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HOCKING COUNTY, OHIO
History & Genealogy

BIOGRAPHIES

Source: 
History of Hocking Valley, Ohio -
Published Chicago:
by Inter-State Publishing Co.
1883
Pg. 813

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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  Perry Twp. -
SAMUEL BAILOR, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, Apr. 16, 1816 ,a son of Samuel and Susan (Shaffer) Bailor natives of Pennsylvania, who came to Ohio in an early day.  The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and educated in the subscription schools.  When seven years old he went to his uncle, Isaac Shaffer, with whom he lived till he reached his majority, after which he engaged in the carpenter's trade for about ten years.  He was married Apr. 4, 1846, to Miss Susannah Buzzard, born July 11, 1822, and a daughter of Jacob Buzzard, one of Hocking County's pioneers, who lived to the advanced age of ninety-nine years.  This union was blessed with nine children - Delila J., born Apr. 12, 1847, and died July 21, 1847; Amelia, born Jan. 28, 1849; Clark, born Oct. 15, 1850; an infant, born Sept. 8, 1853, died Nov. 3, 1853; George, born June 4, 1855; an infant, born Jan. 14, 158, died the same day; Charlotta, born May 30, 1859, died July 7, 1859; John, born July 7, 1860; Charles, born July 31, 1867, died Aug. 3, 1867.  After marriage he followed farming in different places till 1859, when he purchased the farm in Perry Township, Hocking County, where he has since resided, having accumulated a large property of 415 acres by his industry and exertion.  He has given his children a good education.  His wife is a member of the Baptist church.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1113
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
THOMAS EDWIN BAKER, junior member of the firm of Work & Baker, stove and tinware merchants of Logan, was born in Lancaster, Ohio, July 14, 1828, where he was reared.  He is the eldest of five sons of Luman and Sarah (Hart) Baker, with whom he lived till he was fifteen years old, when he became apprenticed to John McClelland to learn the tinner's trade, at which he served till his nineteenth year.  He then went to Columbus, Ohio, and worked as a journeyman for one year, after which he worked for six months at Newark, Ohio.  In the fall of 1849 he went to Bainbridge, Ross Co., Ohio, where he held the position of foreman in the shop of Grove W. Penny until the following spring, when he came to Logan and engaged with his father in the stove and tinware business, the firm name being T. E. Baker & Co.  In 1852 his father retired from the firm, and he carried on the business alone till 1857, when he sold out to G. M. Webb & Co., being employed by them as a journeyman until July, 1862.  He was then commissioned First Lieutenant by Governor Tod, and assisted in recruiting Company G, Ninetieth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he went into service and served in the front until July, 1863, when he was wounded in the foot at Stone River, which disabled him.  In December, 1862, he was ordered to a convalescent hospital at Jeffersonville, Ind., where he remained until October, 1863, when a veteran reserve corps was organized of the convalescents, and he was ordered out as Captain of Company G, Seventeenth Regiment Reserved Corps, he having been promoted to Captain in June, 1863, serving with his company on guard duty at Indianapolis until October, 1864.  He participated in the battles of Perryville, Stone River and several less important skirmishes, and in October, 1864, resigned his commission and returned to Logan.  In March, 1865, he formed a partnership with Robert R. Work in his present business.  He was married Oct. 10, 1850, to Miss Mary D. Towers, of Lancaster, by whom he has had nine children, six of whom are living, viz.:  Frances Mary, wife of George Mumford, of Logan; Annie E., wife of George Brashears, of Straitsville; Luman E., Hamden Culver, Gertrude and Nellie W.  The deceased ones were: John Borland, who died at the age of twenty-four years; Sallie Alice, wife of A. Pettit, of Troy, Ohio, who died at twenty-one years of age, and Louisa, who died aged three years.  Mr. Baker has served as Councilman of Logan.  He is a Master, Royal Arch and Council Mason, and member of the lodge, chapter and council at Logan.  He is a charter member of J. K. Rochester Post, No. 140, G. A. R., of Logan.  He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian Church of Logan, of which he is a Trustee.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 920
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
ABRAHAM WASHINGTON BEERY, a Director of the People's Bank, Logan, was born near Staunton, Rockingham Co., Va., Dec. 12, 1799, a son of John and Margaret (Shafer) Beery.  In 1805 his parents came to Ohio and settled six miles east of Lancaster, Fairfield County, where he was reared.  April 20, 1820, he married Elizabeth Miracle, of Fairfield County, and settled on a farm.  In 1826, in connection with farming, he ran a six-horse freight team from Lancaster to Baltimore and Cincinnati.  In 1834 he sold his farm and team, and removed to Perry County, and in 1836 came to Hocking County, and bought 300 acres of land near Logan, soon  after buying 200 acres more.  He improved it all, and with farming engaged also in stock-raising.  In 1842 he was elected Treasurer of Hocking County, and removed to Logan.  He held the office four years, and at the end of that time returned to his farm.  In 1852 he divided his farm with his sons, and returned to Logan and engaged in the grocery business.  In 1856 he retired from all business except banking.  April 17, 1858, his wife died, leaving thirteen children, only two of whom are now living - Simeon and Amos.  July 14, 1858, he married Elizabeth McFadden, of Hocking County.  At the organization of the First Bank of Logan he was one of the stockholders and was elected a Director.  When the People's Bank was organized he was also a stockholder and was elected Vice-President, resigning in 1882 on account of defective hearing.  He is a member of Mingo Lodge, No. 171, A. F. & A. M.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 921

Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
RAYMOND BELT, Mr. Belt's parentage on the father's side was purely English.  When Wm. Claibourn, in the year 1632, erected a trading post on "Kent's Island" in the Chesapeake Bay, near the site of the City of Baltimore, with a little colony, it was in part comprised of Benjamin and Humphries Belt, from County York, East Riding, England.  In a few years after their arrival, Benjamin Belt became dissatisfied, returned to the mother country, leaving his brother Humprhies, the progenitor of this branch of the Belt family, behind.  John Belt, the father of Raymond Belt, was born in Prince Georges County, Maryland, in 1769, the generation of Belts from Humphries down, having resided in and around Baltimore since 1632.  In 1775 John Belt, with his father's family, emigrated to the State of Pennsylvania, and in 1794, at the age of twenty-five years, married Miss Elizabeth Bumgardner.  In 1804, with his small family, he emigrated to the State of Ohio, settling in Licking County, on a farm near Newark, the county seat.  Here Raymond, the youngest of a family of ten, was born March 4, 1819, He pursued the calling of a husbandman until he was of the age of twenty-three years, receiving in the meantime a good common school education each as was imparted in that day and age by the pedagogues of district schools.  In 1842 Mr. Belt commenced working at the carpenter's trade in the little village of Van Attasburg, in Licking County, and being ingenious and was pronounced a complete workman in wood.  Van Attasburg containing an iron foundry, plow-making was carried on to a considerable extent; in the stocking or wooding of plows, handy, ingenious workmen were required, and Mr. Belt's well-known mechanical ideas soon called him to that branch of wood manufacturing business.  After working about two years in Van Attasburg he removed to Toledo, Ohio; remained there one year and returned to the burg once more, remaining and carrying on for himself and building up the business of the village, until the spring of 1846, when he pulled up stakes and moved his plow-stocking business to the then village of Logan.  There being no foundry in Logan at that time, Mr. Belt transported the iron fixing for his plows from Van Attasburg, by wagon, across the county, a distance of over fifty miles, until the idea suggested itself that castings could be manufactured at Logan as cheap as any other point in Ohio, all that was wanting was the facilities for do doing, and being a man of nerve as well as practical mechanic, he, in 1848, associating with himself Robert Van Atta, a thorough molder and foundryman, they immediately proceeded to erect the first foundry and machine shop in the alley of the Hockhocking, which proved a great success.  Oct. 1, 1848, Mr. Belt married Miss Susan Guthrie, of Zanesville, O., formerly of Baltimore, Md.  Mr. Belt continued the foundry business as a copartnership business until 18860, when he became the sole owner.  The same year Mr. Belt assumed the business alone he enlarged the capacity of the works, manufacturing not only plows, but machinery of every description iron could be formed into, manufacturing during the war great numbers of iron cane mills, and that with the increasing demand of every thing in his line made for him, during these years, an independency as far as worldly goods were concerned.
     In 1873 the main machine shop building and a portion of the foundry were destroyed by fire, causing considerable loss, but Mr. Belt, with that indomitable energy characteristic of the man, immediately commenced building again on a more extensive scale, this time using stone, brick and iron for building material, instead of wood.  Completing the outer works, he filled the establishment with the latest and most improved machinery, continued the business, increasing it year by year, until today we find him conducting the most prosperous machine and foundry works a Southern Ohio.  During the wedded life of Mr. Belt five children have been born unto him, four of whom are still living, two of each sex, and all grown up to manhood and womanhood, six grandchildren being already added to the family list.

SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 921
  Starr Twp. -
DARIUS BENNETT, a prominent mechanic of New Cadiz, was born in Starr Township, Mar. 22, 1841, and is a son of Jacob Bennett, a native of Madison County, N. Y., who came to Starr Township nearly sixty years ago and settled in the woods.  Our subject was brought up on the homestead and received a common-school education.  He possesses much ingenuity and early learned the use of mechanical tools.  He mastered the carpenter's trade while yet a boy without an instructor.  He also possesses a knowledge of machinery.  He erected the machinery and operated a stream engine at Straitsville for three years.  For the past two years he has been erecting coal-hoppers and screens.  He was married in the fall of 1860 to Frances A., daughter of Wesley Campbell, of Cadiz.  They have four children - Warren, Josephine (Thompson), Cynthia L.  and Herman.  Mrs. Bennett died July 10, 1878.  Mr. Bennett was married July 19, 1882, and Charlotte Stemler.  His father, Jacob Bennett, was born Feb. 1, 1788, and married Mrs. Rueann Harper, April 22, 1840.  She is a daughter of John Matheny.  Jacob Bennett died Apr. 12, 1861.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1046
  Laurel Twp. -
JAMES BERRY was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, Nov. 15, 1830.  His father, Benjamin Berry, was an old pioneer of that county, but when James was ten years of age came to Hocking County and located in Laurel Township.  James spent his early life on the farm and in attending school, and when sixteen years of age he commenced teaching school, an occupation he followed the greater part of twenty-two years.  In 1874 he purchased the farm where he now resides.  He has ninety acres of land on section 7, Laurel Township, with a good residence and farm buildings.  He was married when nineteen years of age to Mary Sullivan, a native of Tuscarawas County, Ohio.  They had six children, only one now living - Susanna E.  Mrs. Berry died Sept. 3, 1864.  Sept. 19, 1865, Mr. Berry married Jane L. Marshall, a native of Carroll County, Ohio.  Politically Mr. Berry is a Republican.  During the late war he served four months in Company I, One Hundred and Fifty-first Ohio Infantry.  He has held the offices of Township Trustee and Assessor.  He is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1134
  Starr Twp. -
LEMUEL TOBIAS BETHEL, a farmer of Starr Township, Hocking Co., Ohio, was born in Hampshire County, Va., Nov. 9, 1818, a son of Joshua and Nancy (Kidwell) Bethel.  His parents moved to Ohio and settled near Senecaville, Guernsey Co. ,when he was seven years of age.  When he was twenty-two years of age he purchased a farm near Senecaville and carried it on till 1855, when he came to Athens County and settled in Trimble Township, living there till 1868.  He then removed to Harrison Township, Vinton County, and in 1880 purchased his present farm in Starr Township.  In February, 1842, he married Rebecca Slater, of Guernsey County.  They have eight children - Caroline, now Mrs. John Maxwell; Albert S., of Nelsonville; Joshua C.; Nancy M., now Mrs. J. H. Anderson, of Vinton County; Lettice Ann, now Mrs. D. Ogg, of Vinton County; George William; John Lemuel; Mary I., now Mrs. Charles Collins, of Pike County.  They have lost one daughter, Rebecca J., wife of Levi Collins, who died Dec 14, 1881, aged twenty-one years.  Mr. and Mrs. Bethel are members of the Methodist church.  He is a member of Hockhocking Lodge, No. 339, I. O. O. F., Nelsonville.  While a resident of Trimble Township he served as Trustee and Justice of the Peace.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page1046 - Starr Twp.
  Laurel Twp. -
REV. D. P. BLACK, son of David and Mary Black, is a native of Perry County, Ohio, born Jun. 1, 1833.  He was the fifth of a family of nine children, and his early life was spent on the home farm, when eighteen years of age he went into Deavertown, Morgan County, where he worked at the carpenter's trade five years.  In the month of April, 1856,, he went into Muskingum County and lived nine years in that county.  He came to Hocking County in 1865 and resided in Benton Township until two years ago, when he purchased a portable saw-mill of twenty-five horse power, which he and his two sons are now operating in Laurel Township.  He was married to Oney S. Sowers, of Muskingum County, Apr. 6, 1856.  They have a family of five children - DeWitt C., Addie, Caroline, John S. and Rachel.  Rev. Black is a member of the Disciple church, in which he has labored as a preacher of the gospel for seventeen years.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1134
  Washington Twp. -
JAMES BLACKSTONE, born Jan. 27, 1822, in Guernsey County, Ohio, son of James and Nancy (Dennis) Blackstone, both natives of Chester County, Penn.  The parents of both Mr. and Mrs. Blackstone settled in Guernsey County on adjoining farms where they grew up and married, making that county their home until the time of their death.  Mr. Blackstone died when James was about two years of age.  Mrs. Blackstone afterward married her brother-in-law, Thos. Blackstone.  Both are now dead, Mrs. Blackstone dying in 1876.  The children of her first marriage were - James and William.  By the second there were seven children - Harriette (deceased), Elizabeth, Thomas, Christiana J. (deceased), Vinston (deceased), Eben and Isaac.  James Blackstone, the eldest, grew to manhood in Guernsey County.  Although the educational facilities were very limited, he received a fair education.  During the greater part of the time he helped his father on the farm.  He was married July 4, 1842, to Maria E. Sheley, who was born in Guernsey County, Apr. 15, 1821.  Previous to this he began working at the cabinet trade which he continued after he was married.  Then he turned his attention to carpentering, which occupation he followed in the vicinity of Claysville for nineteen years in succession.  In 1861 he came to Hocking County where he had eighty acres, a part of the farm on which he now lives.  He moved into an old log cabin not three rods from where his residence now stands.  In connection with his work on farm he also kept at his trade during the summer months, having erected a number of buildings in this and Vinton counties.  At two different times he made additions to his farm, having at present 226 acres under good cultivation.  The land has large veins of iron ore, also some coal running through it.  Mr. Blackstone has been connected with the United Brethren church since 1862.  He was reared a Methodist, and has been a member of the church since he was sixteen years of age.  He has been School Director of Washington Township for the last three years.  They have had seven children, five of whom are now living, two sons and three daughters - Nancy Jane, Charlotte C. (deceased), Mary Maria, William Brown, Joseph H., Martha Ellen and one dying infancy.  Mr. Blackstone has always been a hard-working man, and although he has shared all the hardships common to the times in which he lived he is now, at the age of sixty-one years, enjoying remarkably good health.  He is still full of that afore and energy which have all along marked his life.  He has been a devout man, being a constant reader of the scriptures.  Taking Christ for his example, he has tried to live in accordance with His teachings.  For the last fifteen years he has been Class-leader in his church, and has lived to see all of his family brought within its protecting folds.  As a citizen, he has many friends, and is honored and respected by them all.  In 1861 he enlisted in the Ohio National Guards, and, on the first of May, 1863, was mustered into the regular army at Columbus for 100 days.  He served out his time and returned home.  In the fall of 1864, he was drafted into the army and served till the close of the war.  He was mustered out of the service at Richmond, Va., June, 1865, and returned home in July, 1865.  He was in Company G, Sixty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1076
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
ANDREW BLUM, farmer, second son of Martin and Jacobine E., nee Sheine, Blum, was born near Stuttgart, Wurtemburg, Germany, Sept. 28, 1827.  When three years of age he came with his parents to the United States and settled near Hanover, Penn., where they lived three years and then removed to Thorn Township, Perry Co., Ohio, and resided nine years.  They then came to Laurel Township, Hocking County, near Gibisonville.  Mr. Blum has been engaged in farming since twenty-one years of age.  In February, 1873, he came to Falls Township where he has since resided.  Aug. 15, 1848, he married Sarah, daughter of Solomon and Barbara A. (Fought) Kline, of Hocking County.  They have twelve living children - Margaret, wife of Henry Miller of Laurel Township; Jacobine E., wife of George Miller, of Washington Township; Barbara A., wife of John Risch, of Good Hope Township; Abraham, Mary, Solomon, Caroline, Samuel, Ella, John H., Emma and George.  Andrew died in infancy in Van Wert County.  Mr. and Mrs. Blum are members of the Lutheran church.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 923
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
LUTHER STONE BORT, insurance agent, Logan, Ohio, was born near Chautauqua Lake, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., July 18, 1818.  When he was quite small he removed with his parents, Barnard H. and Polly (Dewey) Bort, to Erie, Pa., with whom he lived until he was fourteen years of age, and till then had received but a meager education.  On leaving home he went to Ravenna, Ohio, where he learned the printer's trade with his uncle, Colonel N. Laurin Dewey, being with him four years.  He then worked in different offices of that place until 1840, when he came to Columbus, Ohio, and was employed in the Statesman Office during 1840 and '41.  In June, 1841, he came to Logan and permanently settled, where he was employed as foreman in the Hocking Sentinel office, he issuing the first number of that paper.  In 1845 he purchased a half interest in the same paper, which he owned until 1847, when he sold out, and in that year established in Hocking Valley Republican, which he owned and published until 1850, when he removed his paper to McArthur, Vinton County, where he published it until 1853.  He then sold out and returned to Logan and was employed as clerk and assistant manager of the Logan Furnace Company until the breaking out of the Rebellion, when he returned to Logan, where he has since been variously employed.  In 1861 he was elected Assistant Assessor of Hocking County serving three or four years.  In the spring of 1882 he was elected Justice of the Peace of Falls Township, and is now the incumbent of that office.  Nov. 14, 1843, he was married to Sallie Ann Case, of Logan, by whom he has three living children - Laurin L. and William F., both bookkeepers for W. B. Brooks & Son, of Nelsonville, Ohio, and Lucius O., a clerk in the drug store of Miller & Case, at Logan.  They have lost five by death - two in infancy, two between five and twelve, and one who had reached maturity.  Mr. Bort is a Master, Royal Arch, Council and Knight Templar Mason.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 923
  Green Twp. -
SAMUEL M. BOTTS, deceased, late of Green Township, was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, Mar. 31, 1833, a son of John Botts, who brought his family to Hocking County when Samuel was but a small boy.  He received his education in the common schools, and at the High School at Albany, in Athens County, Ohio.  He taught school eight winters, and was a successful teacher, but failing health forced him to abandon the profession.  Oct. 28, 1856, he married Lucinda C. Parker, a daughter of Albert Parker, an early settler of Green Township.  They had two children - Mary Ellen and Clara M.  The latter died Apr. 9, 1883, at the age of twenty-three years.  Mary Ellen is now the wife of Charles H. Shaw, a son of John A. Shaw.  He was born Nov. 17, 1853, in this township.  They have had three children - Lucy M., Cora F. (deceased) and Gertrude.  Mr. Botts died Jan. 13, 1874, loved and respected by all.  He was an Odd Fellow in good standing, and a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Botts and Mr. and Mrs. Shaw are also members of the Methodist church.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1029
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
CHARLES EDWARD BOWEN, son of Mead and Lucy (Drake) Bowen, was born at Logan, Oct. 7, 1839, where he was reared, being educated in the common and select schools till his fourteenth year, when he began clerking in the store of Crooks & Ijams, remaining three years.  He then clerked in different stores in Logan until he was twenty-one, when he was appointed Cashier of the Citizens' Bank, of Logan.  In 1863 he became a stockholder in the First National Bank of Logan, of which he was elected a Director and Cashier, retaining that position-until July 14, 1881, when the First National Bank surrendered its charter and reorganized as  a private institution under the name of the First Bank of Logan.  He was a stockholder of this bank and was again elected a Director.  April 5, 1877, he was married to Lucy E., youngest daughter of John Rochester, of Logan.  They have three children whose names are - Francis Mead, Eveline and John Rochester.  He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian Church of Logan.  He is a Master, Royal Arch, Council and Knight Templar Mason, and member of the lodge, chapter and council, at Logan, and Commandery No.  2, at Lancaster, and is Treasurer of the lodge, chapter and council at Logan.  In December, 1860, Mr. Brown was appointed City Treasurer to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John Rochester, which office he has ever since held by re-elections.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 923
  Green Twp. -
DAVID BOWEN, section 19, Green Township, was born in Athens Township, Athens Co., Ohio, Dec. 11, 1819, a son of David Bowen, a native of New England, and an early settler of Athens County.  Our subject was reared on a farm and attended a subscription school.  At the age of seventeen years he learned the stone masonís trade, and cut stone on the Hocking Canal for three years, and has worked at the trade at intervals since that time.  He came to Hocking County in 1843, and has since resided in Green Township, where he owns 212 acres of valuable land, and is engaged in farming and stock-raising, making line sheep a specialty.  He owns sixty acres in Starr Township.  He was married Jan 1, 1843, to Margaret Kirkland, by whom he had six children - Russell, Mary J., John, Warren, David and Edmond.  Mrs. Bowen died July 26, 1871, and in 1872 he married Lucinda Lacy.  They have had two children - Hester A. (deceased) and Charles O.  Mr. Bowen was Township Trustee three years.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Presbyterian church.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1030
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
WILLIAM MEAD BOWEN was born in Logan, Hocking Co., Ohio, Apr. 13, 1830, being the eighth child and eldest son of a family of eleven children, an only brother being the eleventh child.  Mead Bowen, the father of W. M. Bowen, was the Welsh extraction, born in Talbot County, Md., Jan.  3, 1782.  Having removed to Frederick County, Va., in 1810, he was married to Miss Lucy Drake, a daughter of Francis Drake, an Englishman, and lineal descendant of Sir Francis Drake,  the famous English navigator of Queen Elizabeth's time.  In the year 1816 the Elder Bowen removed from the valley in Virginia, crossing the Allegheny Mountains with his small family, consisting of his wife are two children, in a two wheeled vehicle, then known as a gig or carryall, landing on Ohio soil in the month of June the same year, stopping temporarily at the small village of Westfall, Pickaway County, where his brother Isaac resided, having preceded him to Ohio several years before.  In the month of June, 1817, Mead Bowen moved for the last time, landing in the wilderness where Logan now stands on the 7th day of the month, and residing in the same community until his death in 1877, being then nearly ninety-six years of age.  W. M. Bowen springs from a family notable for longevity, his father living nearly ninety-six years and mother till eighty-nine years of age.  The early life of W. M. Bowen was spent, in winter attending such subscription or so-called district schools, as a country village could afford, changing masters and books almost every term, and in summer about his father's shop, his father carrying on a cabinet-making and house-joining business, interspersed with hunting, fishing, and the usual routine of fun and frolic always to be found in the backwoods settlement.  Advantages for acquiring an education in those early days, such as the youth of this day and generation enjoy, were not known, and when reading, writing and arithmetic, as far as and including the Rule of Three were mastered, the youth were considered competent for any branch of business in life (barring the professions) to which they might be called.  At the age of sixteen years young Bowen, having passed through the school ordeal, received a call, that is, his father, having a large family of children to support, all girls with this single exception, called the youthful graduate into the cabinet and joiner ship, and inducted his genius into the mysteries of the practical and profitable use of the saw, plane and hammer.  Three years spent in the shop gave a sufficient knowledge to satisfy him that some other kind of business would be more congenial if not more profitable.  During his apprenticeship Bowen had applied his leisure hours to the reading of history and study of chemistry, natural philosophy and the higher branches of mathematics.  Leaving the shop he entered as clerk in a grocery store.  After acting a year or more in this capacity he took a position in a dry-goods store, and Dec. 25, 1851, being then past twenty-one years of age, was married to Mary Elizabeth Crooks, the daughter of James W. Crooks, an old dry-goods merchant of Logan.  They have had eight children, six still living - Charles E., Kate B., James M., William M., Vernon G., and Fannie E.  In 1854 young Bowen wishing to obtain a thorough knowledge of double-entry bookkeeping, attended and graduated from Granger's Commercial College, Columbus, Ohio, after having been a married man some three years.  On his return from his studies in 855, he engaged to keep books for the Five Mile Furnace Company.  The iron interest at that time seeming in a healthy condition a small property in Logan was sold and invested in furnace stock.  The financial crisis of 1857 came on, iron went to naught, and organized companies followed, leaving penniless those who a few years previous seemed riding on the topmost wave of prosperity.  Bowen's stock and earnings went the way of all things tangible, and returning to Logan he for a time engaged in the drug business.  In 1858 he accepted a situation as Cashier and bookkeeper in the Citizen's Bank of Logan, a position he kept until the news of the first battle of Bull Run aroused all the latent patriotism of the individual.  Resigning his position as Cashier in favor of his brother Charles, in fourteen days he reported with 103 men, rank, and file, at Camp Chase, the first three years' company raised in the valley.  Taking position as Captain he was assigned the second place in the Thirty-first Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, that is, Company B.  Having at that time never been exposed or having had any out door exercise, and putting his whole soul and energy in the business of drilling his company for the service, he contracted while in Camp Chase the typhoid fever, and lay all the month of September, 1861, and a portion of October at the point of death.  About the 1st of November, same year, having recovered somewhat from his severe sickness, he reported for duty at Camp Dick Robinson, Garrard County, Ky.  Remained in the services, passing through the campaign of the winters of 1816 - '62, the battle Mill Springs, the occupation of Nashville, and after the battle of Shiloh or Pittsburg Landing, when, having had three several returns of the first attack and completely broken down home, and for more than one-half year remained an idle invalid.  Having regained health somewhat, in the fall of 1862 accepted a position in the Venango Bank, Franklin, Pa., where he removed his family.  He continued in business in Franklin until the spring of 1864; then removed to Corry, Pa., and started the First National Bank of Corry, Pa., with a capital of $100,000, taking the position of Cashier.  Having been successful in several oil enterprises Mr. Bowen sold out his banking interests in Corry and purchased two thirds of the stock of the First National Bank of Logan, whose capital was then $50,000, and in the summer of 1866 removed, once more returning to his native town, by his own business exertions being well fixed in life.  He took charge of the bank as its President, with his brother C. E. Bowen, Cashier.
     In the spring of 1866, by the collapsing of a large private bank in New York City, where his bank had a deposit of $29,000, a loss was sustained, falling heavily on him, when he sold his own stock, making the losses good, but losing his prestige as largest owner and President of the same.  In the same year he bought in connection with E. G. Collins & Co.; bought Mr. Collins' interest afterward and continued the business under the name of W. M. Bowen and sold to Messrs, James & Bishop in 1871.  Being largely interested in fire insurance stock the fire in Chicago cleaned the remainder of Mr. Bowen's fortune, he losing in the destruction of property and depreciation in values consequent upon the passage of the Specie Resumption Act over $25,000; yet, nothing despairing, he is the same business man as of yore.
     In politics Mr. Bowen is a Democrat, and in the year 1873 was elected to fill a vacancy in the Sixty-first General Assembly (caused by the resignation of Hon. O. Case to accept a position in the Secretary of State's office) to represent Hocking County in the Ohio House of Representatives; re-elected again and served through the Sixty-second General Assembly.  Previous to that he had served as President of the School Board, and in various other minor positions.  He was the pioneer fire-brick business man, having built largely for the purpose of manufacturing the same when the crash overtook him.  He was in every public enterprise, among others started the first Building Association in the valley.  He was admitted to the practice of law in April, 1877, and has served as Deputy Probate Judge three years, as Township Clerk two years, and for the office of Auditor, which is equivalent in this county to an election.

SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 925
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
WILLIAM RIBBEL BOWLBY, senior member of the boot and shoe firm, W. R. Bowlby & Son, Logan, was born near Belvidere, Warren County, N. J., June 18, 1829, a son of Charles and Rachel (Ribbel) Bowlby.  In 1835 his parents came to Ohio, and settled on a farm near Newark, residing there till 1841.  They then removed to Linnville, remaining there two years, and in 1843 came to Hocking County.  William R. remained at home till he attained his majority, and in 1851, having learned the shoemaker's trade, he went to Sugar Grove and started a manufactory, hiring a number of hands.  He afterward engaged in the same business in Urbana and Nelsonville, and in 1855 became permanently established in Logan.  Dec. 24, 1854, he married Miss Jane Smith, of Somerset, Perry Co., Ohio.  They have had a family of three children - Kate, Charles and Maggie.  The latter died in 1881, aged fifteen years.  Mr. Bowlby was obliged in early life to rely on his own resources, but by honesty and perseverance has accumulated an extensive property.  Besides his business house and residence, he owns twenty-three tenement houses, which afford him a good revenue.  Politically he is a Republican, and during the war of the Rebellion was a staunch Union man; has cast a vote for every Republican President.  Mr. Bowlby is a man of sound judgment and strong will.  In all his business dealings he is strictly honest, considers his word as binding as his note.  Though quick to resent an insult, he is withal a kind, considerate friend, and has done much toward helping others in a business way, and in that way has lost considerable money, very few deeming it necessary to repay what had been given in an hour of need.  Mr. Bowlby has always been temperate and industrious.  His weight is 213 pounds.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 928
  Salt Creek Twp. -
NELSON BOWSHER, born Jan. 19, 1837, is a son of Abraham and Elizabeth (Gaul) Bowsher, natives of Ohio.  He was married in September, 1861, to Susan, daughter of Jacob and Debby (Grim) Seesholtz, her father a native of Germany and her mother of Ohio.  They have had four children, three only now living - William L., who married Mary MillerGeorge F., who married Dosha Wilkins, and Rose E.  Mr. Bowsher has an interest in a saw-mill which he runs in connection with farming.  He has a well-cultivated farm of seventy acres, with good farm buildings.  He enlisted during the late war in Company.  One Hundred and fourteenth Infantry
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1101
  Laurel Twp. -
JOHN BREHM, son of George and Margaret (Myer) Brehm, is a native of Franklin County, Pa., born Aug. 22, 1803.  In 1810 his parents removed to Perry County, Ohio, near Somerset, where he was reared and educated.  He was married in 1828 to Dorothy Snook, They had a family of five children, only three now living - Margaret, Mary and John.  Mrs. Brehm died, and in 1839 Mr. Brehm married Margaret Marshall.  They had two children, only one now living - Hon. George Brehm, Mayor of Logan.  Mr. Brehm married for his third wife, in 1873, Rachel Crawford  When he came to his present farm it was all wild land, but he now has 172 acres of finely cultivated land with good farm buildings, his residence being on section  31.  He has been a member of the Baptist church forty years.  Politically he is a Democrat.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1135
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
GEORGE WASHINGTON BREHM, Mayor of Logan and attorney, was born in Laurel Township, Hocking County, Ohio, July 14, 1841, where he was reared a farmer, being educated in the district school, and by attending one term at a select school at Lancaster, Ohio.  When sixteen years of age he taught the school in his own district, and afterward taught during the winter season twelve years.  In 1870 he was appointed Deputy Clerk in the Probate Justice's office, under Hon George W. Alfred, and filled that position three years, studying law privately during the time.  In January, 1872, he was admitted to the bar by the District Court of Hocking County.  In 1873 he began the practice of law at Logan, being associated with G. W. Alfred.  This partnership continued, with the exception of two years, 1875-'75, till 1880.  He has been Mayor of Logan since the spring of 1876.  In 1864 he was elected Clerk of Laurel Township, serving till his removal to Logan in 1868.  He has been a Justice of the Peace of Falls Township since 1871.  In 1867 he was appointed School Examiner of Hocking County, serving till 1876.  Mar. 26, 1863, Mr. Brehm married Eliza Snoke, of Fairfield County, who died Dec. 10, 1876, leaving five children - Clara A., Frank H., Charles E., Willie E. and Ida E.  Sept. 5, 1878, he married Marian Josephine Rhodes, of Orleans County, N. Y.  They have two children - Mary and Kate Eliza.  Mr. and Mrs. Brehm are members of the Primitive Baptist church.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 929
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
JOHN G. BRIGHT, farmer, cabinet maker, house carpenter and joiner, fifth son of George and Frances (Bowman) Bright, was born near Bremen, Fairfield Co., Ohio, Mar. 28, 1817.  When nineteen years of age he removed with his parents to Falls Township, Hocking County.  At the age of twenty-one he rented lands of his father.  In 1851 he removed to Elkhart County, Ind., and purchased a farm.  In 1858 he sold his farm and returned to Falls Township and purchased a portion of the homestead.  Although he did not serve as an apprentice at either of his trades, he has become efficient in both.  Jan. 6, 1839, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Isaac and Catharine (Fry) Red, of Marion Township.  They have five children - John, Frances (wife of William Fickle), Franklin P., George and Nancy J. (wife of Isaac Wolf), all of Hocking County.  Mr. Bright is a member of the Dunkard, or Brethren church.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 929
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
JOSEPH LEOHNER BRIGHT was born in Falls Township, Hocking Co., Ohio, Nov. 17, 1841, a son of Joseph 'B. and Catherine (Leohner) Bright.  He was reared a farmer, living with his parents till manhood.  When twenty-one years of age he began teaching, and taught in many of the Hocking County schools.  From 1877 to 1881 he was employed to buy ore for the Franklin Furnace Company, of Columbus, and other furnaces in the Hocking Valley.  In 1881 he was employed as bookkeeper of the Akron Iron Company, of Athens County, remaining with them till 1883, when he resigned his position.  In 1876 he was appointed by the Probate Court, County School Examiner in Hocking County, holding the position three years, and in 1882 was again appointed to the same office, still holding that position.  In September, 1863, Mr. Bright married Margaret Elizabeth Weaver, of Hocking County, Ohio.   They have had nine children, only five now living, the others dying in infancy - Lucy Alice, Ida May (wife of Henry Smith, of Logan), Mattie Izora, Lillie Maud and Jennie Belle.  Mr. Bright is a member of Mingo Lodge, No. 171, A. F. & A. M., Logan.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 929
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
SAMUEL HAMILTON BRIGHT, attorney at law, and senior member of the firm of Bright & Wright, Logan, was born near Logan, Nov. 9, 1841, the second of two sons of Samuel S. and Rebecca (Ijams) Bright.  He was reared a farmer, commencing his education in the common district schools but finishing it in the Ohio University at Athens.  He taught two terms in Hocking County, and in April 1864, enlisted in Company K, Fiftieth Ohio Infantry, to serve three years or during the war, going out as a private.  He was detailed a Quartermaster's clerk, serving as such till May, 1865, when he was promoted to Quartermaster-Sergeant.  He was mustered out in September, 1865, and returned to Hocking County and resumed teaching.  In the spring of 1866 he entered the Ohio University, attending four terms, and in the fall of 1867 he began the study of law in the office of C. H. Rippey, Logan, and was admitted to the bar by the District Court at Circleville, in May, 1869, and at once began the practice of law in Logan.  In 1872 P. F. Price became associated with him, forming the law firm of Bright & Price.  About a year later Mr. Price retired from the firm and in April, 1879, O. W. H. Wright, a former student in his office, became associated with him.  In May, 1869, he was appointed United States Revenue Collector for Hocking County.  The following years the district was enlarged, embracing Hocking, Fairfield and Perry counties.  Jan. 1, 1872, Mr. Bright resigned the Collectorship on account of his increasing law business.  For the last four years he has been President of the Board of Education of Logan.  Feb. 10, 1870, he was married to Lydia T. Allen, of Athens, Bradford Co., Pa.  They have a family of six children - Pascal Allen, Samuel Carlton, Frederick Ijams, Martha Louise, Sumner Spurgeon, and Warren Harris.  Mr. and Mrs. Bright are members of the Methodist church.  He is a member of the James K. Rochester Post, No. 140, G. A. R.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 929
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
ALLEN HEZEKIAH BROOKE, attorney at law, Logan, was born in Greenfield Township, Fairfield Co., Ohio, Nov. 17, 1852, a son of Hezekiah and Frances (Brandt) Brooke.  He was educated in the Fairfield Union Academy at Pleasantville, Ohio, and at Wittenberg College, Springfield, Ohio.  When thirteen years of age he commenced to take care of himself, although he remained at home till seventeen, and defrayed the expenses of his education.  When nineteen years of age he began teaching and taught during the winter terms for three years.  In the spring of 1875 he began the study of law in the office of S. H. Bright and was admitted to the bar by the District Court in Newark, Ohio, in June, 1877.  He then, in company with F. S. Pursell, commenced the publication of the Hocking Valley Gazette, but soon after sold his interest to T. S. Nutter and began the practice of his profession with C. H. Buerhaus, under the firm name of Brooke & Buerhaus.  They continued together but a short time when, by mutual consent, they dissolved partnership, and since then Mr. Brooke has practiced alone.  In 1881 he was elected City Solicitor of Logan and served two years.  July 20, 1881, he married Emma C. Flenner of Lancaster, Ohio.  They have one child - Marie Theresa.  Mr. Brooke is a member of Mingo Lodge, No. 171, A. F. & A. M., and of Logan Lodge, No. 119, K. of P.  His grandfather was one of the pioneer settlers of Hocking Valley, locating near the present site of Logan in 1810.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 931
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
OLIVER BROOKE, son of Hezekiah and Frances (Brandt) Brooke, was born Jan. 20, 1835, in Greenfield Township, Fairfield Co., Ohio, in which place he was reared to manhood.  At the age of eighteen he was apprenticed to Robert Hunter to learn the trade of carriage making, but after serving nearly two years he abandoned it and taught school during the winter months and followed farming during the remainder of the year till 1869.  While living in Greenfield Township, he served as Assessor one year and as Assistant Assessor another year.  From 1869 to 1871 he dealt in produce at Logan, when he worked in the coal mines at Straitsville until 1874, and in that year he established his present grocery business at Logan.  He has been twice married, marrying his first wife, Miss Louisa J. Myers, in 1857.  She died in November, 1863, leaving two children - Charles Luther and Emma Frances.  He married his second wife, Miss Louisa E. Bright, of Logan, Jan. 29, 1867.  They have had six children, viz.: William H., Frank E., Louisa Belle, Mary Ruth, Samuel Bright and George Mills, who died in May, 1873, at the age of six years.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 931
  Marion Twp. -
ALFRED M. BROWN, teacher, twelfth son of Thomas and Hannah (Beech) Brown, was born in Marion Township, July 2, 1856.  He was educated at the common schools.  When twenty-one years of age he began teaching school.  He attended the Normal School at Lebanon, Ohio, two terms, and has attended the select schools during his vacations, thus preparing himself to make teaching a business.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1150
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
CHARLES  D. BROWN, bank foreman for the Columbus & Hocking Coal and Iron Company at Gore, was born in Guilford County, N. C., Sept. 22, 1847.  He is the son of William W. Brown, deceased, a native of Davidson, N. C., who moved with his family to Lawrence County, Ohio, in 1849.  Our subject lived in Lawrence County till 1874, when he went to Zanesville, Ohio, and was employed in the Ohio Iron Company there till 1876.  He then came to Gore where he has since resided.  He was agent for the Baird Iron Works two years, and afterward with the Thomas Iron Works till 1883, still remaining with their successors, having been foreman of their coal mines since September, 1882.  In 1873 he was married to Rebecca Ratcliff, a native of Carter County, Ky., and daughter of Samuel Ratcliff, of Greenup County, Ky.  Mr. Brown belongs to the I. O. O. F. society.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 932
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
JAMES EZRA BROWN, shop-clerk of the C., H. V. & T. Railroad, is the son of Edward M. and Martha J. (Rambo) Brown.  He was born near Roseville, Muskingum Co., Ohio, Aug. 25, 1846, where he lived till August, 1854.  He then moved with his parents to Hocking County, they settling in Benton Township, where his father died in 1861, and in the following year he moved with his mother to Logan.  He received a commercial education at the Eastman National Business College, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., graduating from that institution in July, 1871.  From 1866 to 1871 he taught school in Perry and Hocking counties.  After graduating he entered the Union school of Logan, and taught until 1880.  In June, 1880, he began to learn telegraphy in the office of the C., H. V. & T. Railroad, at Logan, and was so engaged until May 3, 1881.  In 1878 he became Secretary of the Hocking Agricultural Society which he resigned in 1881, to accept his present position.  Mr. Brown is an Odd Fellow and member of Hocking Lodge, No. 262, at Logan, of which he is Past Grand, and is also a member of Mineral Encampment, No. 91, I. O. O. F., of which he is a Past Patriarch.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 932
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
MARTIN B. BROWN, farmer, fifth son of James and Susan (Adams) Brown, was born near Junction City, Perry Co., Ohio, Dec. 7, 1848, and lived there with his parents until manhood.  At the age of twenty-one years he began farming with his father for an interest and worked with him five years.  He then, in 1874, purchased and removed to a farm in Hocking County, and lived there until the spring of 1882,when he sold his farm and purchased the one where he resides.  Nov. 12, 1874, he married Amanda E., daughter of James and Maria (Ashbaugh) Sherlock, of Perry County.  They have one son living - James A.  They have lost one son - Willie A., died aged three years.  Mr. and Mrs. Brown are members of the United Brethren church.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 923
  Marion Twp. -
THOMAS BROWN, farmer, fifth son of William and Hannah (Taylor) Brown, was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., June 13, 1811, and lived with his parents until manhood.  At twenty-one years of age he began working on a farm for wages.  In 1846 he removed to Ohio and leased lands in Marion Township, Hocking County.  In 1850 he purchased the farm where he resides.  He has served as Assessor of Marion Township four years.  Sept. 11, 1832, he married Hannah, daughter of John and Rosanna (Moore) Beech.  They had nine sons - William, of Licking County; David, of Hocking County; Amos O., guard in Ohio Penitentiary; James of Columbus; Joseph, of Franklin County; Lewis, of Putnam; Noah H., of New Baltimore; Isra, of Hocking County, and Alfred, at home.  John, the second son, died aged two years; Samuel died in the army at Boliver, Tenn., aged twenty-one years; Jesse, aged two years; Leroy, aged eleven years; Oliver T., aged one year; Anamary, aged one year; Nancy J., aged one year.  Mr. and Mrs. Brown are members of the Presbyterian church.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1050
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
THOMAS J. BROWN, farmer, second son of James and Susan (Adams) Brown, was born near Junction City, Perry Co., Ohio, Aug. 15, 1842, and lived there with his parents until nineteen years of age, working on the farm and attending the common schools.  Oct. 4, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Sixty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Zanesville, Ohio, as a private for three years and was appointed Corporal at the organization of the company.  He was engaged in the first battle of Winchester, Va., Port Republic, Blackwater, Va., Morris Island, S. C., and the assault upon Fort Wagner, where he was wounded and disabled for five weeks.  He was appointed Sergeant of the company, dating for the battle of ort Wagner.  Nov. 18, 1863, was promoted to First Sergeant, and Jan. 1, 1864, re-enlisted as a veteran.  Jan. 3, 1864, was appointed Sergeant-Major of his regiment and filled the position to the close of the war.  June 9, 1864, he was in the battle of Petersburg, Va., afterward at Walthall Junction, Deep Bottom, Va., Deep Run, Va., also at Chafen's Farm, same date, where he was slightly wounded.  He was at the siege of Petersburg until Apr. 2, 1865, when he was engaged in the assault upon Fort Gregg, near Petersburg, and was present at Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court-House, Va., Apr. 9, 1865.  He was mustered out and discharged at City Point, Va., Sept. 1, 1865.  He then returned home and worked on the farm for his father until the fall of 1868.  In April, 1869, he purchased and moved to the farm where he now resides.  Oct. 12, 1868, he married Mary A., daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Houts) Van Atta, of Perry County.  They have three children - Joshua, Nettie M. and Sarah A., all at home.  Himself and wife are members of the United Brethren church.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 933

Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
WM. M. BROWN (Portrait Only)

SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883

  Starr Twp. -
WILLIAM D. BUCKINGHAM, section 29, Starr Township, was born in Vinton (then Hocking) County, Ohio, Mar. 29, 1842.  He went with his parents to York Township in 1856 and came to this township in 1861.  He was a soldier in the late war in Company E, Ninetieth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Angle, who was killed at the siege of Nashville.  He participated in the battle of Stone River, where he was wounded and thereby rendered unable for duty, and nine months later was discharged and now draws a small pension from the United States Government.  Since the war his business has been for the most part that of a teamster.  He was married July 31, 1862, to Almira McCallister (her father, however, spells the name McCollester), a daughter of Abram McCollester.  They have five children - Frank E., Charles G., Mary D., Martha J. and Abram Curtis.  Mr. Buckingham owns thirty acres of land.  William Curtis Buckingham, the father of the above, was born in Starr Township, Hocking Co., Ohio, Mar. 8, 1819, and is a son of Philo Buckingham, a native of Connecticut, who came to Starr Township in 1817, and settled in the woods.  He resided here about twenty-seven years, then went to Jackson County, Ohio, and in 1850 removed to Edgar County, Ill., where he died in the spring of 1851.  He was brought up on the farm and received a limited common-school education.  He was married Jan. 7, 1841, to Frederica D., daughter of August Schaal.  She was born in Germany, and brought to America at the age of five years.  Mr. and Mrs. Buckingham had six children, four now living - William D., Caroline M., John A. and Andrew B.  One son, George P., died at the age of seven years, and another, Charles W., a promising young man of twenty-two years, was killed by falling coal in the mine at Straitsville, this county.  Our subject removed to York Township, as above stated, in1856, and to Starr in 1861, where he now resides on section 29.  He is a member of the Odd Fellows fraternity./
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1047
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
CARL H. H. BUERHAUS, JR., Prosecuting Attorney for Hocking County, was born at Circleville, Ohio, June 23, 1856.  When he was six years of age he removed with his parents to Zanesville, Ohio.  He attended the city English schools during the day and the German select schools at night until 1864.  When his parents returned to Circleville he attended the common schools of Circleville until 1866, when the family removed to Tarlton, Ohio.  Young Buerhaus worked here in his father's tannery during the day, and at night and at odd times would read.  He early formed a taste for solid reading, making himself familiar with the leading ancient and modern poets and historians.  At the early age of twelve years he was familiar with Rollin, Hume, Macaulay, Gibbon, and the historians of the United States, storing his mind with a knowledge far in advance of his years.  His wonderful memory enabled him to repeat almost all he read, word for word.  In 1874 he came with his parents to Logan, Ohio.  He worked here in his father's tannery, devoting his spare time and at night in obtaining an education.  He would borrow books from neighboring libraries.  He borrowed some histories of the Hon. J. S. Friesner, who, observing his wonderful memory, advance him to study law.  Young Buerhaus borrowed some law books of Mr. Friesner and studied law at home nights for one year, then read law under Hon. J. S. Friesner, and on June 23, 1877, was admitted to the bar, this date being on his twenty-first birthday.  He remained in the office Mr. Friesner a short time, then practiced law with Judge James Grogan until December, 1877, when he was in partnership with Allen H. Brooks until 1878.  In April, 1878, he was elected Township Clerk and re-elected in 1879.  In may, 1880, he was nominated, and in October, 1880, was elected, Prosecuting Attorney of Hocking County by the Democratic party, and was re-elected in 1882, and still retains that office.  He was admitted to the United States bar June 13, 1883.  Mr. Buerhaus is purely a self-made man, and is one of the rising young lawyers of Ohio.  He was married to Miss Ida . Shawver, at Logan, Aug. 7, 1878.  She was born in Liberty, Miss., a daughter of William and Nancy (Myers) Shawver.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 934
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
CARL HENRY HARMON BUERHAUS, proprietor of the largest tannery in Hocking County, at Logan, was born in the city of Hagen, Westphalia, Prussia, Germany, Jan.23, 1823.  He was the son of Henry G. and Joanna (Lucas) Buerhaus.  Carl was the youngest of two sons.  He attended school until sixteen, then worked at the tanner's trade until twenty-one, when he served one year in the Thirty-seventh Regiment of Luxenburg, German army.  He then returned home and traveled for his father, who was a rectifier of fine liquors.  In may, 1851, he came alone to America, landed in New York City; went to Freehold, N. J., worked one month at his trade; then came to Ohio, worked at Marietta two months, then at Zanesville two months, thence came to Lancaster and worked at his trade; was married here to Miss Joanna P. Roof, Nov. 23, 1852.  She was born in Dobel, Wurtemburg, Germany, Dec. 17, 1830, a daughter of Fredric adn CAtherine (Munsch) Roof,  who came to the United States in 1837.  In the spring of 1856 Mr. and Mrs. Buerhaus removed to Circleville, Ohio, and he was foreman of a large steam tannery for eleven years.  He then purchased a tannery at Tarlton, Ohio, and engaged in business here until April, 1874, when he purchased his present tannery, which is the largest tannery in the county.  Mr. and Mrs. Buerhaus have had a family of six daughters and four sons, viz.:  Joanna C. M., born Sept. 12, 1853, died Aug. 4, 1854; Matilda, born Feb. 12, 1855, died Mar. 15, 1855; Carl H. H., born June 23, 1856; Mary, born Sept. 12, 1858, died Apr. 9, 1873; Frederic Wm., born Sept. 1, 1860, died Nov. 12, 1872; Emma, born June 10, 1863; Charles J., born July 30, 1865; Anna C., born April  18, 1869; Edward, born Feb. 23, 1871; Bertha J., born May 28, 1873.  Mr. and Mrs. Buerhaus are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.  Mr. Buerhauas is one of the leading business men and representative citizens of Logan County.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 934
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
ANDREW J. BURGESS, section 36, Falls-Gore, is the son of Richard Burgess, deceased.  He was born in Perry County, Ohio, Aug. 14, 1825, and the following year he was brought by his parents to Falls-Gore, where he has since resided.  He was reared on a farm and attended the subscription schools, his educational advantages being very limited.  He was married Oct. 12, 1845, to Elizabeth Taylor, by whom he has had eight children, six of whom are living - Clara A., John W., Richard, Mary, Lovina (deceased), Andrew J., Jr., Samantha and Amanda J. (deceased).  Mr. Burgess has held the office of Supervisor for the past seventeen years, and has also been Township Trustee four years.  He owns a farm of eighty-seven acres of land and is employed in general farming.  He is a great hunter, having, in connection with four others, in the fall of 1880, killed fifty-seven deer and three bears in four weeks.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 935
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
HENSON T. BURGESS, of New Gore, or Hamlin, was born near Somerset, Perry Co., Ohio, Feb. 4, 1822.  He was married Jan. 7, 1841, to Miss Catherine, daughter of John Hayne.  This union has been blessed with ten children - Mary A., Gabriel, Richard, John B. (deceased), Elizabeth M., Philemon, Louisa C., Mark V., Emanuel H. and George W.  In 1846 he moved to Indiana and settled in French Township, Adams County, and in 1867 returned to Gore Township.  His brother, A. J., and Maxfield Hite first struck the six-foot vein of coal near Gore.  His father, Richard Burgess, settled in Perry County before the war of 1812, and was a soldier of that war.  He then came to what is now Burgessville, or a part of New Gore, in the fall of 1825.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 935
  Perry Twp. -
JAMES R. BUSHEE, blacksmith, South Perry, was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, July 10, 1829.  When he was about two years old came with his father's family to Hocking County, where he was reared and received his education in the common schools.  His father being a blacksmith, he was early put at work in assisting his father in the shop, and there became master o the trade, remaining with his father until he was about eighteen years of age, when his mother died and the family was broken up.  He then went to work as a journeyman in Adelphi and other towns of Ross County.  He was married Nov. 9, 1851, to Sarah Mettler, a native of New Jersey, born Oct. 4, 1831, and came to Hocking County when about nine years of age.  They have had eight children, five still living - Adolphus C., born June 3, 1854; Margaret A., born July 17, 1855; Hannah A., born Sept. 27, 1856; Francis E., born Mar. 8, 1860; began business in South Perry, where he has since been located.  During the late war he enlisted in Company B, Seventy-first Ohio Infantry, where he participated in the battles of Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville.  He served until the close of the war and received his discharge June 12, 1865.  He returned to his home in South Perry and engaged in his present business, which he has since followed.  He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Silver Moon Lodge, No. 440.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1113 - Perry Twp.
  Falls Twp. including Falls-Gore and City of Logan -
JESSE BOWEN BUTIN, of the law firm of Brooke & Butin, and the real-estate firm of Myers, Brooke & Butin, was born in Logan, June 23, 1846, a son of Jacob E. and Mary (Bowen) Butin.  He was educated in the common schools, living with his parents till manhood.  At the age of fourteen he went into the office of the Hocking Sentinel to learn the trade of printer, working some three years, when he abandoned the trade and was employed by L. H. Culver a year.  He then worked for J. D. Poston till the spring of 1867 when he went to Philadelphia and traveled for the wholesale house of Bancroft, Bates & Co. till the following fall, when he was taken sick and was unable to work till the fall of 1870.  In the fall of 1869 he went to Garnett, Kas. (his brother-in-law, Major Elmer Golden, residing there), and while there became associated with Major Golden in the hardware business, remaining till the fall of 1873.  He then returned to Ohio, and was employed in the store of the Baird Iron Works in Perry County till 1875, when he came to Logan and began the study of law in the office of Rippey & Friesner. He was admitted to the bar in the fall of 1878 by the District Court at Long.  He remained in the office of Colonel C. H. Rippey till the spring of 1879,when he engaged in the practice of his profession alone.  In January, 1883, Lloyd Myers and A. H. Brooke became associated with him, establishing a collecting, abstract, real estate and general insurance agency, and at the same time Mr. Brooke became associated with him in the practice of law.  Oct. 3, 1872, Mr. Butin married Vina A. Hunter, of Garnett, Kas.  They have one child - Roy Hunter.  Mr. Butin is a member of Mingo Lodge, No. 171, A. F. & A. M., Logan.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 936
  Green Twp. -
RUSSEL J. BUTIN, born in Starr Township, Apr. 1, 1840, a son of Peter Butin, deceased, a native of the city of Amsterdam, New Holland.  His grandfather, James Butin, left Germany for America in 1797, and settled in New York.  Our subject has been a mechanic since boyhood.  He was united in marriage in 1866 to Fredonia A., daughter of William C. Atkins.  Four children have been born to them whose names are:  Lydia I., Clara J., William A. and James W.  Mr. Butin belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.
SOURCE:  History of Hocking Valley, Ohio - Published Chicago: by Inter-State Publishing Co. - 1883 - page 1030

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