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Greene County, Ohio
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BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
History of Greene County, Ohio,
its people, industries & institutions
by Hon. M. A. Broadstone, Editor in Chief -
Vol. I. & II.
Publ. B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc.,
 Indianapolis, Ind.
1918
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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  DAN BAKER.  Until he recently sold his old home place and moved to the village of Yellow Springs with a view of retiring from the active labors of the farm and "taking things easy" the rest of his life, Dan Baker, a veteran of the Civil War and one of the oldest residents of Miami township, had lived from the day of his birth on the place on which he was born, three and one-half miles southeast of Yellow Springs, the place on which his father had settled in 1828, and had been quite content there to remain.  He was born in a log house there on Apr. 20, 1839, son of Nayl and Huldah (Mills) Baker, who had taken up their residence there ten years or more before.
     Nayl Baker was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and was sixteen years of age when he came with his parents, Thomas Baker and wife, Quakers, from that state of Ohio, the family settling in Greene county in 1812.  Here he took his part as a young man in the development of a pioneer farm and presently began farming on his own account.  On Jan. 6, 1825, Nayl Baker was united in marriage to Huldah Mills, who was born in Montgomery county in 1802, a daughter of Jacob Mills and wife, who were among the first settlers in this section of the Miami valley.  Jacob Mills became a resident of the northern part of this county and when Miami township was organized in 1808 he was elected the first justice of the peace in and for that township.  Miami township then included the northern portions of what are now Cedarville and Ross townships, in this county, and about one-third of Mad River township, all of Greene township and one-half of Madison township, in Clark county.  The first election was held in the house of David S. Brodick at Yellow Springs.  In 1828, three years after his marriage, Nayl Baker settled on the farm which his son Dan has just recently sold and there he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives.  He died in 1865 and was buried in the Clifton cemetery.  He and his wife were the parents of nine children, one of whom died in childhood, and of whom but two now survive, Dan Baker having a brother, William Baker, living in California.  The others were Sarah, Thomas, Jacob, Rachel, Mary and Letitia.
     Dan Baker grew up on the farm on which he was born and helped to develop the same.  During the progress of the Civil War he joined the Home Guard and later went to the front in the hundred-days service.  He always made his home on the home place and after his marriage in 1872 established his home there and continued there to reside until in November, 1917, when he sold the place preparatory to retirement from further active labors and removed to Yellow Springs.  Mr. Baker is a Republican and for twenty-two years served as school director in his home district and also for some time as a director of the village schools at Clifton.  He is a member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic and is a member of the Presbyterian church.  Though now in his eightieth year Mr. Baker retains much of his aforetime physical vigor and is hale and hearty beyond his years.
     On Feb. 22, 1872, Dan Baker was united in marriage to Susan E. Waymire, daughter of Daniel and Mary Anna (Stebbins) Waymire, of Dayton, both of whom were also born in this state and who were the parents of six children, Mrs. Baker having had two brothers, John and Daniel, and three sisters, Mary, Elizabeth and AnnaMrs. Baker died on Nov. 8, 1907.  To her and her husband were born seven children, namely: Joseph, deceased: Huldah, deceased; Mrs. Mary Donovan, of this county; John, deceased; Mrs. Bessie Dallas, who lives near Xenia and has one child, a son, Donald; and Evan, who is married and resides in Springfield.  To Evan Baker and wife four children have been born, one of whom, Harold, is deceased, the others being Mildred. Thelma and Gladys.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 412


Mr. & Mrs.
George Baker
GEORGE BAKER.  The late George Baker, a veteran of the Civil War and for years one of the best known farmers in Miami township, this county, was born in that township and most of his life was spent there, two of his sons and a daughter now occupying the old home place three miles west of Yellow Springs which their father bought in 1881 and on which he spent his last days.  He was born on a pioneer farm one mile south of Yellow Springs on Nov. 14, 1831, son of Isaac and Eliza (Graham) Baker, the latter of whom also was born in this county, Sept. 27, 1809, a member of one of the pioneer families of Greene county.
     Isaac Baker was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, May 3, 1807.  and became one of the early settlers of Greene county, establishing his home here after his marriage to Eliza Graham.  He and his wife reared their family here and here spent the remainder of their lives.  They were the parents of nine children, of whom the subject of this memorial sketch was the first-born, the others being Mrs. Louise Hawkins, deceased; John, who was killed in the battle of Cedar Creek on Oct. 19, 1864, while serving as a soldier of the Union during the Civil War; William P., who died on July 1, 1907; Brinton, who is still living, making his home now at Dayton; Joseph, who is now living at Pratt, Kansas; Mrs. Hester Hutchinson, who is living at Yellow Springs, in this county; Sarah, who died in 1868, and Charles West, who died on Apr. 14, 1914.  Five of these brothers served in the Union army during the Civil War.
     Reared on the home farm in Miami township, George Baker received his schooling in the neighborhood schools at Yellow Springs and early learned the trade of blacksmith at which he worked, at Yellow Springs and at Salem, until he was twenty-five years of age, when, in 1856, he joined that considerable band of Green county young men, including Senator Plum and Captain Frazer, who went to Kansas in 1856 and started things going in the vicinity of where the flourishing city of Emporia now stands.  George Baker set up the first blacksmith shop in Emporia and remained there for three years, or until 1859, being thus an active participant in the desperate struggle that then was being waged in "bleeding Kansas" between the free-soilers who wanted to preserve the Territory of Kansas against the intrusion of the institution of slavery and the "border ruffians" who, coming in from Missouri, across the river and from other points south, were determined to fasten slavery on the prospective state.  The struggle finally became so acute that Mr. Baker, in 1859, became disgusted with the unsettled condition of things and came back home and resumed his labors as a blacksmith at Yellow Springs and was living there when the Civil War broke out.  Early in the progress of that struggle between the states he enlisted his services in behalf of the Union and went to the front as a member of the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served until the termination of his term of enlistment, when he returned home and started farming; but a short time later he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Eighty-fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served until the close of the war, then returned to his farm and there remained until Jan. 3, 1881,when he bough a farm of one hundred acres three miles west of Yellow springs, moved onto the same and there spent the rest of his life, his death occurring on Feb. 6, 1890.  His widow survived him for more than twenty years, her death occurring on Jan. 18, 1911.  George Baker was reared in the Methodist church and his wife was reared in the Catholic church, and their children were reared in the faith of the latter communion.
     On Sept. 14, 1864, at Springfield, George Baker was united in marriage to Elizabeth Higginson, of Yellow springs, who was born in Ireland, but whose girlhood was spent at Albany, New York, where she was living when her family came from that place to Greene county during the '50s.  To that union five children were born, namely: John Wentworth, who died in 1866; Mamie C., who is still living on the old home place, keeping house for her brothers, William and George, who are farming the place; William J. and Elizabeth (twins), the latter of whom is now a nun, a member of the Visitation Order, in the convent at Georgetown, Kentucky, and the farmer of whom is noted above as remaining on the home farm, and George, who is also living on the home place, he and his brother operating the same, while their sister Mamie keeps house for them.  The Baker brothers are good farmers and have a well-kept and profitably cultivated farm.  They are Republicans, as was their soldier, and take a proper interest in local civic affairs, but have not been seekers after public office.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind., 1918 - Page 288-290
  HENRY F. BAKER, M. D.   Dr. Henry F. Baker, of Yellow Springs, the oldest practicing physician in Greene county, has been a continuous resident of the village in which he is now living for nearly forty years, with the exception of about three years during the early '80s, when, on account of the declining state of his wife's health, it was necessary to seek a temporary change of scene.  In August 1879, Doctor Baker located at Yellow Springs.  In 1881 he left, but in 1884 returned to the village and has since made that his place of residence, engaged in the practice of his profession.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 430-431
  JUSTUS LABAN BAKER.  The late Justus Laban Baker, who died at his farm home in Silvercreek township in the fall of 1895, and whose widow is still living there, was born in that township on June 15, 1844, son of Jacob and Lorena (Haughey) Baker, well-known residents of that township, whose last days were spent there.  Jacob Baker and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and were the parents of three children, of whom the subject of this memorial sketch was the first-born.
     Reared on the home farm in Silvercreek township, Justice L. Baker received his schooling in the local schools and remained at home until after his marriage when twenty-one years of age.  Trained as a farmer from the days of his boyhood, he ever followed that vocation and at the time of his death had the farm property of sixty-six acres, on which his widow is still living and the operation of which is being carried on by his son-in-law, George W. Buckwalter.  Mr. Baker was a Republican and had held minor public offices in his home township, particularly school offices.  He was a member of the Baptist church at Jamestown, as is his widow.  Mr. Baker died on Nov. 21, 1895, he then being in the fifty-second year of his age.
     On Feb. 1, 1866, Justice L. Baker was united in marriage to Mary Ellen Smith, who was born in Frederick county, Virginia, and who had come here in 1865 with her parents, John and Maria (Keiter) Smith, the family locating in Silvercreek township.  For a year after coming to this county John Smith rented a farm and then he bought the farm on which W. F. Lewis now resides and there he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring on Feb. 12, 1880.  He was born on June 19, 1806.  His widow, who was born on May 6, 1806, survived him for more than four years, her death occuring on July 10 1884.  She was a member of the Presbyterian church.  John Smith and wife were the parents of seven children, of whom Mrs. Baker was the fourth in order of birth.
     To Justus L. and Mary L. (Smith) Baker were born ten children, namely:  Elma Rosella who is now living in the state of Oklahoma, widow of Grant Bush; George O.; Anna Lorena, who died in the days of her girlhood; John Isaac, who married Eva Gerrard; Emma J., who married George W. Buckwalter and is living on the home place; James Franklin, who married Eva Hargraves and is farming in Jefferson township, this county; William J., who married Sarah Johnson and also is farming in Jefferson township; Wilbur C., who married Bertha Seslar and is farming in the neighboring county of Fayette; Zola, deceased, and Laban, who died in infancy.  They have sixty-six acres.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 722-723


Mr. & Mrs.
Samuel T. Baker


Amos Wilson
Creswell

SAMUEL T. BAKERSamuel T. Baker, farmer and stockman, a soldier of the Civil War, president of the Greene County Fair Association, former mayor of Jamestown and former township trustee, has been a resident of this county all his life.  He was born on a farm on the Xenia-Jamestown pike, one mile west of Jamestown, Mar. 17, 1847, son of John Winans and Elizabeth (Towell) Baker, the latter of whom also was born in this county, in Silvercreek township, in 1813, daughter of John and Sarah Towell, pioneers of that section, who had come here from Pennsylvania.  John Towell was regarded as the strongest man in Greene county in his generation and he died as a result of putting his great strength to an excessive test.  On a wager he carried four bushels of wheat up a stairway in a mill, but the strain was too much and he died shortly afterward, leaving his widow with four small children, of whom Mr. Baker's mother was the youngest, the others being John, who became known as Squire Towell and lived in Ross township, Samuel, who moved to Indiana, and Mrs. Caanan Brouse, who also moved to Indiana.  The Widow Towell did not remarry and lived to be ninety-six years of age.
     John Winans Baker was born in Kentucky in 1814 and was but a child when his parents, John and Mary (Winans) Baker, came up here with their family in 1816 and settled in the immediate vicinity of Jamestown, where John Baker built a large house and became a considerable landowner.  He did a large business in hauling to Cincinnati.  He and his wife were Methodists and were the parents of thirteen children, Mathias, George, William, Douglas, John Winans, Hilary, Jacob, Andrew, Mary and four daughters who died young.  John Winans Baker grew up in the Jamestown neighborhood and after his marriage became engaged in the grocery business at Jamestown, remaining there until his sons were grown, when he moved to his farm southeast of the village.  Upon his retirement he and his wife moved to Columbus, where in 1900 Mrs. Baker died from the effect of injuries received in a fall down a cellarway, she then being eighty-seven years of age.  A year later John W. Baker fell down stairs and received injuries from which he died on Christmas Day, 1901.  They were Methodists and he was a charter member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Jamestown.  John W. Baker and wife were the parents of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fifth in order of birth, the others being the following:
James, who died in his youth;  Sarah, now living at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, widow of James Alexander; William Raper, of Xenia; John H., who died at Columbus; Erastus Frank, who died at Chicago; Isadora, who died at the age of four years, and Arvilla, who is the widow of Willis H. Dye and is now living in Florida.
     Samuel T. Baker was reared at Jamestown, where he received his schooling and became familiar with the details of the grocery business in his father's store.  He was but a boy when the Civil War brook out and in January, 1864, he then not being seventeen years of age, he enlisted for service as a member of Company A, Seventy-fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and became an orderly to Major-Gen. Charles T. Walcott, commanding the First Division of the Fourteenth Army Corps, and while thus detailed went with Sherman's army to the sea and participated in the Grand Review at Washington, being mustered out at the close of the war.  Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Baker returned home and not long afterward opened a grocery store at Grape Grove, but presently returned to Jamestown and was there engaged in the grocery business for three years, at the end of which time he and Alf Johnson started a horse-breeding farm just east of the village, making a specialty of breeding and training saddle, draft and coach horses.  For twenty-five years Mr. Baker exhibited his horses at county and state fairs and in show rings and acted as judge and starter at race meets over a wide territory.  He also made a specialty of auctioneering at horse and general farm sales and for forty-five years followed that vocation throughout this section of Ohio and over in Indiana.  For the last five years Mr. Baker has been serving as president of the Greene County Fair Association.  On the place on which he lives, the old Amos W. Creswell farm east of Cedarville, Mr. Baker has in late years given much attention to the raising of registered Berkshire hogs and in 1913 was the winner of the grand champion sweepstakes for boars at the Ohio state fair.  Mr. Baker is a Republican, served for two terms as mayor of Jamestown and for two terms as township trustee.  He and his wife are members of the Reformed Presbyterian church at Cedarville.
     Mr. Baker has been twice married.  In 1868 he was united in marriage to Sarah Rebecca Townsley, a member of one of Greene county's pioneer families, and to that union two children were born,  Harry T., now living at Columbus and Raymond, now living at Cincinnati.  The mother of these sons died in 1898 and on Oct. 9, 1901, Mr. Baker married Ada L. Creswell, who also was born in this county, daughter of Amos W. and Rebecca (Ward) Creswell, who were the parents of five children, but two of whom, Mrs. Baker and William Ward Creswell, grew to maturity.  Mrs. Baker is connected with two of the oldest families in Greene county.  She completed her schooling in the college at Delaware, this state.  Her father, Amos W. Creswell, who was the owner of five hundred acres of land east of Cedarville, a part of which tract is now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Baker, was born in that same neighborhood on Mar. 13, 1827, son of Samuel and Letitia (Wilson) Creswell, the latter of whom, born in 1802, was a daughter of Amos Wilson, who, with his brother, Major Daniel Wilson, is traditionally said to have been the first permanent white settler in the region that came to be organized as Greene county, Amos Wilson being credited with having built the first house in the county, which he later sold to his brother Daniel, all of which is set out elsewhere in this work.  The Creswells also have been here since the days before the organization of the county, as is set out at length elsewhere.  Amos Wilson Creswell, father of Mrs. Baker, was a grandson of James and Catherine Creswell, the former of whom was killed by Indians in Kentucky, after which his widow and her  children, two sons and five daughters, came up here and settled on what is now the Andrew Jackson farm in Cedarville township.  Samuel Creswell, born in 1778, was the fourth in order of birth of the children of this pioneer widow, the others having been Ann, who married Thomas Spence and had three children: Margaret, who married John McClellan and had six children; Betsy, who married Daniel Boyles; Catherine, who married William McClellan; Sarah, who married Simon Bromagem, and James, who married Ann JunkinSamuel Creswell was a soldier of the second war with England, 1812.  To Samuel and Letitia (Wilson) Creswell were born five children, namely: James, born in 1821, who married Ellen Cregor and moved to Crawford county, Illinois, where he died in 1895; Ann, born in 1823, who remained unmarried, making her home with her brother Amos and died in 1904; Samuel R., born in 1825, who died at the age of sixteen years; Amos W., father of Mrs. Baker, and Benoni, born in 1828, who married Mary Jane Marshall and spent all his life in Cedarville township, his death occurring in 1914.  Amos Wilson Creswell was twice married.  In 1864 he was united in marriage to Hannah Rebecca Ward, who was born on Apr. 27, 1841, and to that union were born five children, of whom Mrs. Baker, the first-born, was born on Nov. 24, 1865, the others being William Ward, born on Dec. 1, 1867, who married Ethel May Fields; Samuel Lee, born in 1870, who died in 1877; one who died in infancy in 1872, and Anna Luella, born in 1873, who died at the age of six months.  The mother of these children died on Jan. 26, 1875, and Mr. Creswell later married Mrs. Margaret A. Raney, a daughter of J. N. Townsley.  He died on Dec. 20, 1899, and the brick house he erected on his farm in 1878 is now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Baker.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 788
  WILLIAM R. BAKER.   William R. Baker, a veteran of the Civil War, former auditor of Greene county and formerly and for years engaged in the mercantile business in Xenia, in which city he is now living retired, is a native son of Greene county, born on a farm in Silvercreek township, one mile west of the village of Jamestown, Aug. 31, 1841, a son of John W. and Elizabeth (Towell) Baker, the former of whom was born in Kentucky in 1814 and the latter, in Virginia, in 1813, who were married in this county and here established their home, many years later moving to Columbus, where their last days were spent.
     John W. Baker was a son of William and Dorothy (Winans) Baker and was fourteen years of age when he came to this county form Kentucky with his parents in 1828.  Two years previously William Baker had come up here from Kentucky on a visit to his kinsman, Doctor Winans who was at that time practicing his profession at Jamestown, then a hamlet of fewer than a dozen houses, and had been so favorably impressed by the promising conditions here that he decided to locate in this county.  Returning to Kentucky he disposed of his interests there and in 1828 came with his family and took up his permanent abode at Jamestown, where he erected a frame building on the site now occupied by Johnson's grocery store and there engaged in the manufacturing of harness.  Not long afterward he established a tavern at Jamestown and Bakers tavern was for years a popular stopping place both "for man and beast," a large yard and stable at the rear affording accommodations for the latter.  That tavern occupied the southeast corner of Main and Limestone streets.  William Baker and his wife were the parents of eight sons and three daughters and John W. Baker was the fifth son.  The latter grew to manhood at Jamestown and there married Elizabeth Towell, who, as noted above, was born in Virginia in 1813.  She was a daughter of John and Sarah Towell, the former of whom died in Virginia, his native state, after which his widow came with her children to Ohio and after a sometime residence at Xenia located at Jamestown.  After his marriage John W. Baker became engaged in the grocery business at Jamestown and remained there until his sons were well grown boys, when he moved to a farm he had bought in Sugarcreek township, south of Jamestown, where he remained until in the early '60s, when, in order to secure better advantages in the way of schooling for the younger daughter he moved to Columbus, where he again became engaged in the grocery business and was thus engaged until his retirement.  He and his wife spent their last days at Columbus, her death occurring there in 1900 and his, in 1901.  They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and their children were reared in that faith.  There were seven of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being Sarah E., widow of James Alexander, now living with her daughters in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; James C., who died in the days of his youth; John H., also now deceased; Samuel T., a veteran of the Civil War, who is living on his farm in the Cedarville neighborhood; Erastus F., w traveling salesman, who died at Chicago in 1914, and Clarissa A., wife of W. H. Dye now living in Florida.
     William R. Baker received his schooling in the schools of Jamestown and was a well-grown lad when his parents moved to the farm, where he was living when the Civil War broke out.  In October, 1861, he enlisted for service, a member of Company A, Seventy-fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served with that command for three years, or until the completion of his term of enlistment, being mustered out in the fall of 1864, when his younger brother Samuel took his place in the company.  During that period of service Mr. Baker was attached to the Army of the Cumberland, Fourteenth Army Corps, Second Division, Third Brigade, and was an orderly at division headquarters when mustered out.  He participated in many of the notable battles and engagements of the war, including those of Stone's River, Chickamauga, Jonesboro and the Atlanta campaign and upon the completion of that active service became an ambulance driver and thus continued his service until the close of the war.
     Not long after his return from army service Mr. Baker became employed as a clerk in the grocery store of H. H. Eavey at Xenia, beginning that employment in 1867, and two years later, in 1869, bought a half interest in the store.  Soon afterward the firm again was reorganized, Mr. Baker's brother-in-law, W. B. Harrison, buying his partner's interest, the firm then becoming Baker, Harrison & Company, and Mr. Baker continued thus engaged in the mercantile business until his election in the fall of 1883 to the office of auditor of Greene county.  He was retained in office, by successive reelections, until 1896, when he declined to be the further nominee of the party that had honored him by these successive nominations without opposition.  For four years after his retirement from the auditor's office Mr. Baker was engaged in prospecting in the Scioto oil fields and since then as been living practically retired, his chief attention being given to the management of a farm he owns in this county, making his home in the old W. B. Harrison residence at 202 East Market street.  He is a republican.
     Mr. Baker has been twice married.  On Mar. 1, 1876, he was united in marriage to Anna Harrison, who was born and reared in this county, her home having been about eight miles east of Xenia.  She was a daughter of James and Ruth (Hanna) Harrison and a sister of W. B. Harrison, who for years was a merchant and manufacturer at Xenia and a politician of more than local influence.  To that union were born two daughters, Florence B., who married Frank Wickersham and now lives in Denver, Colorado, and Jessie R., wife of J. A. Chew, managing editor of the Xenia Gazette.  The mother of these daughters died in October, 1892, and on Sept. 12, 1905, Mr. Baker married Mrs. Agnes (Garrett) Harrison, widow of the late W. B. Harrison, mentioned above.  Mrs. Baker was born at Wilmington, Delaware, a daughter of Elwood Garrett and wife, and was living in that city at the time of her marriage to Mr. Harrison, her home since then having been in Xenia.  Her father, Elwood Garrett, a Quaker, who died in 1910 at the great age of ninety-three years, was a photographer and was quite an inventor, he having put up the first telephone in use in the city of Wilmington.  Mr. and Mrs. Baker are members of the Church of Christ (Scientist) and Mr. Baker is a member of the Masonic order.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 782-784


William Ballard
WILLIAM BALLARD.   Among the farmers of New Jasper township whose influence, in a generation now past, lent stability to that community, there were few who left better memories at their passing than did the late William Ballard, who died at his home in that township in the fall of 1894 and whose daughter, Miss Luella Ballard, now a resident of the village of Jamestown, still owns the old home place of two hundred and twenty acres in New Jasper township. 
     William Ballard was a native son of Ohio and all his life was spent in this state.  He was born on a pioneer farm in Adams county on Mar. 23, 1811, son of the Rev. Lyman and Sarah (Hanover) Ballard, early settlers in that county, who later became residents of Greene county, where their last days were spent.  The Rev. Lyman Ballard was a native of the state of Massachusetts, born in November, 1783.  In the days of his young manhood he came to the then Territory of Ohio and located in Adams county, where he married Sarah Hanover and where he remained until 1822, in which year he came with his family up into Greene county and bought from William Frazer a tract of land in Ross township, about three miles north of the village of Jamestown, where he established his home and where he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives, his death occurring in June, 1873.  The Rev. Lyman Ballard is said to have been the first man in Ross township to own a wagon and four-horse team and when he used to go to mill, driving up to Clifton with his "grist," his neighbors would utilize this conveyance as a means of getting their "grist'' taken to mill, so that his wagon usually was well filled before he had gone far on his journey.  As a preacher in the old Bethel church he for years exerted a wholesome influence in the community.  He and his wife were the parents of seven children, of whom the subject of this memorial sketch was the second in order of birth, the others having been Joseph, Nathan, John, Elizabeth, Jackson and MartinJackson Ballard became the owner of the old homestead place in Ross township after his father's death.
     William Ballard was but eleven years of age when his parents settled with their family in this county in 1822, and he grew to manhood on the home place in Ross township.  He had begun his schooling in his native county of Adams and completed the same in the schools of Greene county; early became licensed to teach school and for some years spent his winters teaching in the local district schools.  After his marriage in the spring of 1842 Mr. Ballard and his wife began housekeeping in a house adjoining that of the former's father in Ross township, but after awhile moved to another farm in that same neighborhood and there resided until 1856, when they moved to the farm in New Jasper township referred to in the opening paragraph of this memorial, where both spent the remainder of their lives.  Willian Ballard was for many years director of schools in his home district.
     On Apr. 21, 1842, in Cedarville township, William Ballard was united in marriage to Margaret Cunningham, who was born in Rockbridge county, Virginia, Feb. 14. 1820, and who was but a child when her parents, James and Mary (Leach) Cunningham, came to Greene county with their family and settled in Cedarville township.  James Cunningham and wife were the parents of five children, Mrs. Ballard having had two brothers. Nelson and John, and two sisters, Martha and Sarah.  To William and Margaret (Cunningham) Ballard were born four children, namely: Rufus H., who died on Sept. 14. 1914, and is buried in the cemetery at Jamestown; Aniel M., who died on Sept. 22, 1874; Elizabeth, widow of S. F. Evans, and Luella, the latter of whom still retains the old home farm in New Jasper township, though now living at Jamestown, to which village she moved on Mar. 10, 1914, and where she lives with her sister, Mrs. Evans.  The mother of these children died on Oct. 9, 1862, about six years after the family moved to the New Jasper township farm, and was buried in the cemetery at Jamestown.  William Ballard survived her for many years; his death occurring on the old farm on Oct. 18, 1894, and his body also was laid in the burying ground at Jamestown.  He was well past eighty-three years of age at the time of his death and more than seventy years of his life had been spent in Greene county, which he came to know as well as any man in the county.  He had been twice married, on Mar. 1, 1865, having married Anna Ellis, of Clinton county, a daughter of Abraham and Sarah (Oglesbee) Ellis.  She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.  While Mr. Ballard never joined the church, he always aided church work with his means and influence.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio, Vol. II - publ. by  B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Ind.,
1918 - Page 452


Mr. & Mrs.
Clark K. Bickett
 

NOTES:

 

 
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