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GUERNSEY COUNTY, OHIO
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BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Guernsey County, Ohio
by Col. Cyrus P. B. Sarchet
- Illustrated -
Vols. I & 2.
B. F. Bowden & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana -
1911

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  JOHN H. NASH
 

Source: History of Guernsey County, Ohio by Col. Cyrus P. B. Sarchet - Illustrated - Vols. I & 2. - Publ: B. F. Bowden & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana - 1911 - Page  735

  ELIJAH NEELAND.   Prominent in the activities of the village of Hartford, in which for many years he has cast his lot, is Elijah Neeland, who was born at Claysville, Guernsey county, Ohio, on June 20, 1854, the son of James and Marinda ( Galloway) Neeland.
     James Neeland came from county Tyrone, Ireland, when he was about twenty-one years of age.  He died on Aug. 24, 1900, aged about eighty.  In 1841 he came to Cambridge, Ohio, and there learned the blacksmith's trade under James Davis, and after three years went to Claysville, where he kept a blacksmith shop for the rest of his life, fifty-six years.  While in Cambridge learning his trade, he married Marinda, the daughter of Elijah and Susan (Rector) GallowayElijah Galloway was born on Oct. 19, 1789, near
Washington, D. C., in Maryland, of German ancestry.  Susan Rector was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, on May 24, 1804, from which place her parents moved to Belmont county, Ohio, where Susan was married to Mr. Galloway on Jan. 25, 1820.  The young couple moved to Guernsey county and entered half of a quarter section of virgin forest land from Congress, purchasing the other half from a neighbor.  Here, amid pioneer hardships, they built a log cabin, and raised a little corn to make bread for food, and a little garden. The next year more land was cleared, and they raised wheat and tobacco.  Mrs. Galloway bravely did both a man's and womanís part, and worked in the tobacco while carrying her baby.  Later they got beyond these hardships, and established the home which has since been that of the Galloway family, and where their fourteen children were horn and reared to maturity.  They all wore homespun clothes of flax and wool, and the family cooking was done on the big eight-foot fireplace with its big backlogs and swinging crane.  Elijah Galloway died on Feb. 19, 1858, aged sixty-nine, his wife on Jan. 1, 1889, aged eighty-five.  Both were active members of the Methodist church, Mrs. Galloway being a charter member at Claysville.  James Neeland and his wife were also life-long members of this church, taking leading parts in church work.  James Neeland was a plain, quiet and hospitable man and a very worthy citizen.  He and his wife were the parents of eleven children, one of whom died in infancy, while the following grew to maturity, and were all living until 1907: Mrs. Susan Burman, of Van Buren, Ohio; Andrew Neeland, of Leipsic; Mrs. Ellen Sheppler, who lived near Cumberland, and died in 1907; Mrs. Sarah Frazier, of Zanesville, Ohio; Elijah, of Hartford; Mrs. Mary Foulk, of near Claysville: Mrs. Elizabeth Hammond, of New Concord; Mrs. Grace Moore, of Zanesville; James, Jr., a carpenter and builder of Claysville: John B., of Hartford.
     Elijah Neeland lived at Claysville until he was twenty-five years old, and learned the blacksmith's trade from his father.  In April, 1879, he came to Hartford, Guernsey county, and for a time ran a blacksmith shop, then was for many years a blacksmith at the mines.  Once or twice in his life he has been away from that work for a few years, but it was his main occupation until Nov. 15, 1909, when he left the occupation.  He also has a farm of eighty acres adjoining Hartford on the north, and in 1910 he platted about twenty-six acres into town lots as an addition to Hartford.  This is an unusually well situated tract for town lots, and will prove a valuable addition to the residence district of Hartford.  Mr. Neeland has in his possession several deeds from the government, one dated in 1807, signed by Thomas Jefferson, a patent to Joshua W. Satterthwaite for land in section 4, Valley township, a part of which is the land which Mr. Neeland has just platted for an addition to Hartford.
     On Oct. 27, 1886, Mr. Neeland was married to Jessie F. Robins, the daughter of Peter D. and Deborah (Thompson) Robins.  Fifty-three years before, lacking three days, the minister, the Rev. G. Keil, who married them, had married her parents, and three years previously her parents had celebrated their golden wedding.  For the early history of the Robins family see sketch of Dr. James E. Robins.  Mrs. Neeland has in her possession a silver cup brought from the isle of Guernsey by her grandparents, engraved June 23, 1777.  Peter D. Robins was in early life a miller, owned a large farm, and later engaged in wool buying as his main business.  He was an influential citizen in his neighborhood. Deborah Thompson was the daughter of James and Mary Thompson.  Her father was born near Senecaville, Ohio, and her mother was from Pennsylvania.  Mr. Neeland's father is a Methodist and Mrs. Neelandís father an Evangelical Lutheran; both were faithful members of church and their homes were always stopping places for the preachers and church people, and Mrs. Neeland's mother has been known to get supper for the preacher even as late in the night as two o'clock, after the late protracted meetings.
     Peter D. and Deborah Robins were the parents of fourteen children, namely: John William, deceased, of Cambridge; Mary Jane, who died at the age of thirteen: James Thompson, who, as a soldier in the Civil war, was accidentally shot by another Union soldier: Madison, deceased, of Cambridge; Harrison, a commission merchant in Baltimore; Alexander, of Cambridge; Peter Hubert, of Eureka. Kansas; Martin Luther, deceased, father of Dr. James E. Robins, whose sketch see; Martha Maria, the wife of E. J. Milhone, deceased; Charles Abraham, of Eureka, Kansas; Rosa E., who married Henry Moss, of Cambridge; and Jessie F., the wife of Elijah Neeland.
     Mr. and Mrs. Elijah Neeland are the parents of one son, Harold Robins, now a student at the Ohio Medical University at Columbus, Ohio, in his second year.  Mr. Neeland has held various township offices, has been school director, and was township trustee for five years.  Both he and his wife are faithful members of the Lutheran church. Mr. Neeland is a man who has striven to do his duty in every situation of life as he has seen that duty, and his neighbors all testify as to the true value of his character and life.  In his community he is much esteemed.
Source: History of Guernsey County, Ohio by Col. Cyrus P. B. Sarchet - Illustrated - Vols. I & 2. - Publ: B. F. Bowden & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana - 1911 - Page
 705
  EDWIN M. NELSON
 

Source: History of Guernsey County, Ohio by Col. Cyrus P. B. Sarchet - Illustrated - Vols. I & 2. - Publ: B. F. Bowden & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana - 1911 - Page  686

  W. G. NICHOLS.   A man of marked individuality and a leader in the affairs of southwestern Guernsey county is W. G. Nichols, editor and proprietor of The Echo at Cumberland.  His life has been one of honest endeavor and filled with good deeds throughout, for he has ever stood ready to foster and develop any movement that makes for the general uplift of his community.
     Mr. Nichols is an American by adoption only, having been horn in Liverpool, England, Oct. 8, 1870.  He came to America with his parents when less than two years of age.  He attended school some in his early boyhood and when nine years of age entered his father's printing office and while yet very young mastered the ďart preservative."  He is the son of George G. and Susan (Wines) Nichols, both natives of England, where they were reared, educated and married.  George G. was the son of William T. and Ann
(Garraway) Nichols
.  She was the daughter of George Garraway, a noted English composer of music.  The Garraways were connected with the royalty of England.  William T. Nichols, the paternal grandfather, was an officer in the English army and was prominently identified with the service for many
years, being a major in the First Dragoon Guards (the Queen's body guard), and for thirteen years was champion swordsman of the English army.  He spent his entire life in England.  Susan Winesí mother (the grandmother of the subject of this sketch) was a Heale, a cousin or second cousin to Edward Everett Hale, the great American author.  George G. Nichols learned the printerís trade in England.  He came to America in 1872, first stopped at Bellevue, Ohio, where he worked for a time.  He was later employed on the Toledo Blade with Nasby and for that paper was present at the Ashtabula wreck, and witnessed the recovery of the body of P. P. Bliss, the hymn writer.  He was also employed later on the Cincinnati Enquirer.  In 1884 he established a newspaper at Zanesville. Ohio, the Family Herald, a weekly, national organ of the Independent Order of Rechabites. a temperance order.  After closing out this, he engaged in the history work travels a few years and later engaged as an advertising writer and manager.  He later organized the Northside Business Men's Association, at Columbus, Ohio.  He was a man of more than ordinary ability, a fluent writer and a splendid organizer.  His home and family remained at Zanesville.  He was attending to some business at Columbus when he took sick and died, on July 10, 1891.  He was a member of the Congregational church.  His wife survived about six months, dying in January, 1902.  They were the parents of the following children: Ann, now Mrs. L. W. German, of Zanesville; Mary, now Mrs. S. C. Hammond, of Zanesville; John H., of East Ringold, Ohio; W. G., of this review; George R., registry clerk in the postoffice at Zanesville; Fanny, now Mrs. E. W. Harvey, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.
     W. G. Nichols, of this review, commenced his work as printer at the age of nine years, as stated above, and he has filled all positions in all branches of the business in Pittsburg and other cities.  He filled these positions with credit to himself and with satisfaction to his employers.  He continued to work in various newspaper offices until 1894, when he bought a job printing plant at Zanesville, remaining there four years.  He then came to Cumberland and took charge of the plant here, which he found very much run down.  He moved his job plant from Zanesville, and began operations here in March, 1898, starting up anew, with an exceptionally well equipped plant, and he was successful from the first.  He has one of the best papers of its type in the state, the Echo being all that could be desired from a mechanical viewpoint, well edited, its columns teeming with the latest, crispiest and best news of the day, and its editorials strong, well written and convincing.  It has been rendered valuable as an advertising medium, and its circulation has gradually increased until the list now numbers over nine hundred.  He has all up-to-date equipment and he has made a success where others have failed.  He does all kinds of job work in a neat, attractive manner, is prompt and tries to please, he has made a success here and is the owner of a valuable, substantial and convenient three-story building, and has several apartments which he rents in this commodious structure, besides his office. 
     Mr. Nichols was married in 1895, Zanesville, to Nellie B. Hocking, a lady of intelligence and culture, who was liorn at Zanesville.  She is the daughter of Richard Hocking, a descendant of a pioneer family of Ohio.  He was born in what is now the District of Columbia.  His father was a native of England, and an uncle of his father preceded him to Ohio.  His home city was Logan, England, the place where the Hockings originated, and when the first member of this family came to Ohio he was a surveyor and laid out and was instrumental in naming Hocking county after the family and the county seat was called Logan, after the old home town.  Richard Hocking was one of the first rolling mill men to locate at Zanesville.  He still resides there, being now seventy-five years of age.  His wife also survives.  He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and has filled all the chairs in this lodge.  He has been a faithful member over fifty years.
     The following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hocking: Harry, manager of the Laughlin plant of the Whittaker-Glessner Steel Company, at Martinís Ferry, Ohio; Alice, now Mrs. H. J. Kimble, of Zanesville: Ida, Mrs. Sheridan Swingle, of Stovertown; Richard, Jr., is at home; Nellie B., wife of Mr. G. Nichols, of this review; Abbie, now Mrs. Guy Fitz, of Zanesville; George was killed in a railroad accident; Ella, who died in infancy.
     One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Nichols, Alice B., who is living at home. 
     Both Mr. and Mrs. Nichols are members of the Methodist church.  Mr. Nichols is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; also Buckeye Camp No. 3224, Modern Woodmen, at Zanesville; also Merit Tent, No. 415, Knights of the Maccabees, of Cumberland; Rebekah Lodge, No. 338; also Cumberland Chapter No. 110, Eastern Star.  Mrs. Nichols is prominently identified with the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, the Daughters of Rebekah, and the Eastern Star.
Source: History of Guernsey County, Ohio by Col. Cyrus P. B. Sarchet - Illustrated - Vols. I & 2. - Publ: B. F. Bowden & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana - 1911 - Page  972
  ANDREW W. NICHOLSON
 

Source: History of Guernsey County, Ohio by Col. Cyrus P. B. Sarchet - Illustrated - Vols. I & 2. - Publ: B. F. Bowden & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana - 1911 - Page  747

  JACOB NICHOLSON
 

Source: History of Guernsey County, Ohio by Col. Cyrus P. B. Sarchet - Illustrated - Vols. I & 2. - Publ: B. F. Bowden & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana - 1911 - Page  806

  JOHN L. NICHOLSON
 

Source: History of Guernsey County, Ohio by Col. Cyrus P. B. Sarchet - Illustrated - Vols. I & 2. - Publ: B. F. Bowden & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana - 1911 - Page  809

  JOHN R. NICHOLSON
 

Source: History of Guernsey County, Ohio by Col. Cyrus P. B. Sarchet - Illustrated - Vols. I & 2. - Publ: B. F. Bowden & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana - 1911 - Page  755

  ULYSSES G. NICHOLSON
 

Source: History of Guernsey County, Ohio by Col. Cyrus P. B. Sarchet - Illustrated - Vols. I & 2. - Publ: B. F. Bowden & Company, Indianapolis, Indiana - 1911 - Page  749

  DAVID W. NOSSET
Page 564

NOTES:  

 

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