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Greene County, Ohio
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BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Greene County, Ohio,
its people, industries & institutions
by Hon. M. A. Broadstone, Editor in Chief -
Vol. I. & II.
Publ. B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc.,
 Indianapolis, Ind.
1918
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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  CHARLES DILL DOBBINS.   The late Charles Dill Dobbins, who died at his farm home on the line between Cedarville and Ross township on Jan. 10, 1909, was a native son of Ohio and all his life was spent in this state, a resident of Greene county since the time of his marriage in 1876.  He was born in the city of Lima, county seat of Allen county, Mar. 10, 1853, son of Hugh and Mary (Elwell) Dobbins, the latter of whom was born and reared in Clark county, this state.
     Hugh Dobbins was born in Pennsylvania and was twelve years of age when he came to Ohio with his parents, the family settling in Allen county, where he grew to manhood and became a farmer and landowner and served for fourteen years as auditor of the county.  After his marriage he moved to Lima and later lived at Yellow Springs.  For years he was a Republican, but in his later years espoused the cause of the Prohibition party.  He and his family were Presbyterians.  Hugh Dobbins was twice married, and by his first wife, Mary Elwell, was the father of four children, of whom the subject of this memorial sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being Chalmers, also deceased; Libbie, wife of Clark Funston of Yellow springs, this county; and James, a farmer, living in the vicinity of Ada, this state.  The mother of the children died in 1856 and Hugh Dobbins later married Mary Funston, who died in 1908.  The latter marriage was without issue.
     Charles D. Dobbins was reared on the farm and completed his early schooling at Ada.  He plowed the first furrow for the foundation of the main building of the Ohio Northern University and later entered the college, pursuing his studies there with a vew of entering the gospel ministry, but failing health interrupted his studies and he did not finish the course.  After his marriage in 1876 Mr. Dobbins made his home in Greene county, buying here the farm of one hundred and fifty-two acres on the line between Cedarville and Ross township where he spent the rest of his life.  In addition to his general farming he gave considerable attention to the raising of live stock, with particular reference to pure-bred Merino sheep and Poland China hogs.  Originally a Republican, Mr. Dobbins in his later years became a Prohibitionist.
     On Oct. 25, 1876, Charles D. Dobbins was united in marriage to Flora E. Turnbull who was born in this country and who survives her husband, now making her home in Cedarville, to which place she moved in 1911 and bought a home on North Main street.  She is a member of the United Presbyterian church at Cedarville, as was her husband.  To Charles D. and Flora E. (Turnbull) Dobbins were born seven children, namely:  Orlando who married Alta Spangler and is living on the home place, a part of which he is farming; Alma, wife of Harry King, a farmer, living at Washington Court House, in the neighboring county of Fayette; Mary, wife of Omer Burrell, of Springfield, in the neighboring county of Clark; Hattie, wife of Denver Wisecup, of Oxford, this state; Max Elwell, who died at the age of two years, and Zelpha, who is living with her mother at Cedarville.
     Mrs. Dobbins was born in Cedarville township, a daughter of Samuel K. and Catherine (Funston) Turnbull, both now deceased, the latter of whom died Sept. 5, 1913, she then being eighty-six years of age, and the former, Jan. 5, 1917, he then being in the eighty-eighth year of his age.  Samuel Kyle Turnbull, further reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume, also was born in Cedarville township, a son of John and Margaret (Kyle) Turnbull, the former of whom was a son of William Turnbull and wife, who had come up here with their family from the vicinity of Nashville, Tennessee, and had settled in Cedarville township in the early days of the settlement of that region, all of which, together with further details of the history of the Turnbull family in Greene county, is set out at considerable length elsewhere.  The stone house erected by William Turnbull upon coming to this county is still standing, now owned by the Fowler family, on the Columbus-Cincinnati pike, about three miles southwest of Cedarville.  Catherine Funston was born in the neighboring county of Clark, a daughter of John and Keziah (Scott) Funston, the latter of whom was a daughter of Thomas Scott, who had come up here into Ohio from the vicinity of Lexington, Kentucky, and had settled in Clark county, not far north of the Greene county line.  John Funston was a son of Paul Funston, whose parents had come to this county from Ireland.  To Samuel K. and Catherine (Funston) Turnbull were born four children, those besides Mrs. Dobbins being John Edwin Turnbull, who is living on the home place in Cedarville township; Fannie, wife of Charles Barber, of Cedarville, and Melda, who married Edwin Bull and who, as well as her husband, is now decease.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 786

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