OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

A Part of Genealogy Express
 

Welcome to
Greene County, Ohio
History & Genealogy


 

AB CD EF GH IJ KL MN OP QR ST UV WX YZ
< CLICK HERE to RETURN to 1881 TABLE OF CONTENTS >
< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO LIST OF BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES >
  Silver Creek Twp. -
JOHN ADAMS, retired blacksmith, Jamestown, is a native of Rockbridge County, Virginia; was born Sept. 2, 1811; reared and remained in that place till twenty-six years of age, when he came to Jamestown, and has since resided in the place.  He married Miss Harriet Dawson, a native of Berkeley County, Virginia, Sept. 9, 1840; she is a sister of Dr. W. W. Dawson, of Cincinnati, Dr. Dawson, of Columbus, and Dr. Dawson, of Bellbrook.  Mr. Adams is a descendant of President Adams.  Has spent a portion of his life while here, blacksmithing, and was successful in accumulating a sufficient amount of means to live his declining years retired from active labor - has at least fifteen thousand dollars.  Came to Jamestown in 1838, and has witnessed many of the changes made in the county since that time.  There were no railroads, no pikes, and but little business compared to the present.  Two children, Saran A. and Mary A., were born to our subject, both living.  Mary A., was married to John C. Stewart, June 5, 1859; they have one child, John D.  Mr. and Mrs Adams and children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Jamestown.  He is a member of Lodge No. 181, I. O. O. F.  He joined the fraternity in Oct. 1854.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 787
  Silver Creek Twp. -
JOHN Q. ADAMS, merchant and carpenter, Jamestown, is a son of Zina B. and Eliza (Sharp) Adams; was born in Jamestown - where he now lives, and has a good store-room and a handsome residence - Mar. 25, 1837.  Was reared and educated here, and married, Oct. 25, 1866, to Miss Laura R. Spark a daughter of Gideon and Phoebe Spark, by Revs. Black and Baker.  Mr. Adams was in the mercantile business from 1860 to 1876, when he sold to his brother, M. O.  He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  His father died in Jamestown, May 22, 1844.  Mrs. Adams then married Mr. James McDowney Mar. 20, 1849, who died Sept. 2, 1878.  Mrs. McDowney's first husband kept hotel in this place about twelve years before his death.  She continued in the business for some time after her marriage with McDowney, making in all about forty years.  Our subject's brother, Thomas H., served three years in the rebellion in Company A, Seventy-Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Colonel Moody commander.  Enlisted Oct. 9, 1861.  Came home without a wound.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 787
  Silver Creek Twp. -
MORGAN O. ADAMS, merchant, Jamestown, is a son of Zina B. and Eliza B. (Sharp) Adams, who were married Dec. 26, 1830, four children being the result of the union:  Samuel died Feb. 8, 1854.  Mr. Adams, sr.'s, father, Reuben, was born Aug. 7, 1775, in Massachusetts.  He married Miss Mary Bosworth, of Delaware County, New York.  They died in Clinton County, Ohio.  Came here about 1814.  There were nine children of this family: Allen, Catherine, John R., Garra V., Zina B., Royal B., Caroline, Jane, and Arabel.  Caroline married Chas. Hathaway, Arabel, Solomon Sharp, Jane, Thomas Demoss, Catherine, Mr. Black.  Mr. Adams' mother is a daughter of Samuel and Susanna (Cook) Sharp.  He was born Sept. 22, 1780, and married in 1805, in Pennsylvania.  There were eight children by this marriage: Morgan, Eliza, Thomas, Liddie, Henry, Susanna, Samuel, and Melissa.  Liddie married Thomas Demoss after the death of his first wife, Jane Adams, Susan to Reuben Moorman, and Melissa to Nelson Powers.  Our subject was born in Brown County, April 15, 1863, and came with his parents to Jamestown the following fall, where he was reared and twice married, first to Miss Amanda M. Johnson, daughter of J. C. and Jane (Greenwood) Johnson, Nov. 1, 1852.  One child, James Harvey, who is in the dry goods business in this place, is the result of this union.  He was born Aug. 28, 1855.  Mrs. Adams died Mar. 6, 1863; Mr. Adams then married Mrs. Flora (Boyer) Armstrong, Aug. 27, 1869.  She had one child, Thomas James, by her first marriage; he is in business with Mr. Adams.  Harvey was born Nov. 21, 1860.  There is one child by the last marriage, Mary E., who was born Nov. 29, 1871.  Mr. Adams and wife are members of the Christian Church.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity of Jamestown.  Is a good business man, and a prominent citizen. 
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 788
  Xenia Twp. -
WILLIAM ALLEN, clerk, Xenia, Ohio, was born in Charleston, West Virginia, and is a son of Arthur and Kitty Allen.  They had a family of seven children, and immigrated to Ohio in 1862.  William the subject of our sketch, was married to Miss Susan McBra, daughter of Charles and Frances McBra, of Kentucky.  They had a family of three children.  Alice A. and Louis A. are dead, leaving only Lee Allen to comfort them in their trials and troubles through life.  When the call was made in defense of our flag, he stepped to the front, and enlisted in the Sixteenth Colored Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel W. B. Gaugh in Company K, Captain Possell commanding, and after going with his regiment through the bloody battles in which it participated, he was discharged on the 16th day of March, 1865, and returned to Xenia, where he has since lived as a man of trust and honor, in the employ of Samuel Allison, for over seventeen years.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 466
  Spring Valley Twp. -
JOHN ANDERSON, retired farmer, and stock raiser, was born Nov. 6, 1813.  His parents, and grandparents came to this stage about 1807, and settled where John now lives.  They formerly lived in North Carolina.  The chances for an education in the early youth of Mr. Anderson, were limited to the usual subscription class of that period, but before his school days were entirely over, he had the pleasure of the free school system for a short time.  Dec. 29, 1837, he was married to Miss Charity Stanfield, by whom he had thirteen children, seven living: William Preston, Harmon, Zero, John, Levina R., and Charley.  The deceased are Nathan, Cicero, Eli, Albert, James L., and an infant not named.  Of those living, all are married except Preston and Charley Mr. Anderson and his wife have been members of the Methodist Church for more than thirty-five years, and during that time he has filled several offices of honor and trust, and is now one of the trustees.  He was superintendent of the Sabbath-school connected with the church, until his failing health compelled him not to accept it any longer.  For more than twenty years he has been a sufferer with the rheumatism, and sometimes to such an extent as to incapacitate him even for walking.  He is, and always has been a Republican since the inception of the party.  His father was a Whig, as was also John, until the Republicans came in vogue.  One year after his marriage he went to Fayette County, when he remained about ten years, then came back, and in about one year purchased the home place of the heirs and since resided there.  All the property he has, three hundred acres of good first class land, he and his wife made by hard work and economy, except about twelve hundred dollars each, which they got from their parents at their death.  He is yet industrious, but is unable to work very much.  Mr. Anderson was not in the war of the rebellion, but has furnished three sons.  William, who was in the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth, Ohio Volunteer Infantry in Virginia, and Preston, and Harman who went into the One Hundred and Tenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  They were in all, or nearly all the battles of the regiment, principally among them being, Winchester, Battle of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and Cedar Creek.  They entered the service Aug. 22, 1862, and remained until the surrender of Gen. Lee to Gen. U. S. Grant, in April, 1865, Although having some very narrow escapes neither of them were wounded, the nearest to it being Harmon, who was hit on the ankle with a spent ball.  They both served with distinction, and each has an honorable discharged.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 856
  Xenia Twp. -
WARREN ANDERSON, printer, Xenia, Ohio, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, May 28, 1832, and is a son of Noah and Mary Anderson.  He is the eldest of ten children.  The family moved to Elkhart County, Indiana, when Warren was in his sixth year.  He assisted in clearing  a farm of one hundred and twenty acres out of the thick woods.  At the age of nineteen, broken down by hard labor and exposure, he entered the dry-goods house, with J. H. Defrees, at Goshen, in the same county, where he remained two years, after which he entered S. E. Davis' store for a few months.  He then engaged in teaching, and taught his first school in 1852, a few miles south of Goshen.  In 1854 he came back to Ohio, and opened books for his uncle, in his store on Wolf Creek, ten miles west of Dayton, Ohio, and remained with him until 1856, when he removed to Yellow Springs, Greene County, and entered the preparatory  department at Antioch College, under Horace Mann, where he remained four years, teaching during the winter, in order to prepare himself for a classical course, up to the year 1860.  When President Mann, died he was at his bedside, and received his kind farewell.  The following fall and winter he taught school at Cass, Miami County, and in the spring of 1861 became principal of Goshen Seminary, Clermont County, Ohio.  Being near Camp Dennison, the war demoralized the school, and it was discontinued for a time.  In the winter of 1861 he taught near Tippecanoe City, Ohio, and in 1862 was principal of the Industrial Academy at Hillsboro, near Richmond, Indiana.  The same year he returned to Goshen, Indiana, and commenced the study of law with George D. Copeland.  Subsequently Copeland bought the Goshen (Indiana) Times, and Mr. Anderson became assistant editor.  In 1863 he resigned, and visited Washington, D. C.  In the winter of 1863-'64 he taught school in Miami County, Ohio, where he cast his vote for Honest Old Abe for president in 1860, and again in 1864.  In 1864 he dismissed school, and enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Forty-Seventh Regiment, Ohio National Guard.  The regiment was Forty-Seventh Regiment, Ohio National Guard.  The regiment was mustered at Camp Dennison, sent to Forts Ethan Allen and Marcy, at the head of Chain Bride, near Washington, D. C., and participated in the battle of Fort Stephens, July 12th, assisting in the repulse of General Early, in his march upon the capital.  Was discharged, August 30th, at Camp Dennison, Ohio, and came to Xenia in the spring of 1865, where he continued his law studies with Hon. R. F. Howard, and was admitted to the bar in April, 1869.  In the winter of 1865-'66 he taught school at Alpha, Greene County, Ohio, keeping up the study of law.  In the winter of 1866-'67 he was principal of Xenia High School, during which time he organized the Eupranine Literary Society, which still survives.  Was secretary of the Republican Central Committee from 1866 to 1869, and secretary of the Greene County Sabbath-school Association in 1869; was married, May 30, 1867, to Miss Cannie Vigus, who was teacher of German in Xenia College, and a graduate of that institution.  May, their first child, was born December, 26, 1868, and died July 6, 1869.  Their second child, Florence, was born Mar. 16, 1874, and is still living.  He was appointed mayor of Xenia in February, 1867, to succeed Hon. John Little, who resigned.  In April following he was elected to the same office for two years.  Was also elected justice of the peace for Xenia Township for three years, ending May, 1870.  As one of the officers, drafted the articles of incorporation for the Young Men's Christian Association of Xenia, in January, 1869.  In April, 1870, was admitted by the Supreme Court of Ohio to practice law.  Was one of the founders, with Hon. J. F. Patton and T. L. Tiffany, of the Xenia Gazette, in August, 1868, and its chief editor until 1870, when he sold his interest to Colonel R. P. Findlay and in November, 1870, removed to Ottawa, Kansas, where he established the Ottawa Herald, December 4th, same year.  Sold out the Herald in 1871, and purchased an interest in the Journal of that city, which was founded by Hon. I. S. Kalloch, present mayor of San Francisco, California.  Was admitted to the Kansas bar, December, 1871.  Sold out the Journal in the fall of 1872, on account of ill health, and returned to Xenia, Ohio, where he resumed the practice of law, and in 1873 edited the Xenia Enterprise, Afterward changed to "News," and new called the Xenia Democrat-News.  Was again appointed by council mayor of Xenia, February, 1876, to fill the unexpired term of Hon. J. W. Keever.  Was correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette, and in October, 1875, was again elected justice of the peace of Xenia Township for three years.  Nov. 7, 1878, started the Xenia Nonpareil, changing its name, in the summer, 1879, to Xenia Sunlight.  Sold his interest, in May, 1880, to O. W. Marshall, and the same year established the Yellow Springs Review, of which he is still editor and proprietor.  Mr. Andrews had always been a Republican in politics, as was also his father, who was Republican representative from Elkhart County, in the Indiana Legislature, in 1861 - '62.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 467
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
DAVID ANKENEY, retired farmer, Byron, was born, June 8, 1831, near Alpha, and is the son of David and Elizabeth Ankeney, who were born in Washington County, Maryland, where they were reared, and after reaching their majority were married.  They immigrated to Ohio in 1830, locating near Xenia, and soon after purchased the farm on which Albert Ankeney now lives, near Alpha, making it their permanent home.  The land purchased was only partially cleared, and had a small log house, in which our subject was born.  He only lived a short time after settling here, dying very suddenly, while in his chair at supper, Nov. 2, 1830, from a paralytic stroke, aged forty-two years.  His wife survived him until Dec. 23, 1851, aged thirty-two years.  They were the parents of ten children, seven of whom are living:  Mary (Mrs. John Steel), Sarah, Margaret (Mrs. Rev. George Long, of Indianapolis), John, Nelson, Jacob, and David.  The deceased are Samuel, Henry, and Martha (Mrs. Shank).  His father and mother were members of the German Reformed Church until their death.  The boyhood of our subject was passed on the farm, receiving his education in the district school.  Soon after twenty-one years of age, he began life for himself, and was married.  Aug. 27, 1852, to Elizabeth, daughter of John Varner, a native of Maryland, and subsequently a citizen of this county, now deceased.  After marriage he located in Alpha, and after residing here for upward of twenty years, purchased a farm of two hundred and ten acres, where he now resides.  He owns, in the aggregate, two hundred and forty-four acres of land, which is mostly in a high state of cultivation, and tastefully improved, making one of the most desirable locations in the township.  Several years afterward he closed active labor, and sought the quiet of retirement.  His well-tilled and productive farm furnishes a handsome income.  Jacob was a member of the One Hundred and Seventy-Fourth Ohio National Guard, an honorable discharge at the expiration of his term of service.  Two children have been born to them, Alice E. and Edward H.  Politically, Mr. Ankeney is a strong Republican, casting his first vote for John C. Fremont.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 588
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
HENRY ANKENEY, deceased, was born in Washington County, Maryland, Feb. 17, 1813, and was a son of David and Elizabeth Ankeney, with whom he came to Ohio when a young man.  In 1837 he was married to Margaret, daughter of Henry Shank, whose history appears in this work.  After their marriage, they took up their residence in Bath Township, near Yellow Springs, where they lived about twenty years.  In 1863, he moved to the land where his widow now resides, near Alpha, and made a permanent home.  He died, Mar. 7, 1880, aged sixty-seven years, leaving his aged wife a farm of sixty-two acres, highly improved, making a comfortable home for her.  He was a member of the German Reformed Church, with which he had been connected for many years.  He was an exemplary man, and his death was regretted by all who knew him.  They had two children, John H. and Orange.  Mrs. Ankeney was born in this county, Feb. 13, 1817, and has been a member of the Lutheran Church since girlhood.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 589
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
HENRY ANKENEY, farmer, deceased, was born near Byron, on the place where his wife and children now reside, in the year 1823, and was a son of Henry and Esther Ankeney.  His boyhood was passed on the farm, receiving his education in the common schools, and working for his father until over twenty-one years of age.  In 1850 he was married to Evaline, daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Marley) Greene, by whom he had eight children, seven living: Margaret, Harriet E., George W., Sarah E., Johanna, Ruth, and Marcellus N., deceased.  After their marriage they located on the present farm, and after five years went to Mahaska County, Iowa, where they resided four years, and then returned, that he might be near his aged father.  His farm consisted of one hundred and sixty-eight acres, on which he resided till his death, Dec. 11, 1879.  He was much beloved and respected, and his death was universally regretted.  Mrs. Ankeney was born in Berkeley County, Virginia, in the year 1823, and when two years old, came with her parents to Ohio, and settled in Licking County, making the journey in a cart, with eight children.  They afterward came to his county, and located in this township, where they lived till their death at the age of seventy-six years.  To them thirteen children were born.  Mrs. Ankeney is a member of the German Reformed Church, which she joined at the age of seventeen.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 589
  Xenia Twp. -
A. J. ARCHDEACON, telephone proprietor and agent, Xenia, Ohio, was born in Springboro, Warren County, Ohio, in the year 1846, on the thirtieth day of September.  He is a son of George and Mary Archdeacon, of Cork, who immigrated to America, in the year 1841, with a family of eight children:  Jane, Richard, Nicholas, George, Benjamin F., Edward T., May E., and A. J., our subject, who is now thirty-four years of age.  He is only four feet high and weighs ninety pounds.  He is a member of the Odd-fellows, has filled all the chairs, has climbed to the topmost round in the order, and is the smallest Odd-fellow in Ohio.  He is one of the liveliest of the lively, and a general favorite wherever he is known; says his fighting weight is eighty-five pounds, and is now trying to bring himself down to enter the ring with the champion light weight of England sometime in August next, (day not set).
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 469
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
JOHN ARCHER, Dayton, Ohio.  This gentleman's grandfather, John Archer, was born in New Jersey, about 1776, married Mrs. (Rockhill) Craft, in 1787, who bore him five children: John, Thomas S., Amy, Sarah, and Susanna.  Mrs. Archer, was born about 1747, and was formerly married to Joseph Craft, by whom she had three children.  In 1805, Mr. Archer came to Ohio, locating on the present site of Centerville, building the first house, and keeping the first hotel in the place  He died in 1824.  Thomas S. Archer, father of our subject, was born in New Jersey, about 1793, and married Miss Sarah Beck, in Centerville, about 1816.  His wife's father, Samuel Beck, was born in New Jersey, in 1749, her mother, Elizabeth, in 1754, and were the parents of ten children, who all married, except one daughter, and raised families.  Our subject's father, had a family of nine children: John, William Thoams, Margaret, Eliza, Sarah, Melissa, and Susanna; five of whom are living.  John Archer, was born in Sugar Creek Township, Aug. 8, 1823, and remained on the farm until his marriage, with Mary Jane Boproff, Mar. 19, 1845.  Mrs. Archer's father, Daniel Boroff, was born in Virginia, in 1800, married Jeanette Fitzgerald, in 1820, who bore eleven children.  Our subject has a family of six children living:  David, Charles, Oliver F., Daniel F., Eliza R., and John E.  Deceased, William H., and three others dying in infancy.  Since his marriage, he has continued farming until the present, with the exception of one and one-half years in the grocery business, in Dayton, and serving as a soldier in the One Hundred and Fifty-Fourth Ohio National Guards.  Mr. Archer has a fine farm of sixty-two acres, well improved, with every modern improvement, on which is a valuable stone quarry, which yields annually from three to five hundred perches.  This, with the abundant yield of his lands, places him and his estimable wife in favorable circumstances to enjoy the evening of a well spent life.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 950
  Xenia Twp. -
JOHN S. ARMSTRONG, insurance agent, Xenia, Ohio, was born at Portersville, Pennsylvania, Aug. 8, 1833.  His father, James Armstrong, was born near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 1808, and his mother, Jane S., was born at Portersville, Pennsylvania, in 1812.  They moved to Johnson County, Missouri, about 1857.  He has five brothers and six sisters, located in different parts of the United States.  He received a good common school education at Portersville, and commenced teaching when seventeen years of age.  Soon after this, he entered the Butler Academy and completed the preparitory course, and then entered West Minster College, Pennsylvania, finished his course in Ohio University, Athens Ohio, then entered the senior class at West Minster, and graduated in the regular collegiate course in 1859.  When twenty-six years of age, he taught for some time, and studied theology.  At the breaking out of the war, he enlisted in the Ninety-third Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which being full, was mustered in the One Hundred and Seventh Regiment, at Camp Portsmouth, as orderly-sergeant of Company E; was soon appointed sergeant major of the regiment, chief clerk of the chief of artillery, Army of the Cumberland.  He then received a commission as second lieutenant, and served for some time as regimental adjutant.  In 1863 his regiment was charged to first regiment, Ohio heavy artillery, and he was promoted to first lieutenant, and assigned to battery C, and served in this company until the close of the war.  He united with the associate church in 1855, and still continues a devout member and believer.  He is also a member of the Knights of Honor.  He was married in 1864 to Miss Esther E. Allison  Her father, Samuel Allison, an old citizen, of Greene County, and her mother, Mary C. Allison were born and reared in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, and moved to Ohio in 1819.  His wife received a thorough education at Glendale Female Seminary, then taught school for sometime at Hagerstown, Ind.  They have five children, Harry C., Frank S., Walter R., Mary B., and Maggie E., the last named now at rest in the New Jerusalem.  In 1871, he received an appointment at United States Indian agent for Capote, Wemeunche, Utes, and Irearilla Apache Indians of northwestern New Mexico, and remained with them about two years.  He was employed in freight, and ticket departments of Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railroad, almost four years.  AT present, he is agent for the Pennsylvania Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 469
  Bath Twp. -
MARTIN V. BAGGOTT, justice, was born in Mad River Township, Montgomery County, Ohio, Jan. 30, 1837.  He is a son of James and Mary (Caylor) Baggott.  He, James, was a native of Virginia, (Fredericksburg,) and removed to this state in 1824, in company with one of his brothers, locating in Montgomery County, where he remained till 1854.  He then removed to Osborn.  He was a cooper by trade.  He was twice married, having children by both wives.  Our subject is a son of the second wife, and one of five who are still living.  James Baggott, as he is familiarly known, spent his boyhood on the farm, and received the rudiments of his education in the common schools, which he afterwards developed by careful research and self application.  At the age of nineteen he began teaching, and has followed the profession ever since, having become identified as one of the leading educators in the section.  During the past eleven years, he has occupied the position of the justice of the peace in Bath Township.  In 1859, he married Louisa Williams.  They have four children:  Vallandigham, Mary, Frances and George P., are living.  Luella, deceased; besides a nephew, son of his brother, whom he adopted when only seven weeks old, John C. by name.  Mr. Baggott is a member of both the Masons and Odd-fellows, to which he is fondly attached, and has held positions of honor in both.  Was Master in the Masons in 1879.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 721
  Xenia Twp. -
BRINTON BAKER, dealer in saddles and harness, Xenia, Ohio, was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1807.  Thomas and Sarah, his parents, were both born in Pennsylvania, and immigrated to Ohio in 1812, and have since made his county their home.  It is said the first saw mill in the county was built by them.  Brinton, the subject of this sketch, was married, in 1831, to Miss Eliza Hivling, of Xenia, Ohio.  Six children were born to them, Abraham H., Sarah, John A., Joshua S., Eliza J., and an infant.  Abraham, the only one living, is in partnership with his father, was educated in Xenia, and has spent his life here.  Mr. Baker was reared by Quaker parents, and is a very moral man.  HE served as county treasurer from 1852 to 1857, and has been a county infirmary director for fifteen years.  He has always been, and is to-day, one of the energetic business men of Xenia.  Abraham is now living on the same lot on which he was born.  In 1865 he was married to Miss Sallie A. J. Miller of Frederick City, Maryland, and is the father of three children, Mary E., John A., and Rachel J., all of whom are living with their parents.  When the war broke out, he was one of the first to respond, and after its close came home with an honorable discharge, and resumed his labors at his trade.  He and his father to-day are in the foremost rank in their business.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 470
  Bath Twp. -
MATTHIAS W. BAKER, retired farmer, was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, Dec. 18, 1806.  He is a son of William and Mary D. (Winans) Baker, natives of Kentucky, and born Aug. 10, 171, and May 2, 1785, respective.  In 1810, he removed with his family to Fleming County, Kentucky, where he remained till 1828, following the business of teamster, hauling form Maysville to Lexington, chiefly.  After coming to this state, in 1828, he followed farming.  He died May 26, 1838.  His wife survived till 1870, dying in her eighty-sixth year.  Our subject lived with his father till 1824, at which time he came to Ohio, making his home with his uncle, Dr. Winans, of Jamestown.  He went back to Kentucky, in 1825, and remained with his father one year, then returned to this county, where he has lived ever since.  In the fall of 1830, he went on a place one and one-half miles west of Jamestown, on the Xenia pike, where he opened a farm.  It was at that time a mass of fallen timber and thick underbrush.  Here he labored till 1853, clearing the farm now owned by John Cooper.   He then moved to within a mile of Byron on the farm he now owns, where he lived seven years.  In the spring of 1860, he moved into Byron, where he kept tavern and grocery some six years.  He then retired from active life, and moved into the dwelling where he now lives.  He was married, Aug. 28, 1828, to Matilda, daughter of Childs Moorman, a native of Rockbridge County, Virginia.  Mr. and Mrs. Byron are parents of four children: Mary E., born Jul. 9, 1829; Lavenia E., Dec. 30, 1830; W. C. M., Oct. 2, 1833; and Selathiel E. W., Sept. 13, 1838; the latter died in Xenia, Apr. 28, 1866, from camp diarrhoea contracted in the army, leaving a wife but no children.  The remaining three are living, and all married.  Mr. Baker was a hard working farmer during the greater part of his life.  He is spending his latter years in the enjoyment of the fruits of his early labors.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 721
  Xenia Twp. -
JOHN W. BALDWIN, farmer, Xenia, Ohio, was born in Hampshire County, Virginia, in the year 1827.  He is the son of James and Amy Baldwin, both natives of Virginia.  They immigrated to Ohio, in the month of May, 1829, with a family of seven children, four sons and three daughters.  John, the subject of our sketch, was sons and three daughters.  John, the subject of our sketch, was married in the year 1857, to Miss Laura A. Bonner, daughter of Styth and Maria H. Bonner of Greene County, Ohio.  They have a family of three children, William H., Annie M., and Mary A., all now living.  John W. enlisted in the Union army, in 1861, under Captain Samuel T. Owen, in Company C, Seventy-Fourth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Colonel Granville Moody, and was engaged in the following battle:  Fort Henry, Neeley's Bend, Stone River, Hoover's Gap, Tullahoma, Dug Gap, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Tunnel Hill, Dalton, Resaca, Dallas Gap, Pine Mountain, Pumpkin-vine Creek, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach-tree Creek, Chattahoochie Rover, Atlanta, and Jonesborough, Georgia, where he resigned his commission as second lieutenant, and came home, November 4, 1864.  He received his education in Greene County, where he has spent the greater portion of his life; is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is one of the leading farmers Greene County.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 470
  Jefferson Twp. -
SILAS BALES, farmer, Paintersville, is a son of John and Sarah (Lucas) Bales.  Mr. Bales was born Mar. 6, 1789, and died Mar. 11, 1864; she died June 8, 1874.  He served a few months in the war of 1812, and then returned to this county, where he was married about 1813, and where he passed the remainder of his life.  There were twelve children of this family, four daughters and eight sons, Silas being the eldest.  He was born in this county, June 11, 1814, and here he was reared, and afterward married Miss Elizabeth Smith, also of this county, by whom he had two children, Sarah and Martha, both of whom are living.  Sarah married a Mr. Marshall, now deceased; she then married Moses McKay, her present husband, and has two children, William S., and Edwin F.  Martha married Joseph Hollingsworth, whose biography appears in this work; they have five children.  Mr. Bales has a farm of one hundred and seventy-eight acres, on which he lives.  Himself and wife have been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church for at least thirty-five years.  He was elected trustee of the township in 1859, and re-elected in 1860.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 830
  Ross Twp. -
JACKSON BALLARD
, farmer, Jamestown, is a native of Adams County, Ohio; was born Oct. 25, 1822; came, with his parents, to this county when he was about four years of age, and has been a resident of this county since that time.  Married Maggie Taylor, of this county, in May, 1851.  Four children are the result of this union: Isaac T., Fannie, Rosa, and Minnie, three of whom survive.  Isaac T. was called to eternity at the early age of seventeen years.  Mr. Ballard has a farm of three hundred and thirty-five acres, well improved, and farms to both grain and stock.  He is one of the most industrious and enterprising men of this county, as is evidenced by his fine farm and excellent stock.  He remembers distinctly when this part of the country had  no pikes, and when there were no grain reapers except the sickle.  He was old enough to work in the harvest field when he saw the first grain cradle that was in part of this county.  The pleasure vehicles were common road wagons and sleds.  Turkeys and squirrels were very numerous when he was a boy.  There were wild deer in the neighborhood when he was quite a large boy.  The school house in which he obtained the early part of his education was a log structure, with slab seats, and with writing-desks made of slabs, laid on pins driven into the wall.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 756
  Ross Twp. -
JAMES BALLARD
, farmer, Grape Grove, is a native of this county, where he was educated; was born May 21, 1836; married, Jan. 12, 1861, to Deborah Gordon, who was born Mar. 10, 1838, and four children are the result of their union, Anna May, Ella, Flora, and Paul H.  Our subject has a farm of sixty-four acres, on which he lives.  Mr. and Mrs. Ballard are members of the Christian Church of Grape Grove, he uniting with that church May 10, 1858, and Mrs. Ballard seven years previous.  The school house in which Mr. Ballard first went to school was made of logs; the seats were made of elm poles, split in the middle, and pins put in for legs.  The windows wee made the full length of the house, and were twenty inches wide, under which the desks were placed, which were made of slabs, laid on pins.  Mr. Ballard's parents,, Josiah and Isabella (Miller) Ballard, were natives of Pennsylvania.  Mr. Ballard died Oct. 10, 1845, and Mrs. Ballard Apr. 10, 1862.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 755
  Jefferson Twp. -
ALLAN BARBER, farmer, Bowersville, son of Stephen and Mary (Vanaman) Barber, was born July 7, 1845, in this county, where he was reared and educated, and where, with the exception of nearly four years spent in the army, he has passed all his life.  He enlisted Sept. 19, 1861, and was discharged July 26, 1865.  Was a Company I, Thirty-First Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and participated in twenty-three engagements, among which were Stone River, Chickamauga, and Mission Ridge; and was with Sherman on his march to the sea.  After his return he engaged in farming.  Nov. 4, 1867, he was married to Martha E. Sparks, of this county, by whom he has had four children: Charley E., John E., Lulu J., and Mary M., all of whom are living.  Mr. Barber's mother was a daughter of Benjamin Vanaman.  Mr. Barber owns and lives on the old homestead, of sixty-five acres, engaged in farming.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 830
  Xenia Twp. -
GEORGE A. BARNES, furniture dealer, Xenia, Ohio, was born in that city, July 14, 1837.  He is a son of Henry and Ruth Barnes, who had a family of thirteen children.  George A., the subject of our sketch, was married Dec. 27, 1872, to Miss Julia Ann Wright, daughter of George and Sarah Wright, of Xenia, Ohio.  They have a family of five children, two sons and three daughters, Clarence, Anna, Lester, and a pair of twins, Ethel and Ester.  He spent this time with his father at the carpentering business until he was twenty-one years of age, and in 1856 he left home and went to Pike's Peak, and, not liking things there, continued his travels to California, where he remained but a short time.  He came back to Salt Lake; and then to Kansas, where he took charge of a mail train.  He then resided at St. Joe, Missouri, when he went to Kansas City, and thence to Santa Fe, New Mexico.  while at Salt Lake, his business was with General Percival Smith, as superintendent of supply trains for the government.  He then went to Santa Fe, and from there to the Rio Grande, to Texas, and when the first notes of war were sounded he was in New Orleans, and had to make his way overland, as best he could, to Evansville, Indiana, where he enlisted in the first regiment he met, the Twenty-Fourth Indiana, Colonel A. P. Hovey.  He went into camp at Vincennes, where he joined Company A, and was mustered in as a private, then promoted to corporal, and in a short time was promoted to duty sergeant.  When the regiment was ordered to St. Louis, they joined Fremont, and his company was ordered on duty to guard the first gun-boat built, the ironclad "Benton."  He then went with Fremont to West Missouri, where the famous Zagoni charge was made.  He was again promoted, to orderly sergeant,  and, returning to Jefferson City, Missouri, they took boats for the Tennessee River, and participated in the fight at Fort Donalson, Fort Henry, and Shiloh, where the regiment was assigned to Lew Wallace's division.  He was then promoted to sergeant-major.  They then crossed the country to Memphis, arriving in time for the naval engagement, and remained in command of the city for a week; thence to Helena, Arkansas, when they were ordered up White River, to reinforce General Curtis; was in several engagements on White River; then returned to Helena, where he was promoted to captain, and assigned to the First Arkansas regiment, to raise the first colored regiment on the Mississippi River, by order of Adjutant-General Thomas.  He was promoted to major of the regiment, which was mustered in as the Forty-Sixth United States Infantry, equipped and in service inside of two weeks, at Lake Providence.  It was then assigned to Goodrich's Landing, where one entire company, officers and men, were captured and shot down.  He was also in the massacre at Millakin's Bend, and in three months they had only three hundred and eighty-one left out of one thousand and fifty men.  From there they went to Vicksburg, where he was under Sherman; up the Yazoo, and had a fight at Chickasaw Bayou; then returned to Memphis, and took charge of a picket post in 1863 and 1864; thence to New Orleans, where he was made enrolling officer, under General Banks; and from there to Brazos Santiago, on the western coast of Texas; thence up the Rio Grande, and captured the last rebel stronghold.  The war being over, he got a leave of absence for six months, and raised a company of three hundred men called Cortenas' Guerrillas, who were equipped by the United States, and crossed the river and organized the liberal movement under the great Mexican chief,  General Cortenas, at Bagdad, Mexico.  They then went to Matamoras, and after a week's siege captured the entire garrison, consisting of French and Austrian troops.  Afterwards the prisoners were sent to Viseconise.  When their army gained force sufficient, they went into the interior and through the war until Maxamillian was captured at Queratta, and saw him shot.  He afterwards joined his regiment at Brownsville, and from there returned to New Orleans, where he took the yellow fever in 1867, and was compelled to resign on account of ill-health.  He returned to Xenia, and was soon appointed superintendent of the county infirmary, which position he held three years, since which time he has been engaged in the furniture business, and has a trade second to none.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 472
  Xenia Twp. -
HON. ISAAC M. BARRETT, miller and farmer, Spring Valley, was born in Saratoga County, New York, in 1827.  He is the son of George and Mahala Barrett.  His father is a native of Vermont; his mother, of New York.  They had a family of ten children, Maria B., Sarah, Mahala M., Mary L., Calista A., Rosanna, Isaac M., Slocum, John R., and Merritt H.  They immigrated to Ohio in 1838.  Isaac M., the subject of our sketch, was married, in 1852, to Miss Rebecca Swayne, daughter of Thomas and Eliza Swayne, daughter of Thomas and Eliza Swayne of Clarke County.  They have a family of ten children, Swayne T., George, Evans, John R., Isaac M., Don Carlos, Clifford, Clara Bell, Mary Ella, and Hattie.  George and Isaac M. are dead.  His wife died in January, 855, and in March, 1859, he married his present wife.  He held the commission of major in the service; was at Cumberland Gap, Virginia, and was mustered out in 1863.  He also held the office of internal revenue assessor for the Seventh Congressional District for over three years, and represented Greene County in the legislature for four years, from 1873 to 1877.  Received his appointment as revenue assessor from Abraham Lincoln, being the first appointed in the seventh district.  He inaugurated and organized the entire system of levying internal revenue taxes for that district.  Mr. Barrett is a self-made man.  He inherited nothing from his ancestors, but through his untiring energy has climbed to his present position.  He is not only one of hte most popular of men, but among the wealthiest, owning some of the finest farms in the county, and is also owner of the Spring Valley Mills, one of the best paying institutions in the county.  He is a Republican in politics, and always is a ready worker for the cause of right, and gives with a liberal hand to the needy.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 473
  Jefferson Twp. -
DANIEL BAYLIFF, farmer, Paintersville, is a son of Joshua and Mary (Fry) Bayliff, who ere married in Virginia, and who came to Ohio in 18904, locating where Cincinnati now stands.  At that time the place contained but few houses, and only one business house, which was a dry goods and grocery store combined.  Here they remained for about a year, and then moved to this county, locating in Caesar's Creek Township.  In 1836 they went to Auglaize County, where he died July 29, 1839.  Mrs. Bayliff died in this county, June 8, 1816.  When they first came to this county Indians and game abounded, and it was customary to attend church fully armed, in order to resist the attacks of the many enemies.  The nearest market was Cincinnati, from whence all supplies had to be transported on horseback.  Our subject was born May 22, 1816, within a mile of where he now lives, where he has a farm of one hundred and forty-eight and three-fourth acres, well improved.  He was twice married.  First, to Miss Eliza Stephens of Clinton County, by whom he had two children: Joshua, born Apr. 4, 1837, and Reece, born July 10, 1854.  Reece was married, Oct. 30, 1875, to Miss Mary O'Conner, by which union there are two children, Walter J., born Aug. 30, 1876, and John, born Mar. 7, 1876.  Joshua was married, Jan. 21, 1860, to Mary L. Stephens, by which union there are four children: William C., born Mar. 31, 1861; Amanda E. born July 7, 1862; Jane, born Feb. 12, 1864, died at the age of two; and Emma who died in her first year.  Joshua died Dec. 12, 1870.  Mrs. Eliza Bayliff died Dec. 21, 1866.  Our subject then married Mrs. Malissa (Fosset) Smith, Oct. 30, 1867.  She had four children by her first marriage, which was celebrated in 1845, with Aaron Smith who died Aug. 19, 1853.  The children are all living and married:  Angeline C. to Louis Powers, Phoebe to Albert Burrell, Levi to Miss Sarah J. Arey, and Abigail to James Curry who died Sept. 21, 1880.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 831
  Cedarville Twp. -
STEPHEN C. BEAL, deceased, Cedarville, son of George and Rachel (Driscol) Beal, was born in Greene County, Aug. 1, 1827.  He married, Aug. 28, 1852, Miss Amanda J. Smith, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Kimble) Smith, who were natives of Virginia, and ranked among the early pioneers of this county.  Stephen was the father of four children, all living: Rosetta J., George D., Etta L., and Charles M.  He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, respected by all, and among the prominent business men of this part of the county.  Departed this life, Apr. 13, 1877.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 559
  Xenia Twp. -
WILLIAM T. BEALL, farmer, Xenia, Ohio, was born in Allegheny County, Maryland, in the year 1798.  He is a son of John and Eleanor Beall, who immigrated to Kentucky about 1810, and stopped at Maysville about two years; came to Ohio in the year 1812, and located on Caesar's Creek, with a family of nine sons and four daughters.  William T., the subject of this memoir, located in Greene County in the year 1823; was married in the year 1822, to Isbellanna Alexander, a daughter of old Colonel John Alexander, who was a representative of the county to congress for two terms.  Mr. Beall has an interesting family of four sons and six daughters.  He received a portion of his education in Maryland, and a portion in Kentucky, and finished it in Greene County.  He was, after the war of 1812, one of the old militia captains, who used to parade in after days with their cornstalk guns, etc., and were so noted for obeying orders from their officers.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and now one of its trustees.  He is a solid Republican, and gave four of his sons to the Union, and only regreted that he had not a dozen more to give.  His eldest son, John A. was lieutenant of a company in the Ninety-Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and his third son, Eli C., was color-sergeant in the One Hundred and Tenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; and George W., and Washington T., were privates under Colonel Robert Stephenson.  All proved themselves gallant soldiers, and at the close of the war were honorably discharged.  His youngest son, Washington, is now seeking his fortune among the Black Hills.  The old gentleman and lady were agreeably surprised on the anniversary of the fiftieth year of their married life; he being presented with a fine gold-headed cane and pair of spectacles, and his wife with a very fine breast-pin and pair of spectacles; but they were still more surprised to see the host of friends that greeted them on the occasion.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 475
  Silver Creek Twp. -
MISSES RHODA AND KEZIAH BEASON, Jamestown, daughters of William and Catharine Beason.  Mr. Beason was a native of South Carolina, and went to Tennessee with his parents at quite an early age.  Came to this county when a lad, and lived the the remainder of his life here.  Married the mother of our subjects, Miss Catharine Hite, about 1826.  They were parents of six children: Pollie, Margaret, Rhoda, an infant son, Keziah, and Catharine; three are living, Rhoda, Keziah, and Catherine.  Mr. Beason was previously married to Miss Mary Standberry by whom he had eight children; six lived to maturity.  He served six month in the war of 1812.  His first wife and himself were members of the Predestinarian Baptist Church, in which faith they died.  The subjects of this sketch have a farm of fifty acres, which is the old home farm, situated three miles southwest of Jamestown, on which they live.  Her parents were members of the Friends' Church and her husband's parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal.  This is a family of reputable children, of whom the mother is proud.  She, though widowed, is cared for and guarded by her dutiful sons.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 788
  Xenia Twp. -
JAMES M. BEATTY, carpenter, Xenia, was born in Rochester, New York, in 1840.  He is a son of James and Isabella Beatty, both of whom were born in Ireland, and immigrated to New York, and from there to Ohio, about the year 1848, and settled in Montgomery County, with a family of four sons and one daughter, Robert, James, William, George, and Katie, all of whom are now living.  James, the subject of this memoir, when he first came to Ohio, entered into the carpenter business with his father, where he remained two years, and when the war broke out he enlisted in Company A, Ninety-Third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel Anderson, our ex-governor, and remained in the service of his country for three years, undergoing many privations and having some very narrow escapes.  He was taken prisoner on the 20th day of December, 1863, at Chickamauga, and remained such for twenty months.  While a prisoner he was conveyed to Belle Island, near Richmond, and thence to Smithsburg, Camp Libby, where he remained some two months; then he was removed to Danville, Virginia, and put in prison No. 5, where he remained about four months; and from there he escaped and was recaptured by blood-hounds at Plymouth, and taken to Warrington and put in jail; thence he was taken to Rolla and put in conscript camp, where he remained some three weeks; thence to Andersonville, Georgia, where he remained just one year; then he was sent to Vicksburg,  Mississippi, where he went into prisoners camp.  From there he started, on the 25th of April, for home.  On the 27th, the boat blew up, and from twelve hundred to fourteen hundred lives were lost.  During his prison life he made several escapes, but in every instance the blood-hounds brought him to bay.  He was promoted to second sergeant during the war, and after he landed in Columbus he felt as though he was again breathing the free air of Ohio, his beloved "Home, Sweet Home."  At one time during his imprisonment, himself and comrades made their escape through a tunnel one hundred and sixty feet long, which they dug, and came out under a negro's cabin; but being exposed, were recaptured and returned to the rebels.  During this escape he received a shot from one of the rebel pickets through the left arm, above the elbow.  He is now pursuing his trade, and by his steady habits and perseverance is doing a business he may well be proud of.  He has married in 1871, to Miss Cynthia Reed, of Xenia, daughter of Arnold and Cynthia Reed.  The result of this marriage is one son, Charles A., now in his fifth year.  Mr. Beatty is a staunch Republican in politics, and can be relied on at all times when his country needs his services.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 476
  Xenia Twp. -
GEORGE BELL, deceased, was born in Baltimore County, Maryland, in 1780, and with his father and three brothers came to Ohio in the winter of 1805-'6, and settled for a few years five miles south of Xenia.  In 1812, he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land three miles southeast of Xenia, which he cleared and lived upon until his death, his father and mother remaining under his care until their death, Aug. 16, 1817, when he married Vinca, daughter of Tinsley Heath, who preceded him to thus county from Virginia.  This union was blessed by ten children, nine of whom are now living, John M., James M., Thomas L., Lewis L., Erasmus U., Jewett F. G., Ann M., Sarah C., and George F.  He was very active in the anti slavery cause, and was a member of the first anti-slavery society ever founded in this country, which advocated the unconditional release of those thousands of souls in bondage.  He was of Scotch descent.  His grandfather was a shipper between England and the colonies, and by going securities lost heavily, and came west.  They were descendants of the Bells of Edinborough, Scotland.  He was not an office seeker, but always took an active part in whatever he thought was right, and was a man of great influence.  He commenced without anything, and succeeded in getting a good home, and was well known for his acts of charity throughout the country.  His son Jewett F. G. was united in marriage with the daughter of the late John Eavey, near Xenia, Oct. 14, 1880.  He attended the Ohio University, and graduated, in 1862, in the scientific course.  His wife also graduated at Xenia College.  In politics he is a Republican, and during the war was a staunch supporter of the cause, doing his share of the work at home, and donating more money to the government than he actually earned.  He is now living near Xenia, where he is engaged in farming and stock raising.  He is a man of very genial disposition, well educated, and beloved by all who know him.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 477
  Xenia Twp. -
PETER O. BENHAM, farmer, Xenia, Ohio, was born in Greene County, Ohio, in 1839, and is the son of Peter and Catharine Benham, both natives of Cincinnati, Ohio, who came to Montgomery County, Ohio, about the year 1830, with a family of twelve children, six sons and six daughters.  Peter, the subject of our sketch, was married, Feb. 18, 1864, to Miss Elizabeth A. Stemble, of Xenia, Ohio, daughter of Frederick Stemble, one of Xenia's oldest inhabitants, who held an office in that place over twenty years, a fact to which every boy in Xenia, during his reign as city marshal, can testify.  Our subject has had a family of six children, three of whom died in infancy, and the living are Blanchie S., Harry F., and George W.  When the war broke out, he was among the first to respond to the call, and on the 8th day of October, 1861, enlisted under Captain Fisher, in Company E, Seventy-Fourth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and continued in the service until May 22, 1865, when he received an honorable discharge.  He was in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, Jonesborough, Kenesaw and Lookout Mountains, Peach-tree Creek, and Fort McAllister, on the Atlantic Ocean; was sergeant of his company, and for bravery was detached, on the 18th of October, 1863, and placed on General Jeff C. Davis's staff, who was in command of the Fourteenth Army Corps, and held the responsible position of commander of an ambulance train.  He was captured on the 22d of February, 1865, by General Wheeler's force, and put in Saulsbury Prison, and from there to Andersonville, and thence to Libby, where so many of our brave soldiers suffered worse than death.  He was finally released,  and on the 22d day of March, 1865, started for "Home, sweet home."  He received his education in the Beaver Creek High School, where he has spent the greater portion of his life.  He is a member of the Odd-Fellows, and holds the office of vice grand, and is also a member of the Encampment.  He now resides on a farm, about two and a half miles west of Xenia, and by his genial disposition and correct habits has gained many warm friends.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 474
  Jefferson Twp. -
GILBERT T. BENTLEY, farmer, Bowersville, is a son of William and Sarah (Hite) Bentley; Mrs. Bentley died in Clinton County, Ohio, in 1852, Mr. Bentley lives in Wilmington, Clinton County, and was born in Highland County in 1808.  There were eight children by this marriage, five living; Ann, Jane, Elam V., Gilbert T., and John; Emily Eliza and Rhoda, deceased.  Gilbert married Miss Lydia A. Hussey, daughter of Christopher, Nov. 19, 1868.  Five children are the result of this marriage: Jacqueline, Jennie, William, John T., and Huston M., all living.  Mr. Bentley has a farm of fifty acres, well improved, on which he lives, a part of the Christopher Hussey land.  Is a member of the I. O. O. F. of Bowersville Lodge No. 559; united with this order at Wilmington in 1870, and is a charter member.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 831
  Sugar Creek Twp. -
FRANKLIN BERRYHILL, minister, Bellbrook, was born in Augusta County, Virginia, Mar. 1, 1811, and is a son of Alexander and Rachel (Thompson) Berryhill,  His mother was a neice of Charles Thompson, of revolutionary fame, and secretary to the first Continental Congress; a man of some executive ability, and a lover of liberty.  Alexander, father of our subject, was a Virginian by birth and at the age of nineteen volunteered in the American army, being under the command of General Greene.  At the battle of Guilford Court House, North Carolina, in the heat of the engagement his company was surrounded by the merciless, victorious British; commanded to give up their arms, and on doing so he was struck on the head with a sword, producing a severe wound, the scar of which remained until the day of his death.  Was held a prisoner by his captors two years, then exchanged; returned to his home, and after some years married and settled on a farm, where our subject was born.  Eleven children were the fruits of this union, eight sons and three daughters, of whom only two survive: Matthew and Franklin.  The latter was educated in the common schools, and afterwards took a full course at the Hanover College, in Indiana, graduating in 1837.  He studied theology under Dr. Matthews, who was his tutor for three years, and then entered the ministry of the old school Presbyterian Church, where for ten or twelve years he was actively engaged in the promotion of Christianity.  Owing to ill-health, he was obliged to abandon active work, and was honorably retired from his chosen profession.  He then sought the invigorating influence of farm life, preaching occasionally, and working earnestly in the Sabbath-school.  Mr. Berryhill was married Jan. 21, 1841, to Miss Nancy Sloan, by whom he had five children: Theodore B., Thomas C., Elmira (wife of William Rupert), and Finette, living and Caroline, deceased, in her thirteenth year.  Mrs. Berryhill departed this life June 13, 1864.  In 1865 Mr. Berryhill was united in marriage with Miss Julia A. Cooper, of Bellbrook.  Mr. Berryhill owns three hundred and seven acres of land, which is principally under cultivation and well improved, making a most delightful place in which to pass the declining years of a long and well-spent life.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 644
  Xenia Twp. -
BARCLAY Y. BERRY, tobacco manufacturer, Xenia, was born in the State of Pennsylvania, June 25, 1832.  He is a son of Michael and Martha Berry, both natives of Pennsylvania.  His father died in his native state, and his mother came to Ohio in 1860.  The family consisted of John L., Barclay Y., Thomas R., and Jane - all living but the daughter, who lost her life in her eight year by being burned to death.  Barclay, the subject of our sketch, has followed the manufacture of tobacco and cigars since he was eleven years of age.  He married Miss Mary O. Lutz, and by her had seven children, John H., Frank R., Fannie and Annie, who were twins, Emma S., William A. and Charles, deceased.  He enlisted in the union army in 1864, and was honorably discharged the same year.  He was also one of the Squirrel Hunters, who drove Kirby Smith from this state.  He was street commissioner for six years.  He is a member of the Odd-fellows, and Knights of Pythias.  He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for ten years.  By his genial disposition and faithfulness to business he has gained for himself many friends, and a steadily increasing patronage.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 479
  Xenia Twp. -
MRS. ISABELLA BICKETT was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1802, and is the daughter of Matthew and Isabella Alexander, natives of Pennsylvania, who immigrated to Ohio in 1804, with a family of six children, Francis, John, William, Isabella, Matthew, and Robert.  Isabella and Robert are the only survivors of the family.  Isabella was married, in 1827, to William R. Bickett, of Green County.  They raised a family of six children. Adam R., Matthew A., Mary J., William H., Elizabeth I., and Lydia A.  The last named died in 1865.  Mrs. Bickett received her education in Greene County, where her life has been spent.  She is a member of the Second United Presbyterian Church.  She is now living on a farm three miles east of Xenia, with her daughter, Mrs. Solomon Foust, who was married in 1868, and has one son, Edwin, who is living with his mother and grandmother on the farm, and attending school.  Mrs. Bickett is now in her seventy-ninth year, and is uncommonly active for one of her age.  The family, from the oldest to the youngest, are Republicans, and enjoy the reputation of being benevolent, and always ready to lend a helping hand in time of need.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 478
  Sugar Creek Twp. -
JOHN BIGGER, farmer, Bellbrook, born in Montgomery County, Dec. 7, 1825; was a son of John and Mary (Bradford) Bigger, the former was born in Kentucky; Mrs. Bigger in Ohio.  They were married in 1824, and were parents of four children, three of whom are now alive, John, Joseph A., and Samuel; one deceased, Linley.  Our subject was reared on the farm, where he received his education in the common schools, and remained with his parents till he attained the age of twenty-eight years, when his father bought the farm where he now resides; he then went to farming for himself which he has followed ever since.  He now owns a farm of one hundred and thirty-eight acres, all in a good state of cultivation and well-improved.  He married in 1854, and he and Mrs. Bigger are worthy members of the United Presbyterian Church.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 645
  Xenia Twp. -
JOSEPH BIGGER, retired farmer, was born in the state of Kentucky, in the year 1800.  He is a son of John and Mary Bigger; the former born in Ireland, the latter in Pennsylvania.  Mr. Bigger's father immigrated to this country when fourteen years old, and settled in Pennsylvania where he was married, and in 1806, by train and wagon, in company with Phillip More came to Montgomery County; their nearest neighbor then being John Duncan, one mile distant.  They settled in a permanent home, clear up and improved their land, living thereon till their decease.  He died in 1833, at the age of seventy-three.  His wife survived him, and died at the age of four score and four years.  They were parents of nine children, of whom only four are living; Thomas, Joseph, James, and Polly, now Mrs. Stephenson, who resides in Monmouth, Illinois.  They were members of the old Associate Presbyterian Church, of which they were life-long members.  He was a ruling elder, and was much interested in the welfare of the church, and all matters pertaining to religion.  He was an old line Whig, and a strong anti-slavery man, always laboring with might and main for the principles which guaranteed the freedom of the downtrodden and oppressed slaves.  The subject of this sketch was reared on the farm, and received his education in the primitive district schools.  He remained with his parents until twenty-five years of age, at which time, Oct. 6, 1825, he was married to Margaret, daughter of John Bradford, who died without issue, Mar. 16, 1856, aged fifty-three years.  After his marriage, he located in Sugar Creek Township, on the farm where he lived until 1859.  Sept. 15, 1867, he was married to Sallie (Robinson) Bosserman, daughter of Captain John Robinson of Warren County.  In 1859, he sold his farm, bought property in Dayton, and in 1861, came to Xenia, where he purchased property, and went into business with J. B. Fleming; afterwards sold out and went to Springfield, purchasing property there.  Again selling out he went to Dayton, where he resided two or three years, and then went back to Xenia, where he has since remained.  He owns a beautiful residence on west Market Street, where he and his wife are enjoying all the comforts and necessaries of life.  He and his wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church, to which he has been connected many years, his wife having previously belonged to the Presbyterian Church.  He has been ruling elder while living on Sugar Creek, and like his parents is much interested in religious matters, being a zealous worker therein.  He is a Republican in politics, having always voted with that party upon all questions at issue.  Mrs. Bigger was born in Butler County, Ohio, in 1812.  The father was a pioneer coming to Cincinnati from Pennsylvania, in 1793, and was a captain of a company of volunteer soldiers in the war of 1812, and was with Hull at his disgraceful surrender, and after which he was paroled, and walked from Detroit to his home in a very lame condition.  They were parents of seven children, of whom only Mrs. Bigger survive: the deceased are Jane W., Anna, Mary, William A., John L., Robert F., and Sallie B.  Mr. Bigger died, in 1845, aged seventy-four years.  She survived her husband ten days, dying in her seventieth year.  They were members of the old Washington Church, being members from youth to death, and were also much interested in religious matters, and stood high in their church.  He was an old line Whig, and frequently predicted the coming war, and that slavery would never be made a civil issue without the fair land of commerce, being drenched in blood, which had a truthful and horrible fulfillment, in the subsequent history of the country.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 946
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
THOMAS BIGGER, retired farmer, was born in Kentucky, in 1792.  Is a son of John and Mary Bigger.  His father was born in Ireland, and his mother in Pennsylvania, where they were married, and after removed to Kentucky.  In 1806 they removed to Montgomery County, Ohio, and were among the pioneers of that county, in which they lived and died.  They were parents of ten children, four of whom are living, Joseph, Mary, James and Thomas.  The former lives in Xenia, and James on the home farm in Montgomery County.  The deceased are Hugh, Rebecca, Hannah, Sarah, William, and John.  Mr. and Mrs. Bigger lived to a good old age, he dying upward of forty years ago, and she about twenty years since. The subject of this sketch was reared on the farm, and received a common school education in the district schools.  He has been thrice married; first, with Hannah Snowden, by whom he had two children, Samuel and Maria, now Mrs. Thomas White.  His second marriage was celebrated with Catharine (Conaver) Bradford, who bore him one child, John B.  His third and last marriage was consummated with Elizabeth (Cunningham) Dallas, by whom he has had three children, two of whom are living, Samuel, Elizabeth, and James, deceased.  About the year 1856, he came to the place where he now lives, and is the owner of one hundred and eighty acres of fine land, which is highly improved, making a beautiful and comfortable place, in which he and his aged wife may end their declining years.  They are both members of the United Presbyterian Church, to which they have been connected for many years, he having been a ruling elder for more than half a century, and has always taken much interest in matters pertaining to religion; and though we find them farm down the hill, toward the setting sun of life, both are reconciled to the will of their Master ,and are patiently awaiting his summons.  His deceased wives were also members of the same church, as also are his children, which is a source of gratification to their aged parents.  Officially, he has served the people in this township as clerk, etc.  In politics he is a Republican, and during his long life has upheld the principles of that party by influence and ballot.  His father left the South when the shadow and curse of slavery began to darken that fair land, and sought an asylum in the free states, to be away form its taint and accursed influence.  He was a strong anti-slavery man, and did all in his power to hasten the freedom of the unfortunate and down-trodden blacks.  He and his wife were members of the United Presbyterian Church, of which both, after a long and useful lie, passed away as bulwarks.  By his marriage with his last wife, he had two children, Dinsmore and Martha.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 590
  Silver Creek Twp. -
REBECCA BINEGAR, Jamestown, is a daughter of James and Rebecca (Resse) Simmons.  He was born Nov. 28, 1802, and she Jan. 9, 1804.  They were parents of twelve children: Thomas W., born Oct. 10, 1823; Jane E., born Apr. 28, 1825, died Oct. 19, 1841; Josiah W., born in 1832; Rebecca, born Dec. 12, 1828; Jane P., born Nov. 16, 1830, died Nov. 11, 1844; Alfred R., born Nov. 27, 1832; Matilda, born Mar. 18, 1838, died in 1877; Julia E., born Dec. 12, 1840; John, born July 27, 1843; Jacob, born in Aug., 1845, died July 9, 1871.  Our subject was married to James Binegar in 1848.  Seven children were the result of this union.  The first died in infancy.  John D., born Aug. 29, 1844; Simmons, born Sept. 19, 1850; John W., born July 13, 1855; Ella A., born Sept. 24, 1857; Mary Ellen, born Oct. 18, 1859; Amanda, born Apr. 20, 1845.  Mrs. Binegar is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. Binegar was also a member of that church.   The widow has a farm of sixty-seven acres, which her sons cultivate, and on which they live.  Her parents were members of the Friends' Church, and her husband's parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal.  This is a family of reputable children, of whom the mother is proud.  She, though widowed, is cared for and guarded by her dutiful sons.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 789
  Xenia Twp. -
WENDEL BLOOM, grocer, was born in Bavaria, 1835.  He is the son of Wendel and Catharine Bloom, both natives of Bavaria, and both deceased.  They raised a family of three children, John, Wendel and MartinWendel, the subject of our sketch, was married, in 1857, to Miss Margaret Byer daughter of August and Johana Byer of Wittenberg, Germany.  She has borne him seven children, John, Mary, Wendel, Kate, George, Edward, and one dead, whose name was MartinMr. Bloom is a member of the Red Men, and has filled all the offices; is also a member of the Catholic Church.  He is now engaged in the grocery business, on Main Street, in Xenia, and has lately purchased the property on Detroit Street, known as the old Hivling House, fitted it up, and now has one of the finest rooms in the city.  He is a thorough business man, and by his genial disposition has gained many warm friends.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 478
  Jefferson Twp. -
THOMAS D. BONE, farmer, Paintersville, is a son of Thomas and Ellen (Turner) Bone, and a native of Maryland, died June, 1865.  They were married in this county in 1814.  There were thirteen children of this family: Christina, Isaac, Dinah, Mary, Stephen, Catherine, Elizabeth, Sarah, Thomas, James and RhodaHarrison and Ellen, deceased.  The subject of this sketch was born July 217, 1834, in this county, where he was reared, and where he married Miss Eliza J., daughter of David and Mary Devoe who lived in Paintersville, Nov. 30, 1865.  There were five children of this union:  Foster L., Flora A., two infants and Etta.  Mr. Bone was one of the "brave, noble boys in blue."  He volunteered Feb. 24, 1862, being a member of Company A, Seventy-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was in two heavy battles, Buzzard's Roost, and Resacca.  Received an honorable discharge at the close of the war.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 832
  Xenia Twp. -
PETER BOON, minister, was born in Virginia, in 1825, and is the son of James and Sarah Boon, who had a family of nine children.  Peter came to Ohio in 1850, and in 1860 was married to Miss Louisa E. Lewis, daughter of Henry and Ann Lewis, of Canada.  He has a family of five children, four by his present wife, and one by his first, Laura J., Mary M., Louis P., Dora M., and Anna B., all living.  He enlisted on the 16th of March, 1865.  Received his education as best he could, never being sent to school; but by his untiring energy fitted himself for the ministry, and has been laboring in the First Baptist Church in Xenia for ten years.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 478
  Silver Creek Twp. -
MARTHA (LOCKHART) BOTLER, merchant, was born in Adams County, Ohio, June, 1823, and came with her parents to this township, in 1824, where she was reared, and where she married Mr. Edward Botler, a native of Maryland, May, 1845.  There were five children born until them; Arthur, Flora, Amelia, Kate, and Mattie all of whom are living, save Amelia, who died at the vary early age of two years and six months.  Arthur and Flora married.  He is engaged with his mother in the mercantile business in Jamestown, where they live, and where his father died, Oct. 29, 1877, aged sixty-five years and twenty-two days.  He had been engaged in merchandise, in the room where the mother and son now do business, for many years before his death.  Mrs. Botler has a good home on Limestone Street, on which the store room is situated.  She and three daughters, are members of the Disciple Church.  Mr. Botler was a member of the Odd-fellows, and a highly respected citizen.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 789
Xenia Twp. -
 
ANDREW H. BOUGHMAN, retired banker, Xenia, Ohio, was born in the State of Maryland, in the year 1807.  He is a son of Andrew and Esther Baughman, who immigrated to Ohio about the year 1800, with a family of six children,, four sons and two daughters.  Andrew, the subject of this sketch, while yet in Maryland learned the milling trade, and after coming to Ohio he attended a mill owned by John Harbine, and continued with him about two years.  He then rented J. Snyders mill, and attended it on the shares for some six years, and then with Casper Snyder bought it, and run it until the year 1853, when they sold out.  He then came to Xenia, and engaged in farming, trading, etc., and in 1876 he was elected president of the First National Bank of Xenia.  When he came to this country his circumstances were such that he was compelled to walk the whole distance from Hagerstown, Maryland, to Xenia, and worked for sometime for his board and clothes.  His untiring energy, and industrious habits and faithfulness to business have gained for him a position in life, and among business men a place attained by very few.  He held the office of township trustee, and was commissioner for twelve years; president of the city council for a number of years; has been a member of the Odd-fellows for thirty-four years, and is a member of the grand lodge and grand encampment; has been a member of the Reform Church for over forty years, filling some office of importance nearly all the time.  He has never had any children, but like a Christian gentleman has raised three children of other parents.  He was married in 1833, and his wife is still living, assisting in cheering his declining years.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 471
  Xenia Twp.. -
JOHN G. BOWSER, railroader, was born in Greene County, in 1854.  He is the son of Mike and Hulda Bowser, who have a family of four children, Frank, Maggie, Emma and John.  Emma was married to W. H. McCaidy, of Springfield, Ohio.  The father is one of Xenia's oldest settlers, and at one time kept what was then known as the Hivling House.  He was also, at one time, sheriff of Warren County.  John has been engaged in various branches of business; was clerk in the Xenia post-office some four years; engaged in the Neff House, at Yellow Springs, for some time, and for the last five years has been engaged in railroading and telegraphing in Chicago.  He is an energetic young man, of fine appearance, and well adapted for almost any position.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 789
  Jefferson Twp. -
JOHN BRAKEFIELD, farmer, Pearson's Station, is a son of Elias and Mary Brakefield.  Elias was born in Berkeley County, Virginia Aug. 31, 1806, and his wife in Ohio, Jan. 27, 1810.  They were married in Ohio about 1830.  There were five children of this family: Armilda, John, David, Thomas, and Elizabeth S.  The parents and all the children are living.  The subject of this sketch was born Jan. 26, 1833, in Fayette County, where he was reared and educated.  He was married to Miss Rachel Fearnow of Buckskin Township, Ross County, at Chillicothe, Nov. 12, 1856.  Four children are the result of this union, Mary A., David A., Rebecca E., and Elias L., the latter deceased.  The mother was born June17, 1837, and died on the farm where the family now lives Nov. 18, 1862.  Mr. Brakefield married Miss Margaret J. Little, Mar. 20, 1864, who was born July 10, 1845, in Fayette County.  There are nine children of this union: Olney O., Armilda H., John A., Hattie, Mattie, Rachel E., Thomas J., William A., and Sophronia.  Mary A. was married to William F. Little, of this county, Jan. 1, 1878; one child, Ward B.  Mr. Brakefield has a farm of one hundred and forty-four acres, well improved, on which he lives, having about one hundred acres in cultivation.  He is a good farmer and excellent citizen, and a member of Lodge No., 181, I. O. O. F., of Jamestown.  Both his wives were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 832
  Bath Twp. -
ELIAS BRANDENBURG, farmer, Osborn, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, Nov. 15, 1825.  He is a son of Aaron and Eliza (Matthews) Brandenburg, natives of Frederick County, Maryland, who came to this state in 1808 or 1809, with their parents.  They were the parents of seven children:  Susannah, Melissa, Elias M., Margaret, Benjamin, George W., and William L.   Aaron Brandenburg was a wood-worker, working chiefly at wagon-making, though his genius at that time allowed him to handle tools in wood in almost any department.  He died in October, 1855, in his sixty-second year.  His wife survives, and is living with her son, Elias M.  The subject of this sketch passed his boyhood in Carlisle, Ohio, and at the age of thirteen went with his father to Indiana, where he remained until he reached manhood.  In November, 1849, he was married to Matilda Lewis, who died in August, 1858.  Mr. Brandenburg then came back to Ohio, and in 1859 consummated his second marriage, with Mary J. Light, and then returned to Indiana, where he remained until January, 1860, following the trade of wagon-maker.  He again returned to his native state, and located on the farm where he now resides.  His farm consists of one hundred and twenty-four acres, which he tills chiefly to grain.  Mr. and Mrs. Brandenburg are active members of the Bath Presbyterian Church, and, though they have no children, take an active interest in the general good of the community at large.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 722
  Xenia Twp. -
CHARLES BROOKS, farmer, was born in Paris, Kentucky, in 1836, and is the son of Dr. John and Evaline Brooks, both natives of Kentucky.  Charles, the subject of this sketch, was married, in 1856, to Miss Hannah Blackburn, daughter of David Blackburn, of Kentucky.  They have one child dead, Joseph, and one living, Charles Anna Brooks.  He is a member of the Christian Church, and also a member of the Odd-fellows, and is right supporter of the noble grand.  He is now living on his farm of forty-three acres, four miles east of Xenia, on the narrow-gauge railroad, and is one of the many men of his color who came here after the war.  He is now one of the prosperous farmers of Green County, a good citizen, and well beloved by all who know him.
ource: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 480
  Ross Twp. -
J. H. BROTHERTON, farmer, Cedarville, is a native of Berkeley County, Virginia; was born May 14, 1825; came to this county, with his parents, Oct. 18,1 835, and has been a resident ever since that time.  Married Electa Jane Lawrence Sept. 26, 1850, who bore him seven children, John W., Amelia Josephine, Eugene, Wilbur, Orville, Charles F., and Burt Earl five of whom are living, John W., and Orville having been called from earth.  Amelia J. is married, the others remain unmarried.  John Brotherton, father of our subject, died in Delaware County, Indiana, in 1863, and his mother died in the same county, in May, 1879.  They were natives of England, and came to America in 1818, locating in Berkeley County, Virginia; left there for Ohio, Oct. 1, 1835; arrived at their destination on the 189th of the same month, and remained in this county until 1849, when they went to Indiana.  Our subject has a farm of two hundred and seventeen acres, well improved, and farms, chiefly to grain at present, previously to stock.  Was elected county commissioner in 1865, an held the office until 1871.  The new infirmary, and many other county improvements, were made during his administration.  He taught school in one of the old school houses, which has long ago given place to the new..  He has been a member of the board of education for twenty years, and has been clerk of his school district for the same length of time.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 756
  Cedarville Twp. -
GEORGE W. BROWN, farmer, Cedarville, was born in Louden County, Va., Feb. 13, 1804, son of Jacob and Judith (Walters) Brown  George immigrated to this county with his parents at the age of thirty-one years.  His father located two thousand acres of land in the woods, where George and his parents lived under one roof for fifty-five years - an occurrence which is seldom known.  They lived and toiled together, cutting away the dense forests, and making themselves a farm.  Our subject was married, Dec. 15, 1849, to Miss Eliza McCroy, the daughter of James and Elizabeth McCroy, who were also natives of Virginia.  George is a member of the Friends' society, a stalwart Republican, and cast his vote for James A. Garfield.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 559
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
SAMUEL BROWN, farmer, was born in Pennsylvania, Nov. 17, 1816, and is a son of George and Elizabeth Brown, who were born in the same state, in which they were married and lived until 1824, when they immigrated to Ohio, locating near Bellbrook, where they made a permanent home, and died at advanced ages.  They had seven children, five of whom are living: Anthony, Abraham, George, Adam, and Samuel.  The deceased were Catharine and Mary.  They were members of the German Reformed Church, and exemplary Christians, their death being regretted by all.  Our subject was reared on the farm; was eight years old when he came to Ohio, and thus early in life became an auxiliary in the labor of the farm, and remained with his father until of age, when he began life for himself.  He engaged in job chopping, a work in which he took great delight, and old as he is, can swing an ax with much of his youthful vigor.  Feb. 11, 1840, he was married to Eva Snypp, who bore him six children, four of whom are living:  Christina, Jacob, Marcellus, and Franklin  The deceased are George and Mary.  Mrs. Brown died in 1856.  She was a member of the Reformed Church.  His second marriage was celebrated with Charlotte (Clark) Sellers, Aug. 28, 1856.  She has borne him three children, Charles A., Benjamin H., and Charlotte F.  In 1840 he came to where he now lives.  He is one of the men of this county who had a full share in bringing about its present almost perfect state of perfection.  Is self-made, beginning life without means, and from his first eighteen months' labor with an ax, saved $200, which was the nucleus of his present large property.  He and his wife are members of the German Reformed Church, he joining when first married, and both take much interest in religious matters.  Her parents, Benjamin and Elizabeth Clark, came to Ohio in an early day, locating in Clarke County, where he father died.  Her mother departed this life in Montgomery County, aged thirty-five years.  Her father was born in England, and they were both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and parents of four children, two living: Benjamin and Charlotte.  The deceased are Rachel and Samuel.  Mrs. Bigger had five children by her first husband (Mr. Sellers), three of whom are living:  Henry, Scott, and Elizabeth.  The deceased are Zachariah T. and Anna.   Henry was a member of Company E, Seventy-Fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, enlisting at the beginning of the war, and serving until the close.  He was twice wounded, once severely through the right arm.  Scott was a member of the same regiment.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 591
  Xenia Twp. -
THOMAS A. BROWN, mail agent and farmer, Xenia, was born a slave in the State of Maryland, in the year 1814.  His father and mother, Jeremiah and Isabella Brown, were both slaves, and natives of Maryland, and had a family of five children, William, Charles, Dennis, Anna and Thomas A.  The subject of this sketch was married in 1840, to Miss Frances J. Scroggins, of Wheeling, West Virginia, by whom eh had a family of six children, Jeremiah A., Bell J., Anna E., Hallie Q., John G., and Mary Frances,  who was burned when her father's house was destroyed by fire.  He lived in Canada from 1861 to 1870, and came to Ohio in 1871 for the purpose of educating his children, which has been done successfully at Wilberforce.  Two of them, John G., and his daughter, Hallie, are teachers, and she is a very fine elocutionist.  He is a self-made man, and at one time owned real estate worth nearly a million dollar.  He bought the freedom of his two brothers, one sister, and himself, and to-day owns a very fine property at Wilberforce, and also a fine farm in Canada.  He is a staunch Republican in politics.  He is now making his home at Wilberforce, and has the esteem and confidence of all who know him.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 479
  Xenia Twp. -
MRS. ELIZA J. BRYANT, matron of Greene County Infirmary, Xenia, was born in Bath County, Kentucky, Dec. 25, 1822, and is the daughter of Augusta and Sarah Shoat.  Her father was a native of Maryland, and her mother of Virginia.  He immigrated to Ohio in 1808.  She was stolen when a child, and brought to Kentucky.  They had thirteen children, who are all dead but Eliza.  She came to Ohio in 1841, on account of the oppression of slavery, it being the year of the reign of the black Indians, when the slave-holders were disguising themselves, and killing off the colored women and children.  She has been twice married: first to Mr. Thomas, by whom she had two children, James and Louisa.  She came to Ohio in 1845, on account of her health, to spend the summer.  She was again married, Mar. 2, 1854, to George W. Bryant, a Baptist minister, who died in Natchez, Mississippi, Oct. 8, 1867, in the home missionary field.  God blessed them with seven children, George, Sarah, John, Eddie, Franz, William, and James.   She is at present matron of the Green County Children's Home, which position she has filled for the last four years.  She professed a hope in Christ in May, 1841, and is now a member of the church.  She is a woman of unusual ability, remarkably well preserved, and peculiarly adapted to the position she now fills.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 480
  Xenia Twp. -
ABNER S. BUCK, attorney-at-law and notary public, Xenia, was born in Washington, Fayette County, Ohio, on the 20th day of September, 1818.  He is a son of Samuel and Sarah Buck.  His father was born in Pennsylvania, Mar. 7, 1780, and his mother in New Jersey, Sept. 29, 1789.  Our subject received his education at Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio, where his youth was spent at school and at labor.  He studied law in his father's law office, which he entered in May, 1837, and was admitted to the bar in May, 1841.  During the time he was studying, he cut three hundred cords of wood.  After practicing four or five years he became dissatisfied with his profession, and withdrew from it and engaged in various other avocations.  He was elected to the office of justice of the peace of Xenia Township, on the 3d day of April, 1876, and reelected Apr. 8, 1879.  He is a member of the United Presbyterian Church, second congregation, of Xenia.  His home has been in Greene County for thirty-eight years.  His father came to Ohio in 1799, and his mother in 1805.  Mr. Buck is the youngest man for his age in Ohio, and a general favorite with all who know him.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 481
  Xenia Twp. -
CHARLES J. BUCK, teacher, son of Samuel and Sarah Buck, was born in Washington Township, Clinton County, Ohio, in the year 1832.  His father is a native of Pennsylvania, and his mother a native of New Jersey, and they raised a family of ten children.  Charles J., the subject of this sketch, was married in 1857, to Miss Julia Campbell, daughter of Hugh Campbell, of Xenia.  They have three children living, Nettie S., Nellie M., and Charles M.; and Maggie F., and Effie May, deceased.  He received his education in Ohio, where he has spent the greater portion of his life.  On the 6th day of August, 1862, he enlisted in the Seventeenth Ohio Battery, and took part in such prominent battles as Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Fort Morgan, Mobile, etc., and in 1865 received an honorable discharge, and return to his home.  The family are members of the First United Presbyterian Church of Xenia.  A fine teacher, and a man of genial disposition, he has many warm friends in this community.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 482
  Xenia Twp. -
HENRY S. BUCKLES, carpenter, was born in Greene County, in 1815.  He is the son of John and Elizabeth Buckles, both natives of Virginia, who immigrated to Ohio in 1804, with a family of nine children.  Henry, the subject of our sketch, was married, in 1837, to Miss Ellen Thomas, daughter of Archibald and Catharine Thomas, of Greene County.  They have a family of eight children, three of whom are dead, James W., Mary E., and Archibald T.  Those living are Narinah P., Eliza J., William M., Emma V., and Arthur S.  Mr. Buckles is a member of the Good Templars, and also of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Xenia.  He received his education in an old log school house, in Bellbrook, where most of his life was spent, with the exception of eighteen years in Champaign County.  He is one of the oldest carpenters in Xenia, and none in the county surpasses him in his profession.  He is a truly good and moral man; not only moral, but religious, being one of the old class leaders in his church, and is a man who shows his religion by his daily walk.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 481
  Xenia Twp. -
LEWIS M. BULL, grocer, son of James R. and Anna A. Bull, was born in Xenia, in 1848.  His father and mother were natives of Ohio and Maryland, and had a family of five children.  Lewis, the subject of our sketch, commenced the grocery business in his native place some six years ago, and by his gentlemanly deportment and fair dealing has built up a trade which is a credit to himself and the city.  In 1844 he was married to Miss Lizzie A. James daughter of Joshua James.  They have one son, Lester J. BullLewis is a member of the Odd Fellows, and also of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics a staunch Republican.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 482
  Cedarville Twp. -
WILLIAM H. BULL, farmer, son of James and Anna (Gowdy) Bull, who were born in Pennsylvania, about 1776, was born in Cedarville Township, Nov. 14, 1805.  James departed this life at the age of ninety-two years, and Anna at sixty-two years.  William spent the early part of his life at home with his parents; when he reached the age of twenty-five, he hired to work on a farm at $8.00 per month.  Was married Dec. 22, 1836, to Abby R. Kyle, daughter of Joseph and Jane (Gowdy) Kyle.  Six children have been born to them.  Four of their sons took part in the late war.  James Kyle was a member of the Thirty-fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  Serving four years, following his regiment through several hotly contested engagements, was incarcerated for some time in Libby Prison.  John Gowdy served as a soldier two years, W. H. Gowdy one year, and Joseph K. Gowdy three months.  William and his family are members of the United Presbyterian Church - Massie's Creek congregation.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 560
  Xenia Twp. -
WILLIAM H. BULL, JR., farmer, Xenia, was born in Greene County, Ohio, in 1845.  He is a son of James R. and Amelia Bull, natives of Ohio and Maryland, who had a family of five children, three of whom are living.  William H., Jr., was married in 1877, to Miss Annie Stevenson, daughter of Samuel and Olive Stevenson, of this county.  He received his education in Greene County, where he and his wife have both spent their lives.  She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  They are a young couple, just starting out in life, and a passer-by would readily judge the outcome from their beautiful farm, and the neatness of its surroundings.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 482
  Xenia Twp. -
GEORGE J. BURDELL, engineer, Xenia, was born in Columbus, Ohio, in 1853.  His father, Asa, born in New York, and his mother, Harriet Burdell, born in New Jersey, where the parents of nine children, Alice B., George G., Charles H., William M., Edward P., and Hattie, who are living; and Ida, Carey, and Gracie, deceased.  They came to Ohio about the year 1860.  George G., the subject of this sketch, was married Aug. 28, 1878, to Miss Ella N. Beckom, daughter of Mary Beckom, of Charleston, Illinois.  They have one son, Asa P., the pet of the household.  He has held positions on many of the prominent roads of the country, and is now engineer of the steam shovel on the Pan Handle.  He received his education in Xenia, where he has spent the greater portion of his life.  A young man of energy, his accommodating disposition has gained for him many warm friends.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 483
  Xenia Twp. -
GEORGE N. BURGESS, tinner, was born in Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, in 1848.  His father and mother, Thornton and Elizabeth Burgess, were both born in Virginia, and immigrated to Ohio about the year 1844, with a family of eleven children.  George, the subject of this sketch, is now working at his trade in Xenia, where he received a common school education, and has spent the latter portion of his life.  He also went to school at Gallipolis, West Union, and Rochester, New York.  In 1872 he was married to Miss Emma J. Roots, and by her has three daughters and one son, all living.  During the war he was in the Fifth Massachusetts Cavalry, Fourth Division, serving two years and seven months, and received an honorable discharge on the 16th day of April, 1863, at Beverly.  His children, Morris E., Mary E., Laura, and Pearl, are models, and the pride of their parents.  He is a staunch Republican, and a good worker for his party.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 483
  Jefferson Twp. -
WILLIAM H. BURR, farmer, Bowersville, is a son of John and Henrietta Burr, who were born in this county, where they were reared and married and where they died.  There were five children of this family: William H., Louisa E., Mary E., Hannah B., and John, all of whom are living, save John, who died at the early age of one year.  William H. was born Nov. 20, 1852, and married Miss Flora Hussey a daughter of  Christopher, who father was the earliest settler in this township.  There are are four children of this family, Charlie M., Euphemia, John C. and Frederick E., all living save John C. who died at two years of age.  Mr. Burr has a farm of ninety-six acres, on which he lives, and which is a part of the larger tracts of land formerly owned by Christopher Hussey.  He and Mrs. Burr are members of the Christian Church of Bowersville.  They were also members of the Patrons of Husbandry, and Independent Order of Good Templars of Bowersville.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 833
  Beaver Creek Twp. -
JOHN BURROWS, deceased, was born in Maryland, in the year 1800.  He was the son of William and Priscilla Burrows, who immigrated to Ohio in 1810, and in 1814 located on land where Sarah Burrows now resides.  Here a permanent home was made, then land was cleared up and improved, and, in the course of human events, became one of the pleasant places in the township.  Grandfather William Burrows died in 1827 or 1828, aged about sixty-one years.   Priscilla, his wife, departed this life some six years afterwards.  They were parents of fourteen children, six living, viz:  Martha J., Sarah, Anineta, Margaret, Richard, and Joseph.  John Burrows was married to Eliza Davis in 1837, by whom he had five children, of whom one, Sarah, is living; the deceased are William C., Nelson D., Matilda, Mrs. Fogle, and Mary T.  On the land settled by his father, he made a life-long place of residence, and at his death left one hundred and sixty acres of fine land.  He died in 1870, aged seventy years.  His wife preceded him to her last resting place in 1864, aged fifty-three years.  She was a member of the Reformed Dutch Church till her death.  Nelson was a member of Company D, Twenty-Second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, enlisting in the begining of the war, Aug. 31, 1861.  He saw much active service, passed through many of the hard-fought battles of the war, after his return home, died of wounds contracted while in the service of his country.
Source: History of Greene County, Ohio - Publ. 1881 - Page 592

NOTES:
 

 
CLICK HERE to RETURN to
GREENE COUNTY, OHIO
INDEX PAGE
CLICK HERE to RETURN to
OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS
INDEX PAGE
FREE GENEALOGY RESEARCH is My MISSION
GENEALOGY EXPRESS
This Webpage has been created by Sharon Wick exclusively for Genealogy Express  2008
Submitters retain all copyrights