OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

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Welcome to
Gallia County, Ohio
History & Genealogy

Source:
History of
GALLIA COUNTY

Containing
A Condensed History of the County;
Biographical Sketches; General Statistics;
Miscellaneous Matters, &c.
H. H. HARDESTY & CO., PUBLISHERS, CHICAGO AND TOLEDO.
1882

Greenfield Township
 

I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII XIII XIV XV XVI XVII XVIII XIX XX XXI XXII XXIII XXIV XXV XXVI XXVII XXVIII XXIX XXX

For Chapters XX, XXI, XXII, XXIII, XXIV, XXV, XXVI & XXVII - SEE TOWNSHIPS BELOW HERE

TOWNSHIPS:
includes biographies

BIOGRAPHIES

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Page XXIII -

     This is the extreme western township of the county, bounded north by Jackson county, east of Perry township, south by Lawrence County, and west by Lawrence and Jackson counties.  It contains thirty full sections, five north and south by six east and west.  The surface is somewhat hilly, and the soil is clay and sandy loam; all good grain land.  There is an abundance of iron ore, bituminous coal and limestone in the hills,  which is being quite extensively worked.  The principal timber is oak, hickory, beech and maple.
     Symmes creek, the principal stream, enters the northern part of this township, from Jackson county, runs southwest into Perry township, thence south through Lawrence county, emptying into the Ohio river.  Dirty Face creek rises in the southeast part of the township, runs northwest, and empties into Symmes creek.  Grassy fork enters the township from Jackson county, runs southwest three-quarters of a mile, and empties into Symmes creek.  Black fork also enters from the north, running south about one-half mile, then east, emptying into Dirty Face.
     The first to settle in the township were Daniel Faulkner, James Rice (who died at the advanced age of one hundred and twenty years), and Andrew Faulkner.  On the 22d of June, 1882, the latter gave an account of his early pioneer recollections to the one appointed to collect and record them for this work, and four days later he had "passed beyond the river," dying suddenly June 26th, 1882.  The pioneers first settled at the forks of Symmes creek, Daniel Faulkner building the first cabin, in 1806.
     Miss Jennie Faulkner was the first child born in the township; her parents were Daniel Faulkner, a native of Ireland, and Nancy (Dunlap) Faulkner, a native of Scotland.  John Kershatt's marriage to Miss Elizabeth Faulkner, at the house of the bride's parents, was the first in the township.
     Among the first of the early settlers, the following names are given, in addition to those above recorded: Philip Lambert, Jerry Lambert, John Shelton, John Acord, Hamilton Harper, John McKenzie, James McMertry, P. Lambert, Vincent Bruce, John Symmes, George Chapman, Obediah Lee, S. Rose, and Thomas Johnson.
     The township was organized Mar. 20th, 1818; the first election was held at the house of Michael Shaffer, which then stood one-half mile east of what is now known as Gallia Furnace, and the number of votes polled was eight.  Samuel Mertry was first elected a justice of the peace, and Ebenezer Donaldson, constable.
     A grist-mill, erected in 1822 by Daniel Faulkner, was the first in the township.  It was built of logs, and one run of stone.  In the year 1832 Samuel Hempenstall built a dam across Symmes creek, upon the Hempenstall farm, and erected a saw mill, which he run by water.  The building was made of square timber, framed together, and the saw, which was an upright one, was attached to the same shaft as the water-wheel.
     Joseph Price taught a school composed of twenty scholars, at an early day, in a building which stood upon what is now known as the James Norman farm.  The school house was made of round logs, and oiled paper was pasted over an opening for windows.  In 1824 was erected the first building for school purposes, near Center Point, on John Symmes place.  There are now ten comfortably appointed school houses, and the schools conducted in each are all well attended.
     For a number of years after the township was first settled, the nearest postoffice at which mail could be obtained was located in Raccoon township.  There is now a postoffice established at Gallia Furnace.
     Religious services were first held in a log building, upon Daniel Faulkner's farm, for which he donated one acre.  A colored Baptist, Rev. James Stuart, was the first minister, and he is remembered with feelings of respect, as a thorough Christian, who labored earnestly for the good of the early settlers.  Among the original members were Philip Lambert and wife, Mrs. C. Shelton, Minerva Crump, Hannah Shaffer, Michael Shaffer, William Faulkner, Sarah Faulkner, John Symmes and wife, and Mrs. Obediah Lee.
     The second church building was erected of round logs, and located on Dirty Face creek, by a party of colored people who came from Tennessee.  The third was also a log building, erected in the lower settlement, near John Symmes farm.
     There are now three churches in Greenfield township.  The United Brethren church building is also of logs, and stands upon the Souder farm, on the Day ridge, about two miles from Gallia Furnace.  Its Calvinistic church is a frame building, situated on David Davis' farm, on Dirty Face creek.
     Claiborn Shelton first established a Sabbath school in 1833.  There are now two union schools established, one still superintended by Claiborn Shelton.

GALLIA FURNACE

is situated upon Dirty Face creek.  It was established in 1847, and owned by a stock company which was organized the same year.  Its present officers are John Campbell, A. L. Norton, and Joseph Stafford.
     The company owns 6,000 acres of land, in which are extensive coal fields, and immense deposits of iron ore and limestone.  Their furnace produces iron suitable for car wheels and machinery, and their capacity is three thousand tons a year.  The Toledo, Cincinnati & St. Louis Narrow Gauge Railroad runs through the immense coal fields belonging to the company, which have a vein of superior iron smelting coal running through them of four feet in depth.  They are preparing to erect a new furnace of larger capacity at an early day, and intend to engage extensively in the shipment of stone coal, iron and limestone.  Gallia Furnace is an excellent shipping point, and well located for the establishment of works for the manufacture of agricultural implements, which will probably soon be done.  The village was laid out in 1846, and in 1880 had a population of 136.

See Page XXIV - Addison Twp. -

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