OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

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Welcome to
Greene County, Ohio
History & Genealogy

BIOGRAPHIES:

Source:
HISTORY OF GREENE COUNTY

together with
Historic Notes on the Northwest
and
The State of Ohio.
Gleaned From Early Authors, Old Maps and Manuscripts,
Private and Official Correspondence and
all other Authentic Sources, Ohio - Publ. 1881
By R. S. Dills
Illustrated.
Dayton, Ohio
ODell & Mayer, Publishers.
1881
 
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  Beaver Creek Twp. -
ELI A. KERSHNER, retired, Alpha, was born in Washington County, Maryland, Aug. 18, 1809.  He is a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Ankeney) Kershner.  His father died Feb. 22, 1826, and after his death, his wife, with her family, came to Ohio, in the spring of 1828, settling in Beaver Creek Township, in which she lived till her decease, which occurred in 1864, aged upwards of eighty years.  Her second marriage was with Jonathan Snyder.  The boyhood of our subject was passed in his native state.  Three years after coming to Ohio, he returned to Maryland, and for more than twenty years thereafter lived first in the one state and then in the other, until 1851, when he returned to Ohio and located in Alpha; here he has since lived, with the exception of four years he passed on a farm in the township.  Mar. 4, 1861, he was married to Elizabeth Steele, by whom he had two children, one living, Emma; Etta, deceased.  Mrs. Kershner departed this life in September, 1864, aged thirty-seven years.  She was a member of the German Reformed Church, as is her husband. Politically he is a Republican, having cast his first ballot for Henry Clay.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 610
  Jefferson Twp. -
SIMON L. KLINE, farmer, Bowersville, is a native of Virginia, where he was reared and educated.  Was born in 1836, and came to Ohio in 1858, locating in Clinton County, where he remained until 1867, when he came to this county, and married Miss Sophia J. Early, April, 1865.  Three children are the result of the marriage: Asa C., Orie C., and Minnie A., all living.  He has a farm of one hundred and twenty-two and one half acres, on which he lives.  His mother is living in Virginia, aged eighty-eight years;  His father died there in February, 1868.  There were twelve children of his father's family, of whom eleven are living, one younger than SimonMrs. Kline's parents were natives of this county; she is a grand-daughter of Benjamin Vannienam, and early settler in this township.  Mr. Kline is a member of Bowersville Lodge No. 559, I. O. O. F.  He and his wife are members of the Methodist Protestant Church of Bowersville.  He went as a substitute to the rebellion, in Company C, One Hundred and Forty-Ninth Ohio National Guards, being in the service four months.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 843
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
GEORGE KOOGLER, retired farmer, Zimmermanville, was born on the old home place, near Union, Aug. 11, 1806; son of Jacob and Kinley (Harner) Koogler.  His father was born in Pennsylvania, his mother in Germany, and when six years old immigrated to Pennsylvania with her parents  About the year 1800 Jacob and Kinley, with their parents, came to Greene County, and about 1802 were married by Judge Huston, being the second couple married in the county.  Grandfather George Harmer had a small copper still, and as Indians were plenty, he had frequent calls from the noble red man, who had a particular love for fire-water.  Jacob Koogler was a soldier in the war of 1812, having been twice drafted, but only served a short time, as he procured substitutes.  They were parents of ten children, eight of whom are living: Catherine, George, Mary, Samuel, Solomon, Simon, Jacob, and John.  The deceased are Mettrias and SarahJacob Koogler and wife were members of the Lutheran Church till death; he died in 1871, at the age of eighty-six; she died previous to the late civil war, upwards of sixty years.  The boyhood of our subject was passed on the farm, on which he labored for his father until he was twenty-two years of age.  In 1828 he was married to Mary, daughter of Matthew Black, who settled herein 1821 or 1822.  For two years after marriage, he lived on the old home farm, then moved to the place on which Oliver Moler now lives, where he resided until 1833 or 1834, when he came to where he now lives.  He erected a house, the same in which he yet lives, and began the Herculean task of clearing up his land, which in after years he got in condition to receive the improved implements of agriculture.  On this place he has passed nearly half a century, has seen the forests disappear, and improved fields spring up their stead.  Owns one hundred and ten and one-half acres of fine land, which is the fruit of energy and untiring industry.  Mr. Koogler died about 1850, aged forty-one or forty-two years.  To them nine children were born, six living: William, Mary M., Martin, Catherine, Eliza and George.  The deceased are John, Andrew J., and Matilda.  His second marriage was celebrated with Eleanor, daughter of John Ivens, who was born in Pennsylvania, and came to Ohio when a man grown.  Six children have been the result of his last marriage, three living: Sarah M., Isabella I., and Jacob K.  The deceased are Eleanor F., Elizabeth C., and an infant.  Mr. Koogler and wife are members of the German Reformed Church, with which they have been connected for ten years; they are exemplary, Christian people, take much interest in the church, and endeavor to carry their Christian standard high.  Their children, with the exception of one, are members of the same church, as are also two of the children by the first wife, which affords the parents much gratification.  Mrs. Koogler was born in Huron County, in 1823.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 611
  Bath Twp. -
SIMON KOOGLER, retired, Osborn, was born in Beaver Creek Township, Sept. 30, 1817, and is a son of Jacob and Kindla (Harner) Koogler.  He was a native of Pennsylvania, she of Germany, coming to this country when about five years old.  Both immigrated to Ohio in 1794, with their parents, and stayed for protection in the fort called Columbia, a short distance above Cincinnati, for some time.  They then located where Camp Dennison now is, in Clermont County.  In the year 1800, they moved to Beaver Creek Township, where they located on a farm and there Jacob and Kindla (who is his step-sister) were married in 1802, being the fifth couple who were joined in wedlock within the limits of this county.  There they lived the rest of their lives, and reared their family of ten children: Catherine, George, Samuel, Mary, Solomon, Mathias, Sarah, Simon, Jacob and John.  All are living but Sarah and Mathias, and all residents of this state, except one, who is in Iowa.  They are all farmers, each owning a good farm.  She died Nov. 27, 158, aged seventy-five years; he died on Sept. 15, 1870, at the advanced age of eighty-three years.  Simon has been a farmer all his life, living on the homestead until he was fifty-seven years old; he then moved to Osborn and retired form active life, having been afflicted with rheumatism for the past ten years.  In 1839 he married Elizabeth Parsons, a native of Rockbridge County, Virginia.  They are parents of nine children: Jacob H., Jane, David P., Sarah C., Isabella P., Elizabeth J., John W., Elizabeth E., and Annie L.  Six are living; two, Jane and Eliza J., died in infancy.  Jacob H., died in the army, a member of the One Hundred and Tenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  Of the remaining members, there are four who now reside in this county, one in Madison county, and one in the state of Nebraska.  Mr. and Mrs. Koogler are members of the German Reformed Church, with which they have been connected for forty years, trying to live consistent, Christian lives.  In politics he has always been a staunch Republican.  The family on Mrs. Koogler's side have been prominent in the wars of the country.  Her grandfather was in the revolution, her father in the war of 1812, and two sons, Jacob H. and David P., in the rebellion.  David P. was a member of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 730
  Xenia Twp. -
DR. KYLE, physician and surgeon, was born in this county, in the year 1812, and is a son of Joseph and Jane (Gowdy) Kyle.  His father was born near Lexington, Kentucky, in 1787; he was a son of Joseph Kyle, who was probably born in Pennsylvania.  This Joseph, was, also, a son of Joseph, who came from Ireland.  The family originating from Scotland, from which they fled to avoid persecution.  Joseph, the third in his line, and grandfather to Dr. Kyle, was a soldier in the war of 1812, as were five of his brothers, who all survived the struggle.  His great, great grandfather Kyle was a soldier in the war of 1812, as were five of his brothers, who all survived the struggle.  His great, great grandfather Kyle, was of Scottish origin, and a Sampson in strength.  It is said he was without ribs, having solid cased sides and double teeth, top and bottom.  While by himself in the woods, he came upon a log with wedges inserted, which had been left, and thinking it a good chance to try his strength, he placed his hands in the log, sprung it so the  the wedge dropped out, closed, and he was trapped, where he died from starvation.  Grandfather, Joseph Kyle and family, came from Kentucky to this county, in 1804.  Joseph, father of the doctor, was married to Jane Gowdy, who bore him ten children, five living.  Grandfather died, in February, 1821.  Grandmother Kyle, nee Chambers, died in 1827.  They were parents of six children; came to Ohio; father was a farmer by occupation and was a poor man.  Represented his county in the legislature in 1824, and again in 1838, wand was justice of the peace for nine years,  was a Whig, and religiously a Presbyterian.  He died in 1849; mother died in 1855.  The boyhood of the doctor was passed on the farm.  He received the rudiments of his education in the common schools, and was afterwards developed in the high school; fitting himself for the study of medicine.  He read medicine under the guidance of Dr. Adam Hayes of Jefferson County, Indiana, who was his partner for two years, when he entered the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati, taking one course.  He began practice of Jasper Township, and since has practiced in the county.  He was married in December, 1838, to Sarah A. Money, and has ten children, four living, Mary Robinson, Johanna, Kyle Joseph, and William.  The deceased  are Elizabeth J., Martha, Edward, Emma, Sarah, and Charles.  They were members of the Associate Church since childhood.  He has practiced medicine since 1847, and is one of the practitioners of the county.  Is the inventor of a water-wheel of the turbine pattern, for which is claimed a per cent. of power over other wheels.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page  948
  Cedarville Twp. -
JAMES KYLE, retired farmer, Cedarville, was born in this township, Nov. 8, 1819.  Is the son of Samuel and Rachel (Jackson) KyleSamuel was born near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and emigrated, with his parents, to near Cynthiana, Kentucky, and was married at about the age of twenty-three, to Miss Mitchell.  Six children were born to them.  She departed this life about the year 1813.  Again, in 1815, Samuel married Miss Rachel Jackson.  Fifteen children were borne by this marriage, ten of whom are now living.  James, the subject of this sketch, was the tenth child, and remained in the family until the age of twenty-five, when he married Jane Park.  She died one year after, and in nine years from her death he married Miss Maria Tarbox.  They have but two children, John M. and Charles H.  Mr. and Mrs. Kyle are both members of the United Presbyterian Church, and are living on a farm of one hundred and four acres, pleasantly located.
Source: History of Green County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 566
  Xenia Twp. -
JOSEPH D. KYLE, clerk Second National Bank, Xenia, was born in that city, Oct. 2, 1852.  Is the son of James and Rachel Kyle, natives of this county, and one of the oldest families in the county.  They had a family of three children, Joseph, Olive, and Nellie, the last one having died at the age of one year.  Joseph, the subject of our sketch, was married to Sallie E. Neville, daughter of Henry Neville, of this city, on the 16th of December, 1879.  They have one child, James LeRoy.  Joseph received his education in this city, and spent fifteen years of his life in Cincinnati, where he was engaged in book-keeping for different branches of business, and is new correspondent for the Second National Bank of this city, a very prominent and responsible position.  Is a member of this city, a very prominent and responsible position.  Is a member of Damon Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of Cincinnati.  His father and mother are now living in the last named city, keeping the Merchants' Union Hotel, which is connected with the Union Bethel.  Was mayor of this city in 1861, at which time a number of young men of fighting quality came to him, and proposed to raise a company of the war, and make him their leader, to which he responded, and was commissioned as captain of Company H, Ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteers.  Was appointed provost marshal under General Rosecrans, and resigned on account of ill-health.  Was a brother of Dr. James A. Kyle, one of the oldest and most prominent citizens of this city.

Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 501

  Cedarville Twp. -
WILLIAM KYLE, farmer, Cedarville, was born on the farm now known as the Mardock Place, Aug. 27, 1821, and is the son of Samuel and Rachel (Jackson) Kyle, of whom mention is made in another part of this work.  Received the rudiments of his education in a log school house, that stood not far from where the Oak Grove House now stands.  At the age of twenty-four, he married Rachel Cherry, daughter of James and Elizabeth Cherry, natives of Virginia.  He is the father of nine children, all living..  Are members of the United Presbyterian Church.
Source: History of Green County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 566
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
GEORGE B. LAFONG, deceased, Zimmermanville, was born in Richmond, Virginia, Feb. 26, 1787, and was a son of George Lafong, of Bordeaux, France, who emigrated to America and located in Richmond, near where he lived until his death.  The boyhood of our subject was passed in his native place, where he received his education, and laid the foundation of a life that became marked after arriving his maturity.  July 24, 1813, he was married to Casandra Lovel, who was born in Bristol, England, Apr. 22, 1796.  After his marriage he engaged in mercantile pursuits, until his removal to Ohio.  Enlisting in 1813, he served in the war of 1812, and acted as clerk to his superiors during his term of service.  The journey from Virginia to Ohio, in 1830, was accomplished by them, through an almost impenetrable wilderness.  Upon his arrival, he located on land near the southeast part of the township, where he purchased one hundred and four acres of land, which was partially improved.  In February, 1847, he removed to two hundred and eight acres, on which the remaining portion of his life was passed.  He was a man of large mental calibre; a great student, loving to delve down into the mysteries of science; storing his mind with a fund of general information, which intellectually gave him superiority over his fellow man.  As a grammarian he ranked high; excelled in history; and understood fully the principles and truths of theology, to which he was ardently attached; was well versed in the current events of the day, and was able at all times to discuss them.  Generous to a fault, he was ever ready to lighten the cares and burdens of the more unfortunate wayfarer.  In his church (the Lutheran) he was an ardent and zealous member - ready at all times to assume any responsibility, however grave, that would tend to develop and advance the cause of Christianity.  Was an exemplary and consistent Christian gentleman, and held the office of deacon in the church.  His death was sudden.  A week's sickness carried him beyond all earthly help and pain, and on the 18th of April, 1875, he quietly passed away - thus ending a long and well-spent life.  To Mr. and Mrs. Lafong were born eight children, four of whom are living: Mary, A. L. (now Mrs. Wall), Orlando B., Elizabeth E. (now Mrs. Kemp), and Ferdinand L.  The deceased are Sylvester G., Cassandra M., Minerva A., and Marcellus.  Mrs. Lafong is a daughter of Joseph and Mary Lovell, who were born in England, where they were married.  Mr. Lovell died in his native country.  After his death his wife and children emigrated to America, landing in Boston, from whence they went to Richmond, Virginia, where they remained during the ensuing winter.  Here she married her second husband, James Breem, and afterwards located in Kanawha County, West Virginia, where they lived till their death.  By her marriage with Mr. Lovell she had fourteen children, of whom Mrs. Lafong alone survives.  By her last marriage she had two children, both deceased.  Mrs. Lafong is a member of the Lutheran Church, and has been for the last quarter of a century; is an exemplary Christian lady, and is passing her declining years amid peace and plenty.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 612
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
DAVID LAMME, farmer, deceased, was born in Garrard County, Kentucky, Jan. 1, 1791.  Was a son of Nathan and Nancy (Ralston) Lamme, the former a native of Virginia, and the latter of Pennsylvania.  They removed to Kentucky when they were married, and in teh spring of 1796 removed to Ohio, and settled in Sugar Creek Township, on land where the widow of David Lamme yet resides, making there a permanent home, as will be found in the history of the township.  Nathan was captain of a company in the continental army, during the struggle for liberty in the dark days of 1776, serving until the close of the war.  David was a soldier in the war of 1812, serving as a volunteer, substitute, and drafted soldier.  Nathan Lamme died in 1834, aged eighty-nine years, and his wife died in 1814, aged forty-seven years.  Eight children were born to them, all of whom are dead:  Josiah, William, Samuel, James, David, Jesse, Anna, and Martha.  The sons, with the exception of William, who died in Iowa, lived and died in this county.  Nathan was also a captain during the Indian war, and was at Point Pleasant.  In this war he went as a substitute, for which service he received buckskin enough to make a pair of moccasins.  Was the first sheriff of Greene County, and also acted as assessor of the county for many years.  Was a prominent man, and stood high in the Masonic fraternity.  In religion he trained with the old school Presbyterian Church, and was much interested in religious matters - strict in integrity, and a strong advocate of the truths and principles of the Bible.  David Lamme was raised a farmer and in 1824 was married to Margaret, daughter of William and Jane Frazier, by whom he had seven children, six living: William, John, Josiah, Francis, Nancy, Sarah, and Margaret, deceased.  David made the home of his father his place of abode during his natural life, and died Sept. 11, 1859.  In politics he was an old time Whig.  Nathan, his father, was a federalist.  The parents of Mrs. David Lamme came to Ohio in 1814, and settled in this township, south of Bellbrook, on land now owned by Matt. Morris.  On this land Mr. Frazier lived till his death, which occurred in August, 1815.  Mr. Frazier died in Sidney, May 10, 1850.  They were parents of six children, three of whom are living:  Margaret, John and William.  The deceased are Cyrus, Sarah, and Samuel.  They were both members of the associate Church.  Francis Lamme enlisted in Company E, Seventy-Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged on account of sickness the following year.  The children of David Lamme are residents of this county, except John, who resides in Illinois.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 613
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
JESSE LAMME, farmer, was born on the place of his present residence, in 1821, and is a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Martin) Lamme, natives of Kentucky, who came to Ohio early in the nineteenth century, and settled near the Little Miami.  Our subject is one of nine children - Henry, Nancy, Lucy, Miranda, Marilla, and Jessie, living, and Powell, Nathan, and Sarah, deceased.  Nathan was a captain in the revolutionary war, and Samuel was a soldier in the war of 1812.  They literally cut their farm out of the forest.  Samuel died in 1866, aged eighty-four, and his wife in 1874, also aged eighty-four.  The former was a Presbyterian, the latter belonged to the Protestant Methodist Church.  Our subject was reared on a farm, received a common school education, and in 1852 married Margaret, daughter of Samuel and Mary Spicler of Maryland, who bore him two children, Ida Alice, living, and Emmet, deceased.  Jesse has always lived on the old homestead, caring for his parents during their old age.  Both himself and wife are members of the Lutheran Church.  Is the owner of one hundred and seventy-three acres of excellent land, well improved.  In politics he is a Republican.  Mrs. Lamme was born in Washington County, Maryland, in 1832, and removed with her parents to Ohio, in 1840, locating temporarily in Knox County, and afterward removing to Montgomery County, where they died.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 613
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
JACOB L. LANTZ, farmer, Harshmanville, was born in this township in 1840, and is a son of John and Catharine Lantz, whose sketch appears in this work.  Jacob  was reared on the farm, receiving the rudiments of his education in the district schools, which was afterward developed in the high schools of Xenia, in which he fitted himself to teach, under the tutorship of Professor Twitchell.  For nineteen years he has successfully taught in the schools of this county, and as an educator stands high in the profession.  During the above time he has farmed during the summer seasons, owning fifty acres of land, which is well improved.  Is trustee of the township, and has held other offices of the same, and has also been a member of the Lutheran Church for ten years, taking much interest in religious matters, being a zealous worker in class and Sabbath-school.  Was a member of Company E, Seventy-Fourth Ohio National Guards, enlisting in the spring of 18646;  was stationed at New Creek, West Virginia, and was in the engagement which took place there; served his time, and was discharged at Camp Dennison in September of the same year, and was sergeant of his company.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 615
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
JOHN LANTZ, deceased, Alpha, was born in Washington County, Maryland, Aug. 27, 1806, his boyhood being passed in his native place, on the farm.  In 1826, he was married to Catharine, daughter of John and Barbara Rhodes, after which he engaged in milling and distilling, which he followed till 1836, the time of his removal to Ohio.  Their trip was made overland, by team, consuming four weeks' time.  They made a temporary stop in Hardin County, where they remained from spring till fall, when they came on to Greene County, and settled in the neighborhood where Mrs. Lantz now lives.  After remaining a few years, they went to Springfield, Ohio, where he followed milling for several years, and then came and located where his widow now lives.  Officially, his ability was recognized and sought by his townsmen, whom he served in the capacity of trustee, and a number of the more minor offices of the township, to the entire satisfaction of his constituents.  Six children were born to them, four of whom are living:  Barbara A., John D., Eliza E., and Jacob L.  The deceased are Catharine J. and Mary E.  Mrs. Lantz is a member of the Lutheran Church, with which she has been connected many years, and is a consistent Christian lady.  Barbara A. was married to George S. Lafong, on the 19th of February, 1852, who departed this life, Jan. 30, 1877.  Eliza E. married John A. Harner, and has three children, Maggie K., Jonathan  H., and Ann J.  Mrs. Lantz was born in Maryland, in 1807, and her parents were born in the same state, in which they lived, died, and are buried.  They were parents of eight children, two of whom are living:  Catharine and Rose Ann.  At Mr. Lantz' death, he left two hundred and seventy-six acres of land.  He was a self-made man, a hard worker, and was beloved and respected by all who knew him.  On the 14th of July, 1871, he passed away, after a long and well-spent life.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 615
  Bath Twp. -
JOHN LOUCK, grocer, Fairfield, was born in York County, Pennsylvania, Jan. 12, 1813, and is a son of George and Catherine (Hoffman) Louck, both natives of Pennsylvania.  The family were originally from Alsace, Germany.  John's grandfather came to this country before the revolution, and was a member of the American army.  George Louck died at Baltimore, Maryland.  His wife married again, but after the death of her second husband, came to this state, and died at Spring Hill, Champaign County, in August, 1874.  John Louck spent his boyhood with his father, who was a butcher, assisting in his work.  In 1821, went to Baltimore, where his father died in 1826.  He afterwards went into the country, near Hanover, Pennsylvania, where his grandfather and an uncle lived, and made his home with them on a farm.  He learned the trade of shoemaking, but not being satisfied with the business, he engaged in the butchering business, which he had learned from his father, and in 1835 came to Ohio, locating at Fairfield, where he has since remained, with the exception of about six months in 1844, when he went wet and bought land, but becoming sick soon after arriving there, he decided to return to the valley of the Mad River.  After coming to the state he teamed for a year and then opened a butcher shop.  Afterwards farmed for several years, and on returning from the west in 1844, opened a shoe shop.  In 1854 he was elected treasurer of Greene County for a term of two years, and in some unaccountable way was $2,480 short at the end of his term, which he promptly paid, taking nearly al the property he owned.  The first house he ever owned he sold to pay a security debt.  Of late, however, he has been more successful, owning the property where he carries on business and the house where he lives, together with some other property.  During the past eleven years, he has been engaged in the grocery business at Fairfield.  For the past forty years Mr. Louck has been an auctioneer in connection with his other business, being one of the best known criers in this section of country.  In 1833 he was married to Elizabeth Burk.  They are parents of eight children, Lucy Ann, Catharine, Mary, Margaret, John, and Laura living;  George and Christianna, deceased.  Mr. Louck came from Pennsylvania with a team through the then almost unbroken forest, and although he started on the 1st of May, he frequently encountered snow-storms among the mountains.  He spent seventeen days on the road.  For a number of years past Mr. Louck has been identified with the pioneers of this and adjoining counties, as the leader of the far-famed Old Folk's Choir.  He has held the office of constable ten or eleven years, and at present (1880) is township clerk.  These opportunities, together with his genial nature, have made him one of the best known men in the county.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 731
  Xenia Twp. -
BASIL V. LUCAS, dealer in wood and iron fencing, Xenia, was born in Berkeley County, Virginia, in the year 1837.  Is a son of Dennis and Elizabeth Lucas, both natives of that state, who removed to Ohio in the year 1858, with eight children, Basil V., Emily C., Matilda A., John W., Elizabeth B., Dennis T., Charles D., and Eliza S.  The subject of our sketch was married, Oct. 24, 1868, to Rebecca A. Niswanger, daughter of Perry and Hester Niswanger, of this city.  They had a family of six children, Effie G., Ida May, Minnesota, William A., Basil V., and Lee McClung.  The daughters are all dead.  He enlisted in the Union Army on the 3d day of February, 1864, in Company D, Seventy-Fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and received his discharge in 1865, at Camp Dennison, Ohio.  He was in many hard-fought battles, and at Tunnel Hill was in a continual fight until the battle of Jonesborough, and was with Sherman in his famous march to the sea.  At Buzzard's Roost, on the 10th day of May, 1864, his collar bone was broken, by being struck with a piece of shell, disabling him in the right arm.  Received his education in Virginia, where he lived until he was twenty-one, when he came to Ohio, where he has been engaged in carpentering since the war.  Is now, in connection with his trade, contacting and putting up iron fencing, and is also engaged with George Barnes in the manufacture of a patent folding lounge, one of the best, if not the best, ever brought before the public.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 503

NOTES:
 

 
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