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Source: Dayton Transcript
Dated: Saturday, June 21, 1845
    
Isaac Engle and Elizabeth Brumbaugh both of Green Co. married by Rev. D. Winters at his res.
Source: The New York Herald
Date: Jun. 1, 1857

The Fugitive Slave Case in Ohio.
[From the Cincinnati Gazette, May 29]
     There has been great excitement during the last two days in Greene County, in this State, in consequence of the arrest of four individuals charged with aiding a slave to escape.  On Tuesday, United States Deputy Marshal Churchill, accompanied by eleven assistants, left this city for Mechanicsburg, Champaign County, Ohio, eleven miles from Urbana, having with him a warrant issued by Commissioner Newhall for the arrest of Charles and Edward Taylor, brothers, Russell Hyde and Hiram Guttridge? who says the warrant, did, about the 21st day of August, 1856, harbor and conceal one Add White, a person owing service and labor to Daniel G. White, of Flemingsburg, Ky, who had, previous to said date, escaped into the State of Ohio, and was then a fugitive from such service and labor, so as to prevent the discovery and arrest of the said Add White.  The offence charged, it will be observed, si not that the slave was aided in his escape from his master in Kentucky by the four accused persons, but that they sheltered and protected him in Ohio; or, in other words they "put him through" on the underground railroad.  The penalty for the offence is a fine of a thousand dollars and imprisonment.
     On Wednesday morning the Deputy Marshal left Urbana with his posse, in hired carriages, and in Mechanicsburg, and the neighborhood, succeeded in arresting the four accused individuals.  While the arrests were in progress the most intense excitement was created in the vicinity.   The news spread rapidly, and a determination was expressed to use every means the law provides to rescue the prisoners from the hands of the border ruffians, as the officers where called whose sole object, it was confidently, though erroneously asserted, was to take them over to Kentucky and lynch them.
     A writ of habeas corpus was procured from a Judge in Champaign county, and the Sheriff attempted to serve it; but before he could do so the officers had conducted the prisoners beyond the bounds of the county.  A second warrant was then procured in Clark County.  The Sheriff in this instance pursued and came up with the party; but they refused to obey the writ.  The Sheriff not having force to compel obedience, they proceeded on their journey to this city.  A third writ was then obtained in Greene county, and the Sheriff of that county, with his posse, served it upon the United States officers at 6 o'clock yesterday morning, in Jamestown.  The United States officers resented the act of the county officers in seizing their horses' reins before making known their business.  A warm altercation ensued.  The Sheriff and his men were assisted by an excited crowd of two or three hundred persons.  Rifles and pistols were displayed.  The Marshal and his men drew their weapons, and several shots were fired.  Mr. Churchill discharged his revolver at the crowd, but no one was injured.  The conflict was sharp and stubborn, but superior numbers prevailed and the Deputy Marshal, and all his posse, were made prisoners, and a dispatch received yesterday afternoon stated that they were to be sent last night to Springfield for trial.
     At Springfield, at 1 o'clock yesterday, Deputy Marshal Kiefer arrested Isaac Sargent on a similar charge to that made against the others, and brought him to this city, where he was held by Commissioner Newhall in $1,500 bail for examination next week.

Source: Delaware State Reporter - Delaware
Date: Jun. 5, 1857

The Ohio Fugitive Slave Case - A Speck of Civil War.
     There has been great excitement.....(same as above article)

LATER:
Cincinnati
, June 2, - The habeas corpus issued by Judge Leavitt has been obeyed, and the prisoners brought to this city for trial.  The examination commenced yesterday.  The case was adjourned till next Tuesday, in order to allow the production of affidavits by either party.  It is probable the prisoners will be discharged by Judge Leavitt, but this will not prevent their indictment by the Grand Jury of Clark county  and their arrest for trial.

More News connected to the above articles.

Source: The Georgia Telegraph
Date:  June 9, 1857

Fugitive Slave Case in Ohio.
    
Brief mention has already been made in our telegraphic column in relation to what appears to be a serious conflict in Ohio between State and federal authority, growing out of an attempt of the deputy United States marshal and his assistants to arrest certain parties in that State who stand charged, as is alleged with harboring and concealing a fugitive slave.  In the Cincinnati Gazette (black republican) of last Friday's issue we find the following account of the arrests and the rescue:
     "There has been great excitement during the last two days in Greene county, Ohio in consequence of the arrest of four individuals charged with aiding a slave to escape.  On Tuesday United States Deputy Marshal Churchill, accompanied by eleven assistants, left this city for Mechanicsburg, Champaign county, Ohio, eleven miles from Urbana, having with him a warrant issued by Commissioner Newhall, for the arrest of Charles and Edward Taylor, brother, Russell Hyde, and Hiram Guttridge, who, says the warrant, did, about the 22st day of August, 1856, harbor and conceal one Add White, a person owing service and labor to Daniel G. White, of Flemingsburg, Kentucky, who had previous to said date, escaped into the State of Ohio, and, and then a fugitive from such service and labor, so as to prevent the discovery and arrest of said Add White.  The offence charged, it will be observed, is not that the slave was aided in his escape from his master in Kentucky by the four accused persons, but they sheltered and protected him in Ohio; or, in other words, they 'put him through' on the underground railroad.  The penalty for the offence is a fine of a thousand dollars and imprisonment."
     "On Wednesday morning the deputy marshal left Urbana with his posse, in hired carriages, and in Mechanicburg and the neighborhood succeeded in arresting the four accused individuals.  While the arrests were in progress, the most intense excitement was created in the vicinity.  The news spread rapidly, and a determination was expressed to sue every means the law provides to rescue the prisoners from the hands of the border ruffians, as the officers were called, whose sole object, it was confidently though erroneously asserted, was to take them over to Kentucky and lynch them.
     "A writ of habeas corpus was procured from a judge in Champaign County, and the sheriff attempted to serve it; but before he could do so, the officers had conducted the prisoners beyond the bounds of the county.  A second warrant was then procured in Clark county.  The sheriff in this instance pursued and came up with the party; but they refused to obey the writ.  The sheriff not having force to compel obedience, they proceeded on their journey to this city.  A third writ was then obtained in Green county, and the sheriff of that county, with his posse, served it upon the United States officers at six o'clock yesterday morning, in Jamestown.  The United States officers resented the act of the county officers in seizing their horses' reins before making known their business.  A warm altercation ensued.  The sheriff and his men were assisted by an excited crowd of two or three hundred persons.  Rifles and pistols were ____________ and stubborn, but superior numbers prevailed, and the deputy marshal, with all his posse, were made prisoners, a despatch received yesterday afternoon stated that they were to be sent last night to Springfield for trial."
     The Cincinnati Enquirer of Saturday morning thus notices the arrest and subquent  imprisonment of the deputy United States marshals:
     "All the reports concur as to the main facts of the great outrage recently committed at Xenia in the forcible resistance of the deputies of the United States marshal while engaged in executing a writ issued by the United States commissioner, and their arrest and detention by a sheriff of one of the counties, aided by a lawless mob.  There is no doubt or difficulty as to the authority and the marshals; the fact of their having the prisoners in custody, and the legality of the officer from whom the writ issued.  The naked questions are then presented, whether the United States government has the power to enforce the process of its courts within the State of Ohio, whether the populace or the State authorities can, upon their private convictions or ideas as to the right and justice of the laws of Congress, set aside and disregard the authority of the federal judicatory? and whether the general government will, under any circumstances, and from an apprehension of any consequences, submit to such contempt and violation of its power and dignity?  The test case has now arisen.  The deputies of the United States marshal are now in the custody of the sheriff of Green county.  They must be rescued and released at all hazards, or henceforth the federal government is without weight or respect within this State.  It is quite vain to incur the expense of a federal judiciary here if it is to be thus made the sport of a mob, the scorn of the populace."
     Some further particulars will be found in the subjoined telegraphic despatches:
     "CINCINNATI, May 29. - The United States marshal telegraphed to the Secretary of the Interior today for instructions regarding the arrest and imprisonment of the United States officers at Springfield, but the nature of the instructions has not transpired.
     "Judge Leavitt, of the United States district court, issued a writ of habeas corpus today, and the United States Marshal has gone to Springfield to serve it.  In case of resistance being offered, it is reported the United States troops will be called out."
     "CINCINNATI, May 30 - The United States Deputy Marshal Deputy Marshal Chuchill were brought before Justice Christie, at Springfield this morning.
     "Messrs. Elliott and Churchill were arraigned on two charges - one for assaulting Deputy Sheriff Compton, and the other for assaulting Sheriff Layton with intent to murder.
     "Messrs. Churchill were arraigned on two charges - one for assaulting Deputy Sheriff Compton, and the other for assaulting Sheriff Layton with intent to murder.
     "Messrs. Churchill and Elliott asked, through their counsel, that the amount of bail be fired for their appearance at the next term of the common pleas.  Their bail was fixed at $2,500 each on both charges.  The balance of the party, eight in number, were required to give in the sum of $10,000, and, refusing to do so, were all committed to jail." 
    
The case as it now stands, confused and even contradictory though it may be, reveals a state of feeling among that class of people in Ohio who affect to be guided in their civil relations by a higher law than any recognized by the constitution, which is calculated to excite a deeper feeling than that of apprehension in the heart of every true patriot.  We shall defer further comments until we are in possession of all the facts in the case; and in the meantime the whole country may rest assured that the President will discharge his high constitutional obligations before the nation promptly, boldly, and faithfully, and uninfluenced by any other motives save the honor, the prosperity and the integrity of the Union; or to use the language of Secretary Thompson, in his despatch to the United States marshal of Ohio: "Execute the law.  The President expects you to do your duty, and he will do his."
     No official account of the affair, beyond a brief telegraphic despatch from the United States marshal, has reached the government; and until the President is fully and correctly advised in regard to the true merits of the case, it would be unreasonable to look for any official interposition from this quarter.
 
Source:  Ohio Statesmen
Dated: Aug. 4, 1858
NEGROPHOBIA IN GREENE COUNTY, OHIO
     The Torch Light, of Xenia, Greene County, Ohio, in its issue of July 28, has a leader on what the Editor is pleased to term Negrophobia, a disease that has lately made its appearance in that region.  That our readers may have some idea of the cause of the disease, which it seems is now affecting all classes of the white community of one of our populous counties, we will transcribe from the Torch Light:
     "Something has been said on the streets about the origin of the dark streak of luck which has befallen Greene County, but in our opinion no one has placed the responsibility where it rightfully belongs.  Until the purchase of 7

 
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