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Welcome to
Greene County, Ohio
History & Genealogy


BIOGRAPHIES
Transcribed by Sharon Wick

Source:
HISTORY of GREENE COUNTY, OHIO
Embracing the
Organization of the County, Its Division into Townships,
Sketches of Local Interest Gleaned from the Pioneers from
1803 to 1840, together with a
Roster of the Soldiers of the Revolution and the War of 1812,
who were Residing in the County.
Also,
A Roster of Ten Thousand of the Early Settlers from 1803 to 1840.
By George F. Robinson.
- ILLUSTRATED -
Published:
Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company.
1902.
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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  ADAM GERLAUGH.    One of the most highly respected citizens that has ever been connected with the agricultural interests of Greene county was Adam Gerlaugh, who, from pioneer ties down through the greater part of the nineteenth century, was numbered among the valued residents of his community.  He was identified with agricultural pursuits and his life was so honorable and upright that his name is a synonym for integrity.
     He was born in Beavercreek township upon his farm now owned by his brother.  Arthur Gerlaugh, the date of his birth being Aug. 6, 1814.  His parents were Adam and Catherine (Haynes) Gerlaugh.  The former was born in Washington county, Maryland, in 1786, and the latter, a native of the same county, was born a few days later.  In 1807 Adam Gerlaugh became a resident of Ohio, accompanying his father, who also bore the name of Adam, to Beavercreek township, Greene county, settling upon the farm which in now the home of our subject.  The family sent their goods down the Ohio river, while they traveled overland by wagons and teams, eight weeks being consumed in making the trip which led through the forests and over poor roads, which were often scarcely more than a trail.  Some time prior to the arrival of the family, the grandfather, accompanied by Mr. Haynes, made a trip to Ohio, looking over the land, and after making purchases they returned to Maryland.  The latter never afterward came to Ohio, but his family later removed to this state and occupied the land which he had purchased.  Adam Gerlaugh, the grandfather, had become the owner of three-quarters of a section, securing a quarter section for each of his children.  Upon the place he erected a log cabin and the family began their life in Ohio in that primitive dwelling.  With characteristic energy he took to work, clearing the farm and developing the fields.  The land was covered by a dense growth of timber.  Soon the woodman's ax awakened the echoes of the forest and in course of time the sunlight fell upon the plowed fields and the ripened grain which had there been planted by pioneer hands.  Adam Gerlaugh bore an active part in the work of primitive development and progress and aided in laying the foundation for the present advanced condition of Green county, enabling it to take an important position in this great commonwealth.  He died between 1820 and 1825, when about seventy years of age.
     Adam Gerlaugh, the father of our subject, became familiar with pioneer experiences for his youth was largely passed in Greene county before the work of progress and civilization had made great changes.  He married Catherine Haynes in the winter of 1707-8.  She had come with her brother and his family to the county in 1807, making the trip on horseback from Maryland.  They settled upon the land which had been purchased by her father sometime before when he had come to Ohio with the grandfather of  our subject.  Mrs. Gerlaugh was born Apr. 22, 1788, and her death occurred on the 19th of April, 1852.  She and her husband had lived together as man and wife for forty years until death separated them, their mutual love and confidence increasing as the years passed by.  Mr. Gerlaugh belonged to the German Reformed church, while his wife held membership in the Lutheran church.  Several years after her death he went to Minnesota to visit a son and while on the return trip was taken ill in Warren county, Illinois, and there died in the home of another son, in 1856, when seventy years of age.  This worthy couple were the parents of ten children, eight sons and two daughters:  David, now deceased, is mentioned on another page of this volume.  Jacob has also passed away and his history farms a part of this work.  Otho and Adam have departed this life.  Robert lives in Warren county, Illinois.  Arthur is a farmer of Beavercreek township, whose name appears on another page of this volume.  Jonathan is deceased.  Frances  is the wife of Benjamin Clark, a resident of Montgomery county, Ohio.  Henry is deceased.  Mary Jane, now Mrs. Hawker, resides in Dayton, Ohio.
     Adam Gerlaugh pursued his education in the early schools of his district and worked upon his father's farm, devoting his time between the duties of the schoolroom and the labors of the field, also enjoying the pleasures that the playground afforded.  On the 25th of January, 1848, he was united in marriage to Eliza Dutoid, who was born in Indiana, a daughter of Eugene and Lydia (De Fray) Dutoid, both of whom were natives of Switzerland.  In order to give their children better educational advantages they removed to Dayton and the father purchased a farm in what is now called East Dayton, between Third and Fifth streets.  He made it his place of residence until his death which occurred about 1868, when he was seventy-six years of age.  His wife survived him about eleven years, passing away at a very advanced age at her home in Shakerstown, Ohio.  Both were interred in Woodland cemetery.
     After his marriage, Mr. Gerlaugh of this review, rented a farm from Mr. Harshman and continued its cultivation until 1857.  He had inherited a part of the old homestead and from the other heirs he purchased their interests and made his home upon that place throughout his remaining days.  The barn there has built by his father, but the present fine residence which stands upon the place has been erected by Mrs. Gerlaugh, since her husband's death.  Six children were born unto our subject and his wife.  Lydia became the wife of George Buvinger, a resident of Dayton, and their children are: Perry, Ruth, Edith, John, Lydia, and AaronCatherine is the deceased wife of Horton Tippy, a resident of Fairfield, Ohio, and their children were:  Everett, Pearl and RalphEugene, who is living in Montgomery county, Ohio, married Elizabeth Tippy, and they have four children - Laura, Lucy, Adam and Daniel.  Charles is a resident of Clark county, Ohio.  Charlotte is the wife of William H. Lenz, who is operating the home place for her mother.  He was born in Dayton, Ohio, Mar. 13, 1852, and is a son of William and Elizabeth (Kline) Lenz, both of whom were natives of Germany, and died in Dayton.  Unto William H. Lenz and his wife have been born three children: Bertha, the wife of Andrew O'Hara, of Alpha, Ohio, by whom she has two children, Lenz and Mosco; Elizabeth, the wife of Rush Huston, a resident of Sugarcreek township; and May Flora at home.  Phoebe Ellen, the youngest of the family, is the wife of John J. Reeder, a resident of Dayton, and their children are Fred Wells and Robert.
     Mr. Gerlaugh
was a Republican in his political views, and he served as trustee for a number of years.  He regarded in public office as a public trust and was therefore ever loyal and faithful to his duty.  He owned and operated one hundred and sixty acres of good land, carrying on general farming and stock-raising and by the careful control of his business affairs, he won creditable success, becoming a well-to-do citizen.  He passed away in May, 1883, and was laid to rest in Mount Zion cemetery.  Throughout the community his loss was widely and deeply mourned for he had many friends.  He was a loyal and progressive citizen and a devoted husband and father, and although he never sought public honors or notoriety he yet won that unqualified regard which is freely accorded to sterling worth in every land and clime.  Mrs. Gerlaugh still resides upon the old home place, and in 1887 she erected a fine farm residence there.  She is a member of the German Reformed church and is a most estimable lady, enjoying in a high degree the esteem and confidence of those with whom she is associated.  So long has she resided in this county that she is known either personally or indirectly to most of the citizens of this section and well does she deserve representation in this volume in connection with the life history of her honored husband, Adam Gerlaugh.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio by George F. Robinson, Publ. 1902 - Page 784-785
  ARTHUR GERLAUGH.     Arthur Gerlaugh is a retired farmer living in the northwestern portion of Beavercreek township.  He was born Feb. 16, 1819, in an old log house that stood within sight of his present dwelling upon the farm which is yet his place of abode.  His parents were Adam and Catherine (Haines) Gerlaugh.  The former was born in Washington county, Maryland, in 1786, and the latter, a native of teh same county, was born a few days later.  In 1807 Adam Garlaugh became a resident of Ohio, accompanying his father, who also bore the name of Adam, to Beavercreek township, Green county, settling upon the farm which is now the home of our subject.  The family sent their goods down the Ohio river while they traveled overland by wagons and teams, eight weeks being consumed in making the trip while led through the forests and over poor roads, which were often scarcely more than a trail.  Some time prior to the arrival of the family, the grandfather, accompanied by Mr. Haines, made a trip to Ohio, looking over the land, and after making purchases they returned to Maryland.  the latter never afterward came to Ohio, but his family later removed to this state and occupied the land which he had purchased.  Adam Gerlaugh, the grandfather, had become the owner of three-quarters of a section, securing a quarter-section for each of his children.  Upon the place he erected a log cabin and the family began their life in Ohio in that primitive dwelling.  With characteristic energy he took to work, clearing the farm and developing the fields.  The land was covered by a dense growth of timber.  Soon the woodman's ax awakened the echoes of the forest and in course of time the sunlight fell upon the plowed fields and the ripened grain which had there been planted by pioneer hands.  Adam Gerlaugh bore an active part in the work of primitive development and progress, and aided in laying the foundation for the present advanced condition of Greene county, enabling it to take in important position in this great commonwealth.  He died between 1820 and 1825, when about seventy years of age.
     Adam Gerlaugh, the father of our subject, became familiar with pioneer experiences, for his youth was largely passed in Greene county before the work of progress and civilization had made great changes.  He married Catherine Haines in the winter of 1807-8.  She had come with her brother and his family to the county in 1807, making the trip on horseback from Maryland.  They settled upon the land which had been purchased by her father some time before when he had come to Ohio with the grandfather of our subject.  Mrs. Gerlaugh was born Apr. 22, 1788, and her death occurred on the 19th of April, 1852.  She and her husband had lived together as man and wife for forty years until death separated them, their mutual love and confidence increasing as the years passed by.  Mr. Gerlaugh belonged to the German Reformed church, while his wife held  membership in the Lutheran church.  Several years after her death he went to Wisconsin to visit a son and while on the return trip was taken ill in Warren county, Illinois, and there died in the home of another son, in 1850, when seventy years of age.  This worthy couple were the parents of ten children, eight sons and two daughters:  David, now deceased, who is mentioned on another page of this volume; Jacob who has also passed away and his history forms a part of this work; Otho and Adam, who have departed this life; Robert, who lives in Warren county, Illinois; Arthur, of this review; Jonathan, deceased; Frances, the wife of Benjamin Clark, a resident of Montgomery county, Ohio; Henry, deceased; and Mary Jane, now Mrs. Hawker, of Dayton, Ohio.
     At an early age, Arthur Gerlaugh attended school that was held in a little log cabin where the furnishings were primitive.  The methods of instruction were scarcely modern than the building.  He went each morning and night a distance of two and one-half miles to and from his home in the winter months.  He pursued his studies until he was sixteen years of age, and during the summer months he worked in the fields and meadows assisting in the cultivation of crops and the care of the stock.  He gained good practical experience in farm work, and throughout his active business career was identified with the tilling of the soil.
     On the 20th of August, 1854, Mr. Gerlaugh was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Elizabeth Rockafield, who was born in Bath township, Greene county, a daughter of John and Susanna (Cost) Rockafield, both of whom were natives of this county.  Two sons were born unto our subject and his wife.  Charles, the elder, married Julia A. Hower, and they reside in Clark county, Ohio, where he is extensively and successfully engaged in the breeding of shorthorn cattle.  They have six children - Arthur who is pursuing a college course in Springfield, Ohio; Hower, Ellen, Bertha, Paul and Catherine, at home.  John, the younger son, married Bertha Scott, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Lutes) Scott, and they reside upon the father's farm, the operation of which devolves upon John Gerlaugh, who is making a specialty of the breeding of shorthorn cattle.  He and his wife have no children of their own, but have an adopted daughter, Beth Gerlaugh Conley, who is now a student of the high school.  In his business interests John Gerlaugh is very successful, and has taken many prizes and sweepstakes with his herd of shorthorn cattle.
     Arthur Gerlaugh of this review is a Republican in politics and keeps well informed on the issues of the day, but has never been an aspirant for office, preferring to devote his energies to business affairs.  He and his wife are members of the United Brethren church, in which he is serving as a trustee and the cause of Christianity finds in him a warm friend.  He ever does his part in promoting the cause of the church and in advancing all interests that tend to benefit mankind.  To-day he is one of the most prosperous agriculturists of his community.  For many years he was closely associated with farming interests and well does he deserve the rest from labor which he is now enjoying.  His judicious investments, his careful supervision of his financial interests and his indefatigable energy have resulted in making him the owner of nearly eleven hundred acres of well improved land lying in Greene and Clark counties.  In 1875 he erected a fine brick residence upon his farm.  It is supplied with a hot water plant for heating, is tastefully furnished and in all its appointments indicates the culture and refined taste of its occupants.  Mr. Gerlaugh also has a large barn forty-four by ninety feet, which was built by his father.  As yeas have passed and improvements have been made in farm machinery he has been quick to note those of practical value and to bring them into use upon his place.  He has added to his farm all modern equipments and accessories and now has one of the most desirable country seats in Greene county.  Of recent years he has left the work and supervision of the farm to his son and is enjoying and honorable retirement from labor.  It would be difficult to find a man in all this county who has a wider knowledge of its history, its progress and its development.  Throughout life he has resided upon the farm which is still his home and no history of Greene county would be complete without a record of his life.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio by George F. Robinson, Publ. 1902 - Page 590

E. O. Gerlaugh
EDWARD O. GERLAUGH.    With the agricultural interests of Beavercreek township Edward O. Gerlaugh has long been prominently identified, and is accounted one of the most skillful and successful farmers of his community.  A native of Ohio, he was born in Montgomery county, Feb. 27, 1846, and there spent the first six years of his life, but since that time has made his home in Greene county.
     Jacob Gerlaugh, the father of our subject, was born in Beavercreek, this county, in 1810, and was a brother of Arthur Gerlaugh, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this volume.  The former grew to manhood upon the old homestead in Beavercreek township, and was a student in an old log school house which stood about three-quarters of a mile below the farm.  It was a primitive structure, light being admitted through oiled paper instead of glass, and seated with slab benches.  At that time the early settlers shelled their corn by the horses tramping over it.  Jacob Gerlaugh assisted in the work of the home farm until thirty years of age when he was unitedin marriage to Miss Anna Miller who was born in Virginia, and on coming to Ohio made her home with an uncle in Montgomery county, until her marriage.  Thirteen children blessed this union, namely:  William, decreased; Oliver, who died in infancy; Lydia Ann who married Jacob R. Black and lives in Illinois; Edward O., of this review; Taylor, also a resident of Illinois; Mary Jane and Martha Ellen, twins, the former of whom is living in Dayton, and the other on the old home farm in Bath township, this county; Haines, a resident of Illinois; Hattie the wife of Charles Weiffenbach of Bellaire, Michigan; Alice, who died in infancy; Jacob, who makes his home in Illinois; Henry, deceased; and Sarah Belle, wife of Frank Weiffenbach of Dayton.  Of this family William Gerlaugh was among the brave boys in blue during the dark days of the Civil war, being a member of Company E, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  He left Alpha on the 1st of May, 1864, but was soon taken prisoner by the rebels at Moorfield, and was starved to death in Salisbury prison, North Carolina, dying Feb. 15, 1865.  The mother of our subject died in 1893, and the father passed away in February, 1897.  Throughout life he successfully engaged in general farming and stock-raising, his crops being principally corn, wheat, oats and barley.  He kept good grades of horses and cattle, making somewhat of a specialty of the best Leicester sheep and short horn cattle, and he took great pride in his stock, being a lover of all dumb animals which have become so useful to mankind.  Mr. Gerlaugh was a man of high moral character and had the confidence and respect of all who knew him.
     Edward O. Gerlaugh was educated in district school No. 4 of Bath township, where he continued his studies until seventeen years of age, and then took his brother's place on the farm where he now lives, the latter having died in the service of his country.  He now owns two hundred and eighteen acres of highly improved and productive land, it being considered one of the best and most desirable farms of its size in the county.  The old horse was destroyed by fire in 1887, and he has since erected a more modern and pleasant residence, and made many other useful and valuable improvements, the place being supplied with all the conveniences and accessories found upon a model farm of the present day.  Mr. Gerlaugh has made a specialty of breeding and raising Hereford cattle and has registered stock at the head of his herd.  He was one of the first to introduce this variety in the County.  He is a member of the Hereford Breeders' Association and is interested in a high grade of cattle.
     In 1870 Mr. Gerlaugh married Miss Martha Ellen Harshman, a native of Beavercreek township, and to them were born seven children, as follows: William and Anna, both now deceased; Edward, a resident of Dayton; Oscar, Luella and Jacob, all at home; and Earl, who is attending high school.  In politics Mr. Gerlaugh is independent, voting for the men and measures that he believes will best advance the public welfare.  He withholds his support from no enterprise calculated to promote the moral, social or material welfare of his community.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio by George F. Robinson, Publ. 1902 - Page 854
  CONRAD GILLAUGH.    Conrad Gillaugh was born in Germany on the 24th of August, 1824, but from the age of five years has been a resident of the United States, having come to this country with his parents.  Albert and Catherine (Miller) Gillaugh, both of whom were natives of the fatherland.  The former served as a soldier of the German army and upon coming to the new world he took up his home in Cumberland county, Maryland, about thirty miles from Baltimore.  There he worked in the mines for a year, after which he turned his attention to farming, which he followed for a number of years in that county.  There his death occurred when he was seventy-three years of age and his wife passed away in the same locality.
     Conrad Gillaugh well remembers the voyage to America, which was made upon a sailing vessel, twelve weeks having passed ere anchor was dropped in the harbor of Baltimore.  He lost his mother when about ten years of age.  His education was pursued in the schools of Cumberland county, Maryland, and in his youth he worked upon a farm in the home neighborhood.  About fifty-three years ago he came to Ohio, first settling in Clark county, near Springfield, where he was employed as a stone quarryman and in the lumber districts.  He afterward engaged in farming near Osborn.  Twenty-three years ago he took up his abode in Cedarville township, Greene county, where he purchased forty acres of land on which he has since made many improvements.  There he engaged in general farming and stock-raising, continuing upon that place until about seven years ago when he removed to the town of Cedarville in which he is now living a retired life.  His business career has been one in which he has closely followed honorable principles, manifesting marked diligence and perseverance in all his work.
     Mr. Gillaugh was united in marriage to Ann E. Alexander, who was born in Pennsylvania, Oct. 22, 1825, and died Aug. 30, 1870, upon the home farm in Greene county.  Eight children were born of that union.  Kate is the wife of Charles W. Crouse, a butcher, of Cedarville, Ohio, and they have two children; Charles and Ethel, the latter being the wife of Sydney Smith, who is employed in the paper mill at Cedarville.  John A., the second member of the family, is a resident farmer of Greene county.  He is a resident farmer of Greene county.  He is married and has three children: George D., Anna and LawrenceElla, the third in order of birth, is deceased.  Horace, who resides upon the old home place, married Sarah McKay.  Emma Jane is the wife of Fred Fraver, of Xenia, Ohio, and their children are: Nellie, William and Dora.  Sallie is the wife of Wallace Barber, a carpenter of Dayton.  William is in the employ of the freight house at Xenia.  Charles is engaged in the grocery business at Cedarville and married Rosa Hoover, by whom he has two children, Pauline and Hubert.  For his second wife Mr. Gillaugh chose Mrs. Mary Kramer, widow of Peter Kramer of Clark county, by whom she had one child, Sarah Ellen, now the wife of Oscar Raber, of Springfield, Ohio.  She had previously been the widow of Jacob W. Leffel, and by her first marriage she had six children: Daisy, Harry, Cleve, Lula, Lawrence and Henry.  By his second marriage Mrs. Gillaugh has one son, Frank, who is engaged in the grocery business with his brother.
     In his political views Mr. Gillaugh is a Democrat and in religious faith is connected with the German reformed church.  There is no native born citizen of America who is more loyal to the interests of his land than our subject, who throughout the years of his residence here has taken a helpful interst in many measures for the general good.  He has also improved his business opportunities and enterprise and determination have been strong characteristics of his successful career.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio by George F. Robinson, Publ. 1902 - Page 791
  FRANCIS GRINNELLFrancis Grinnell is one of the early settlers and leading and influential citizens of Miami township, and as the qualities of an upright manhood are numbered among his salient characteristics he well deserves mention among the representative men of Greene county.  He was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, Nov. 5, 1821, a son of Cornelius and Eliza (Russell) Grinnell.  The father was also born in New Bedford and there spent almost his entire life with the exception of a few years, during which he was engaged in business in New York.  His father was a captain in the merchant marine service and Cornelius Grinnell also engaged in shipping and in the whaling trade.  He died at the comparatively early age of forty years.  The mother of our subject had passed away previously and the father had married a sister of his first wife.  The Grinnell family in religious faith were originally Friends.
     Francis Grinnell spent the entire period of his minority in the place of his nativity.  He was educated in the place of his nativity.  He was educated in the academy at South Kingston, Rhode Island, and afterward at Cambridge, Massachusetts, and for one year was a student at Well College at Jamaica Plains, near Boston.  After completing his education he entered the counting room of his brother at New Bedford, but remained only a short time, after which, until twenty-one years of age, he traveled fro place to place, being employed in various ways.  On attaining his majority he purchased a farm near New Bedford.  This had formerly been an island, but was dyked in by his father, who purchased the land in 1812.  Mr. Grinnell of this review remained upon his farm and continued its cultivation until 1855, when he sold that property and came to Ohio with his family, settling at Yellow springs, in Miami township.  For two years he resided there and then purchased a tract of land of one hundred and sixty-eight acres in Miami township.  This he improved, placing it under a high state of cultivation.  He then purchased one hundred and forty acres more and added to the farm from time to time until he now owns something over three hundred and fifty acres.  In 1862 he purchased of Mathew Couny the gristmill which he now operates.  It was built in 1821 and is therefore one of the landmarks of the community.  Mr. Grinnell has operated the ill and engaged in farming ever since he made the purchase of the property, and is a worthy reprehensive of the agricultural and industrial interests of the community.
     In 1846 in Washington, D. C., was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Grinnell and Miss Marian Gales Johnson, a daughter of Robert and Winifred (Gales) Johnson, the former a native of North Carolina.  Mrs. Grinnell was a devout member of the Episcopal church and a most estimable lady.  She died upon the home farm in Miami township in 1893, leaving a family of eight children, while one had previously passed away.  Cornelius H., who owns a large ranch and is extensively engaged in raising cattle in Sheridan, Wyoming, married Miss Sabiton and they have three children: Marian W., now deceased; Joseph and LawrenceAltona Holstein became the wife of Bailey Willis, a son of N. P. Willis, the poet, and died leaving one child, HopeRobert J., who is engaged in milling in South Carolina, is married and his children are:  Burard, Kate, Reginald, and Ernest, who is deceased.  Frank, who was born in Massachusetts on the home farm, came to Greene county with his parents, and here resided until 1901, when he removed to Kentucky, where he is now engaged in farming.  He married Miss Minnie Robinson, and they have one child, Catherine Winifred.  Gales M., who follows farming in Miami township, wedded Millie Goe and they have one child, Bailey W.  Ernest, born in Miami township, is married and resides in Sheridan, Wyoming.  Nellie W. is at home.  William L., of Portland, Oregon, married Ethel Galloway and their children are: George and Francis M.  Morton R. is assisting his father on the home farm.  He married Esther Kolp and their children are Marjorie, Malcolm M., Ralph and Harold.  For almost a half century Francis Grinnell has resided in Greene county and is well known to many of its citizens.  He has always been an industrious, energetic man and in his business affairs has manifested the strictest integrity and fidelity to commercial ethics.  Throughout the community he is held in high regard, and as one of the early settlers of Miami township he well deserves mention in this volume.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio by George F. Robinson, Publ. 1902 - Page 578

NOTES:
 

 
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