwards, daughter of Joseph Edwards, A Welshman.  This marriage occurred when he was 27 years of age.  Eight children were born to them, all of whom grew to maturity.  They were William Thomas, Charles, Wesley, Nancy, Rebecca, Elizabeth and Sarah  His wife died in Mason county, Virginia.  In 1816 he came to Ohio and settled on Symmes creek, in this county, leasing a part of the school land.
GEORGE WHALEY declared Jan. 27, 1821, that he was enlisted for one year at Lewisburg, Greenbrier county, Virginia, on or about the 15th day of November, 1776, and served in the company of Captain Matthew Arbuckle of the Twelfth regiment of Virginia, and that he continued to serve in said company in the service of the United Staes, in the Continental army, against the common enemy until about the 15th day of November, 1777.  He was again enlisted at Lewisburg in state and county aforesaid, in the company of Captain Matthew Arbuckle of the Twelfth regiment of Virginia, commanded by Colonel John Newel of General Hand's brigade; that he continued to serve in said corps, or in the service of the United States, in the Continental army, against the common enemy, until about the 15th day of November, 1779, when he was honorably discharged at Fort Randall, at the mouth of Big Kanawha, and that he was in service three years in the whole time.  Was at Fort Randall when attacked by the Indians in 1778.
 

 

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