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OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

 

Welcome to
Harrison County, Ohio

BIOGRAPHIES

   
 

 
JOSEPH M. McCULLOUGH.  On the excellent farm of 112 acres which is his present place of residence in Archer Township, Harrison County, Joseph M. McCullough was born May 12, 1852, and the fine old homestead has been the state of his productive activities from his youth to the present time.  He is the son of John and Jane (Welsh) McCullough, both likewise natives of Archer Township, where the former was born the 5th of October, 1822, and the latter on the 6th of May, 1827 - dates that show that the respective families were founded in this county in the early pioneer days.  The mother of Joseph M. McCullough was a daughter of John and Jane (McClellan( Welsh, both natives of Ireland.  John Welsh, a son of Samuel Welsh, was ten years of age when his parents came to America, and within a short time after their arrival in this country they established their home on a pioneer farm in Harrison County, where the father reclaimed his land from the forest wilds and where he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives, as sterling pioneer citizens of Archer Township.  John Welsh was reared under the conditions that marked the early stages of development in this county and became a prosperous farmer in Archer Township, where he and his wife remained until their deaths, both having been members of the Presbyterian Church.  Their children were ten in number:  Samuel, John, Matthew, James, David, William, Mary, Elizabeth, Anna and Jane.
     John McCullough
was a son of Joseph McCullough, who came to Harrison County when this section of Ohio was little more than a forest wilderness, and he settled on the land which constitutes the present well improved farm of his grandson, Joseph M., of this review, the farm having remained continuously in the possession of the family since the early pioneer era.  The name of the first wife of Joseph McCullough was Hanna, and they became the parents of seven children:  John, James B. (became a physician), Elizabeth, Sarah Jane, Mary, Esther and Isabel.  The religious faith of the family was that of the Presbyterian Church, and the lineage traces back to staunch Scotch-Irish origin.
     On the ancestral farm which was the place of his birth John McCullough passed his entire life and in his character and worthy achievement he well upheld the high honors of the family name.  Both he and his wife were well advanced in years at the time of their deaths and both were earnest members of the Presbyterian Church.  They became the parents of four children, Elizabeth ( Mrs. Thomas B. Copeland ), Amanda J. ( Mrs. Andrew J. Palmer ) and John W. (died in childhood).
     Joseph M. McCullough, the only surviving male representative of his generation of the family, gained his early education in the district schools of Archer Township and eventually became the owner of the old homestead farm, with the activities of which he has been associated from his youth.  He is known as a farmer of resourcefulness and enterprise, and has been successful as a representative of agricultural and live-stock industry in his native county.  His political allegiance is given to the republican party, and he and his wife hold membership in the neighborhood Methodist Episcopal Church known as Bethel chapel.
     The 30th of November, 1876, recorded the marriage of Mr. McCullough to Miss Elizabeth Birney, who was born and reared in Green Township and who is a daughter of the late Asbury and Eleanor (McCullough) Birney.  Mr. and Mrs. McCullough became the parents of five children:  Eleanor is the wife of Charles McKee, a prosperous farmer in Archer Township, and they have four children, Joseph Ross, William Birney, Mary Elizabeth and Anna Martha.  Mary is the wife of T. S. Birney, of Washington Township.  John, a farmer in Archer Township, married Miss Clara Ora Heavilin, and they have three children.  Chester H. Joseph Dwaine and Vula Elizabeth.  Alice died at the age of four years, and Lela O. remains at the parental home.
 Source: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921
JOHN McKIBBEN, a prosperous farmer of Moorefield Township, Harrison Co., Ohio, is a son of George and Martha (Brocaw) McKibben.  George McKibben is a son of Richard, whose father, a native of Ireland, immigrated in an early day to the United States and settled in Allegheny County, Penn., in 1742 where he grew to manhood.  He wedded three times.  His first wife was a Miss Coulter; the second a Miss Robison, and the third was Sarah Brocaw.  To this last union were born eight children, by name: Richard, Joseph, Samuel, Thomas, William, Rebecca, Jane and George.  About 1790 Richard migrated with his family to Warrenton, Jefferson Co., Ohio, and entered a large tract of land.  He remained there only a short time, when he removed to Belmont County, thence to Harrison County, and thence to Morgan County, Ohio, where he died in 1827.  His son, George, was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, Sept. 15, 1804, and grew to manhood in Jefferson and Belmont Counties.  In 1828 he married Miss Brashers, who became the mother of one son, Jesse, who now resides in Illinois.  This wife lived only a short time after the birth of the son, and in 1830 George McKibben married Miss Martha Brocaw.  To this union were born two sons: George, in Nottingham Township, Harrison County, and John, our subject.  This wife died in a few years, and Mr. McKibben married, for his third wife, Miss Eleanor Morrison, by whom were born three children, namely: William, Eleanor and Richard, the latter residing with his father.  This wife lived but a few years after marriage, and Mr. McKibben then married Jane Bealle who died in 1887.  The father of our subject resides on his old farm in Moorefield Township, where he has lived many years, and is the oldest person person residing in Moorefield Township at this date, March, 1890.
     John McKibben was born Jan. 27, 1833, in the southern part of Athens Township, Harrison Co., Ohio, where he grew to manhood and received a common-school education.  Jan. 3, 1856, he married Miss Isabelle McMillan, who was born in Athens Township, Oct. 6, 1829, a daughter of Charles and Rosanna (Gilmore) McMillan, natives of Ireland, who emigrated to New York City in 1806, and thence Harrison County, Ohio.  After his marriage Mr. McKibben remained in Athens Township for two years, then came to Moorefield Township, Harrison County, where he has since resided.  In 1859 he purchased the farm he now owns, which contains sixty-four acres on Section 31, Moorefield Township.  Our subject and wife are parents of six children, named George J. C., Mary E. and Sarah B., still at home; William, in Moorefield Township, who is married, and Thomas C., deceased.  Mr. and Mrs. McKibben are members of the Nottingham Presbyterian Church.  Politically Mr. McKibben is a Republican.
Source:  Biographical Record of the Counties of Harrison and Carroll, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. - 1891 - Page 631

SHERMAN W. McKIBBIN is a representative of a sterling pioneer family to Moorefield Township, Harrison County, where he is now a progressive young agriculturist and stockgrower, as the owner of a well improved farm of 100 acres.  He was born in this township, on the 24th September, 1894, and is a son of William and Lydia S. (Porter) McKibben, both likewise natives of Harrison County.  George McKibben, grandfather of William, was one of the most venerable citizens of Moorefield Township at the time of his death and had been a resident of that township for many years, he having there developed a good farm.  He was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, Sept. 15, 1804, but was reared principally in Belmont.  He was a son of Richard and Sarah (Brocaw) McKibbenRichard McKibben was born in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, in 1742, and was there reared to manhood, his father having there settled upon immigrating from Ireland, his native place.  About the year 1790 Richard McKibben came with his family to Ohio, and after remaining a short time in Jefferson County he removed to Belmont County.  Later he resided for a time in Harrison County, and he was a resident of Morgan County at the time of his death in 1825.  Upon coming to Ohio he entered a large tract of land, and he and his family had a full share of experience in connection with life on the frontier.  The family name of his first wife was Coulter, that of his second wife was Robinson, and Sarah Brocaw became his third wife, eight children having been born of the last union, namely: Richard, Joseph, Samuel, Thomas, William, Rebecca, Jane and George.
     George McKibben
was reared under the conditions of pioneer life in Ohio and in 1828 he married, the family name of his wife having been Brashers and she died within a short time after the birth of their only child, Jesse, who eventually established his home in the State of Illinois.  In 1830 Mr. McKibben wedded Miss Martha Brocaw, and they became the parents of two sons, George and John.  Mrs. McKibben died within a comparatively few yeas after her marriage and for his third wife Mr. McKibben chose Miss Eleanor Morrison, who became the mother of three children - William, Eleanor and Richard.  After the death of his third wife, Mr. McKibben married Jane Bealle, who died in 1887.
     John McKibben, son of George and Martha (Brashers) McKibben, was born in Athens Township, Harrison County, Jan. 27, 1833.  Jan. 3, 1856, recorded his marriage to Miss Isabelle McMillen, who was born in the same township, Oct. 6, 1829, a daughter of Charles and Rosanna (Gilmore) McMillan, who came from Ireland to America in 1806 and who became pioneer settlers in Harrison County, Ohio.  Two yeas after his marriage John McKibben removed to Moorefield Township, where he became the owner of a farm in section 31 and where he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives, both having been members of the Nottingham Presbyterian Church, and his political support having been given to the republican party.  John and Isabelle McKibben became the  parents of six children - George, John C., Mary E., Sarah B., William and Thomas C.
     Sherman W. McKibben
gained his early education in the public schools of his native township and he remained on the old homestead farm of his parents until his marriage, since which time he has parents until his marriage, since which time he has been engaged in independent farm enterprise in his native township, where he is the owner of an excellent farm of 100 acres, as previously stated in this context.  His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he and his wife hold membership in the Nottingham Presbyterian Church. 
     On the 30th of June, 1915, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. McKibben to Miss Jennie Hamilton, daughter of Salathiel M. Hamilton.  Mr. and Mrs. McKibben have four children- Sherman, Esther, Ernest and Helen.
Source: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921~ Page 1015

JAMES A. McLAUGHLIN.  The late James A. McLaughlin, of Short Creek Township, was for thirteen years one of the successful farmers and live-stock men of his community, and his name is held in the highest esteem in Harrison County, while his own career and the history of his family lend distinction to the pioneer annals of this section of Ohio.
     Mr. McLaughlin was born at Adena, Jefferson County, Ohio, Nov. 24, 1849, son of William J. Elizabeth (Berry) McLaughlin.  His father was born at the old McLaughlin homestead near Adena in Jefferson County March 3, 1812.  His mother was born near Venice in Jefferson County, Pennsylvania, July 15, 1815, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania, July 15, 1815. They were married Oct. 20, 1840.  The parents of Elizabeth Berry were William and Jane (McConnell) Berry.  Her father was born and reared in Washington County, where he learned the carpenter's trade in youth, later became a successful operator of a flour mill at Venice, and owned and developed a good farm in that locality, where he spent his entire life.  He served more than thirty years in office as justice of the peace.  He and his wife were zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he served as an elder for many years.  Their children were named John, Mary, Elizabeth, William, Matthew, Prudence and James.
     John McLaughlin
, founder of the family of that name in southeastern Ohio, was born in Cecil Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania, and married there Miss Anna Johnson.  In 1801 he became one of the earliest settlers in Smithfield Township, Jefferson County, where he and his wife endured the circumstances of the frontier while he was reclaiming a farm from the forest wilds.  He was an honored and influential citizen of he county and for seventeen years was a member of the Lower House of the Legislature, having a record of sixteen consecutive years in that office.  He impressed his ability upon the legislative record of the period and was the first to suggest and urge the establishment of a state asylum for the deaf and dumb.  He and his wife were revered pioneers of this county.  They were United Presbyterians.  Their family of children were Eliza, Polly, Nancy, Peggie, Anna, William J., John, James M., Jane, Catherine and Samuel R.  Samuel R. was distinguished by a brilliant intellect, being only twelve years old when he gained admission to Franklin College at New Athens.
     William J. McLaughlin was reared and educated in Smithfield Township, Jefferson County.  Virtually his entire active career was devoted to farming, with a high degree of success and accompanied with the responsibilities of an influential citizen.  He was a republican, and he and his wife were members of the United Presbyterian Church.  His death occurred in January, 1894, while his wife passed away Dec. 28, 1898.  The names and respective birth dates of their children were: John M., Jan. 8, 1843; Jane, Dec. 25, 1845; William G., Apr. 25, 1847; James A., Nov. 24, 1849; Samuel, Mar. 24, 1854; and Martha, Oct. 8, 1856.
     The late James A. McLaughlin during his youth acquired a fortifying experience in connection with the work of the old home farm, and at the same time profited by the advantages of the district schools.  In his native township as a young man he commenced farming for himself, and during the long intervening years gave unwearying industry and allegiance to the production of crops and live-stock, with a degree of success merited by his labors and good judgment.  The scene of his farming enterprise continued in Jefferson County until 1907, in which year he removed to short Creek Township and for the next six years was engaged in partnership with his sons William W. and Wilmer M. in farming and live-stock operations.  In 1913 he and his son Wilmer M. became partners in the operation of the old Ladd farm and he so continued until his death on Feb. 14, 1920.  During his time the partnership became notable for the successful breeding of registered Jersey cattle. 
     Mr. McLaughlin was a republican, though he never sought or held public office.  He and his family were United Presbyterians and at the time of his death he was an elder in the Harrisville United Presbyterian Church.
     Feb. 2, 1874, Mr. McLaughlin married Miss Sarah A. Barkhurst.  she was also born and reared in Jefferson County.  Her father, William Barkhurst, was of pioneer stock.  Mr. McLaughlin was bereaved of his devoted companion of more than thirty years on Feb. 22, 1906.  The memory of her kindly personality is deeply cherished in Jefferson County and by her children and grandchildren in Harrison County.  Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. James A. McLaughlin, Ella May, born Feb. 29, 18 is the wife of George T. Davis and has three children, named James Howells, Sarah Catherine and Martha.  Mary E., who was born Jan. 10, 1879,, is the wife of Rev. Herbert Haldy, a clergyman of the Society of Friends.  They have two children, Helen Avien and Josephine A.  The sons of William Wilson and Wilmer M. are accorded special mention in these pages.  Jennie B., who was born May 1, 1886, died Jul. 3, 1891.  Russell H., the youngest, was born Nov. 16, 1888, married Miss May Rogers and has two children, John Howard and Martha Marie.
 Source: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 761
SAMUEL K. McLAUGHLIN was for many years actively identified with agricultural enterprise and the raising of live stock in Harrison County, where he improved one of the finest farms in Short Creek Township.  He remained on this model rural estates until 1899, when he removed to Cadiz, where he now holds precedence as one of the buyers and shippers of wool  in this section of his native state, the family name having been identified with Ohio history for more than a century.
     John McLaughlin, grandfather of him whose name introduces this review, came to Ohio in 1801, and in the following year he established the family home in Jefferson County.  He had previously gained more than a usual amount of frontier experience, as he had served the Government as an Indian spy through the wild country between Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Wheeling, West Virginia.  He purchased a tract of heavily timbered land in the midst of the forest wilds of Jefferson County, and their instituted the reclamation and development of a pioneer farm, the land having been originally secured by his brother-in-aw, John Johnson, at the rate of twelve and one-half cents an acre.  Of this resourceful pioneer an interesting record has been previously published, and from the same is reproduced the following data, which is well worthy of perpetuation: "John McLaughlin was a man of more than ordinary attainments for those days, and soon after coming to Ohio he was elected a member of its Legislature, in which he served five years as a member of the House of Representatives.  He was then elected to the State Senate, in which he served twelve years.  In the Senate he was intimately associated with Gen. William Henry Harrison, John C. Wright and Charles Hammond.  The sessions were first held at Zanesville, later at Chillicothe and finally at Columbus, which was made the permanent capital of the commonwealth.  Mr. McLaughlin was a member of the 'call session' of the Legislature in 1832 to settle the dispute relative to the boundary line between Ohio and Michigan.  He was the founder of Adena, Jefferson County, securing the postoffice for that place and giving the village its name.  At the time of his death he was an elder in the United Presbyterian Church and a member of the session of Piney Fork.  He was for many years a justice of the peace, and, beyond all doubt, was during his active career the most prominent and influential man in his district.  He was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, Nov. 4, 1774, and died Nov. 10, 1860, in his eighty-seventh year.  About 1799 he married Miss Annie Johnson, who died June 6, 1849.  Their children were thirteen in number."
     James McLaughlin, son of John and father of Samuel K. of this review, was born on the pioneer homestead near Adena, Jefferson County, and was the second son in the large family of four children, of whom four sons and five daughters attained to years of maturity.  Educational advantages in his youth were limited in this section of Ohio, but by self-application he became a man of broad information and mature judgments.  He was a staunch abolitionist in the climacteric period leading up to the Civil war and united with the republican party at the time of its organization, his previous alignment having been with the whig party.  He and is wife were zealous members of the United Presbyterian Church at Piney Fork, and on one occasion he represented his church as a delegate to the General Assembly of the denomination in the City of Philadelphia.  He served long and effectively as an elder of the church, was a leader in movements tending to advance the material and civic welfare of the community and was specially influential in developing an effective public-school system at Adena.  He married Miss Sarah J. Kerr, who was born and reared in Harrison County, the eldest daughter of Samuel and Annie (Smith) Kerr, and of the nine children of this union one died in infancy; William B. was a resident of Adena, Jefferson County, at the time of his death; Ann E. became the wife of Lewis Bernhard, of Harrison County; Mary E. married William Courtright, of Harrison County; Nancy J. became the wife of Joseph C. McNary, of Unionport, Jefferson County; Samuel K., immediate subject of this sketch, was the next in order of birth; Sarah M. married Rev. Hugh W. Parks, of Harrison County; Joseph S., of Adena, Ohio, is now deceased; Mary Emma married Robert G. Dean, and they established their home at Omaha, Nebraska.  She is now a widow, residing at Seattle, Washington, and the mother of two sons and two daughters living.  James McLaughlin died Aug. 26, 1865, in his fifty-second year, and his widow, surviving him by many years, continued to reside at the old home in Jefferson County until her death, at the venerable age of seventy-two years.
     Samuel K. McLaughlin was born at Adena, Jefferson County, Sept. 12, 1846, and was there reared to adult age.  There he received the advantages of the common schools of the period, and at the age of eighteen years entered the McNeely Normal College at Hopedale, Harrison County, where he continued his studies until the death of his father made it necessary for him to return to the old home and assist his widowed mother in the management of the farm.  While applying himself vigorously to farm work during the summer seasons be made an admirable record as a successful and popular teacher in the public schools in the winter season after having passed the examination which entitled him to a teacher's certificate of the first class.
     May 22, 1872, recorded the marriage of Mr. McLaughlin to Miss Mary Belle Snider, who was born and reared in Green Township, Harrison County, a daughter of Samuel and Hannah Snider, and soon after their marriage the young couple established their home on the old Hurford homestead in Short Creek Township, Harrison County.  In the following year they removed to Adena, Jefferson County, the old home of Mr. McLaughlin, who resumed his educational service as a teacher in the village schools and who also erected in the meanwhile the best residence in the town.  In 1875 returned to Harrison County and established their home on the fine farm of 230 acres which was to continue as their abiding place for many years.  In 1888 Mr. McLaughlin erected on his farm one of the most commodious and modern farm houses in Short Creek Township.  Mr. and Mrs. McLaughlin were member of the United Presbyterian Church until they took up their residence in Cadiz, since which time they have been members of the Presbyterian Church.  They became the parents of four children: Charles Johnson, John Orrin, Hannah Lucretia and Samuel Parks, all of whom are deceased except Robert Parks, the youngest, who is now Government postoffice inspector at Waterloo, Iowa.  He married Margaret McIlvaine, the daughter of judge Walter G. Shotwell, of Cadiz.  They are the parents of four daughters, Nancy Shotwell, Margaret McIlvaine, Mary Elizabeth and Ann.
     Mr. McLaughlin
has never wavered in loyal allegiance to the republican party and has been influential in its council and campaign activities in Harrison County.  He gave effective service as trustee of Short Creek Township and later represented Harrison and Carroll counties in the State Legislature for two terms, with a record that fully justified his election to this office.  Mr. McLaughlin made his farm one of the best improved and most valuable in Short Creek Township, and he still owns the property, though he has maintained his home at Cadiz since 1899 and is here actively and successfully engaged in the buying and shipping of wool, as one of the leading representatives of this line of business in Harrison County.  A man of genial sincerity and sterling character, his circle of friends is virtually coincident with that of his acquaintances, and though he has passed the span of three score years and ten he is still hale and vigorous and takes satisfaction in his business activities.
Source: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 660
WILLIAM WILSON McLAUGHLIN is the owner of an excellent farm of eighty and one-half acres in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, and is one of the vigorous and successful agriculturists ad stock-growers of the younger generation in that township, where he is now beginning to give special attention to the breeding and raising of blooded Shorthorn cattle.
     William Wilson McLaughlin was born in Belmont County, Ohio, Dec. 9, 1879, and is a son of James of James A. and Sarah (Barkhurst) McLaughlin, individual mention of the father being made on other pages of this volume, so that further review of the family history is not here demanded.  He whose named introduces this article gained his early education in the public schools of Belmont and Jefferson counties and in 1907 he came with his father to Harrison County, where the latter engaged in farm enterprise in Short Creek Township.  Here William W. was associated with his father's farm industry until his marriage on Oct. 1, 1912, and the following winter they spent in Florida, and then resided in Cadiz for one year.  In 1915 Mr. McLaughlin purchased his present farm in Short Creek Township, and here he  has since been successfully engaged in effective enterprise as an agriculturist and stock-grower, with high civic standing in the community.  His political allegiance is given to the republican party, he holds membership in the United Presbyterian Church, and his wife is a birthright member of the Society of Friends, with which she maintains active and appreciative affiliation.
     On the 1st of October, 1912, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Laughlin to Miss Erie Esther Fox, who was born on Apr. 13, 1880, and reared in Short Creek Township, a daughter of the late William Spicer Fox, whose death occurred Jan. 28, 1908.  Mr. Fox was born in Short Creek Township Sept. 22, 1839, and was a son of Charles James and Esther (Cooper) Fox, the former of whom was born in the City of Washington, D. C., Oct. 17 1805, and the latter of whom was born near Baltimore, Maryland, Apr. 4, 1810.  The Fox family is of honorable English Origin and its history has been fully written and published representatives of the family of Harrison County having copies of these genealogical records, running back to the year 1650.  Charles James Fox was a son of Josiah Fox, who was born in Falmouth, England, Oct. 9, 1763, and who entered upon a seafaring life when a young man of about twenty-seven years.  He visited many of the important parts of the world and in 1793 he was engaged by the United States Government as navy constructor, in which capacity he drafted plans for a goodly number of early war vessels.  He continued in this service until 1811, when he located at Wheeling, West Virginia.  In 1814 he established his home on a frontier farm at Colerain in Belmont County, Ohio, and there he died in 1847, his wife having passed away in 1841.  By reason of his having been concerned in the building of war vessels Mr. Fox was disowned by the Society of Friends, with which the family has been prominently identified for many generations.
     Charles James Fox settled in Short Creek Township, Harrison County, Ohio, in 1842, and here he passed the remainder of his life.  He became one of the most successful farmers and wealthy and influential citizens of the county, and both he and his wife were venerable in years at the time of their deaths, they having been earnest birthright members of the Society of Friends.  He died June 21, 1895, and his wife died Apr. 2, 1896.
     William S. Fox, a man of superior education and fine intellectuality, developed one of the fine farms of Short Creek Township, and on his farm he constructed a large pond and engaged in fish culture.  HE was a leader in community sentiment and action, was a staunch republican and he and his wife were members of the Hicksite branch of the Society of Friends.  In 1876 Mr. Fox wedded Miss Esther J. Moore, daughter of Jeremiah Moore of Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, and of this union were born three children - Mary Moore, John Francis and Erie Esther.
     Mr. and Mrs. McLaughlin
have three children whose names and respective dates of birth are here recorded: Francis Fox, Feb. 22, 1915; James Alfred, Sept. 29, 1915; and Dorothy Loraine, born Sept. 17, 1918.
Source: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 666
WILMER M. McLAUGHLIN, Wilmer M., of Short Creek Township, Harrison County, is recognized as one of the successful and representative farmers and stock-raisers and is a son of the late James A. McLaughlin, of a prominent pioneer family of Jefferson County and whose connections with the life and affairs of that county and also with Harrison County are reviewed in the preceding sketch.
     Wilmer M. McLaughlin was born in Belmont County, Ohio, Nov. 19, 1882.  He was reared in that county and educated in the schools of Belmont and Jefferson counties.  In 1907 he came with his father and other members of the family to Short Creek Township, and he and his father and brother, William W., engaged in farming and the stock business in partnership, their partnership being continued for six years, until terminated in 1913.  The son Wilmer M. and his father continued partnership relations in farming and stock-raising on the old Ladd farm until the death of his father in 1920.  Since then Wilmer M. McLaughlin has continued the operation of this well known stock farm and is one of the recognized authorities on pure bred cattle and sheep in that section of the state.
     He stands for all that is best in citizenship, and is an honor to his community, is industrious, and has exemplified the quality of fair dealing and consistency in his relations both to business and the fundamental religious principles  of life.  He is a member of the Harrisville United Presbyterian Church and a republican in politics.
Source: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 762
GEORGE M. MALLARNEE.  One of the most pleasing revelations of this publication is that in both Harrison and Carroll counties are to be found at the present day many representatives of honored pioneer families who initiated the work of development and progress in eastern Ohio, and such distinction attaches to George M. Mallarnee, who is now one of the prosperous and enterprising exponents of farm industry in his native county.  He was born in Cadiz Township, Harrison County, Feb. 19, 1876, and he has resided since he was four years old on the fine farm which he now owns in Nottingham Township, the same comprising 160 acres, and special attention is being here given to the raising of fine sheep in connection with well ordered agricultural exploitation.
     John Calvin Mallarnee, father of him whose name introduces this review, was born at Bloomfield, Jefferson County, Ohio, Oct. 22, 1843, a son of John G. and Mary (Galbriath) Mallarnee, the former of whom was born in Maryland in 1815, and the latter of whom was born in Ohio about the year 1820.  John G. Mallarnee was a son of Isaac Mallarnee, who was born in the State of Maryland about the year 1778, and who was there reared to manhood.  There he learned the trade of wagonmaker, and from his native state he went forth as a soldier in the War of 1812.  Soon after the close of this conflict he came with his family to Ohio, where he first located at Bloomfield, Jefferson County, whence he removed to Smithfield, that county, shortly afterward.  At the latter place he followed his trade until impaired health prevented, and he passed the closing years of his life in the home of his son John G., then a resident of Guernsey County, where he died in 1870.  John G. Mallarnee was a child at the time of the family removal to Ohio, where he was reared to manhood and where he learned the trade of wagonmaker under the effective direction of his father.  He finally engaged in the work of his trade at Bloomfield, Jefferson County, where he remained until 1850, when he removed to Tuscarawas County.  Within a short time thereafter he purchased and removed to a small farm near West Chester, Guernsey County, where he and his wife remained until their death, both having been earnest members of the Methodist Protestant Church.  They became the parents of eleven children: John Calvin (father of the subject of this sketch),  Sylvester, Jasper, Lafayton, Ashley, Samuel K., Margaret, Sarah E., Mary C., Elizabeth and Estella.
     John Calvin Mallarnee
gained his early education principally in the schools of Tuscarawas County, and remained at the parental home until he had attained to his legal majority.  Thereafter he found employment at farm work, and after his marriage, in 1872, he rented a farm in Cadiz Township, Harrison County, where he remained six years.  Thereafter he was similarly engaged one year in Moorefield township and the next year in Athens Township.  He then, in 1880, purchased a farm in section 23, Nottingham Township, and here he remained as one of the progressive agriculturists and stock-growers of the township until his death, on the 12th of January, 1900, his widow passing away Mar. 17, 1913.  He became prominent as a grower of high-grade sheep, of which he had some of the finest in Nottingham Township, and on the old home farm his son George M., subject of this review, is well maintaining precedence in this special field of industrial enterprise.  Mr. Mallarnee was originally a democrat, but when his convictions led him to oppose the liquor traffic he transferred his allegiance to the prohibition party, of whose cause he continued a staunch supporter until the close of his life, both he and his wife having been members of the Presbyterian Church.
     On the 25th of January, 1872, was solemnized the marriage of John C. Mallarnee to Miss Eleanor McKibben, a daughter of George and Eleanor (Morrison) McKibben, and she was about seventy-six years of age at the time of her death, in 1913.  They became the parents of two children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the older and the one surviving, the younger son, John Curtis, Jr., having been born Sept. 22, 1878, and having died Apr. 21, 1884.
     George McKibben Mallarnee, as already noted, was four years old at the time the family home was established on his present farm, into ownership of which he came at the death of his parents.  He early gained practical experience in connection with the activities of the home farm, and thus was well fortified when he began his independent enterprise as an agriculturist and stock-grower on the old home place, which he has maintained at high standard and which comprises 160 acres of the excellent land of Nottingham Township.  His early education was gained in the schools of this township, and has been effectively supplemented by self-discipline and active association with the practical affairs of life.  His political allegiance is given to the republican party, and he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian Church at Deersville.
     On the 14th of September, 1898, Mr. Mallarnee wedded Miss Dessie Titus, who was born in Nottingham Township Sept. 12, 1877, and who is a daughter of Marion and Louisa (Reynard) Titus, both likewise native of this county, where the former was born Aug. 17, 1865, and the latter on the 1st of November, 1857, in Franklin Township.  Mr. Titus was one of the substantial farmers and honored citizens of Nottingham Township at the time of his death in 1881, and his widow survived him by nearly a quarter of a century, her death occurring Jan. 5, 1905.  Both were active members of the Presbyterian Church at Deersville.  Mrs. Mallarnee is their only child.  Marion Titus was the only child of Uriah and Sarah (Garner) Titus, sterling pioneer citizens of Harrison County.  Uriah Titus was born Jan. 8, 1813, and died July 28, 1875; his wife was born Nov. 25, 1817, and died Jan. 4, 1907, when eighty-nine years of age.  Mr. and Mrs. Mallarnee have six children:  Louella Gertrude, Wilma Frances, Walter Raymond, Marion Calvin, Helen Virginia and Alice GenevaLouella Gertrude was graduated from the Deersville High School, later attended Franklin College at New Athens, and has been a student also in the Ohio State Normal School at Athens, where she intends eventually to complete the full normal course, she being (in 1921) a successful and popular teacher in the district schools of Nottingham Township.  William Frances, the second daughter, is a member of the class of 1921 in the high school at Freeport.
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ource: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 669
BENJAMIN J. MALLERNEE, son of Levi and Eleanor (Johnson) Mallernee, mentioned in the preceding sketch, was born in Nottingham Township, Harrison County, on the 10th of February, 1849; was here reared and educated; and here he has been continuously identified with farm enterprise, except for two years passed at Cadiz, the county seat.  He is the owner of an excellent farm property of 191 acres and is one of the substantial and highly esteemed citizens of his native county, his home farm comprising ninety-one acres, and the remainder of his farm property being not far distant.  He is a staunch republican and has served as township trustee, his religious faith being indicated by his status as an earnest member of the Baptist Church.
     Jan. 17, 1872, was marked by the marriage of Mr. Mallernee to Miss Margaret J. Warman, who was born in Illinois Mar. 15, 1850, a daughter of William and Margaret (Hoffman) Warman.  Mrs. Mallernee passed to the life eternal Apr. 8, 1894, and of her four children two are living: Ellen Mabel, born Jan. 10, 1873, is deceased; Myrtle Florence, born Nov. 4, 1874, is the wife of Alvah Lee, and they have one child, Clyde; Blanche W., born Sept. 5, 1879, is deceased; and Frank G. was born Oct. 24, 1881.
     On the 23d of December, 1896, Mr. Mallernee married Mrs. Emma Morris, and they are leading members of the Christian Church at Minksville.  Frank G. Mallernee, only son of the subject of this review, married Miss Blanch Garner, whose death occurred Oct. 3, 1917, and who is survived by two children - Harold V. and Mary Margaret.
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ource: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 733
JAMES G. MALLERNEE, a brother of Levi E. Mallernee of Nottingham Township, was one of the honored residents of that community for many years, and though he died comparatively young he was in every sense a successful man.
     He was born in Nottingham Township Oct. 10, 1866, and was reared and educated on the home farm in that locality.  In 1887, at the age of twenty-one, he married Alice R. Hefling, a native of Washington Township in Harrison County and daughter of Noah and Jane (McCullough) Hefling.  After their marriage they made their home on a farm in Washington Township, where Mr. Mallernee continued to live until after the death of his wife.  In 1915 he removed to Tippecanoe, Ohio, and died there May 7, 1918.  He was an elder in the Christian Church at Tippecanoe.  On May 12, 1914, he married Sarah M. Hitchcock, who was born in Washington Township Aug. 18, 1880, daughter of Johnson and Rebecca (Jackson) Hitchcock.
     Mr. Mallernee
by his first marriage had six children: Earl, who died June 28, 1916; Audra, who is the wife of Laurence Rose and has four children named Viola, Helen, Pauline and Lucile; Mabel, wife of Frank Jenkins, has four children, named Mirl, Edith, Hazel and James; Paul, whose career is briefly sketched below; Bessie, wife of Robert Young and mother of Maxine; and Marian wife of Eugene Walker
     Paul Hefling Mallernee, who was born Oct. 24, 1893, was one of Harrison County's soldiers in the World war.  He entered the service Sept. 20, 1917, and was trained at Camp Sherman, where he was assigned to duty with the 308th Veterinary Section.  In January, 1918, he was promoted to corporal.  June 14, 1918, he left New York, landed in France on the 21st of June, and was in service with his organization until the signing of the armistice, and was then sent to Germany with the Army of Occupation.  He returned to the United States July 9, 1919, and received his honorable discharge at Camp Mills.  Before going overseas and while at Camp Sherman his father died, and he came home to attend the funeral and while at home was married on May 10, 1918, to Alice Jenkins, daughter of James Jenkins.
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ource: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 733

LEVI E. MALLERNEE is another of the native sons of Harrison County who is here standing as a successful exemplar of agriculture and livestock industry, and the finely improved farm which he owns and operates comprises 245 acres in Nottingham Township.  He was born in this township on the 20th of October, 1868, and is a son of Levi and Jemima (Garner) Mallernee, the latter's first husband having been a Mr. Hines concerning whom more specific mention is made on other pages, in the sketch of their son Nelson T.
     Levi Mallernee
was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, Feb. 12, 1816, and in 1829 his father came to Harrison County, where he bought eighty acres of forest land in Nottingham Township, where he remained until his death, Feb. 23, 1839, his industry as a pioneer farmer having been supplemented by his work at the shoemaker's trade.  The worthy pioneer, Emanuel Mallernee, was born in Maryland, Nov. 3, 1779, a son of William and Sarah Mallernee, who came from that state and settled in Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1909.  Emanuel Malernee first married Rachel Matthews, who was born in Maryland Nov. 3, 1778, a daughter of Francis and Mary (Carr) Matthews, who came to Ohio in 1809.  Emanuel and Rachel Mallernee became the parents of eight children - William, Aquilla, Mary A., Matthew F., Levi, Emanuel, Jr., Lewis and Elizabeth.  Mrs. Mallernee died June 24, 1828, and her husband later married Hannah Eaton, the three children of this union having been Benjamin, Rachel and Jared.
    
On the 6th of December, 1838, Levi Mallernee married Eleanor Johnson, who was born in Nottingham Township, Harrison County, Jan. 27, 1820, a daughter of Benjamin Johnson.  They became the parents of nine children - Daniel Turner, Emanuel, Mary A., Benjamin J., Lemuel, Lydia A., Caroline L., Eleanor J. and Kinsey C.  Mrs. Mallernee died Dec. 23, 1863, and afterward Mr. Mallernee wedded Mrs. Jemima (Garner) Hines.  They became the parents of three children - James G., Levi E. and Ruth J.  After the death of his second wife Mr. Mallernee married Rachel Crabtree, and exactly one year later his death occurred, on the 1st of June, 1880.  Levi Mallernee passed his entire life in Harrison County and his active career was given principally to farm enterprise.  He was a republican in politics and his religious faith was that of the Baptist Church.
     Levi E. Mallernee gained his early education in the district schools of Nottingham Township, but he was only thirteen years of age when he began working on a neighboring farm.  He has been continuously identified with farm industry during the long intervening years and has through his own efforts become one of the prosperous farmers of his native township, his large farm being the stage of well ordered agricultural and live-stock operation, and many of its modern improvements, including the house and barn, having been installed since he became the owner of the property.  He is a loyal and progressive citizen, is a republican in politics and he and his wife hold membership in the Christian Church.
     May 22, 1890, recorded the marriage of Mr. Mallernee to Miss Olive Carson, daughter of John K. and Anna (Cope) Carson, and of this union have been born three children: James Lyle, who resides at Alliance, Stark County, married Ada Howell, and they have three children - Olive, Veda and Charles.  Edith May and Ethel Fay were twins, the former having died at the age of eleven months, and the latter remaining at the parental home.
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ource: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 732

ANDREW B. MILLER is a well known citizen and farmer of Rumley Township, Harrison County.  For nearly half a century his time and activities have been devoted to the routine of agricultural efforts; and his standing as a farmer and a good citizen is an additional tribute to the qualities of one of the sturdy pioneer families established in this county more than a century ago.
     Mr. Miller was born in German Township, Harrison County, Dec. 9, 1852.  His grandfather, Daniel Miller, was born in Frederick County, Maryland, in 1788, and was a youth of eighteen years when he came with his parents to Harrison County in 1806, his father settling on Government land in German Township in that year.  Daniel Miller lived a long and useful life, had a share in the arduous task of clearing a portion of the wilderness, and he lived to see the fruits of his toil and the many collective benefits achieved by an increasing population.  He married Susannah Lowmiller, who was born in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania in 1796, daughter of John and Catherine (Long) Lowmiller, w2ho had settled in Harrison County in 1800, when she was four years of age.  The children of Daniel Miller and wife were Catherine, Elizabeth, Sarah, John, Henry, Susannah, Rebecca, Margaret, Abigail and Eliza J.
     John Miller
, a son of Daniel, was born in German Township Feb. 22, 1822.  His birthplace was a log cabin.  He attended log cabin schools in his early youth and taught public school.  When he left the home farm he began an independent career as a farmer, and at the time of his death had a valuable and well improved place of 166 acres.  He was a democrat who filled several local and county offices, and was a devout member of the Lutheran Church.  May 1, 1849, he married Susannah Mikesell, who was born Feb. 15, 1824, daughter of Peter and Mary A. (Long) Mikesell, another early family in Harrison County.  John Miller and wife had the following children:  O. B., who was a public school teacher and a music teacher; Rebecca Margaret; H. A., deceased, was a farmer of German Township; Andrew B.; Rev. Daniel d., a minister of the Lutheran Church; Prof. Samuel H., an educator and at one time a member of the faculty of Thiel College at Greenville, also president of Fredonia Teachers Institute, Pennsylvania; John O.; Joseph M. of Hanlon Station, West Virginia; Clement E., owner of the home farm; Clayton I., deceased, formerly of Greenville, Pennsylvania; and Rev. Jesse L., a minster of the Lutheran Church, Youngstown, Ohio.
     Andrew B. Miller like the other children was afforded good educational advantages.  After the district schools in German Township he spent a year in the Hopedale Normal School, taught in the public schools for a time, and since then his life has been one steady and successful devotion to farming.  Mr. Miller owns ninety acres in Rumley Township, and it is a farm of well diversified industry.  His specialty in livestock is sheep.  It is an attractive home, and from this farm have radiated some of the good influences to the community at large.  Mr. Miller has never sought a place in politics, but has been a life long democrat, and he and Mrs. Miller are members of the Lutheran Church at Germano.
     In 1878 he married Miss Flora A. Smith, a native of Carroll County and daughter of Aaron and Sarah (Weir) Smith.  Mr. and Mrs. Miller are the parents of five children.  Rev. Charles D., the oldest, a resident of Cleveland, married Miss Adeline Corll, of Greenville, Pennsylvania, and has four children, Charles, Robert, Frank and Dorotha.  The second son is Monfred L. of Harrison County.  Wilbert S. Miller, President of the Wheeling, West Virginia.  He married Miss Ruth Snyder.  Laura B., the only daughter, is the wife of Frederick Miller, of Jefferson County, Ohio, and is the mother of three children, Arthur, John and Flora Frances.  The youngest of Mr. Miller's sons is Harry C. of Wheeling, West Virginia, and honored as one of the ex-service men from Harrison County.  He enlisted and joined the colors Aug. 30, 1917, and after ten days at Columbus was stationed at Madison Barracks until the latter part of November, when he sailed for overseas.  In France he was with the transportation department of the Medical Corps, and was on duty abroad for nineteen months.  He received his honorable discharge July 5, 1919.  He is at present post commander of the Loyal Legion at Wheeling.
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ource: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 735
CHARLES B. MILLER.  Among the enterprising farmers of Harrison County whose well directed efforts have been rewarded by deserved success, is Charles B. Miller of Monroe Township.  He was born in Stark County, Ohio, a son of Isaac and Mary (Bricker) Miller, and grandson of Simeon Miller, a native of Germany, who came to the United States when a young man and established himself in Stark County, as a farmer.  The children born to him and his wife were as follows:  James, Andrew, Isaac, Hannah, Polly, Rachel and Betsy.  The maternal grandfather was Jacob Bricker, and he was a saddler of Pennsylvania, who later on in life came to Ohio and here became a farmer and mail carrier.  HE became the father of the following family:  Mary, Margaret, Minerva, Emma, Clara and Edith.
      Isaac Miller
was born in Stark County, Ohio, and his wife was born in Pennsylvania.  Until about 1878 he was engaged in farming in Stark County, Ohio, but in that year he went west to Kansas and for the succeeding eleven years was there engaged in farming.  Returning to Ohio, in 1889, he located on the farm in Monroe Township, Harrison County, now occupied by his son, Charles B. Miller, and here he continued to reside until 1909, when he retired, moved to Canton, Ohio, and died in that city, Mar. 26, 1913.  His wife died July 1, 1906.  Their children were as follows:  William, who is deceased; Charles B., who was born June 1, 1872; Edgar, who lives in Stark County; Stewart, who is deceased.  The family all belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church.
     Charles B. Miller attended the public schools of Stark County, Ohio, and Kansas, and completed his education in those of Monroe Township.  Since 1889 he has lived on his present farm, and became owner of its 158 acres at the death of his father, and here he has since been engaged in general farming and stockraising with very gratifying results for his land is fertile and he knows how to operate it as he is a practical agriculturist.
     On Aug. 23, 1894, Mr. Miller was united in marriage with Mary Helen Crumrine, a daughter of James Crumrine (Dixon) Crumrine.  James Crumrine was born in Monroe Township, Harrison County, Ohio, and his wife was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and they were farming people of Monroe Township.  Mr. Crumrine died Apr. 27, 1916.  His children were: Ellen, who is Mrs. Miller; Elizabeth, who lives at Ulrichsville, Ohio; and Carrie, who is deceased.  The Crumrine family all belonged to Plum Run Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. and Mrs. Miller, also belong to this church.  Clyde A. is the only child of the Millers, and he married Gladys M. Brown and they have a daughter, Helen Elizabeth, born Sept. 6, 1920.
     Clyde A. Miller is a veteran of the great war, having entered the service of his country July 24, 1918.  He was first sent to Camp Sherman and assigned to Company E, Three Hundred and Thirty-third Infantry, Eighty-fourth Division.  On Aug. 22, 1918, he left Camp Sherman with his organization for Camp Mills, Long Island, and on Aug. 31, set sail on the "Carmanian" for France, landing at Liverpool, England, on Sept. 13, at six o'clock in the evening.  From there the organization went on to Southampton, England, and crossed the English Channel on the night of Sept. 17th, landing at Le Havre, France, although the boat was torpedoed when nearing the harbor, but managed to reach it before sinking.  After landing in France he had the misfortune to be stricken with the influenza, and was confined in the hospital for a month on account of it.  Following his recovery he was sent to Le Mans, France, where he was assigned to the Three Hundred and Eighth Motor Transport Train, and remained with this organization until his return to the United States.  On June 16, 1919 he left Le Mans and sailed from Le Havre on June 28, arriving in New York City July 8, 1919.  He received his honorable discharge July 18, 1919, at Camp Sherman, and returned home.  His marriage occurred on Oct. 14, 1919.  Like the majority of the young soldiers of this memorable conflict Mr. Miller is very modest about his country had need of him he responded to its call and risked his life and limb in its behalf.  No man make such a sacrifice without emerging from the experience a better citizen.  A land worth dying for is certainly one worth the best efforts of its American-born people, and it is doubtful if any of the returned soldiers will be indifferent to the welfare of the land in whose behalf they took up arms.
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ource: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 965
CLEMENT E. MILLER has exercised with marked circumspection and progressiveness his functions as one of the constructive representatives of farm industry in his native county, and in German Township, Harrison County, he owns and resides upon the old homestead farm which figures as the place of his nativity.  Here he was born on the 14th of June, 1863, and he is a scion of a family that was founded in this county more than a century ago, when this section of the Buckeye State was virtually a forest wilderness, John Miller, the original representative of this family in Harrison County, came here from his native State of Maryland, in the year 1806, and in Rumley Township he reclaimed from the forest a productive farm, he having been the owner of an estate of 215 acres at the time of his death in 1836.  His nine children were: Daniel, David, John, Jr., Jacob, Jacob, Catherine, Hannah, Polly and Sarah.  Of these children Daniel, grandfather of Clement E. Miller of this review, was born in Frederick County, Maryland, in 1788, and thus was a youth of about eighteen years at the time of the family removal to Harrison County in 1806.  In 1817 he married Susannah Lowmiller, who was born in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, in1796, and whose parents, John and Catherine (Long) Lowmiller, became in 1800 early settlers in Harrison County, Ohio.  Daniel Miller acquired a large and valuable farm property in Rumley and German Townships, and was one of the substantial and influential citizens of the county at the time of his death, his widow having been more than ninety-five years of age when she passed from the stage of life's mortal endeavors.  They had ten children - Catherine, Elizabeth, Sarah, John, Henry, Susannah, Rebecca, Margaret, Abigail and Eliza J.
     John Miller, son of Daniel and Susannah (Lowmiller) Miller was born in German Township, this county, on the 22d of February, 1822, the place of his advent in the world having been a log house of the pioneer typ0e.  He continued to be associated in the work of the home farm until the death of his father in 1854, and eventually he became one of the most successful exponents of farm industry in his native county as the owner of a large and valuable landed estate, including the fine old homestead now owned by his son Clement E. of this review.  He was influential in local affairs of public order, served in various township offices, was a democrat in politics and both he and his wife were communicants of the Lutheran Church.  Mr. Miller died at the age of eighty-nine yeas and his wife at the age of eighty-nine years.  They became the parents of eleven children: Oscar B., Rebecca Margaret, Henry A., Andrew B. (individually mentioned on other pages of this work), Daniel D. (a clergyman of the Lutheran Church), Samuel H. became a member of the faculty of Thiel College, Greenville, Pennsylvania, John O., Joseph M., Clement E., Clayton L. and Jessie L.  On the 1st of May, 1849, was solemnized the marriage of John Miller to Miss Susannah Mikesell, who was born in Rumley Township, Harrison County, Feb. 15, 1824, a daughter of Peter and Mary A. (Long) Mikesell, pioneers who came to the county in 1800 from Frederick County, Maryland, and thus it is to be seen that the subject of this sketch is a representative of fine pioneer stock in both the paternal and maternal lines.
     Clement E. Miller was reared under virtually the same conditions and influences as other farm boys of his day and generation, and his early education was obtained mainly in district school No. 4, German Township.  He has remained from the time of his birth on the old home farm, which comprises 166 67/100 acres in the portion owned by him, and here he has been engaged in independent and successful enterprise as an agriculturist and stock-grower since the year 1906.   He is one of the county's leaders in the breeding and raising of pureblood and registered Poland-China swine, and in all departments of his farm industry he gains the maximum returns, owing to his progressiveness and mature judgment, as combined with his long and practical experience.  His political allegiance is given to the democratic party, and he and his wife are active communicants of the Lutheran Church at New Jefferson.
     On the 26th of March, 1903, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Miller to Miss Mary Elizabeth Rutledge, who was born and reared in Salem Township, Jefferson County, Ohio, a daughter of Thomas and Mahala (Skelley) Rutledge, both likewise natives of that township, where the respective families were founded in the pioneer days.  Thomas Rutledge was one of the prosperous farmers and influential citizens of is native township and county at the time of his death, in 1905, aged seventy-eight years, and his widow passed away June 5, 1915, at the venerable age of eighty-five years.  They were devout communicants of the Methodist Episcopal Church and four of their sons are clergymen in that denomination.  Mr. and Mrs. Rutledge became the parents of nine children:  James A. and Caleb H. are ministers of the Methodist Episcopal Church; Margaret, Jane is deceased; William A., and John S. are Methodist clergy men, and the latter has given effective service as president of the Anti-saloon League in the City of Cleveland; Bert M. is a resident of Toronto, Jefferson County, Ohio; Mary Elizabeth (Mrs. Miller) was the next in order of birth; Franklin P. resides on the old home farm of his parents in Jefferson County; and Myra R. married Howard Copeland, and they reside in Jewett, Ohio.
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ource: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 800
DAVID D. MILLER, the subject of this sketch, was born Jan. 30, 1843, in Harrison County, Ohio, near the line between Archer and Stock Townships.  His father, R. D. Miller, was, at an early age, married to Jane Curry; he soon after settled in Archer Township, where he reared a family of five children, three of whom are still living.  After a happy life of a few short years his wife died, leaving him alone with his family of little ones.  That they might receive a mother's care, he was married again, this time to Mrs. Jane Robinson, and removed to North Township.  After residing there some time they removed to Gallia County, where they still reside.
     At eleven years of age David D. Miller left home, determined to win for himself a living and to gain a competency for old age.  He early learned the carpenter's trade, and followed it for many years with profit. In February, 1862, he responded to the call of his country for volunteers, enlisting in Company G, Seventy-fourth O. V. I., and went with his command to Camp Chase, and was then sent to Nashville, Tenn., to join the Army of the Cumberland.  He served with distinction through the war, participating in all the battles of his regiment, never flinching from his duty, irrespective of the danger to himself.  At the expiration of his time he, like many other brave and loyal soldiers, re-enlisted for the remainder of the war.  He was mustered out in 1865, when he returned home and took up his trade again.  On Nov. 25, 1880, he was married to Martha Eastlick, who was one of the descendants of the earliest settlers of the county, and a most estimable woman.  In politics, Mr. Miller is a Republican, and, although not desiring any office, still works for the interests of his party in every way that is honorable.  He and his wife are members of the Ridge Presbyterian Church, and are among the foremost in all works of benevolence and charity. Mr. Miller, by his own unaided efforts, has acquired a splendid farm, which is under excellent cultivation and highly improved.  Since early life Mr. Miller has struggled earnestly, bravely and persistently, and his is a life that might well be emulated by the young men of present day.
Source:  Biographical Record of the Counties of Harrison and Carroll, Ohio, Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. - 1891 - Page 385
EMANUAL MILLER   This representative and public spirited citizen of Sherwood, Defiance County, is a native of Harrison county, this State, born December 4, 1843. 
     Elias Miller married Rebecca Foos, and they had a family of five children,  the second of these being Emanuel, the subject of this sketch.  Z. H. and Vincent V. are also members of this family.  Mr. and Mrs. Elias Miller resided in Harrison county for a number of years prior to the fall of 1855, when they removed to Defiance county, making it their permanent home.  The father is still living, but the mother is deceased.
     Emanuel Miller, accompanying his parents to Defiance county when a lad of nearly twelve years, remained with them in their new home until he was about twenty years of age, when he went into the forests of Michigan and worked at lumbering about eight months.  With the exception of this time and several months spent in Illinois and Iowa, he has been a resident of Sherwood ever sine his removal here with his parents.  Although agriculture has been the chief business of his life, he has devoted some time to other pursuits, was associated with his brother Vincent for about five years in the operation of a sawmill, and has engaged in the work of a carpenter to some extent.
     Mr. Miller married Miss Martha E. Taylor, of Sherwood, a daughter of the late William Taylor, a Pennsylvanian by birth.  Mrs. Miller is a native of Crawford county, Ohio.  Her father lived but a few years after locating in Sherwood.  Mr. and Mrs. Miller have had six children as follows:  Nellie G., Emerson, Maggie J., Cora B., Elba M. and Clara.  All of them are living except the eldest, with whom they were called to part when she was twelve years old.
     Mr. Miller owns more than one hundred acres of land in the corporation of Sherwood, and he is an active and interested participant in all local affairs.  He has honored with the office of trustee of Delaware township, and his fellow townsmen in Sherwood evinced their appreciation of his worth by making him one of their first councilmen.  Socially, he is a member of the Patriotic Order Sons of America.
Source:  Commemorative Biographical Records of Northwestern Ohio including the counties of Defiance, Henry, Williams & Fulton. - Published at Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. 1899.
H. A. MILLER, one of the young and most successful farmers of German Township, Harrison County, is a son of John and Susan (Mikesell) Miller.  He was born Mar. 8, 1851, and received a practical business education at the common schools.  He remained on the farm with his parents till Mar. 5, 1874, when he married Miss Sarah C. Wood, who was born in Loudon Township, Carroll Co., Ohio, Sept. 22, 1852, a daughter of Ellis and Elizabeth (Shearer) Wood, also natives of Carroll County.  Joseph Wood, the father of Ellis, came from Pennsylvania, and was among the early settlers of Carroll County.  Mr. Shearer, father of Elizabeth Shearer, was of German origin, and was also among the early settlers of Carroll County, Ohio.
     On June 20, 1875, H. A. Miller came to where he now lives, in Section No. 15, German Township.  He bought the farm, containing one hundred acres, of his father, which is considered by competent judges to be one of the best farms in Harrison County.  He takes pride in raising Clydesdale horses, of which he has six of the finest in German Township.  On Apr. 12, 1889, his buildings are all destroyed by a cyclone, excepting a portion of his house, and the damage to him by this storm would reach two thousand dollars.  Among the stock killed were fine sheep, valued at two hundred dollars, one horse, valued at two hundred dollars, cattle and poultry, etc.  He rebuilt at once, having now, without doubt, the best barn in German Township, it being 40x60 feet, having a fine basement, and being finished complete in every respect.  No similar example of pluck and energy is on record in the township.  Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Miller are both active members of the Lutheran Church, and are parents of five children: John E., Chester O., Etta B., Homer L. and Welta R.
Source:  Biographical Record of the Counties of Harrison and Carroll, Ohio, Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. - 1891 - Page 424
HENRY MILLER, breeder of Clydesdale horses, etc., German Township, Harrison County, is a son of Daniel and Susannah (Lowmiller) Miller, and was born Aug. 27, 1824, on the farm where he now lives.  Daniel Miller was a son of John, a native of Frederic County, Md., who came in 1806 to Rumley Township, Harrison Co., Ohio, where he purchased land of the Government, and at the time of his death, in 1836, he was owner of 215 acres of land.  When he came to Rumley Township he had to cut the road through the woods to et to his premises, and had to camp out while he built his cabin.  He was the father of nine children, viz.:  Daniel, David, John, Jacob, Joseph, Catherine, Hannah, Polly and Sarah.
     Daniel Miller
was born in Frederick County, Md., in 1788, and in 1806 came with his parents to Ohio, where he shared all the hardships his father encountered in clearing land and making a home.  In 1817 he married Miss Susannah Lowmiller, a daughter of John and Catherine (Long) Lowmiller.  She was born in Dauphin County, Penn., in 1796, and her parents came to Harrison County in 1800; she is still living, now aged ninety-five years.  Daniel Miller, after his marriage, settled in German Township, Harrison County, where he bought 100 acres of land for $1,500, borrowing the money of his father and father-in-law; afterward he bought 160 acres in the same township, and 160 acres in Rumley Township.  He afterward sold his land in Rumley Township, and bought 73 acres in German Township, Harrison County; then bought 145 acres where John Miller at present lives, and twelve acres adjoining, where his widow now lives.  Daniel Miller and his wife were the parents of children named as follows: Catherine, Elizabeth, Sarah, John, Henry, Susannah, Rebecca, Margaret, Abigail and Eliza J.  The father died in 1854.
     Henry Miller received a common-school education in German Township, and has always lived on the farm where he was born.  On May 20, 1856, he married Miss E. W. Gault, who was born Feb. 28, 1831, a daughter of John and Nancy (McKinsey) Gault, who came to Harrison County, Ohio, in 1839.  Mr. Miller is a great lover of fine horses, always endeavoring to get the best that can be found, and has made several trips to Canada, to Kentucky, and through the western States, in search of fine blooded stock; he pays special attention to Clydesdales, although he breeds some trotting stock, of the Mambrino, Patchin and Log blood, and he has thirty of these noble animals on his farm at the present time.  He is also a considerable breeder of fine sheep, of which he has a flock of 175.  His farm contains 338 acres of fine farming land, and he is the owner also of eighty acres of timber land in Michigan.  Politically Mr. Miller is a Democrat, in which party he has always served faithfully.  His father and grandfather were Democrats, also his brother, John Miller, and five of his sisters married Democrats.  He has had several offices of trust tendered him by his party, but has always declined them, choosing rather to look after his farm and business.  Mr. Miller has had several serious accidents in his life, chiefly caused by his horses, and once he was shot through the hip accidentally by his brother John; but he recovered from them all, and now at the age of sixty-six years he is hale and hearty, attending to his affairs just as in his younger days.  In September, 1862, during the War of the Rebellion, Mr. Miller was drafted into the army.
Source:  Biographical Record of the Counties of Harrison and Carroll, Ohio, Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. - 1891 - Page 602
HENRY MILLER, who was one of the venerable native sons of Harrison County at the time of his death in 1910, was a representative of one of the best known pioneer families of this county, with whose history the family name has been identified for more than a century.  Adequate details concerning this influential family may be found in the sketch of Andrew B. Miller on other pages of this work.  Henry Miller was a man of fine character and marked ability, became one of the most successful agriculturists and stock-growers' of his native township, ad at the time of his death was the owner of a valuable landed estate of more than 300 acres n German Township.  He achieved special success in the breeding and raising of Clydesdale horses, as well as the best type of standard bred horses and also fine sheep.
     Mr. Miller was born in German Township, on the farm which was his place of residence at the time of his death, and the date of his nativity was Aug. 27, 1824.  He was a son of Daniel and Susannah's (Lowmiller) Miller, and a grandson of John Miller, who came to Harrison County from Maryland in 1806.  Mr. Miller passed his entire life on the farm on which he was born, and his early educational advantages were those of the pioneer schools.  May 20, 1856, recorded his marriage to Miss E. W. Gault, who was born Feb. 28, 1831, a daughter of John and Nancy (McKinsey) Gault, her parents having become residents of Harrison County in 1839.  Mrs. Miller was seventy-one years of age at the time of her death, and both she and her husband were communicants of the Presbyterian Church.  They had no children, but in their home they reared from childhood David B. Zollars, a representative Harrison County farmer of whom individual mention is made in the preceding sketch.  Mr. Miller was a staunch democrat in politics and was liberal and public-spirited as a citizen, the while his generous and kindly native gained for him the high regard of all who knew him.  He lived and labored to worthy ends, achieved much of success, and by his character and accomplishment honored the country and state of his birth.
S
ource: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 784
JASON MILLER.  The Miller family were among the first settlers of North Carolina and took a prominent part of the development of that section.  The earliest one of whom any knowledge exists is Mason Miller,  who was the son of one of the leading residents of that section.  His youth was spent in his native place, where he married Ruth Howard.  The young couple, in whom the adventurous spirit was well developed, immediately left home and friends to settle in the wilds of Ohio and there built themselves a home.  After many days' tedious journey through the woods, when paths had to be cut, and rivers forded - part of the time walking, and sometimes riding - they arrived in Smithfield Township, Jefferson County where they purchased a farm.  They remained here but a short time, however, when they entered a large tact in Freeport Township, and afterward in Washington Township, Harrison County.  Their family consisted of the following named children: Asa, Nathan, Stephen, Eli, Richard, Sarah, Mary, Edith, William and Thomas.  Here, in the wilderness, they struggled under many difficulties, among which not the least to be experienced were the dangers from beasts to be experienced were the dangers from beasts of prey and the Indian.  They were among the organizers o the Friends Church in their vicinity, and were active in promoting its success.  Politically the family supported the Whig party, and were much interested in its success.  They were well known and highly respected, and after a long life of usefulness the parents passed to their reward.
     Nathan Miller, the second son, spent his youth on the home place, and was active in the performance of the duties of the farm.  In his early youth he was married to Amy Jones, of Washington Township, Harrison County, settled on a farm in that township, and remained there till his death.  His children were Ruth Ann (Mrs. William Wallace), Jason, John N., Ardenna J. (Mrs. Joseph Miller) and Elizabeth A. (Mrs. Leander Wallace).  In his early life Mr. Miller supported the Democratic party, but in 1840 he joined the Whig party, and remained true to it until his death.  He was one of the prominent men of his township, and was repeatedly elected to it s various offices.  A self-made man, he by his own efforts succeeded in the duties of life,  and, numbered among the progressive men, he ever identified himself with all movements for the furtherance of the interests of the people with whom he lived.  His death took place in 1882 and that of his wife in 1885.
     Jason Miller, second child and eldest son of Nathan and Amy (Jones) Miller, was born Apr. 29, 1835, in Washington Township, Harrison Co., Ohio, where he has thus far spent his life.  He received his education at the common schools, where he laid the foundation for the subsequent study, in which he has spent much of his leisure.  In politics Mr. Miller, while a believer in the doctrines of the Republican party which he usually supports, still in local elections votes for the man he deems best fitted to perform the duties of the office.  He now resides on the home place, where he engages in general farming and stock-raising.  An enterprising citizen and an excellent neighbor, Mr. Miller has well filled the place occupied by his father.
Source:  Biographical Record of the Counties of Harrison and Carroll, Ohio, Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. - 1891 - Page 646
  JOHN MILLER, a farmer, German Township, Harrison County, is a son of Daniel and Susannah (Lowmiller) MillerDaniel Miller was the son of John, a native of Frederick county, Md., who came in 1806 to Rumley Township, Harrison County, Ohio, where he purchased land of the Government, and at the time of his death, in 1836, he was the owner of 215 acres of land.  When he came to Rumley Township he had to cut the road through the woods to get to his premises, and had to camp out while he built his cabin.    He was the father of nine children, viz.:  Daniel, David, John, Jacob, Joseph, Catherine, Hannah, Polly and Sarah.
     Daniel Miller
was  born in Frederick County, Md., in 1788, and in 1806 came with his parents to Ohio, where he shared all the hardships his father encountered in clearing land and making a home.  In 1817 he married Miss Susannah Lowmiller, a daughter of John and Catherine (Long) Lowmiller.  She was born in Dauphin County, Penn., in 1796, and her parents came to Harrison County in 1800; she is still living, now aged ninety-five years.  Daniel Miller, after his marriage, settled in German Township, Harrison County, where he bought 100 acres of land for $1,500, borrowing the money of his father and father-in-law; afterward he bought 160 acres in the same township, and 160 acres in Rumley Township.  He afterward sold his land in Rumley Township and bought seventy-three acres in German Township, Harrison County; he then bought 145 acres where our subject at present lives, and twelve acres adjoining where his widow now lives.  Daniel Miller and his wife were the Parents of children named as follows:  Catherine, Elisabeth, Sarah, John, Henry, Susannah, Rebecca, Margaret, Abigail and Eliza J.
     JOHN MILLER, whose name opens this sketch, was born in German Township, Harrison County, Ohio, Feb. 22, 1822, in an old log cabin, and received an education in one of the log school houses, such as they had in those days.  He spent his boyhood days in his old home helping his father, who died in 1854.  On May 1, 1849, he was united in the holy bonds of matrimony with Miss Susannah Mikesell, who was born in Rumley Township, Harrison County, Ohio, Feb. 15, 1824, a daughter of Peter and Mary A. (Long) Mikesell, who came from Frederick County, Md., with the early settlers in 1800.  After his marriage Mr. Miller settled on the farm he now owns, where he has erected fine buildings, and his farm ranks among the best of the county.  He and wife are the parents of children, as follows:  O. B., a professional teacher of music and public school in Germano; Rebecca Margaret; H. A., a farmer in German Township; Andrew B., a farmer in Rumley Township; Rev. Daniel D., married and living at Parker's Landing, Penn.; Samuel H., a professor in Thiel College, at Greenville, Penn.; John O.; Joseph M., a farmer in Washington County, Penn.; Clement E., Clayton L. and Jessie L., at Thiel College, Pennsylvania.  Mr. Miller has held various township office, and in 1883 was elected county commissioner, which position he filled three years.  Both parents and children are members of the Lutheran Church, and, politically, strong adherents to the party of Jefferson and Jackson.
Source:  Biogr
aphical Record of the Counties of Harrison and Carroll, Ohio, Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. - 1891 - Page 592
JOHN MILLER, one of the leading farmers of Stock Township, Harrison Co., Ohio, was born Feb. 6, 1832, in Belmont County, Ohio.  His father, Samuel G. Miller, was born Feb. 6, 1832, in Belmont County, Ohio.  His father, Samuel G. Miller, and was a son of John Miller, a native of Pennsylvania, where he was married and reared a family of eighteen children, nine of whom were boys, and in his native State he followed the vocation of farming until his death.  Samuel G. Miller, who was reared to the farming business, came to Ohio in 1828, and settled in Belmont County, where he was married to Margaret Lightner, who was born in Pennsylvania, Apr. 3, 1805.  To this marriage were born the following children: John; Mary J., Mrs. R. P. Smith; William; Elizabeth, Mrs. Richard Lane; Belinda, deceased, and Margaret A.  In 1853 Mr. Miller removed to Morgan County, Ohio, where he purchased a farm, which he lived on till 1874, when he came to Stock Township, Harrison County, and lived with his children until his death, July 26, 1889, when his remains were laid in Pleasant Valley Cemetery, Harrison County.  His wife, who had died Mar. 14, 1860, was buried in Morgan County.  Mr. Miller was a Democrat in politics, and in religion affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal Church at Pleasant Valley.
     John Miller, the subject proper of this sketch, passed his youth in Belmont, Harrison and Morgan Counties, Ohio, where he attended the common schools during his leisure hours - or, rather, those not occupied with farm work, and these precluded any extended devotion to educational matters.  Nov. 3, 1853, having reached his majority and the years of discretion, Mr. Miller married Miss Margaret, daughter of William P. Smith, the result resting in the following family of children: Amanda, Mrs. John A. Miller; George H.; William D.; Anna J.; Maggie M.; Clement L. and Albert L.   The Miller family are respected members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Pleasant Valley, in which Mr. Miller has especially taken an active interest.  In politics he has ever been a member of the Democratic party, and has several times served as township trustee, and also as treasurer.  The present financial prosperity of Mr. Miller is due solely to his own efforts, with the aid of his excellent wife, and he has built up his present extensive property from nothing.  An active and energetic gentleman, he has won the respect of all who know him, and his fair dealing and honest life have been the admiration of his neighbors.
Source:  Biographical Record of the Counties of Harrison and Carroll, Ohio, Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. - 1891 - Page 659
JOHN MILLER, a native of Frederic county, Md.; removed to Rumley township, Harrison county, Ohio, about 1806, where he d. 1836; had issue:
   I. Daniel, b. in Frederick County, Md., 1788; came with his parents to Harrison county; settled in German township, where he d. 1854; m. 1817, Susannah Lowmiller, b. in Dauphin county, Penn., 1796; daughter of John and Catherine Lowmiller, who settled in Harrison county before 1810; had issue: 1. Catherine; 2. Elizabeth; 3. Sarah; 4. John, b. Feb. 22, 1822; m. May 1, 1849, Susanna Mikesell, b. in Rumley township, Feb. 15, 1824, daughter of Peter and Mary A. Long Mikesell, who removed from Frederick county, Md., to Harrison county, before 1810 (had issue: 1. O. B.; settled at Germano, Harrison county; ii. Rebecca Margaret; iii. h. a., b. Mar. 8, 1851; m. 1874, Sarah C. Wood, b. Sept. 22, 1852, daughter of Ellis and Elizabeth Shearer Wood, of Carroll county; iv. Andrew B. settled in Rumley township; v. Daniel D., a minister, settled at Parker's Landing, Penn.; vi. Samuel H., settled in Greensville, Penn.; vii. John O.; viii. Joseph M., settled in Washington county, Penn.; ix. Clement E., x. Clayton L.; ix. Jesse L.); 5. Henry, b. Aug. 27, 1824; served in the Civil War; m. May 20, 1845, E. W. Gault, b. Feb. 28, 1831, daughter of John and Nancy McKinsey Gault; who settled in Harrison county in 1839; 6 Susannah; 7. Rebecca; 8. Margaret; 9. Abigail; 10. Eliza J.  II. David.  III. John. b. 1801; settled in Rumley township before 1838, where he d. 1836; m. Margaret Lowmiller, b. 1805; d. 1876; daughter of John and Susannah Ulerich Lowmiller; had issue: 1. Mary Ann; 2. Susanna, b. in Rumley township, Oct. 11, 1828; m. May, 1847, Thomas W. Ramsouer, b. in Rumley township, 1820; d. in Jewett, 1880; son of John and Catherine H. Ramsouer (had issue: i. Josiah A.; ii. John William; iii. Margaret C.; iv. Sabella J.; v. Harden Miller, settled in Massillon, Ohio; vi. Daniel D. vii. Hester A., m. Wm. Custer Edwards; settled in Dennison, Ohio; viii. Lauretta F.; ix. Susan Maria, m. Richey Osborn); 3. Isabella, m. William Manbeck; 4. Elizabeth, m. Isaac McCloud, and settled in Kansas; 5. Jacob; settled in Jefferson county, Ohio; 6. Daniel, IV. Jacob.  V. Joseph.  VI.  Catherine. VII. Hannah.  VIII. Mary.  IX. Sarah.
Source:
  Historical Collections of Harrison County in the State of Ohio - By Charles A. Hanna - Published New York, 1900 - Page 547
JOHN N. MILLER.  The ancestors of the Miller family in Harrison County came from North Carolina.  Mason Miller, the first to come to Ohio, married Ruth Howard, and at once, with his bride, left the Old North State for the Far West, and after a long and tedious journey, during which paths had to be cut through forests, and rivers had to be forded, at times riding and at other times walking, they at least reached Ohio, where they purchased a farm in Short reek Township, Harrison County.  For a while they resided in this tract, and then entered a large tract  in Freeport Township, and, still later, one in Washington Township, where they permanently made their home, which they carved out of the wilderness.  They became highly respected by their neighbors, and after a long and useful life passed away, leaving the following named children: Asa, Nathan, Stephen, Eli, Richard, Sarah, Mary, Edith, William and Thomas.
     Nathan Miller
, the second son of Mason, and the father of the gentleman whose name heads this sketch, was reared on the home farm, in the development of which he took an active part.  In his early youth he was married to Amy Jones, of Washington, who bore him the following children:  Ruth Ann (Mrs. William Wallace), Jason, John N., Ardenna J. (Mrs. Joseph Miller) and Elizabeth A. (Mrs. Leander Wallace).  Nathan Miller, in his early days, was a Democrat in politics, but in 1840 united with the Whig party, with which he remained until his death.  He became a very prominent man in his township, quite popular with his party, and by it was repeatedly elected to office.  He was progressive in his ideas, and was fully identified with every measure that had a tendency toward the advancement or improvement of the condition of the community in which his lot was cast.  His death took place in 1882, when he was aged seventy-six years, and that of his wife in 1885, when she was aged seventy-three years.
     John N. Miller, the second son of Nathan Miller, was born Oct. 20, 1836, in Washington Township, Harrison Co..., Ohio.  He spent his youth in attendance at the schools of the period, during his leisure from the duties which claimed so much of his attention on the farm.  His life has been one of hard work and economy, and by it he has succeeded in making a competency.  His success is due to his own efforts, he having commenced life with no aid from any, but gradually he has added to his possessions and now has a small, well-stocked farm, situated about three miles from Freeport, which he has largely improved himself.  As in finances, so he is in educational matters, his knowledge, which is varied, having been acquired after his school days were over, and when, in the spare time from his work, he found opportunity to gratify his desire for knowledge.  He takes an especial interest in the political affairs of his country, and is exceptionally well informed on the leading questions of the day.  He has always, however, been identified with the Republican party, but is not actively engaged in politics.  He has ever been found among the representative men of his county and township, as well as among the liberal supporters of charity, and other matters of public and private benefit.  On Apr. 1, 1862, he chose, as his life's partner, Mary Guthrie, daughter of Benjamin C. Guthrie, of Franklin Township, and two children have been born to them, viz.: Anna Belle and Benjamin N., the latter of whom is now deceased.
Source:  Biographical Record of the Counties of Harrison and Carroll, Ohio, Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. - 1891 - Page 555
JOSEPH MILLER, one of the substantial farmers and sterling citizens of German Township, Harrison County, is a representative of an honored pioneer family that was here founded in the early pioneer days.  His grandfather, George Miller, reclaimed a farm from the forest wilds and became one of the prosperous citizens of German Township.  The family name of his wife was Sawvell, and both were earnest communicants of the Lutheran Church.  Of their children the following names are recorded:  Solomon, Adam, George, Jr., Melinda, Lydia, Mary Ann and Catherine.
     Joseph Miller
was born in Loudon Township, Carroll County, Jan. 4, 1851, and is a son of George Miller, Jr., and Catherine (Lowmiller) Miller, both natives of German Township, Harrison County.  Mrs. Miller was a daughter of Harry Lowmiller, who was born in Maryland and was a boy when his parents came to Harrison County, Ohio, and numbered themselves among the earliest settlers in the present German Township.  George Miller, Jr., was reared and educated in German Township and eventually became one of the representative exponents of farm industry in Loudon Township, Carroll County, where he established his home soon after his marriage and where he continued his residence until his death, May 9, 1888.  His wife died in August, 1892, and both were earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  They became the parents of the following children - Mary Ann (Mrs. Simeon Gotshall), Absolom, Jacob, Joseph, Sarah (Mrs. Abraham Baker), Hannah (Mrs. James Ryder) Henry (deceased, aged eight years), and Lydia (Mrs. John Shawver).
     To the district schools of Loudon Township, Carroll County, Joseph Miller paid due academic tribute during the period of his boyhood and youth, and in the meanwhile he profited also by the sturdy discipline gain in connection with the activities of the home farm.  In 1871 he assumed connubial responsibilities, and it was soon after his marriage that he established  his residence on a farm which he rented in Rumley Township, Harrison County.  There he continued his vigorous operations eleven years, and for the ensuing three years he rented a farm in Germon Township.  The next two years found him engaged in farming in North Township, and in 1893 he purchased his present farm, which comprises ninety-one acres of fertile and productive land and is one of the valuable properties of German Township.  He has erected substantial and modern buildings on the place, in fact all of the buildings that are here found were placed since the property came into his possession except the horse barn.  The house is modern in design and appointments, is equipped with steam heat and has running hot and cold water in all rooms, so that it figures as one of the model farm dwellings of the community.  Mr. Miller ahs had no ambition for political activities or official preferment, but is loyal to all civic responsibilities and gives his support to the democratic party.  Both he and his wife are influential members of the Howard Chapel (Methodist Episcopal), and he has served as trustee and steward of the same.
     The year 1871 recorded the marriage of Mr. Miler to Miss Nancy L. Zollars, daughter of David and Matilda (Richardson) Zollars, of German Township, Harrison County.  Of this union have been born four children: George D. married Miss Carlie Rife and they had three children - Harold, who is deceased; Nellie, who is the wife of William Dedrich and has one child Harold; and Joseph E.  David W. married Miss Anna Galligher, and of their two children, Josephine and Nancy Ellen, the former is deceased.  Joseph Eugene first married Miss Louis Briney, and they became the parents of three children, Henry, Doris (deceased), and Lando (deceased).  After the death of his first wife Joseph E. married Miss Helen Hardington, and they have two children, Marion and Ruth, the family home being now in the City of Columbus.  Jacob S., who resides at Dillonvale, Jefferson County, married Miss Hazel Petty, and they have one child, Ward Eugene.
Source: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921
- Page 770
MONFRED L. MILLER, son of Andrew B. Miller, subject of the personal sketch and family record that immediately precedes this review, was born on the old homestead farm in Rumley Township May 8, 1881.  He acquired his youthful education in the district schools of Rumley and German townships, and thereafter continued his association with the activities of his father's farm until he was about twenty years of age, when he went to the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where for two years was in the employ of the street-railway company.  For the ensuing three years he was there in the employ of the Pittsburgh Construction Company.  He then manifested his wisdom by returning to his native county and resuming his active association with farm industry.  He is now the owner of a well improved and productive farm of 102 acres in the northeast corner of Rumley Township, and his pleasant farm residence is almost directly across the road from that of his parents.  For six years after returning to Harrison County from Pittsburgh Mr. Miller gave special attention to the buying and selling of horses, but as an agriculturist and stock-raiser he has found his maximum potential in a business way and counts himself fortunate to be an exemplar of the basic industries under the influences of which he was reared, the while his loyalty to his native county is marked by full appreciation of its attractions and advantages.  He is a democrat and his wife is a republican in their political proclivities, and both are communicants of the Lutheran Church.
     On the 1st of August, 1907, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Miller to Miss Grace Amos, daughter of Joshua and Mary V. Amos, of Loudon Township, Carroll County.  Mr. and Mrs. Miller have four children - John A., Anna Virginia, Helen Elizabeth and Samuel Jefferson.
Source: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921
- Page 735
WILLIAM MILLER, born in the North of Ireland; emigrated to America, and settled in Huntington county, Penn., about 1789; m. Rebecca Wylie; had issue: 1. James; 2. Samuel; 3. Joseph; 4. Benson; 5. Margaret; 6. Isabel; 7. Martha, d. 1873; m. John L. Martin, son of John and Elizabeth Livingston Martin, of Mifflin county, Penn. (had issue: 1. Rebecca-Jane, m. 1861, Lyons F. Grider; ii. John. m. Jane Johnson; iii. Samuel; iv. William; v. Joseph); 8. Hester; 9. Rebecca.
Source:  Historical Collections of Harrison County in the State of Ohio - By Charles A. Hanna - Published New York, 1900 - Page 547
HARRY M. MILLIKEN is one of the progressive agriculturists and stock-raisers of the younger generation in his native county, where he owns fifty acres in Cadiz Township, this constituting his homestead place and eighty-eight acres in the adjoining township of Nottingham.  He is a scion of one of the honored pioneer families of Harrison County, and thus by ancestry as well as by reason of his individual standing in his native county he is specially entitled to recognition in this history.
     Mr. Milliken was born in Nottingham Township August 22, 1885.  His father, William Milliken, was born in Cadiz Township in the year 1838, his entire life having been passed in Harrison County, where he was continuously identified with farm industry, - in Cadiz and Nottingham Townships.  He was the owner of a valuable farm property of 187 acres at the time of his death, on December 13, 1916, his wife having passed away in 1889.  He was a son of Michael Milliken, who was born in Green Township, this county, October 25, 1812, whom this section of the Buckeye State was mainly a forest wilderness.  He was a son of John and Hannah (Karbaugh) Milliken, who were born and reared in Pennsylvania, where their marriage was solemnized.  Mark Milliken father of John, was a native of England and was a young man when he came to America and established his home in Pennsylvania.  In the old Keystone state John Milliken learned the shoemaker's trade, and this he found of much value after he and his young wife became pioneer settlers in Harrison County, Ohio, where Mr. Milliken first settled on a tract of wild land in Green Township, whence in 1815 he removed to the farm which later was owned and occupied by their son Michael.  Here John Milliken died in 1856, at the age of seventy-nine years, his wife having passed away at the age of sixty years.  In 1838 Michael Milliken was united in marriage to Charity Day, who likewise was born and reared in Harrison County, and they passed the remainder of their lives on their old homestead farm in Cadiz Township, Mr. Milliken having reclaimed much of his land from the native forest.  He became the owner of 248 acres of land, in Cadiz and Nottingham townships, and was one of the honored and influential men of his community.  His political support was given to the whig part until the organization of the republican party, when he allied himself loyally with the latter.  He and his wife were venerable in age at the time of their deaths, and of their four children, William, the eldest, John is deceased; Adeline became the wife of George Christie, and they established their home in the State of Iowa; and Hannah Margaret became the wife of Albert Rogers, a farmer of Cadiz Township.
     William Milliken was reared on the home farm and secured his early education in the common schools of the locality.  In his active career he will maintained the prestige of the family name through his loyalty as a citizen and his resourceful and productive activities as an agriculturist and stock-grower.  Following their marriage he and his wife returned to Nottingham Township, where the wife died September 13, 1887.  In 1891 he married Hannan (Hines) Blair, the widow of Albert Blair, and then came to Cadiz Township where he died.  His widow survives.  By his first marriage William Milliken became the father of three children: Lennie became the wife of Obediah K. Ourant and she is deceased; Nannie is the widow of Frank Carson; and Harry M. is the youngest of the children.
     Harry M. Milliken is indebted to the public schools of his native township for his youthful education, and he was associated with his father in the work and management of the old home farm until the latter's death, his present farm property being a portion of the land formerly owned by his father.  He gives his attention to well diversified agriculture and also raises excellent grades of live stock.  He is a republican, but has no desire for political activity or official preferment.  August 18, 1909, recorded his marriage to Miss Florence Keesey, daughter of John and Mary (Haverfield) Keesey, of Harrison County, and they have three children - Allen Scott, born May 26, 1910; Neva Elizabeth, born January 25, 1912; and John William, born February 21, 1915.
 Source: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921
MICHAEL MILLIKEN, one of the most respected and at one time one of hte most robust and vigorous of the native born agriculturists of Harrison County, first saw the light in Green Township, Oct. 25, 1812.  His grandfather, Mark Milliken, was born in England, and when a young man came to the United States.  His son, John, learned the trade of shoemaker, and was married to Hannah Karbaugh, a native of Pennsylvania.  They came to Ohio and settled upon a piece of wild land in Green Township, Harrison County, where they remained some time, and then removed (in 1815) to the farm where their son, the subject of this sketch, now resides.  Here the mother of Michael passed from earth at the age of sixty years, followed several years later by the father, who departed this life in 1856, when aged seventy-seven years.  They were the parents of fourteen children, two of whom survive:  Mrs. Abigail Blair and Michael, both now residents of Cadiz Township.
     Michael Milliken, who name appears at the opening of this sketch, from the age of three years grew to manhood on his present farm, and, as soon as he was able to wield an ax, set to work to aid in clearing and improving the place.  In 1838 he was united in marriage with Miss Charity Day, also a native of Harrison County, and four children have been born to them, viz.:  William, residing in Nottingham Township, Harrison County; John, on the home farm; Adeline, Mrs. G. Christie, living in Iowa, and Hannah M., Mrs. Albert Rogers, in Cadiz Township, Harrison County.  Politically Mr. Milliken was first a Whit, and afterward, on the formation of the party, a Republican.  For several years his health has been failing, and in May, 1889, he had the misfortune to be stricken with apoplexy.  Mrs. Milliken, now seventy years of age, although feeling somewhat the weight of years, is still in the enjoyment of comparatively good health.  The home farm of 248 acres of choice land is devoted chiefly to sheep culture, and the dwelling is neat and commodious.
Source:  Biographical Record of the Counties of Harrison and Carroll, Ohio, Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co. - 1891 - Page 727

JAMES E. MORRISON was a resident of Harrison County from his boyhood until his death, and left upon the community the impress of strong, noble and useful manhood.  He became one of the representative farmers of Freeport Township, and upon his fine old homestead farm he continued to reside until his death, on the 23d of March, 1908.  Since that time his widow and sons have effectively continued the management of the farm, which comprises 161 and 35/100 acres and which is devoted to diversified agriculture and stock-raising with special emphasis given to the dairy department of the progressive farm enterprises.
     James E. Morrison was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, on the 30th day of August, 1856, was about nine years of age at the time of the family removal to Harrison County, Ohio, in 1864, and he was reared to manhood in Freeport Township, the while he was given excellent educational advantages, as gauged by the standards of the locality and period.  The genealogy of the Morrison family of Harrison County traces back to John Morrison, who was born and reared in County Antrim, Ireland, where he became a farmer and where he also followed the trade of stone mason.  There he married Miss Nancy Taggart, and they became the parents of five children - James, Mary, John, Nancy  and Rachel.  Soon after the death of their parents Mary and John came to America.  In the late '30s James Morrison married Mary Ervin, of County Antrim, her parents, John and Jane (Wallace) Ervin, having been of Scotch ancestry and their religious faith having been that of the Secedar Church, as it was then known.  In the year 1847 James Morrison came with his family to the United States and established his home in Washington County, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in farming and where he also followed the trade of stone mason.  In September, 1864, he came with his family to Harrison County, Ohio, and purchased the farm in Freeport Township that later was owned by his son, James E., the subject of this memoir.  Here he continued his activities as a farmer during the remainder of his active life, and here his death occurred Oct. 19, 1886, his widow passing away Dec. 13, 1889.  Both were earnest members of the Covenanter Church, and his political views were in consonance with the tenets of the republican party, the four who attained to years of maturity and survived the honored parents were Samuel W., Nannie C. (Mrs. William J. Blackwood), Jennie A. (Mrs. Marshall McCall) and James E.
     James E. Morrison
was a loyal and public-spirited citizen, was a republican in his political sentiment, and was a zealous and influential member of the Reformed Presbyterian Church at Londonderry, in which his widow and sons likewise hold membership.  On the 12th of November, 1887, Mr. Morrison wedded Miss Jennie M. Forsythe, who was born and reared in Freeport Township, this county, and who is a daughter of William and Rose A. (McKeown) Forsythe, the latter a daughter of Alexander McKeown, who was an honored pioneer settler of Harrison County,  William Forsythe was one of the representative farmers of Freeport Township at the time of his death, in August, 1871, and his widow's death occurred in February of the following year, both he and his wife having been earnest members of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, in which he served as an elder.  Of the children of William and Rose A. Forsythe the following brief data is available:  Jennie M., widow of the subject of this memoir, was born Sept. 20, 1863; Arthur M., who became a prosperous farmer in Guernsey County, was born June 13, 1865; Nannie M., who was born Mar. 26, 1867, married David C. Sleeth, of Guernsey County, now deceased, her second marriage being to George Rapp, a contractor of Cleveland, Ohio; and William A., who was born Jan. 29, 1869, is now (1921) superintendent of the city schools of Canton, Ohio.  William Forsythe was a son of Matthew and Margaret (Glenn) Forsythe, natives respectively of County Antrim and County Derry, Ireland.  There marriage was solemnized in Pennsylvania, whence they came to Ohio in October, 1840, the closing years of their lives having been passed in Harrison County, where Mr. Forsythe died in 1874, his wife having passed away in 1872, and both having been members of the Reformed Presbyterian Church.  Their children were three in number- William, Jane (Mrs. Jesse Alexander), and Margaret (Mrs. James Alexander).
     Mr. and Mrs. James E. Morrison
became the parents of three children - Samuel W., James R. and Ralph M., the last named havinb died on the 6th of June, 1918, and the two surviving sons being associated in the management of the old home farm.
     James R. Morrison was born on the farm which is now his place of residence, and the date of his nativity was Dec. 12, 1889.  His native county must ever honor his name by reason of the gallant service which he gave in connection with the nation's participation in the great World war.  He entered service Oct. 6, 1917, and thereafter was stationed at Camp Sherman until the 10th of December, 1917, when he was transferred to Camp Hancock, Georgia.  There he was assigned to Company H of the First Motor Mechanics Regiment, with which he embarked Feb. 8, 1918, on the Government transport "President Lincoln" and sailed for France.  It is worthy of incidental note that on a later return trip this vessel was sunk by the enemy.  Mr. Morrison landed with his command at St. Nazaire, France, and there he was stationed during the entire period of his active service in France.  He was granted furloughs on three occasions, and on one of these passed ten days in the city of Paris, besides which he availed himself of the opportunity of visiting the great battlefields of Rheims, Chateau Thierry and Soissons.  On the 26th of June, 1918, he sailed for home, and shortly after his arrival he received his honorable discharge, on the 14th of July, 1919, at Camp Sherman.
     The Morrison family are members of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, the members of which denomination do not vote, for the reason that Christ is not acknowledged in the Constitution of the United States as King of Nations, or the Bible accepted as the Supreme Law of the land.
Source: History of Carroll and Harrison Counties, Ohio - Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1921 - Page 495

 
 
 
 
 

 

   
 
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