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Greene County, Ohio
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BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Greene County, Ohio,
its people, industries & institutions
by Hon. M. A. Broadstone, Editor in Chief -
Vol. I. & II.
Publ. B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc.,
 Indianapolis, Ind.
1918
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
  CHARLES THOMPSON.   Charles Thompson, a veteran of the Civil War, formerly and for years engaged in the retail meat business at Xenia and later a rural mail carrier, now living retired in the city which has been his home for many years, is a native of the great Empire state, but has been a resident of Ohio since the days of his boyhood and of Xenia since the year 1867, having located there not long after his return from service in the army at the close of the war.  He was born in Onondaga county, New York, Oct. 6, 1839, a son of John Thompson and wife, the latter of whom was a Gail, both natives of the state of Massachusetts, whose last days were spent in Ohio.  John Thompson was a ship carpenter.  He was married in Massachusetts and after a sometime residence there moved to Onondaga county, New York, whence, in 1845, he came with his family to Ohio and located at Piqua, where he resumed work at his trade and where he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives.  They were the parents of ten children, Eliza, Deborah, John, Martha, Emma, Jane, James, Charles and two who died in early youth.
     Having been but about six years of age when his parents moved from New York state to Piqua, Charles Thompson grew to manhood in that city, receiving his schooling in the public schools there, and was living there when the Civil War broke out.  On Apr. 18, 1861, three days after President Lincoln issued his first call for volunteers to put down the armed assault against the Union, Mr. Thompson enlisted for service and went to the front as a member of Company F, Eleventh Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, serving with that command until the end of  his period of enlistment, four months.  He later re-enlisted and was attached to Company A.  One Hundred and Tenth Ohio, attached to the Eighth Army Corps, and with their command was sent to Virginia and with the Army of the Potomac participated in all the battles from the Wilderness to Spottsylvania Court House.  Mr. Thompson served as a soldier in the union for three years, two months and thirteen days and received his discharge at Washington, D. C., June 25, 1865, the war then being over.  During this period of service he served with the Third Brigade, Army of West Virginia, to December, 1862; Eighth Corps. Middle Department, to March, 1863; First Brigade, Second Division Eighth Army Corps, Middle Department, to July, 1863; Second Brigade, Third Division, Third Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1864, and Second Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Army Corps. to the time of his discharge, the only period of disability he suffered during that time being a period of eight weeks when he was laid up with typhoid fever.
     Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Thompson returned to Ohio and was employed in the neighboring county of Miami until 1867, when he moved to Xenia and there engaged i the retail meat business, continuing thus engaged in that business in that city for twenty-four years, during more than twenty-two years of which time he had his store on Main street.  When the system of rural mail delivery was inaugurated in the Xenia postoffice Mr. Thompson was made the carrier on the first route thus established out of that office and continued to carry the mail on that route for seventeen years, or until his retirement in March, 1913, since which time he has been "taking things easy."  Mr. Thompson has been quite a traveler in his time and has at one time and another visited most of the chief points of interest to travelers in the United States.  He is a Republican and a member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic.
     On Dec. 31, 1867, the year in which he took up his residence in Xenia, Charles Thompson was united in marriage to Ada P. Harner, who was born in Greene county, daughter of Jacob and Lydia (Kirshner) Harner, both of Pennsylvania-Dutch stock, their respective parents having come to this county from Pennsylvania in pioneer days, and whose last days were spent in Xenia.  Jacob Harner was a Republican and had served for some time as deputy sheriff of Green county, as well as having served in township offices.  He was a farmer and landowner.  He was a member of the Lutheran church and his wife was a member of the Reformed church.  They were the parents of five children, of whom Mrs. Thompson is now the only survivor.  two of these children died in early youth and Solomon and Caroline, the two others who reached maturity, are also now dead.  Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 794
  ANDREW J. TOBIAS.    The late Andrew Jackson Tobias, who died at his farm home in Beavercreek township on Apr. 10, 1910, and whose widow is still living there, the farm being managed by her son, Samuel E. Tobias, was born in that township in 1833, a son of Jacob Tobias and wife, who had come to this county from Pennsylvania and who were the parents of eight children, Andrew having had four brothers, Peter, Jonathan, Samuel and John Tobias, and three sisters, Margaret, Catherine and Susanna.  Later the family moved to Auglaize county, this state, and thence to Illinois, where Andrew J. Tobias completed his schooling.  As a young man he returned to Green county, took up carpentering here and here spent the remainder of his life, in 1882 taking up farming and becoming the proprietor of a farm of two hundred and five acres in Beavercreek township, Sarah E. Harshman, daughter of John C. and Maria (Miller) Harshman, further mention of whom is made elsewhere, and in 1863 was united in marriage to Andrew J. Tobias.  To that union two children were born, Samuel E. and Emily Leonora, the latter of whom married L. E. Coy, a grocer at Dayton, and has two children, Ethel, born in 1889, and Herbert, born in 1897.
     Samuel E. Tobias was born on Mar. 12, 1864, and was educated in the schools of Beavercreek township.  He early became interested in blacksmithing and continued engaged in that vocation for twenty years, at the end of which time he began to give his particular attention to gunsmithing and has since made a specialty along that line, having become recognized as one of the expert gunsmiths in the United States.  Since the death of his father he also has given his general oversight to the operations of the home farm.  Mr. Tobias is a Democrat and for fifteen years served as a member of the local board of education.  Fraternally, he is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and he and his family are members of the Mt. Zion Reformed church.
     In January, 1883, Samuel E. Tobias was united in marriage to Jennie Belle Bates, who also was born in Beavercreek township, and to this union seven children have been born, namely: Blanche Lenora, who married Hiram Zimmer, now living in Logan county, and has two children, Leon and Elza Juanita; Elmer Fay, a farmer, living on his grandmother Tobias' farm in Beavercreek township and operating the same, who married Anna Zimmer and has four children, Elsie, Elwood, Gladys and Alberta: Thomas C., who is at home; Esta, who died in infancy, and Elsie May, Winifred and Edythe.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 643
  ORVILLE D. TOBIAS.    Orville Dewey Tobias, proprietor of a Beavercreek township farm on rural mail route No. 10 out of Xenia, was born on a farm in Sugarcreek township, this county, Mar. 8, 1861, son of William and Jane (Miller) Tobias, the former of whom also was born in this county and whose last days were spent here.
     William Tobias was born in the village of Zimmerman on Mar. 14, 1821, a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Hanney) Tobias, who had come to this county from Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, and had located in the settlement that early took the name of Zimmerman, in Beavercreek township.  There Samuel Tobias bought twenty-five acres of land, built a log cabin and established his home.  There he died in 1829, leaving his widow with six children, three sons and three daughters, those besides William who was eight years of age at that time of his father's death, having been Lydia, who became the wife of William Kirkpatrick; Margaret, who married Noah Enry and moved to Illinois; Daniel who made his home in the vicinity of Troy, this state; Samuel, who died unmarried, and Catherine, who married Wallace Haines.  The widow Tobias married Michael Swigart and lived to be seventy-six years of age, her death occurring in 1871.
     Following the death of his father William Tobias was taken into the home of Peter Swigart, a brother of his stepfather, and there remained until he was past twenty-one years of age.  When twenty-five years of age he married and began farming on his own account, for some years renting farms, and in 1869 bought the farm on which his son, the subject of this sketch, is now living and there spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in January, 1911, he then lacking but three months of being ninety years of age.  William Tobias was a Republican.  Reared a Lutheran, he later became affiliated with the Reformed church and for many years served as a deacon of the Beavercreek congregation of the latter communion.
     William Tobias was twice married.  On Dec. 24, 1846, he was united in marriage to Sarah Swigart, who died in 1851, at the age of twenty-four years, leaving two sons, Martin Luther and Samuel, both of whom are now deceased, the former of whom became a farmer in Beavercreek township and the latter of whom made his home in Dayton.  Martin L. Tobias was twice married.  By his first wife, Christine Peeples, he had two children, Eva, Grace and John.   Samuel Tobias married Emma John and had three children, Homer, Harold and Howard.  On June 19, 1852, William Tobias married, secondly, Jane Miller who was born in Bath township, this county, Nov. 25, 1824, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Wheeler) Miller, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Maryland, who came to Ohio after their marriage, first locating at Columbus, then at Cincinnati and then in Greene county, becoming early settlers in Bath township, where the former spent the remainder of his life.  James Miller was a soldier of the War of 1812.  He died in 1840 and was buried in the Byron cemetery.  His widow survived him until 1854, her death occurring at Dayton.  To William and Jane (Miller) Tobias were born eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the sixth in order of birth, the others being the following:  William A. who became a farmer in Beavercreek township, where he died in April, 1917, and who had married Jannie Alice Garlough and had one child, a son, Emerson D.; Elizabeth and Catherine twins, the former of whom is unmarried and both of whom are now living at Dayton, the latter the widow of the late John W. H. Barney, by whom she was the mother of four children, Dora, Bertha, Eugene J., and Ralph; Daniel and Calvin, who died in the days of their young manhood; one who died in infancy, and Newton W. now a druggist living at Ada, who married May Kemp and has one child, Vivian G.  Mrs. Jane Miller Tobias survived her husband nearly two years, her death occurring in December, 1912.
     Orville D. Tobias was eight years of age when his father bought the farm on which he is now living and there he grew to manhood.  He received his schooling in the local schools and after his marriage in 1890 continued to make his home on the home place, managing the same for his father, and after the latter's death bought the place from the other heirs and has since been the owner of the same, a farm of something more than one hundred acres.  Mr. Tobias is a Republican and, fraternally, is affiliated  with Silver Star Lodge, Knights of Pythias, at Alpha.  He is a member of the Beaver Creek Reformed church as is his wife, was formerly and for years a deacon of that congregation and is now an elder in the church.
     Mr. Tobias has been twice married.  On Nov. 12, 1890, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Ana (Koogler) Coffman a widow, who died eighteen months later, and on Mar. 6, 1898, he married Mrs. Effie (Miller) Armstrong, a widow and the mother by her first marriage, of four children.  Harry, who is now living in Bath township; Mayme, wife of Vernon Ewing, of Dayton; Louise, at home, and Nellie, who died in the days of her childhood.  Mrs. Tobias is a daughter of Israel and Jane Miller, both now deceased, who were residents of Bath township.  To Mr. and Mrs. Tobias one child has been born, a son, Raymond, born on Dec. 27, 1900, who is now (1918), a student in the Beaver Creek high school.

Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 821


William A. Tobias
& Family
WILLIAM A. TOBIAS.    The late William A. Tobias, who died at his farm home in Beavercreek township in the spring of 1917 and whose widow is still living there, was a member of one of Greene county's pioneer families and all his life was spent here.  He was born on a farm in Sugarcreek township on Jan. 19, 1853, son of William and Jane (Miller) Tobias, the former of whom was born in the Zimmerman settlement in this county, in 1821, a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Hanney) Tobias, who had come here from Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania.  Jane Miller was born in Bath township, this county, in 1824, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Wheeler) Miller, the former of whom was a soldier of the war of 1812, and who had come here after their marriage in Maryland.  William and Jane (Miller) Tobias were the parents of eight children, of whom William A. was the third in order of birth, and further mention of whom is made in a somewhat more comprehensive narrative relating to the Tobias family in this county presented elsewhere in this volume.  William Tobias died on Jan. 15, 1910, and his widow survived him less than a year, her death occurring on Dec. 15, of that same year.  They were formerly members of the Lutheran church, but later became members of the Beaver Reformed church.
     Reared on the home farm, William A. Tobias received his schooling in the local schools and remained at home until his marriage in the fall of 1881, after which he rented a farm and began farming on his own account.  In 1893 he bought the farm on which his widow is now living, on rural mail route No. 10 out of Xenia, and there spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring there on Apr. 13, 1917.  Mr. Tobias was a Republican and was a member of the Reformed church.
     On Nov. 24, 1881, William A. Tobias was united in marriage to Jennie Alice Gerlaugh, who was born in Beavercreek township, this county, daughter of David and Rebecca (Weaver) Gerlaugh, the former of whom was born in that same township, son of Adam and Catherine (Haines) Gerlaugh, both of whom were born in Washington county, Maryland.  Adam Gerlaugh was a son of Adam Gerlaugh and was twenty-one years of age when he came with his father and the other members of the family to Ohio in 1807 and settled on a tract of land in Beavercreek township, this county, which the senior Adam Gerlaugh had bought some time previously when he made a prospecting trip out this way with a neighbor, Mr. Haines, who also had bought a tract of land here, the two then returning to Maryland.  Mr. Haines never returned to Ohio, but the land he had bought here was later occupied by members of his family who came out here at the time the Gerlaughs came, among these being the daughter, Catherine Haines, and her brother, and in the winter following their arrival here the younger Adam Gerlaugh and Catherine Haines were married and settled on the Haines tract.  There they reared their family and there Mrs. Gerlaugh died in the spring of 1852.  Adam Gerlaugh survived his wife for four years, his death occurring at the home of a son down in Warren county in 1856.  They were pioneer members of the Reformed church in Beavercreek township and their children were reared in that faith.  There were ten of these children, eight sons, David, Jacob, Otho, Adam, Robert, Arthur, Jonathan and Henry, and two daughters, Frances, who married Benjamin Clark, of Montgomery county, and Mary Jane, who married one of the Hawkers and became a resident of Dayton.
     David Gerlaugh grew up on the home farm in Beavercreek township and after his marriage to Rebecca Weaver began farming for himself, he and his wife making their home in a log cabin on the farm on which their daughter, Mrs. Tobias, is now living.  That was a farm on one hundred and sixty-two acres, on which at that time there was but a small clearing, but Mr. Gerlaugh presently got the place under cultivation and in good time built a substantial brick house, the house in which Mrs. Tobias is living, burning the bricks for the same on his place, and there he and his wife spent their last days, his death occurring on Nov. 4, 1885, and hers, Apr. 27, 1889.  They were members of the local congregation of the Reformed church.  Of the four children born to them Mrs. Tobias was the last-born, the others being Mary, who married William Needles and is now deceased; Harriet, who married Samuel Rahn and is also deceased, and Alexander, a farmer, who spent his last days at Springfield, in the neighboring county of Clark.
     To William A. and Jennie Alice (Gerlaugh) Tobias were born three children, D. Emerson, Edna, who died at the age of nine years, and Irene, who died in infancy.  The Rev. D. Emerson Tobias, now a minister of the Reformed church, stationed at Baltimore, this state, was educated at Heidelburg College at Tiffin, Ohio, and at the Central Theological Seminary at Dayton and in 1909 was ordained to the ministry, later occupying charges at Hillsboro and at West Salem, from which latter place he was transferred to Baltimore, in Fairfield county, where he is now stationed.  He married Florence Engle and has one child, a son, William A.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 640

NOTES:

 

 
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