OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

A Part of Genealogy Express
 

Welcome to
Greene County, Ohio
History & Genealogy

BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Greene County, Ohio,
its people, industries & institutions
by Hon. M. A. Broadstone, Editor in Chief -
Vol. I. & II.
Publ. B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc.,
 Indianapolis, Ind.
1918
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
  ADDISON D. SMITH.    Addison D. Smith, one of the best-known young farmers of New Jasper township, was born in that township on a farm a mile and a half east of the village of New Jasper on Apr. 29, 1871, son of James Marion Smith, a veteran of the Civil War, who died in 1911, was for years regarded as one of the most substantial farmers of the New Jasper neighborhood and elsewhere in this volume there will be found in detail a history of his family.
     Reared on the home farm, Addison D. Smith received his schooling in the Schooley district school.  After his marriage in 1895 he continued to make his home there, he and his brother Alva operating the farm in partnership, the place then consisting of three hundred acres.  There Addison D. Smith continued to make his home until 1904, in which year he bought the farm of one hundred acres in New Jasper township that formerly belonged to his maternal grandfather, William S. Huston, moved to that place and has ever since resided there.  In addition to his general farming, Mr. Smith has given considerable attention to the raising of live stock.  He is also the owner of sixty-eight acres of his  father's old place east of New Jasper and of the Griffith Sutton farm of sixty-seven acres just west of the village.
     On October 23, 1895, Addison D. Smith was united in marriage to Sadie Fields, who also was born in New Jasper township, daughter of Samuel and Catherine (Peerman) Fields, who at the time of her birth were lliving on a farm in the northeast corner of the township and the former of whom is now living retired in the village of Jamestown.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at New Jasper, Mr. Smith being a member of the present board of stewards of the church.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 916


Alfred Z. Smith
ALFRED ZINEY SMITHAlfred Ziney Smith, superintendent of the plant of the Hagar Strawboard Company at Cedarville, a member of the common council of the city of Cedarville, member of the school board and former president of the local board of health, was born at Waterlook New York, July 14, 1850, son of Sidney and Flora (Wilson) Smith, both of whom were born in that same state.
     Sidney Smith was a superintendent of an extensive dye-works establishment at Waterloo and died at his home at that place at the age of forty-seven years, leaving his widow with four small sons.  Mr. Smith kept the family together, presently moving to a farm in Wayne county, New York, where she remained until after the Civil War, when she moved with her sons to Illinois and established her home on a farm of three hundred and fifty acres south of the town of Marseilles, in LaSalle county.  She died in Marseilles in 1897, she then being eighty-four years of age.  Her sons, of whom the subject of this sketch is the youngest, are all still living, Leonard, a paint contractor, making his home at Joliet, Illinois; Louis, formerly a miner at Leadville, Colorado, now living in New York state, and Charles continues to make his home at Marseilles, Illinois, where he is the proprietor of a barber shop.
     Alfred Z. Smith was but little more than two years of age when his father died and he was about four when his mother moved onto a farm in her home state, in the neighborhood of which he received his early schooling.   After the family moved to Illinois he continued work on the farm until he was eighteen years of age, when, in the spring of 1871, he began working in a paper-mill at Marseilles and was thus employed in the plant of the Brown & Norton Paper Company, for five years, at the end of which time, in 1876, he went to Milan, Illinois, and was there engaged for three years working in another paper-mill.  He then entered the employ of the American Paper Company and was for five years stationed at Quincy, being transferred thence to Circleville, Ohio, where he installed the machinery for the papermill there and was made superintendent of the plant, a position he held until 1893, when he was offered the position of superintendent of the mill of the Columbia Straw Paper Company at Xenia and moved to that city, remaining thus engaged there for three years, or until 1897, when he entered upon the duties of his present position as superintendent of the plant of the Hagar Strawboard Company at Cedarville and has ever since been thus engaged.  Mr. Smith is a Republican and is a member of the common council of his home town.  He served for several years as a member of the local school board, for some time president of the same, and also has served as president of the local board of health.
     On June 2, 1874, while living in Illinois, Alfred Z. Smith was united in marriage to Kate Herlihy, who was born in southern Illinois, daughter of Daniel and Margaret (McCarty) Herlihy, both of whom were born in Ireland, and to this union two children have been born, a son and a daughter, Sidney Daniel and Louisa, the latter of whom is living at home with her parents.  Sidney D. Smith, who was trained in the art of paper-making by his father, is now assistant superintendent of the plant of the Hagar Strawboard Company at Cedarville.  He married Hetta Crouse and makes his home at Cedarville.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 240
  ALVA H. SMITH.   Alva Huston Smith, former treasurer of New Jasper township and proprietor of a farm of about two hundred acres on the New Jasper pike a mile and a half east of the village of that name, situated on rural mail route No. 1 out of Jamestown, was born on the old Smith farm a mile northeast of New Jasper on Aug. 16. 1868, son of James Marion and Eliza (Huston) Smith, both of whom also were born in New Jasper township and the latter of whom is still living, now a resident of the village of New Jasper.
     The late James Marion Smith, a veteran of the Civil War, who died at his home in New Jasper township on Dec. 10, 1911, was born in that township on Feb. 14, 1839, son of Daniel and Lucinda (Spahr) Smith, the latter of whom also was born in this county, in the vicinity of Xenia, a daughter of Mathias and Susanna (Hagler) Spahr, both members of pioneer families in this section of Ohio, who were married on Aug. 8, 1818.  Daniel Smith was born in Virginia and was but a babe in arms when his parents.  Jacob and Elizabeth (Kimble) Smith, drove through to Ohio in 1814, in company with Philip Spahr and family, and settled in Greene county, locating in what is now New Jasper township, the Smiths and the Spahrs establishing their respective homes on adjoining tracts of land.  Jacob Smith became the owner of three hundred acres of land and his children in due time were given a good start in life.  He was a cooper by trade and for years operated a cooper shop on his farm, his sons looking after the farm affairs.  He and his wife were members of the Methodist church and their children were reared in that faith.  There were ten of these children of whom Daniel was the third in order of birth, the others being as follow:  Sarah, who married William Spahr; Susan who married David Paullin and lived in Silvercreek township; Phoebe, who married Evan Harris, of Caesarcreek township; Elizabeth who married James Spahr; William who became a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church and made his home in Silvercreek township; James, who also became a Methodist minister and lived in Silvercreek township; Nelson, who made his home in New Jasper township; Catharine, who married Peter Tressler, and Amanda, who married Stephen  Beal, of Cedarville.  Daniel Smith grew up on the pioneer farm on which his father had settled upon coming to this county and after his marriage established his home on a farm east of New Jasper, where he spent the rest of his home on a farm east of New Jasper, where he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring there in 1884, he then being seventy years of age.  In addition to his home farm, Daniel Smith was the owner of two other farms in that part of the county.  He was for years a class leader in the old Mt. Tabor Methodist Episcopal church.  He and his wife were parents of nine children, seven sons and two daughters, all of whom lived to maturity, married and reared families of their own.
     Reared on the farm on which he was born, James Marion Smith grew up there and in due time his father helped him get a farm.  James M. Smith and his brother David bought a tract of fifty acres in partnership and for some time operated the same under that arrangement, but later James M. Smith, bought his brother's interest in the tract.  By that time he had acquired other land and was thus the owner of a tract of one hundred and fifty acres northeast of New Jasper, where he had established his home after his marriage.  He added to his land holdings until he became the owner of five farms and nearly five hundred acres of excellent land.  In August, 1862, James M. Smith enlisted his services as a soldier of the Union during the Civil War and went to the front as a member of Company D, One Hundred and Tenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served for two years and six months, or until he received his honorable discharge following an accident which befell him during the campaign in the Wilderness, an ax which flew off its helve while soldiers were constructing a breastwork nearly cutting off one of his feet and incapacitating him for further service.  For some time was confined in a hospital at Washington and when he was in a condition to be removed his father went East and brought him home.  James M. Smith was a Republican.  In addition to his general farming he was engaged in cattle raising.  He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at New Jasper and was a class leader, even as his father had been.
     On Oct. 17, 1866, James Marion Smith was united in marriage to Eliza Huston, who also was born in New Jasper township, on a farm a miles northwest of the village of New Jasper, in 1845, and who is still living, now a resident of the village of New Jasper, to which place she moved in 1916.  Mrs. Smith is a daughter of William Smith and Sarah (Smith) Huston, the latter of whom also was born in New Jasper township, in 1822, and who died when thirty-three years of age.  William Smith Huston was born in Knox county, Ohio, Jan. 28, 1821, and was fourteen years of age when his parents, Robert and Ann (Lyon) Huston, moved from that county to Greene county in1835 and located on a tract of land now occupied by the station of New Jasper, Robert Huston there becoming the possessor of three hundred acres of land.  Originally a Whig, Robert Huston became a Republican upon the organization of the latter party.  He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church and their children were reared in that faith.  There were eleven of these children, of whom William Smith Huston was the first-born and all of whom save Robert N., the sixth in order of birth, grew to maturity, the others having been George, James, Josiah, Mary L., Eliza Ann, John, Deborah Jane, Margaret and Robert Harvey.  All these save Mary L., who married and moved to Mt. Vernon, Ohio, continued to make their homes in Greene county and here reared their families.
     William Smith Huston grew to manhood on the farm on which his father had settled upon coming to this county and after his marriage bought the old Moore farm of one hundred and fifty acres, nearby his father's place, and there established his home.  He later bought two other farms.  Politically, he was a Republican and by religious persuasion was a Methodist.  His last days were spent on the farm which he had brought to a high state of development and there he died on Apr. 29, 1896, he then being past seventy-five years of age.  William Smith Huston was twice married.  His first wife, Sarah (Smith) Huston, died in 1855 and he later married Mrs. Emily (Howell) Fawcett, a widow, who survived him for seven years, her death occurring in 1903.  By his first marriage Mr. Huston was the father of three children, namely: Eliza, widow of James Marion Smith; Sarah Jane, now deceased, who was the wife of Isaac Files, of Xenia, and Milton, deceased, who lived on the old home farm in New Jasper township.  By his second marriage he had two sons, Addison J., a farmer in New Jasper township, and John C., a hardware merchant at Xenia.  To James M. and Eliza (Huston) Smith were born three children, namely: Alva H., the immediate subject of this biographical sketch; Addison D., who is now living on the old home farm of his grandfather Huston in New Jasper township and a biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume, and Jennie, wife of Dr. George Davis, of Xenia, a biographical sketch of whom also appears elsewhere in this volume.
     Alva Huston Smith was reared on the farm on which he was born and there grew to manhood. He received his early schooling in the nearby Schooley district school and supplemented the same by a course in the Xenia high school.  After his marriage in 1895, he and his brother Addison, who married about that same time, established their home on the old homestead place of their grandfather, Daniel Smith, owned then by their father, and began farming that place, at the same time taking charge of their father's adjoining farms of three hundred acres.  Thus they continued in partnership for ten years, at the end of which time Addison Smith bought the old Huston place and moved to the same.  Alva H. Smith continued his operation of the Smith farms, still maintaining his home in the old Daniel Smith house, and after his father's death came into possession of that place, a farm of one hundred and forty-eight acres, on which he still lives.  He bought a fifty-acre tract adjoining and now has about two hundred acres.  The house in which he lives, a substantial brick structure typical of the period in which it was built, was erected in 1862 by his grandfather, Daniel Smith, and is in an excellent state of preservation.  It stands on a rise overlooking Caesars creek and among the noble old cedar trees that adorn the dooryard are two which were grown from sprouts that were sent by mail to Grandfather Smith from the latter's birthplace in Hardy county, Virginia, about the year 1860.
     On Dec. 25, 1895, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Rosa May Sutton, who also was born in New Jasper township, daughter of John and Catherine (Reason) Sutton, both members of pioneer families in Greene county, for both the Suttons and the Reasons have been represented here for more than a hundred years, and to this union has been born one child, a daughter, Catherine Eliza, born on Aug. 14, 1905.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the New Jasper Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Smith is a class leader, as were his father and his grandfather before him.  For the past twelve years he has been a member of the board of trustees of the church and treasurer of the board.  Mr. Smith is a Republican and for six years served as treasurer of his home township.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 377
  COMMANDER CHARLES EARL SMITH, U. S. N.    In making up the list of those sons of Greene county who have represented this county creditably in far fields and whose actions have added to the luster of the county's fair name, it is but fitting that some special mention should be made of one of these sons whose rise in the navy has been the occasion of much congratulation on the part of his many friends here and whose service in that arm of the nation's defense in the present (1918) struggle is contributing valiantly to the world's common cause.  Charles Earl Smith, commander in the United States navy, now (1918) in command of the United States destroyer "Nicholson," stationed in the submarine zone in British waters, was born at Xenia in 1881, a son of Judge Horace L. Smith and wife, a biographical sketch of the former of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume.
     Reared at Xenia, Charles Earl Smith received his early schooling in the schools of that city and upon completing the course in the high school received the appointment from this congressional district as a cadet in the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, form which he was graduated as an ensign in 1903.  During his term of study in the Naval Academy he "starred" in athletics, particularly on the "gridiron," he having played quarterback on the navy team during the seasons of 1901 and 1902.  Upon receiving his title of ensign he was assigned to the cruiser "New York," and during the next two seasons helped to coach the navy football team.  During the fleet's celebrated trip around Cape Horn he was stationed on a torpedo-boat destroyer, which, though not built for long trips, got through all right; and after the completion of that memorable voyage he was assigned to the Pacific fleet and did duty along the California coast until 1915, when, meanwhile having been advanced to the grade of first lieutenant, he was given command of a flotilla of submarines and was at Honolulu at the time the ill-fated submarine 4 was lost in the harbor there, to him falling the duty of raising the same.  After that tragic experience Lieutenant Smith obtained shore leave and was assigned to special service at the Naval Academy, in charge of athletics, and was thus in service at the time war was declared against Germany in the spring of 1917, with the rank of lieutenant-commander, in charge of the training of marines for petty officers; later was raised to the rank of commander, and is now (1918) engaged in convoying transports carrying soldiers and provisions to and from England and France and on the lookout for German submarines.  Commander Smith has also rendered service in the army, he having been a member of the First Ohio Cavalry, doing service during the Spanish-American War, and was stationed in camp at Chickamauga at the time he received his appointment as a cadet to tlie Naval Academy at Annapolis, obtaining a furlough in order that he might take the examination necessary to qualify for the latter service.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 95-96
  CHARLES N. SMITH.    Charles N. Smith, a veteran of the Civil War and one of the best-known
citizens of Greene county, a retired farmer and active trader, now living at Jamestown, is a native son of this county and has lived here all his life.  He was born a farm in New Jasper township on Nov. 9, 1841, son of Daniel and Lucinda (Spahr) Smith, the latter of whom also was born in this county, a member of one of the first families to settle in Xenia township.
     Daniel Smith was born in Virginia in 1803 and was but three months of age when his parents came to Ohio with their family and settled in Greene county, where he grew to manhood and became a successful farmer, the proprietor of a farm of five hundred or six hundred acres.  Daniel Smith died on the home farm in New Jasper township about 1873.  He and his wife were the parents of nine children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being as follow: Silas, deceased; James M., deceased; David S., deceased; Mrs. Mary E. Brown, of New Jasper township; Daniel B., of Xenia: Jacob N., of Xenia: Mrs. Alice St. John, deceased, and Mathias, the present superintendent of the county farm. 
     Reared on the home farm in New Jasper township.  Charles N. Smith received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and was early trained in the ways of practical farming.  He was but nineteen years of age when the Civil War broke out and on Oct. 9, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Seventy-fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served until his honorable discharge in January, 1864.  He immediately re-enlisted and continued serving until the close of the war, receiving his final discharge on July 25, 1865, after a service of nearly four years.  Mr. Smith participated in Sherman's memorable march to the sea, was captured by the enemy and was confined in Libby Prison, having been one of the last prisoners released from that historic place of detention.  Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Smith returned home and not long afterward was married and settled down on his grandfather's old place in Nev; Jasper township, where he continued successfully engaged in farming and trading until his retirement from the farm and removal about 1890 to the village of Jamestown, where he ever since has made his home.  For the past thirty-five years Mr. Smith has served as assessor of the township.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and, fraternally, is affiliated with the Grand Army of the Republic, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the oldest member of the latter order in Greene county.  Mr. Smith is an ardent disciple of Izaak Walton, it being his custom to go away to Michigan every summer on a fishing trip.
     As noted above, it was not long after his return from the army that Mr. Smith was married.  His wife died at Jamestown on Apr. 15, 1908.  She also was born in this county, Hulda W. Browser, daughter of Thomas Y. and Sarah (Hurley) Browser.  To Mr. and Mrs. Smith were born three children, Lester A., Minnie B. and Sarah L., the latter of whom is living at home with her father.  Lester A. Smith, who is also living at Jamestown, married Lillian Weed and has one child, a daughter, Martha Minnie B. Smith married Thomas Riggs, of Dayton, and has one child, a son, Jack Nelson.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 898
  ELMER H. SMITH.    Elmer H. Smith, proprietor of a farm of nearly one hundred acres in silvercreek township, was born on a farm in Caesarscreek township on Feb. 18, 1880, son of John B. and Sarah (Baynard) Smith, both of whom are still living, now residents of the city of Xenia.
     John B. Smith is a Virginian, but has been a resident of this county since he was seventeen years of age.  His mother died when he was a small child and his father afterward married and a few years later died.  The stepmother, accompanied by the son John B. and his two sisters, then came to Ohio, locating south of Xenia, in this county, where John B. Smith remained until his marriage to Sarah Baynard, after which he rented a farm in New Jasper township and later moved to Caesarscreek township and began farming on his father-in-law's farm.  He later bought a farm in Caesarscreek township and there resided until failing health compelled his retirement and removal to xenia, where he and his wife are now living on North Detroit street.  John B. Smith is a Republican.  His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.  They have six children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being Mary J., wife of William Fudge, a farmer of New Jasper township; Walter B., a carpenter; George, who is the manager of the Walker coal yard at Xenia; Hazel, wife of O. C. Colvin, a farmer of Caesarscreek township, and Albertus D., who is now (1918) with the American expeditionary Force in France, a member of the Sixteenth Company, Second Motor Mechanics Regiment, national army of the United States, in the war against Germany. 
     Elmer H. Smith was reared on the home farm and received his schooling in the local schools.  After his marriage in 1908 he took charge of the place he now owns and has since been operating the same, since taking possession having made numerous improvements, including a new barn.  In addition to his general farming Mr. Smith gives considerable attention to the raising of registered big-type Poland China hogs, Shorthorn cattle and horses of a good strain.  In his political affiliation he is a Republican.
     On Dec. 26, 1908, Elmer H. Smith was united in marriage to Alice Haughey, who was born in Jefferson township, this county, daughter of David P. and Rose (Early) Haughey, the Haugheys being one of the old families in Greene county, and to this union two children have been born, daughter both, Zora Lucile and Mary Alice.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith are member of the Methodist Protestant church at Bowersville and Mr. Smith is a member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Xenia.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 587
  EUGENE D. SMITH.   Eugene D. Smith, yardmaster for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, at Xenia, was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, Dec. 25, 1880, a son of James and Frances (Lowe) Smith, both now deceased, the former of whom was born and reared at Xenia and the latter at Marshall, Illinois.  James Smith was a son of Adam L. and Sarah (Gano) Smith, the latter of whom was a member of one of the oldest families in Greene county, her mother, Mary (Williams) Gano, having been the first female white child born within what is now the precincts of the city of Xenia and was cradled in a maple-log trough in an old log house that stood on what is now the Roberts place on the north edge of the city.  Mary Williams was a daughter of Remembrance Williams, of whom mention is made in the historical section of this work.  Adam L. Smith was a native of Scotland, born and reared at Edinburgh, who came to this country as a young man of nineteen and presently set up a carriage shop at Xenia.  He spent his last days in Xenia and lived to be seventy-two years of age.  He and his wife were the parents of a considerable family of children, among those still living being Ed. M. Smith, former chief of police of the city of Xenia, now living on Church street in that city, and George H. Smith, also of Xenia, who lives on South Detroit street.
     James Smith was born and reared in Xenia and early entered the railroad service, presently becoming a fireman and then a locomotive engineer on the old Terre Haute & Indianapolis Railroad, now a part of the Pennsylvania system, during that period of service being located at Terre Haute.  He later became connected with the Wabash Railroad and during that period of service made his home at East St. Louis, where he later became engaged in the hotel and restaurant business.  James Smith was twice married and by his first wife was the father of two sons, the subject of this sketch having had a brother, Albert Smith, now deceased, who also became engaged in the railroad service and was thus engaged to the time of his death.  Following the death of his first wife, Frances Lowe, Mr. Smith married Sarah Capoe and by that union was the father of one child, a daughter, Edna.
     Eugene D. Smith
was but a child when his mother died and he was reared by his grandmother Smith at Xenia, in the schools of which city he received his schooling.  He then rejoined his father at East St. Louis and there became employed as a messenger boy for the Wabash Railroad, later becoming a yard clerk and then a locomotive fireman.  In 1902 he returned to Xenia and there became employed as a pipe-fitter and plumber and was thus engaged for three years, at the end of which time he returned to railroad service and became a brakeman in the Pennsylvania Railroad yards at Xenia, presently being promoted to the position of yard conductor and served in the latter capacity for one year, or until 1906, when he was made night yardmaster.  In 1913 Mr. Smith was promoted to the position of day yardmaster in the Xenia yards of the Pennsylvania Company and still occupies that position.
     On Jan. 6, 1906, Eugene D. Smith was united in marriage to Cora C. Weddele, who was born at Dayton ,his state, daughter of George and Mary Weddele the former of whom is now engineer at the Ohio Soldiers and Sailors Orphans Home at Xenia.  Mr. Smith was reared in the faith of the Episcopal church.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 195
  FLORANCE R. SMITH.   Florence Smith, proprietor of a Ross township farm of two hundred acres on rural mail route No. 4 out of Jamestown, was born in that township on Sept. 16, 1851, son of James W. and Dorcas (Spahr) Smith, both of whom also were born in this county, members of pioneer families.
     James W. Smith was born on a farm in the Jasper neighborhood in 1821, his parents having been early settlers there, coming  to this county from Virginia.  He grew up there and after his marriage established his home on a farm in Ross township, the place now owned by his son Florance, and there died in 1861.  He and his wife were the parents of four children, of whom the subject of this sketch is now the only survivor, the others having been Philip, Jacob and Mrs. Arabella Brickel.
     Florance Smith was but ten years of age when his father died.  He was reared on the home farm, received his schooling in the neighborhood schools and in due time began farming on his own account, a vocation he ever since has followed.  after his marriage in the fall of 1887 he established his home on the place on which he is now living in Ross township and has continued to make that his place of residence.  In addition to his home place of two hundred acres he owns a farm of one hundred acres over in the neighboring county of Fayette.
     Mr. Smith has been twice married.  On Nov. 26, 1887, he was united in marriage to Margaret Ferguson, who died on Oct. 9, 1889.  To that union was born one child, a daughter, Margaret E., who died in infancy.  On Feb. 26, 1891, Mr. Smith married Mrs. Elizabeth Burr, of this county, and to this union two children have been born, one who died in infancy and Herbert, who was born on Dec. 20, 1904.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Jamestown and Mr. Smith is a Republican.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 758
  HARRY D. SMITH.   Harry Dwight Smith, prosecuting attorney for Greene county, former president of the council of the city of Xenia and former city solicitor, was born at Xenia, on Apr. 20, 1879, son of Judge Horace L. and Mary A. (Jones) Smith, the former of whom is still living at Xenia, where for many years he has been engaged in the practice of the law and further mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume, together with further details relating to the Smith family in Xenia.  Judge Smith has two sons, the subject of this sketch having a brother.  Commander Charles E. Smith, of the United States navy, further mention of whom also is made in this volume.
     Reared in Xenia, Harry D. Smith was graduated from the high school there in 1896 and then entered Antioch College, from which he was graduated in 1900 with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy.  In the meantime, under the preceptorship of his father, he had been giving attention to the preliminary study of law and upon leaving college entered the law department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and was graduated from that institution in 1903. Following his graduation Mr. Smith was admitted to the bar and straightway opened an office for the practice of his profession in Xenia, where he since has been located.  He is a Republican and during the year 1906-07 served as president of the city council and in 1908 was elected city solicitor, which latter position he held until his election to the office of prosecuting attorney for this judicial district in the fall of 1916. Mr. Smith entered upon the duties of this latter office on Jan. 1, 1917, and is now serving in that capacity, his term of office to expire on Jan. 1, 1919.
     On June 23, 1904, Harry D. Smith was united in marriage to Mae Prugh, of Xenia, daughter of V. H. and Mary (Conner) Prugh, both now deceased, and to this union two children have been born, Horace H., born in October, 1905, and Mary Carolyn, August, 1907.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Presbyterian church.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 299
  JUDGE HORACE L. SMITH.   The Hon. Horace Lee Smith, former judge of the court of common pleas of the third subdivision of the second judicial district of Ohio and a member of the Greene county bar, with offices at Xenia since the spring of 1875, is a native son of Ohio, born at Loganville, in Logan county, Aug. 28, 1853, a son of Dr. Clinton and Mary (Davidson) Smith, the former of whom was born in Dublin, in Franklin county, this state, and the latter at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.  In 1855 Dr. Clinton Smith moved with his family from Loganville to Bloomingburg, in the neighboring county of Fayette, where he continued engaged in the practice of his profession the rest of his life, his death occurring there on Nov. 9, 1879.  His widow survived him for twenty-seven years, her death occurring in 1906.  They were the parents of three children, the subject of this review having a brother.  Dr. Homer Smith, of Westerville, and Dr. Eva Smith, of Middletown.
     Having been but two years of age when his parents moved from Loganville to Bloomingburg, Horace L. Smith was reared in the latter village and there received his early schooling, later entering Bloomingburg Academy, where he prepared for entrance at Wooster University, from which he was graduated in June, 1872, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts.  He then entered the law department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and was graduated from that institution in March, 1875, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws.  In April of that same year he was admitted to practice by the supreme court of the state of Ohio and straightway afterward opened an office for the practice of his profession at Xenia, where he ever since has made his residence.  In the fall of 1888, as the nominee of the Republican party, Judge Smith was elected judge of the court of common pleas of the third subdivision of the second judicial district of the state of Ohio and in the following February ascended the bench, occupying the same, by re-election until Feb. 9, 1899, a period of ten years.  Upon the completion of this term of service Judge Smith resumed practice at Xenia and has so continued, though of late years he has sought to confine his personal practice chiefly to taking care of the needs of his old clients, the general practice of the office being looked after largely by his son, Harry Smith, who for some time has been associated with his father in the practice of his profession at Xenia, under the firm name of Smith & Smith, and who know occupies the official position of prosecuting attorney for Greene county.
     Judge Smith has been twice married.  In April, 1875, the month in which he was admitted to practice, he was united in marriage, at Bloomingburg, to Mary A. Jones, of that place, who died in 1885, leaving two sons, Harry, mentioned above, who was elected prosecuting attorney for Greene county in 1916, and Charles Earl, now a commander in the United States navy and further and fitting mention of whom is made elsewhere.  Besides these two sons there were born to that union a son and a daughter who died in infancy.  In January, 1887, Judge Smith married Mrs. May Loughry, a daughter of John Orr, who for eighteen years was clerk of the court of common pleas.  During the period of raising the second Liberty Loan in the fall of 1917 Judge Smith had charge of Greene county's participation in that patriotic "drive."
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 19
  ISAAC SMITH.   The late Isaac Smith, who died at his home in Jamestown in the fall of 1914 and whose widow yet lives there, was a native of the Old Dominion, but had been a resident of Greene county since the days of his young manhood.  He was torn in Hampshire county, Virginia. June 20, 1839, a son of John and Maria (Kiter) Smith, both of whom were born in Virginia, the former on June 6, 1806, and the latter. May 22. 1806, who came to Greene county after the Civil War and here spent their last days.  John Smith and wife were the parents of seven children, George, Isaac, Hester, Mary, Elizabeth, Frederick and Catherine, of whom but three, Hester, Mary and Frederick, are not living.
     Isaac Smith was about twenty-one years of age when he left his naive Virginia and came over into Ohio, arriving in Greene county with seven dollars in his pocket.  That was about the year 1860.  Upon his arrival here he began work as a farm hand and was thus engaged until he was joined here by his parents some three or four years later, when the family rented a farm and established a home.  Isaac Smith presently bought that farm, but after his marriage in 1881 sold the same and bought the farm of one hundred and fifty-four acres in the immediate vicinity of Bowersville upon which he and his wife established their home and which his widow now owns, and there he continued farming until his retirement in 1890 and removal to Jamestown, where he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring there on Oct. 5, 1914, and where his widow is still living.  Mrs. Smith is a member of the Baptist church and Mr. Smith gave to that church his financial support during his residence in Jamestown.
     It was on Dec. 18, 1881, that Isaac Smith was united in marriage to Catherine M. Hite, who was born in Caesarcreek township, this county, a daughter of Andrew D. and Mary (Meyers) Hite, the former of whom was born on Dec. 16, 1816, and the latter, Aug. 14, 1814.  Andrew D. Hite and wife were the parents of ten children, two of whom died in infancy, the others, besides Mrs. Smith, being James (deceased), William, George (deceased), John (deceased), Allen, Cyrus and Elizabeth (deceased).  To Mr. and Mrs. Smith one child was born, a son, Homer Smith, born on Jan. 4, 1885, who is making his home with his mother at Jamestown and who is engaged in looking after his farming interests nearby.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 328
  JOHN SMITH.    For many years John Smith, who died at his home in Ceasarscreek township, this county, Jan. 31, 1883, eighty-four years of age at the time of his death, had been a resident of this county since he was eighteen years of age and in consequence was thoroughly familiar with the main facts of the development of this region during the long period covered by that tenure of residence.  John Smith was a Virginian, born in Rappahannock county, in the Old Dominion, Feb. 14, 1798, and was eighteen years of age when he came over into Ohio, riding through on horseback, and located in Greene county.  For decades after taking up his residence here he made it a joint every ten years to ride back to his old home in Virginia, going over the ground on horseback he had covered upon coming out here in 1816.  In due time after his arrival here Mr. Smith got a tract of land in Caesarscreek township, married Margaret Burrell, a member of one of the pioneer families of this section, she having been born in Caesarscreek township on Aug. 16, 1806, and established his home in that township, continuing to spend the rest of his life there.  Originally a Whig, he became a Republican upon the organization of the latter party.  He was one of the early assessors of Caesarscreek township and, as is related elsewhere in this volume in a further reference to this pioneer, had quite a time convincing some of his neighbors that it was their duty to return their property for taxation.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.
     John Smith was twice married.  His first wife, Margaret Burrell, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this volume, together wth (sp) something relating to the history of the Burrells in this county, died on Jan. 23, 1849, being then in the forty-third year of her age, and he later married Nancy Wright, this latter union being without issue.  By his first marriage John Smith was the father of twelve children, namely:  Burrell, William, Eleanor, Henry, Susan Ann, Eli, Elizabeth, Nancy, Alfred, Mary Jane, Margaret, born on Feb. 21, 1844, who is now living on her farm in Jefferson township, this county, widow of James W. Clark and Emily.
     Margaret Smith
was married on May 8, 1878, to James W. Clark, who was born in Rappahannock county, Virginia, and who haf rendered service as a soldier of the Confederacy during the Civil War.  Not long after the close of the war James W. Clark came to Ohio and located in this county, where in the spring of 1878 he married Margaret Smith.  For eight years after his marriage he made his home on a farm in Jefferson township and then bought the farm of thirty acres on which his widow is now living in that same township, rural mail route No. 3 out of Jamestown, and there he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring on July 26, 1904.  To Mr. and Mrs. Clark was born one child, a son, John Edgar, who died in the days of his childhood.  Since the death of her husband Mrs. Clark has continued to make her home on the home farm, the place being looked after by Orville Fawley, who with his family has made his home there since Mar. 20, 1905.  Orville Fawley was married on Dec. 22, 1909, to Myrtle Sturgeon and has three children, Helen M., George A. and Aletha I.  Mrs. Fawley was born at Jamestown, this county, daughter and only child of Albert and Flora (Tidd) Sturgeon, the latter of whom, a daughter of Josiah B. Tidd, died in 1902 and the former of whom is now living in the village of Selma, in the neighboring county of Clark.  Mr. Fawley was born at Paintersville, a son of George and Laura Fawley.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 625
  JOHN W. SMITH.    John W. Smith, now living practically retired at his farm home in Sugarcreek township, is a native son of Greene county, born on a farm in Spring Valley township on Aug. 22, 1846, son of James and Sarah A. (Dill) Smith, both of whom also were born in Ohio and whose last days were spent here.
     James Smith was a farmer and for several years after his marriage lived in Spring Valley township, moving thence in 1847 to Sugarcreek township, where he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring on June 30, 1899.  His widow died on Sept. 5, 1909.  They were the parents of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being William J., now a resident of Detroit, Michigan: Elizabeth Ellen, now living at Spring Valley, widow of John D. Haines; Daniel Freeman, who is still living on the old home place in Sugarcreek township, and Sarah Jane, widow of Wilson J. Osborn, of Spring Valley.
     John W. Smith was under two years of age when his parents moved from Spring Valley township to Sugarcreek township and on the home farm in the latter township he grew to manhood, receiving his schooling in the local schools.  He was married when twenty-one years of age and then began farming on his own account.  In 1886 he bought the farm on which he is now living, on rural mail route No. 2 out of Spring Valley, and has since resided there.  Mr. Smith has a farm of sixty acres, but for the past ten years has been living practically retired from the active labors of the farm.  He is a Democrat.  For fourteen years he was a member of the board of directors of the Sugar Creek Cemetery Association.
     Mr. Smith has been thrice married.  On Feb. 13, 1868. he was united in marriage to Rebecca J. Steelman, who died in 1897 leaving one child, a daughter, Rilla. wife of Carson McCoy, of Sugarcreek township.  Mr. Smtih (sp) later married Mary E, Lampton, who died on Feb. 1, 1909, without issue, and on May 29, 1912, he married Martha Esther Howland, who was born in Highland county, this state, daughter of the Rev. Ralston and Rebecca Jane (Gilliland) Howland.  The Rev. Ralston Howland was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church and further mention of him is made elsewhere in this volume.  Mrs. Smith is a member of the local branch of the Order of the Golden Eagle at Dayton.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 705
  MILTON A. SMITH.   Milton A. Smith, distributing clerk in the postoffice at Xenia, was born on a farm one mile south of the village of New Jasper, in the township of that name, Mar. 7, 1877, and has been a resident of this county all his life, formerly and for seven year prior to entering upon service in the xenia postoffice having been a school teacher in the county.  His parents, William Albert and Keziah (Thomas) Smith, also were born in this county and the latter is still living, having made her home at Xenia since her husband's death in 1908.  She was born on Dec. 3, 1855, daughter of Jacob and Eliza (Beason) Thomas, the former of whom was a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Rayliff) Thomas, Benjamin Thomas having been a son of Jacob and Ellen Thomas, who settled on Painters run in this county about the year 1802, Benjamin Thomas there marrying Elizabeth Bayliff, a neighbor, daughter of Joshua and Margaret (Fry) Bayliff, who had come here from Virginia about that same time or shortly prior thereto and had settled in the Paintersville neighborhood on Paints run in Caearscreek township, all of which, together with a comprehensive history of his family, is set out at length elsewhere in this volume.  Eliza Beason Thomas, mother of Mrs. Smith, was a daughter of Thomas and Keziah Beason, who had a farm three miles south of New Jasper on the Paintersville road and who were the parents of twelve or fourteen children.  Mrs. Smith was the first-born of the eight children born to her parents, the others being the following: Joshua, born on Aug. 4, 1858, who died on Nov. 18, 1863; Benjamin, Jan. 29, 1860, who died on November 30, 1863; Lydia, June 7, 1862, wife of Jacob R. Jones, of Mt. Tabor, this county; Alice, Aug. 7, 1864, who married J. C. Bales and died on Jan. 4, 1892; Loretta, Apr. 10, 1866, who married Frank M. Spahr and who, as well as her husband, is now deceased, her death having occurred on June 1, 1915; Francis Marion, Feb. 1, 1868, who married Alice L. Brown and lives on a farm in New Jasper township, and Jacob Lewis, May 8, 1870, who married Ida Hite and is now living in Logan county, this state.
     William Albert Smith was born on a farm in Caesarcreek township, this county, son of Burrell and Mary (Bales) Smith, both of whom also were born in this county, members of pioneer families, and further mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume.  Burrell Smith was a son of John and Margaret (Burrell) Smith, the latter of whom was born in Caesarscreek township, this county, Aug. 16, 1808.  John Smith was born in Rappahannock county, Virginia, and was eighteen years of age when he came to Ohio, riding through on horseback to Greene county, where he eventually established his home, becoming the owner of a farm of two hundred acres in Caesarscreek township.  He was one of the early assessors of that township and there is a tradition that he had a difficult time convincing some of the settlers that it was their duty to return their property for taxation.  He was a Whig and became one of the organizers of the Republican party in this county.  By religious persuasion he was a Methodist.  His death occurred on Jan. 31, 1883, he then being eighty- four years of age, and he was buried in the Baptist graveyard near Jamestown.  On Jan. 16, 1823, John Smith married Margaret Burrell and to that union were born twelve children, of whom Burrell Smith, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was the first-born, the others being the following: William, born on Aug. 3, 1825, who married a Miss Ireland and lived at Blainetown; Elnora, Sept. 9, 1827, who married John Ford and moved to Indiana: Henry, Sept. 12, 1829, who died in childhood; Sarah Ann, Apr. 9, 1831, who married Lafayette Lucas and moved to Indiana; Eli, Mar. 21, 1833, who married Lucy E. Hobbs and moved to Indiana; Elizabeth, Sept. 21, 1835, who married William St. John and lived in Caesarscreek township; Nancy, Oct. 17, 1837, who died unmarried; Alfred, Dec. 6, 1839, a carpenter, who went to Missouri; Mary Jane, Dec. 30, 1841, who married Asa Devoe and moved to Indiana; Margaret, Feb. 11, 1844, who is still living, making her home in Jefferson township, widow of James W. Clark, a memorial sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume, and Emily, Sept. 27, 1848, who married Joseph Bosman and moved to Indiana.
     Burrell Smith was born on Dec. 10, 1823, and was reared on his father's farm.  After his marriage to Mary Bales, who was a member of one of Greene county's old families, he established his home on a farm on the line between New Jasper and Caesarscreek townships and spent the rest of his life there.  He and his wife were Baptists.  They were the parents of four children, one of whom died in infancy, the others besides the father of the subject of this sketch being John B. Smith, now living at Xenia, a member of the firm of Bales & Smith, and Emma Jane, wife of J. S. Bales, of Xenia.
     William Albert Smith grew up on the home farm and at the age of nineteen years began teaching school, a profession he followed with slight intermission for many years, or until his health became so broken that he no longer could be of service in the school room.  He owned a farm in New Jasper township, devoting his summers to the cultivation of the same.  In 1893 he attended college at Ada, Ohio, graduating in 1894, and later taught school at Bellbrook.  Then in 1896 he located on his father's old home place in Caesarscreek township and on the latter place spent the rest of his life, his death occurring there on Feb. 19, 1908.  During his long service in the public schools of this county William A. Smith was for several years the superintendent of the Bowersville schools, for two years was superintendent of the Bellbrook schools, for two years head of the schools at New Burlington and later was returned in charge of the schools at Bowersville, where he was serving when his health failed and he was compelled to retire from the school room.  He was a Republican and a member of the Mr.(sp) Tabor Methodist Episcopal church.  Since the death of her husband Mrs. Smith has been making her home with the family of John Bales at 33West Third street, Xenia.  It was on Mar. 11, 1875, that William Albert Smith and Keziah Thomas were united in marriage.  To that union were born four children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being Lucien E. Smith, who lives on a farm in the vicinity of Mt. Tabor church, seven miles southeast of Xenia: Prof. Orma J. B. Smith, now an instructor in the University of Idaho, and William M. Smith, a farmer, living in Caesarscreek township.
     Milton A. Smith spent his youth mainly on the farm and his early schooling was received in such schools as his father would be teaching from term to term, his course being completed by attendance at the high school at Ada and the high school at Bellbrook.  When twenty-one years of age he began teaching in the schools of this county and was for seven years thereafter thus engaged, employing his summers on the farm.  In July. 1909, Mr. Smith accompanied his widowed mother to Xenia and has ever since made his home in that city.  Upon taking up his residence there he entered a civil service examination and in the following October was appointed to service in the postoffice, being put on as a substitute mail carrier.  Not long afterward he was transferred to a position as clerk and presently was promoted to the position of distributing clerk in the postoffice, a position he ever since has held.
     On May 14, 1913, Milton A. Smith was united in marriage to Lavina A. Martin, who was born in Maryland, daughter of John and Amanda Martin, now living on a farm in the Cumberland valley in Pennsylvania.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Reformed church at Xenia and he is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.  He and his wife reside at 410 West Main street.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 673
  OSCAR L. SMITH.    Oscar L. Smith, cashier of the Exchange Bank of Cedarville, this county,
was born near Selma, in the neighboring county of Clark, and has lived in this part of the state all his life.  He was born on Aug. 23, 1877, son of Seth W. and Hannah L. (Lewis) Smith, both of whom also were born in Ohio, the former in the vicinity of Selma and the latter at New Vienna, in Clinton county, and who are now living at Whittier, California.
     Seth W. Smith was born on a farm in Green township, Clark county, near the village of Selma, Jan. 24, 1843. son of Seth and Deborah (Wildman) Smith, earnest Quakers and pioneers of the Selma neighborhood, both of whom are buried in the Selma cemetery.  Seth Smith was born in eastern Tennessee and his father's name also as Seth, born in Pennsylvania, a son of Joseph and Rachel (Bales) Smith, Quakers, the former of whom also was bornin Pennsylvania, where his father and two brothers had settled upon coming to this country from England to join William Penn's colony of Friends.  After his marriage Joseph Smith located in the vicinity of Bladensburg, Maryland, and there for some time was a farmer and miller, later disposing of his interests there with a view of returning to Pennsylvania.
     While driving across to what he had designated as his new place of residence at the point where Brownsville, Pennsylvania, is now located, he was attacked by highwaymen, an experience which caused him to change his course.  He settled on a farm in the vicinity of Winchester, Virginia, and there spent the rest of his life.  Among the sons of this couple was Seth Smith, who married and moved to eastern Tennessee, where he lived for fourteen years, or until the year 1800, when he moved into Ohio Territory and settled in Ross county. Here he remained until 1811, in which year he moved into Clark county and settled on the farm in Green township mentioned above as the birthplace of Seth W. Smith.  Upon settling in Clark county, the pioneer Seth Smith purchased the Fitzhugh survey, a tract supposed to contain one thousand acres, but which on later survey turned out to contain eleven hundred and twenty acres.  ON that place he built a log house and in that primitive abode made his home until 1817, when he erected a substantial two-story brick house which stood until torn down by Seth W. Smith in 1899, and there he and his wife spent there last days.  They were the parents of six children, the youngest, Seth, being the grandfather of the subject of this biographical sketch.
     Seth Smith II was born in 1798 and was thus about thirteen years of age when the family settled in Clark county in1811.  There he grew to manhood and as a young man became a farmer and stockman on his own account.  He inherited from his pioneer father two hundred and sixty acres of land and to this made additions from time to time until he became the owner of no less than two thousand acres of land.  He was a birthright Quaker, an active Abolitionist and an ardent worker in the cause of temperance exerting much influence in those directions in his community.  He died in 1876, being then seventy-eight years of age, and was buried in the Selma cemetery.  His wife, Deborah (Wildman) Smith, died in 1857.  To that union were born three sons and one daughter.
     Reared on the home farm in the Selma neighborhood, Seth W. Smith, son of Seth and Deborah (Wildman) Smith, received his early schooling in the village schools and supplemented the same by a two-years course in Earlham College and a year at the Michigan State Agricultural Collee at Lansing.  He inherited some of his father's lands and bought more until he became the owner of about five hundred acres in Clark county, and in addition to  his general farming became a breeder of pure-bred livestock.  In 1905 Seth W. Smith and his son Oscar bought out the Wildman interest in the Exchange Bank.  He became president and his son, cashier, the latter being practical manager of the bank.  In 1916 Seth W. Smith retired from active participation in the affairs of the bank and moved to Whittier, California, where he and his wife are now living.
     Seth W. Smith, in 1877, at New Vienna, in Clinton county, married Hannah Lewis, who was born in that village, daughter of Isaac and Mary (Hoskins) Lewis, also Quakers.  Isaac Lewis was a landowner and also operated a tannery at New Vienna.  He later moved to Sabina, in that same county, and there became president of the Sabina Bank, a position he was holding at the time of his death, he then being past eighty-five years of age.  Seth W. Smith and wife are both birthright members of the Friends church and their children were reared in the faith of that communion.  There are three of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the eldest, the others being Lewis H., who is owner of the old home farm in the vicinity of Selma, which has been in the possession of the family for more than one hundred years, and Mary Emma, wife of Dr. Herbert Tebbetts, a physician and surgeon, of Whittier, California.
     Oscar L. Smith was reared near Selma and upon completing the course in the high school there took a course at Earlham College at Richmond, Indiana.  In 1898 he became bookkeeper in the Exchange Bank at Cedarville.  W. J. Wildman at that time being cashier, and was thus engaged until 1905, when he and his father bought the Wildman interest in the bank, he became cashier of the bank, which position he still occupies.  In July, 1914, the Exchange Bank of Cedarville secured a new charter and has since been operated as a state bank.  Mr. Smith is the secretary and treasurer of the Cedarville Lime Company, one of the leading industries in the village, and also looks after his farming interests, having a farm of more than two hundred acres, located in the Rife neighborhood along the Little Miami river.  In 1912, Mr. Smith erected on West Main street a buff-colored brick house and he and his familly (sp) are now residing there.
     On Oct. 1, 1903, Oscar L. Smith was united in marriage to Jean Blanche Ervin, who was born at Cedarville, daughter of David S. and Belle (Murdock) Ervin.  The former formerly operated the D. S. Ervin Lime Company's plant at Cedarville, but has now retired from active business.  To this union have born two children, Isabelle born in 1908, and Elizabeth, 1911.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the United Presbyterian church at Cedarville.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 747


R. W. Smith
RAYMOND W. SMITH, M. D.     The late Dr. Raymond W. Smith, of Spring Valley, who died on Aug. 18, 1916, was a native son of Ohio and had lived in this state all his life, a resident of Greene county since the days of  his young manhood.  He was born on a farm southeast of Hillsboro, in Highland county, Nov. 30, 1862, son of Henry B. and Elizabeth C. (Griffith) Smith, both of whom also were born in Highland county, who are now living retired at Spring Valley, in this county, where they have resided since 1905.
     Henry B. Smith was born on July 9, 1832, son of Henry and Lydia (Bane) Smith, the former of whom was a native of Virginia and the latter of Maryland, who came to Ohio in 1815, by way of Kentucky, and settled on a farm in the neighborhood of Hillsboro, where they spent the remainder of their lives.  They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and were the parents of ten children, Aquilla, Parmelia, Elizabeth, John, Richard, Clinton, Catherine, Russell, Henry B. and Wesley.  Henry B. Smith grew upon on the home farm and remained there until his marriage in the spring of 1855, after which he located and there became engaged in farming, the owner of a fine place of one hundred and three acres, on which he and his wife resided until their retirement from the farm and removal to Spring Valley in 1905.  He is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.
     It was on May 11, 1855, that Henry B. Smith was united in marriage of Elizabeth C. Griffith, who was born on a farm in the vicinity of Marshall, in Highland county, this state, daughter of William H. and Margaret D. (Howe) Griffith, the former of whom was a native of Kentucky and the latter of Virginia, who were married in Highland county, where their respective parents had settled in pioneer days.  Of the eleven children born to William H. Griffith and wife five grew to maturity, those besides Mrs. Smith being R. H., Arminta, Lottie and John F.  To Henry B. and Elizabeth C. (Griffith) Smith were born ten children, nine of wohm (sp) grew to maturity namely:  Prof. Russell Smith, who married Emma Cluxton and is now living in Cleveland, a teacher in the high school in that city: Prof. William Smith, principal of the high school at Dallas, Texas, who married Lulu McMurry, of New Jasper; Lettie, who married A. A. Monett and is now living at Reno, Nevada: Emsley O., deceased; Dr. Raymond W. Smith, the immediate subject of this memorial sketch; Prof. John Smith, who married Olive Tingle, also a teacher, and is now teaching in the schools of Brookville. this state; E. D. Smith, who married Martha Frazer and is engaged in the practice of law at Xenia; Harley Smith, also of Xenia, formerly a teacher, who has been twice married, his first wife having been Emma Shidaker and his second, Mrs. Snyder; and Carrie, wife of Allan McLean, a Xenia undertaker.
     Raymond W. Smith received an excellent education in the days of his youth and early began teaching school, for some years being thus engaged at New Jasper, in this county.  After his marriage in 1888 he continued teaching, meanwhile giving his attention to the study of medicine, and presently entered the Louisville Medical College, from which he was graduated in 1893.  Upon receiving his diploma, Doctor Smith located at Spring Valley, where he continued successfully engaged in the practice of his profession until his death in the summer of 1916, a period of twenty-three years of continuous practice in the same place.  During that long period of unselfish labor Dr. Smith endeared himself to the whole community and his passing was sincerely mourned.  The Doctor was ever a helpful force in his community and as one of the county newspapers, in an appreciation published after his death, said: "The many things of this community that he helped to formulate and mold will miss the forcefulness of his touch."  The Doctor was a successful business man as well as a practitioner and besides the property he had in Spring Valley was the owner of some valuable farm lands.  He was a member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Junior Order of American Mechanics, and was a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as is his widow.  The Doctor's relations with his church were of a peculiarly close character and, as the newspaper appreciation above quoted said following his death: "The church of this community is at this time by his removal facing a peculiar and awful vacancy, for one of its most interested and beneficent friends has gone to take his place in the Infinite Bliss of the Great Beyond."
     Since her husband's death Mrs. Smith has continued to make her home in Spring Valley, where she has long been very pleasantly situated.  Doctor Smith was much attached to his home and in that connection it is not regarded as unseemly to quote further from the newspaper article above mentioned, which said of him that "his going away from us is to leave a home and a family he most dearly loved; for the environments give evidence that no sacrifice was too great for him to make."  Mrs. Smith was married on Aug. 23, 1888.  She was born in this county, Mattie D. Mann, daughter of George and Rachel (Kearns) Mann, the former of whom also was born in this county, son of pioneer parents in Spring Valley township, and the latter in the vicinity of Newark, this state.  George Mann was a successful farmer in the vicinity of New Burlington.  He and his wife were the parents of four children, as will be noted in a history of the Mann family in this county set out elsewhere in this volume.  To Doctor and Mrs. Smith were born two sons, Carl Emsley and George Henry, the latter of whom received his schooling in the Spring Valley schools, the Xenia high school and at Cedarville College and is now living at home.  Carl Emsley Smith, who was educated at Antioch College and at the Ohio State University, is now (1918) serving with the National Army, attached to the supply corps of the Three Hundred and Twenty-second United States Field Artillery, in the war against Germany.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 896
  WILLIAM M. SMITH.    William M. Smith, one of Cedarville township's substantial farmers, was born on the farm on which he now lives, on Mar. 22, 1875, son of Samuel and Esther J. (Cook) Smith, the former of whom was born in that same vicinity, just over the line in Madison township, in the neighboring county of Clark, and the latter near the village of Waynesville, in the county of Warren, neighboring Greene county to the southwest.
     Samuel Smith was born on Dec. 31, 1827, a son of Seth and Deborah (Wildman) Smith, pioneers of the Selma neighborhood up in Clark county.  Seth Smith was a Virginian, born in Loudoun county, in the Old Dominion, July 11, 1798, and was but two years of age when his parents, Seth Smith and wife, also Virginians, the former of whom was born on May 19, 1761, came to the then Territory of Ohio and settled on a tract of land about a mile from where later came to be established the village of Selma.  The elder Seth Smith and his wife were earnest Quakers and were among the original members of the Friends meeting at Selma, and their descendants even to the present generation ha\e ever preserved their birthright in that meeting.  The elder Seth Smith created a good piece of farm property there in pioneer days and spent his last days on that farm, his death occurring there on Apr. 1, 1837.  On that place his son Seth grew to manhood.  After his marriage to Deborah Wildman, who was a member of one of the pioneer Quaker families of that neighborhood, he established his home on a farm in that same vicinity, bordering on the Greene county line, about a mile from Selma, and there developed a fine piece of property.  He and his wife were the parents of four children, of whom Samuel Smith, father of the subject of this sketch, was the first-born, the others being Ruth, who became the wife of Samuel Hadley, of Wilmington, county seat of the neighboring county of Clinton; Oliver, who moved from his farm on the line between Clark and Greene counties to Emporia, Kansas, in 1885, and thence, after a while, to Whittier, California, where he spent his last days; and Seth, who came into possession of his grandfather's old home place, but years ago moved to Whittier, California, where he is now living retired.
     Reared on the place on which he was born, Samuel Smith was early trained in the ways of practical farming and after his marriage established his home on that portion of the home farm which extended over the line into Cedarville township, this county, and where in 1874 he erected the substantial brick house in which his son William is now living.  After his father's death Samuel Smith inherited that farm and gradually added to the same until he became the owner of a tine place of three hundred and forty-two acres.  In addition to his general farming, he was widely known as one of the most successful stockmen in that part of the county.  Samuel Smith was a Republican and had rendered public service as. a director of schools in his home district.  He and his wife were earnest adherents of the Friends meeting at Selma and he was for years an office bearer in the same.  His death occurred at his home on Feb. 24, 1901, he then being in the seventy-fourth year of his age.  His wife had preceded him to the grave by fifteen years, her death having occurred on September 28, 1885. She was born, Esther J. Cook, in the vicinity of W'aynesville, in Warren county, this state, Jan. 24, 1846, daughter of Marcellus and Harriet (Whittaker) Cook, the former of whom was reared in the vicinity of Selma, a birthright member of the Selma meeting of Friends, and whose last days were spent in the vicinity of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he had made his home upon his retirement from his Warren county farm.  Marcellus Cook was thrice married and his daughter Esther was one of the children of his first marriage.  Samuel Smith and Esther Cook were united in marriage on June 1, 1869, and to that union were born four children, namely: Howard, a well-to-do farmer of the Selma neighborhood; Anna Ethel, who died in her third year; William M., the immediate subject of this biographical sketch, and Edith, wife of G. W. Sharpless, a dairyman, living in the vicinity of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
     William M. Smith grew up on the farm on which he is now living and supplemented the schooling received in the Selma schools by attendance for two years at Earlham College, in which institution his brother and his sister also completed their schooling, and after leaving school resumed his place on the farm and gave his serious attention to the further development of the same.  Following the death of his father in 1901 he inherited one hundred acres of the farm, including the home place in Cedarville township, and after his marriage in 1904 established his home there.  Since coming into his inheritance Mr. Smith has bought seventy-two acres adjoining and has made substantial improvements on his place.  In addition to his general farming he feeds about fifty head of cattle and one hundred head of hogs each year.
     On Sept. 14, 1904, William M. Smith was united in marriage to Floy McDorman, who also was born in this county, daughter of Allan and Stella (Paullin) McDorman, residents of Ross township and members of the Selma meeting of Friends, and to this union have been born two children, daughters both, Esther, born on Jan. 22, 1907, and Virginia, Feb. 12, 1914.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith are both birthright members of the Selma meeting of Friends and take an interested part in the good works of the same, Mr. Smith having served as overseer of the meeting.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind., 1918 - Page 946
  REV. THEOPHILUS STEWARD and S. MARIA STEWARD, M. D.  In the varied activities of Wilberforce University there are few more prominent factor or more popular individuals than the Rev. Theophilus Gould Steward, chaplain and vice-president of the university and pastor of the African Methodist Episcopal church at Wilberforce, or than was his late wife Dr. S. Maria Steward, formerly and for years a resident physician and member of the faculty of the university, lecturer on hygiene and physiology before the girls' classes, and who also was engaged in general practice in and about Wilberforce.  Dr. Steward, who died on Mar. 7, 1918, had been a resident of Wilberforce ever since1898, having located there when her husband went to the Philippines as chaplain of the regiment which he had served in that capacity since the days of President Harrison's administration, and Chaplain Steward has been stationed at Wilberforce since 1907, when he was made a member of the faculty, professor of history and languages, later being elected vice-president of the institution.  Chaplain Steward has a pleasant home, "Oakview," on the Columbus pike, in the immediate vicinity of the university.
     The Rev. Theophilus Gould Steward, more familiarly known locally as Chaplain Steward, is a native of New Jersey, born at Gouldtown, in Cumberland county, that state, Apr. 17, 1843, son of James and Rebecca (Gould) Steward, both of whom were born in that same vicinity and the latter of whom died in 1877 at the age of fifty-seven years, the former surviving until 1892, he being past seventy-seven years of age at the time of his death.  James Steward for thirty years was foreman of the finishing department of the Cumberland Nail and Iron Works at Bridgeton, New Jersey.  Though a man of small education he recognized the advantages of schooling and he and his wife, the latter of whom had been a teacher in the days of her young womanhood, instilled into the breasts of their children a desire for learning that inspired all their after lives.  The parents were members of the African Methodist Episcopal church and their children were reared in that faith.  There are six of these children, all of whom are still living, the youngest being now sixty-nine years of age, and of whom Chaplain Steward was the fourth in order of birth, the others being the following: Margaret, who married Lorenzo F. Gould, farmer, justice of the peace and veteran of the Civil War, and lives at Gouldtown, New Jersey; William, who for years has been engaged in newspaper work at Bridgeton, New Jersey, a writer of stories and a correspondent for metropolitan newspapers; Mary, wife of the Rev. Theodore whose service she draws a pension from the government, and Stephen S., a carpenter, also residing at Gouldtown.  Chaplain Steward knows little about his paternal grandparents, his grandmother, Margaret Steward, having gone to Santo Domingo and with her what records the family had, but regarding the Goulds, his mother's family, he has a long and interesting history, the Goulds having been represented at Gouldtown, New Jersey, ever since the founding of the colony.
     When the English came into possession of New Amsterdam in 1664 the colony which the Dutch had settled at Bergan before 1620 came under the control of the Duke of York, who finally made over the whole to Sir George Carteret, from whose native island of Jersey the provinces were named.  Later, John Fenwick, styled knight and baronet, second son of Sir William Fenwick, baronet, representative from the county of Northumberland in the last parliament under the Commonwealth, came into possession of a considerable tract of this land in the south part of New Jersey, chartered a ship and with his children and their families and effects sailed for the colonies.  Fenwick's wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Walter Covert, of Sussex, and among their children was a daughter, Elizabeth, who had married John Adams, a weaver, who with his wife and three children (one, a daughter Elizabeth) formed a part of the new colony, which in 1675 settled on the eastern shore of the Delaware river.  Johnson's "History of Fenwick's Colony," written in1835, says: "Among the numerous troubles and vexations which assailed Fenwick, none appears to have distressed him more than the conduct of his granddaughter, Elizabeth Adams, who had attached herself to a citizen of color.  By his will he deprived her of any share in his estate 'unless the Lord open her eyes to see her abominable transgression against him, me and her good father, by giving her true repentence and forsaking that Black which hath been the ruin of her and become penitent for her sins.'   Further on the same historian says:  "Elizabeth Adams had formed a connection with a Negro man whose name was Gould. Elizabeth Adams, grand-daughter of Fenwick, had five children by Gould, one of whom was a son named Levi.  Three died young.  All trace of Levi has been lost.  The other son, Benjamin Gould, was the founder of Gouldtown and the founder of the family with which Chaplain Steward is connected through the maternal line. It is quite probable that when Benjamin Gould grew up there were no women of his own color in the settlement with whom he could have associated had he desired to do so.  In 1627 Swedes and Finns had settled on the Delaware, regarding that country as part of the province of New Sweden, and upon Fenwick's arrival there were numerously represented in what are now the counties of Salem and Gloucester, and it was recorded that Benjamin Gould married a Finn by the name of Ann.  Benjamin and Ann Gould had five children, Sarah, Anthony, Samuel, Abijah and Elisha, who, it is recorded, were fair skinned, with blue eyes and light hair, the force of the mother's Ugrian blood evidently having been dominant in this progeny.  Abijah Gould, born about 1735, married Hannah Pierce, who was born in 1756,  third daughter of Richard and Mary Pierce, and the first-born son of this union, Benjamin Gould, born in 1779, married Phoebe Bowen, who was born in 1788, in Salem county, New Jersey.  Benjamin Gould (second) died in1851, at the age of seventy-two years.  His widow survived him until 1877, she being eighty-nine years of age at the time of her death. They were the parents of nine children, Oliver, Tamson, Lydia (who lived to the great age of one hundred and two years), Jane, Abijah, Sarah, Rebecca, Phoebe and Prudence.  Of these children, Rebecca Gould, mother of Chaplain Steward, was born on May 2, 1820.  In 1838 she married James Steward and was the mother of the children noted in the preceding paragraph, including Chaplain StewardJames Steward's parents had gone to Santo Domingo with the Bowyer expedition in 1824 and it was known that they there became engaged in coffee growing.  James Steward had been indentured to a man who ill-treated him so shamefully that before he was nine years of age he ran away and found shelter in the household of Elijah Gould at Gouldtown, where he was reared, later marrying Rebecca Gould, as set out above.
     Chaplain Steward received excellent scholastic training for the ministerial duties he has so long and so faithfully performed.  Upon completing the course in the local schools at Bridgeton he for two terms taught school.  He early had turned his attention to the ministry and in due time was ordained as a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal church and held local charges.  During the reconstruction period following the Civil War, 1865-71, he labored in Georgia and South Carolina, and after some further service entered the West Philadelphia Divinity School, associated with the Protestant Episcopal church, and was graduated from that institution at the head of his class in 1880, afterward being given charges in Brooklyn, Philadelphia and Wilmington, Delaware, and had charge of a church in Baltimore when, in 1891, he was appointed by President Harrison chaplain of the Twenty-fifth Regiment, United States Infantry.  For seven years thereafter Chaplain Steward was stationed with his regiment in Montana and then, in 1899, went with that regiment to the Philippines, where he remained for three years, at the end of which time he returned with the regiment and for some time thereafter was stationed at Niobrara, in Nebraska, later being stationed at Laredo, Texas, in which latter post he was serving when retired in 1907.  After a trip to the City of Mexico he returned to Wilberforce, where his wife had installed her home upon his departure for the Philippines, and at once was made instructor in history and languages in the university, two years later being made vice president of the university, which latter position he still occupies, as well as serving as pastor of the local African Methodist Episcopal church.  Chaplain Steward has published several books, including "The Haitian Revolution, 1791 to 1804."  "Genesis Re-read" and "Death, Hades and the Resurrection."  In 1909 and again in 1911 he and his wife made trips to Europe, in the latter year both the Chaplain and his wife being representatives from the African Methodist Church in America to the Inter-racial Congress held in London in that year, both having places on the program of the meetings scheduled for that occasion.
     Chaplain Steward has been twice married.  On Jan. 1, 1866, he was united in marriage to Elizabeth Gadesden, of Charleston, South Carolina, and to that union were born eight children, five of whom survive, namely:  Dr. Charles Steward, a dentist, now practicing his profession at Boston; Capt. Frank R. Steward, who commanded Company G, Forty-ninth Regiment, United States Infantry, during the Spanish American War and is now practicing law at Pittsburg; Dr. Benjamin Steward, who attended the medical department of the University of Minnesota and is at present employed by the United States government as assistant inspector in the Chicago stock yards; Prof. Theophilus B. Steward, instructor in English in the Lincoln high school at Kansas City, Missouri, and Gustavus Steward, present secretary to Archdeacon Russell, of St. Paul's (Episcopal) School at Lawrenceville, Virginia.  The mother of these children died in 1893.  She was a member of one of the old free families of Charleston and a woman of exalted character.  It is doubtless to her teaching and example that Chaplain Steward and her sons now living owe much of their success in life.  Although of a very affectionate nature she was nevertheless endowed with a large practical intellect and very sound judgment.  Her family furnished one brother alderman of the city of Charleston, one assistant postmaster, and another, a prosperous butcher, who at one time commanded a troop of show cavalry composed of young colored men of the city who furnished their own horses and equipments.  She is buried in the Gouldtown cemetery and over her grave stands a beautiful shaft on which is inscribed the just encomium:  "The model wife and mother."  On Nov. 27, 1896, Chaplain Steward married Dr. Susan Maria (Smith) McKinney, widow of the Rev. William G. McKinney, an Episcopal minister at Charleston, South Carolina, and the mother of two children, the Rev. William S. McKinney, a recently ordained minister of the Episcopal church, now a resident of Jamaica, Long Island, and Mrs. Anna Maria Holly, now a teacher in public school No. 109 at Brooklyn, New York.  Mrs. Holly was graduated from the public schools of Brooklyn and later entered Pratt Institute in that city, where she took the full course, being the first colored graduate of the high school department of that institution.
     Dr. S. Maria Steward, who, as noted above, died at her home at Wilberforce in the spring of 1918, was one of the best-known women of her race in the United States, and for years exerted a remarkable influence for good in and about Wilberforce, where she had been practicing her profession for the greater part of the time since 1898, resident physician at the university since 1907 and a member of the faculty, giving lectures on hygiene and physiology to the girls.  She was born in Brooklyn, New York, daughter of Sylvanus and Ann Elizabeth (Springsteel) Smith, the latter of whom also was born in Brooklyn and the former, at Little Neck, Long Island, and who were the parents of five daughters.  Doctor Steward having had four sisters, the late Mrs. S. J. S. Garnet, who for years was a principal of one of the public schools of Greater New York; the late Mrs. Emma Thomas, who also was a teacher; Mrs. Clara T. S. Brown, a successful teacher of music in Brooklyn, and Miss Mary Smith, who became quite successful in business.  Doctor Steward was given excellent educational advantages in the days of her girlhood in Brooklyn, and upon completing a normal course became engaged as a teacher at Washington, D. C.  In the meantime she had been devoting her leisure to the study of medicine and two years later entered the New York Medical College, from which she was graduated in 1870, valedictorian of her class.  She later attended clinics at Bellevue Hospital, in the meantime engaging in practice in Brooklyn, and in 1878 took a post-graduate course in the Long Island Hospital and College.  After her first marriage she continued in practice in Brooklyn, her practice not being limited by color or creed.  She was a member of the Kings County Homeopathic Society and of the New York State Medical Society.  In addition to her knowledge of medicine.  Doctor Steward was also a musician of skill and for twenty-eight years served as organist of the Bridge Street African Methodist Episcopal church and for two years, of the Bethany Baptist church.  Her removal from Brooklyn was the outcome of her marriage to Chaplain Steward.  After that marriage in 1896 she was for a time stationed with the Chaplain in the West and in 1898, when it became known that he would have to go with his regiment to the Philippines, she located at Wilberforce, where she resumed the practice of her profession and was thus engaged there until her husband's return in 1902, when she rejoined him and was with him in Western army posts, still practicing, however, until his retirement and return to Wilberforce in 1907.  Upon her return to Wilberforce she resumed her practice and in that same year was made resident physician and member of the faculty of the university, both she and her husband thus devoting their energies to that institution.  In addition to her membership in the New York medical societies noted above.  Doctor Steward was a member of the Ohio State Medical Society.  She took an active interest in the work of the Red Cross Society and of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and proved a strong force for good among the young women of the university community.  She had written and read numerous papers before the various medical societies with which she was affiliated; in 1911 read a paper on "Colored Women in America" before the Inter-racial Congress held in London in that year, and in 1914 read a paper, "Woman in Medicine," before the meeting of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs at Wilberforce.  This latter paper was published in pamphlet form and has had wide circulation.  She was buried in Greenwood cemetery, Brooklyn. New York.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 968
` DANIEL McMILLAN STEWART.    Daniel McMillan Stewart, veteran of the Civil War, banker, former member of the city council and for many years actively identified with the various interests of his home town and of Greene county in general, and who is now living practically retired from the more active affairs of life in his pleasant home at Xenia, is one of Greene county's native sons and has maintained his home here all his life, though formerly and for some years his business interests required that he spend much of his time in the West.  He was born on a farm on the Jamestown pike, just one mile east of the court house in Xenia, Mar. 17, 1840, son of William H. and Esther (McMillan) Stewart, both of whom were born in South Carolina, members of families that became pioneers in Greene county.
     William H. Stewart was born at York, South Carolina, in 1809, and was nine years of age when his parents.  Samuel and Elizabeth (Hart) Stewart, left that section, where they also had been born, and came over into this section of Ohio in 1818, settling on what is now known as the Collins farm on the Jamestown pike in this county.  Samuel Stewart and his wife were members of the old Associate Reformed church, which after the "union" of 1858 became merged with the Associate church, the two forming the United Presbyterian church, and were bitterly opposed to the institution of slavery which had become fastened upon their native state and thus they disposed of their interests in South Carolina and came out into a free state.  Upon his arrival here Samuel Stewart became the owner of two hundred acres of wood tract and with the assistance of his four elder sons cleared and developed the same.  He was an ardent Abolitionist and took an active part in the anti-slavery agitation of his day.  The few slaves which had come to him in his native state he brought out here with him and gave them their freedom.  He lived for more than twenty-five years after coming to Greene county, his death occurring in 1846. He and his wife were active in the work of the Associated Reformed church and their children were reared in that faith.  There were twelve of these children, all of whom lived to rear families of their own, except one, who died unmarried.
     William H. Stewart grew up here a tall, raw-boned man of sinewy frame and of great muscular strength.  He received but limited schooling in his youth, but by self-study in after years became a very well-informed man.  Much of the time during his youth was spent with his ax in the woods.   At that time the nearest real market was at Cincinnati, sixty-five miles away, and occasional trips would have to be made there for supplies.  When about twenty-five years of age he married and located on a farm of one hundred acres on the Jamestown pike, one mile east of the court house in Xenia, established his home there and on that place all his children were born.  When the Pennsylvania railroad came along and cut through his farm he left the place and bought a tract of one hundred and seventeen acres, the old Adams place, in the neighborhood of Cedarville, where he remained until 1870, in which year he retired from the farm and moved to Xenia, establishing his home in King street,, where he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring there on Apr. 23, 18S9, he then being past seventy-eight years of age.  William H. Stewart had become a Republican upon the formation of that party.  Reared as an adherent of the Associate Reformed church, he later became a member of the Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanter) church.
     William H. Stewart was twice married, his first wife, Esther McMillan, having died in 1856, after which he married Eliza Bradford, who survived him many years, her death occurring in 1912.  That second union was without issue.  Esther McMillan was born at Chester, South Carolina, Sept. 14, 1814, daughter of Daniel and Jeannette B. (Chestnut) McMillan, who became residents of Greene county in 1832 and here spent the remainder of their lives.  Daniel McMillan was born in County Antrim, Ireland, on Aug. I, 1776, son of Hugh and Jane (Harvey) McMillan, natives of that same county, the former born in 1750, who were married there in 1775 and who came to this country in 1786, settling in South Carolina.  Hugh McMillan and his wife were members of the Covenanter (Reformed Presbyterian) church and with four other families of that same faith decided to emigrate to the newly established United States of America.  After an ocean voyage of nine weeks they landed at Charleston and shortly afterward located in the Chester district, in South Carolina, where they purchased land and established a church of their faith.  Hugh McMillan died there on Jan. 5, 1818, at the age of sixty-six years.  His widow survived him until 1825, she being seventy-five years of age at the time of her death.  They were the parents of seven children, Daniel, John, Mary, Gavin, David, James and Hugh.
     Daniel McMillan was ten years of age when he came with his parents to this country and his youth was spent on the farm on Rocky creek, in the Chester district of South Carolina, remaining on that farm until 1794, when the family moved to a farm which the father had bought on Bull run, in the same neighborhood.  When twelve years of age Daniel McMillan fell and suffered a fracture of the thigh bone, the accident rendering him a cripple.  When eighteen years of age he suffered a second fracture of the same bone and thereafter was compelled to use both a crutch and a staff.  He began teaching school and for eight years thereafter was engaged in teaching.  In the meantime, in the spring of 1806, he married and, having saved the sum of five hundred dollars, engaged in the mercantile business in partnership with his wife's brother, James Chestnut.  In 1830 Hugh and Gavin McMillan, his brothers, came over into Ohio on a mission in behalf of the Reformed Presbyterian church and while visiting the church of that faith in Greene county became greatly impressed by the outlook in this region.  Upon their return home so enthusiastic were their praises concerning the settlement here that the whole family decided to come out here, and in 1832 the sons of the elder Hugh McMillan, with their respective families, came to Greene county.  Daniel McMillan bought an improved farm a mile and half east of Xenia and there spent the rest of his life.  He was an elder in the Reformed Presbyterian church and enthusiastic in its service, riding horseback to Pittsburgh to attend the presbyterial meetings of the same.  An ardent Abolitionist, he had freed the slaves his wife had inherited, to the number of one hundred, and upon coming here became one of the active "conductors" on the "underground railroad," furnishing teams and other means to aid in the transportation of runaway slaves to free soil.
     It was on Mar. 11, 1806 that Daniel McMillan was united in marriage to Jeannette B. Chestnut, who was then not sixteen years of age.  She was a daughter of Col. James and Esther (Stormont) Chestnut, who lived eight miles north of Rocky Creek, in the Chester district of South Carolina.  Col. James Chestnut, who was an officer of the patriot army during the Revolutionary War, was at one time captured and was sentenced by the Tories to be hanged.  The place of execution was fixed, but before the hour for the same came around a party of General Washington's soldiers appeared on the scene and rescued him.  To Daniel and Jeannette B. (Chestnut) McMillan were born twelve children, of whom ten lived to maturity, namely: Jane, who married the Rev. Ebenezer Cooper, a minister of the Reformed Presbyterian church, and died in 1888; James C., born in 1810, who also became an active church worker and who was thrice married, his first wife having been Margaret Millen, his second, Christiana Moody, and his third, Mary Reece; Mary, who married the Rev. Robert McCoy, a minister of the Reformed Presbyterian church, and died without issue; Esther, mother of the subject of this biographical review; Martha, born in 1817, who married Samuel Dallas and died on Feb. 27, 1898; Margaret, who married David Millen, of Xenia, and died without issue; Nancy S., born in 1822, who married Joseph Kendall, a farmer of Greene county; the Rev. John McMillan, born in 1826, who married Elizabeth Walton, was for years the pastor of the Reformed Presbyterian church at the corner of Fifteenth and Lombard streets, Philadelphia, and who died on Aug. 30, 1882; Jeanette, born in 1829, who married James D. Liggett, a Xenia lawyer and onetime editor of the Xenia Torchlight, and Daniel, born on May 6, 1832, who married Elizabeth Bennett and became a farmer and stockman in this county.  William H. Stewart and Esther McMillan were united in marriage on May 6, 1837, and to that union were born eight children, of whom Daniel M. Stewartr is now the only survivor.  Four of these children died in infancy, one died at the age of twenty years, another died at the age of twenty-one, and the other, James R. Stewart, who married Rachel Dallas, spent his last days at Springfield, Missouri, his death occurring there on Apr. 24, 1912.
     Daniel McMillan Stewart spent his early youth on the home farm on the Cedarville pike and was fourteen yeas of age when his father moved to the Cedarville neighborhood in 1854, after which he attended the Cedarville schools, there coming under the instruction of Professor Orr and James Turnbull.  He later attended a couple of terms at the Urbana Institute and in 1860 matriculated at Monmouth College, but was taken ill with diphtheria at the outset of his college career and was compelled to return home, where for sometime afterward he was in a poor state of health.  When the Civil war broke out he desired to enlist, but was unable to do so on account of the state of his health.  He was able, however, later to enter the service with the hundred-day men and thus served as a member of Company F, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Stewart returned home and became engaged in farming, his father giving him the old home place east of Xenia.  He later became engaged in the real estate and insurance business at Xenia, buying his grandfather's farms of three hundred and sixty-five acres, disposed of them and bought a farm in Champaign county and has ever since been more or less engaged in the real-estate business in and about Xenia.  After his marriage in 1877 he established his home in Xenia, where his wife planned the erection of the brick house at 114 West Third street, where he still lives, and that has ever since been his established home, though for some years afterward much of his time was spent in the West.  It was about the time of his marriage that Mr. Stewart became engaged as an agent for the sale of railroad lands along the line of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad and he was thus engaged for seven years, or until the lands were closed out.  He then became engaged in the lead-mining business at Joplin, Missouri, and after operating with more or less success in that section for fifteen years "struck it rich" when he opened the "Get There" mine at Webb City, Missouri, which he developed and operated for three years, at the end of which time he leased the mine and later, in 1896, sold it.  Since that time Mr. Stewart has devoted his time to  his real-estate and other interests in and about Xenia.  For years he has been a member of the board of directors of the Xenia National Bank, for the past fifteen years vice-president of the same.  Mr. Stewart is a Republican and for twelve years served as a member of the board of trustees of the Xenia Theological Seminary.  Mr. Stewart is a member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic.
     On Jan. 1, 1877, Daniel M. Stewart was united in marriage to Harriet Bonner, who was born on a farm on the lower Bellbrook pike, in Xenia township, this county, and who died in April, 1908, at her home in Xenia.  Mrs. Stewart was a daughter of the Rev. James R. and Martha (Gowdy) Bonner, the former of whom at the time of her birth was pastor of the First Reformed Presbyterian church at Xenia and the latter of whom was a member of the numerous Gowdy family which came up here from Kentucky in 1806.  To Mr. and Mrs. Stewart one child was born, a daughter, Lunette Belle, who was graduated from the seminary at Washington, Pennsylvania, and who on Dec. 24, 1906, was united in marriage to Charles Murdock Kelso, a consulting engineer and contractor, of Dayton.  Mr. and Mrs. Kelso have one child, a daughter, Mary Stewart Kelso, born on Sept. 5, 1909, whom Mr. Stewart regards as "the apple of his eye."
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 80


P. M. Stewart
PERRY M. STEWART.    Perry M. Stewart, president of the Miami Deposit Bank of Yellow Springs, this county, and former treasurer of Clark county, is a native son of the Buckeye state and has lived here all his life.  He was born on a farm in the vicinity of the village of Salem, in Greene township, in the neighboring county of Clark, July 6, 1866, son of the Hon. Perry and Rhoda (Wheeler) Stewart, both of whom also were born in that county, the former on June 6, 1818, and the latter, Dec. 30, 1824, and whose last days were spent at Springfield, county seat of their home county.
     The Hon. Perry Stewart, a veteran of the Civil War, a former member of the board of county commissioners of his home county and a one-time representative in the state Legislature from that district, spent all his life in his home county.  He was born on a pioneer farm in Greene township and there grew to manhood, becoming in time a substantial farmer on his own account.  On Oct. 15, 1844, he was united in marriage to Rhoda Wheeler, who also was born in that county, and after his marriage established his home on the old home farm, where he was living when the Civil War broke out.  He helped to raise a company and went to the front in 1862 as captain of Company A, Ninety-fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and with that company served until the close of the war in 1865.  Upon the completion of his military service Captain Stewart returned home and resumed his farming operations, in which he became quite successful.  He was an active Republican and took an interested part in local public affairs, for six years representing his district as a member of the board of county commissioners.  He later was elected to represent his legislative district in the lower house of the Ohio General Assembly and so satisfactory was his service in that connection that he was re-elected and thus served for two terms in that important office.  Upon his retirement from the active duties of the farm Captain Stewart moved to Springfield, where both he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives, her death occurring there in July, 1904, and his, in 1907.  They were the parents of ten children, namely: Henrietta E., wife of James Hatfield, of Greene township, Clark county; Julia A., now living in California, widow of Robert N. Elder; David W., who married Amanda McClintock and is living in Clark county; John T., who married Anna M. Keifer and is now living in Houston, Texas; Mary E., who married Samuel H. Kerr and who, as well as her husband, is now deceased; Charles F., a member of the present board of county commissioners of Clark county, who married Clara Garlough and is living at Springfield; Jane, who married George Nicholson and who, as well as her husband, is now deceased; Jessie, who died at the age of four years; Perry M., the subject of this biographical sketch, and E. Wheeler, who married Nettie Shobe and is living on a farm in the neighborhood of the old home in Greene township.
     Perry M. Stewart was reared on the home farm in Clark county and upon completing the course in the local common school entered Antioch College and there studied for two years.  For a few years thereafter he continued his place on the farm, taking the active management of the same for his father and then gave up farming and became engaged in the mercantile business in the neighboring village of Selma, employed there in a grocery and general merchandise store, and was thus engaged there for two years, at the end of which time he accepted a position as deputy in the office of the county auditor at Springfield, where he remained for two years, 1893-95, later accepting a position as deputy county treasurer and thus continued in the court house for another four years.  In 1900 Mr. Stewart was elected county treasurer, his term of office beginning in 1901, and this gave him another four-years tenure in the court house at Springfield.  Upon the completion of that term of service, in 1905, he moved to Yellow Springs, helped to organize there the Miami Deposit Bank and has ever since been engaged in the banking business at that place.  The Miami Deposit Bank was organized with a capital stock of twenty-five thousand dollars and has done well, as will be noted in a review of that sound financial institution presented in the historical section of this work.  Mr. Stewart is a thirty-second-degree (Scottish Rite) Mason, affiliated with the consistory at Dayton, and is also a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias.  Politically, he is a Republican.
     On Oct. 16, 1901, Perry M. Stewart was united in marriage to Irene B. Black, daughter of Charles R. and Mary A. Black, of Linden, Ross county, Ohio, and to this union have been born three children, Mildred, born in 1903; Russell B., 1905, and Mary E., 1908.  Mr. and Mrs. Stewart are members of the Presbyterian church.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 224

NOTES:

 

 
CLICK HERE to RETURN to
GREENE COUNTY, OHIO
INDEX PAGE
CLICK HERE to RETURN to
OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS
INDEX PAGE
FREE GENEALOGY RESEARCH is My MISSION
GENEALOGY EXPRESS
This Webpage has been created by Sharon Wick exclusively for Genealogy Express  2008
Submitters retain all copyrights