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Fulton County,  Ohio
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BIOGRAPHIES

Source:
The County of Fulton
A History of Fulton County, Ohio

Publ.: Madison, Wis. Northwestern Historical Association
1905

Transcribed by Sharon Wick

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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R. J. KUMP


SARAH C. KUMP

REUBEN J. KUMP has been a resident of Fulton county since his childhood days and is numbered among the representative farmers and stock growers of Franklin township.  He was born in Berlin, Mahoning county, Ohio, June 23, 1856, and is a son of Levi and Sarah (Kime) Kump.  The former was born in Dover township, York county, Pennsylvania, June 14, 1832, and he died on his homestead farm, in Franklin township, Fulton county, Ohio, Sept. 17, 1904.  When he was about one year old his parents removed from Pennsylvania to Mahoning county, Ohio, where he was reared to manhood and where his marriage to Sarah Kime was solemnized, May 17, 1855.  In the spring of 1860 he came with his family to Franklin township, Fulton county, where he continued to be identified with agricultural pursuits until his death.  In early life he became a member of the Lutheran church, in whose faith he was reared, but after removing to Fulton county both he and his wife united with the Methodist Episcopal church, becoming faithful and zealous in the work of the same.  His parents, Daniel and Elizabeth (Gross) Kump, were both born in Pennsylvania, of stanch German descent, and both died in Mahoning county, Ohio, being interred in the cemetery at North Berlin.  Sarah (Kime) Kump, mother of the subject of this review, was born in Mahoning county, Ohio, Apr. 11, 1832, being a daughter of Henry Kime, who was a blacksmith by trade, a native of Pennsylvania and a pioneer of Mahoning county, Ohio, where he died.  Since the death of her husband Mrs. Kump has resided in the home of her daughter Ella D. Sayers, near West Unity, Williams county.  Of the six children in the family Reuben J. is the eldest; Ada is the wife of Noah W. Bowser, a farmer of Franklin township; Oliver F. is engaged in farming in Gorham township; Sylvanus D. is deceased, as is also Orpha E.; and Ella D. is the wife of Artwell Sayers, a farmer near West Unity, Williams county.  Reuben J. Kump was four years of age at the time when his parents took up their residence in Fulton county,, and he was reared to maturity on the homestead farm, in Franklin township, in whose public schools he secured his early educational training.  He remained associated with his father in the management of the home farm until he had attained the age of thirty years, and he then located on his present farm, which he purchased ten years later.  He has one hundred and fifteen acres of most fertile and productive land, he has been successful in both the agricultural and stock-growing departments of his enterprise, and he has made excellent improvements on his attractive farmstead.  He has given much attention to the breeding of high-grade cattle, swine and sheep, and has had the best of breeding lines of full-blooded sort.  Mr. Kump is a stanch Republican and is a loyal and liberal citizen, commanding uniform confidence and esteem in the community which has been his home from childhood.  He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with its adjunct, the Daughters of Rebecca, of which latter his wife also is a member.  Jan. 1, 1887, Mr. Kump married Miss Sarah Catherine Punches,  who was born in Gorham township, this county, being a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Deal) Punches, who settled in Fulton county in September, 1850.  Henry Punches was born in Seneca county, New York, May 21, 1821, and he died in Fayette, Feb. 7, 1895.  His parents removed from Berks county, Pennsylvania, to Seneca county, New York, in an early day, having been of German lineage.  Jan. 31, 1847, Henry Punches married Elizabeth Deal, who likewise was born in Seneca county, New York, and she now (1905) resides in Fayette, aged seventy-eight years, being one of the honored pioneer women of Fulton county.  She is a member of the Reformed church, as was also her husband.  Mr. Punches was a carpenter by trade and followed his vocation for a number of years, but he gave his attention almost entirely to the work of his farm after coming to Fulton county.  Of the nine children all grew to years of maturity: Frances, who became the wife of William Gamble, resides in Fayette; Edward died July 18, 1888, at the age of thirty-eight years; Lawrence is a resident of Fayette; Mrs. Kump was the next in order of birth; Mary is the wife of Horace Ford, of Fayette; Arthur is a resident of Springport, Michigan; Nathaniel is a farmer of Gorham township; Marion died in Colorado, when a young man; and George resides in Fayette.  Mr. and Mrs. Kump have one daughter, Alma Elizabeth, who remains at the parental home, being of the popular young ladies of the community.
Source : The County of Fulton - A History of Fulton County, Ohio - Publ.: Madison, Wis. Northwestern Historical Association - 1905 - Page 444
  AARON KUNEY is the owner of one hundred and twenty acres of land, in Gorham and Franklin townships, the estate being in one body, and the residence is located in the latter township.  Mr. Kuney is a veteran of the Civil war and is a citizen of sterling worth, commanding the esteem of those who know him.  He was born in Fayette township, Seneca county, N. Y., May 28, 1846, and is a son of Henry and Rachel (Landis) Kuney, both of whom were born in the State of Pennsylvania.  In 1855 they removed to Fulton county, Ohio, and settled in Gorham township, one mile north of the present homestead of their son Aaron, who was a lad of nine years at the time.  There Henry Kuney purchased land, which he reclaimed and improved, and he passed the remainder of his life in this county, his death occurring in 1898, at which time he was eighty-four years of age.  His wife preceded him into eternal rest by about one month, having been eighty-one years of age.  They became the parents of thirteen children, of whom ten attained maturity; Martin  resides in Fayette, this county; Polly is the wife of William Smith, of that place; Catherine is the widow of Lorenzo Downer and resides in Archbold, this county; Henry is a resident of Morenci, Mich.; William of birth; Sarah remains on the old homestead; Lucinda became the wife of Jacob Smith and both are deceased; Levi is a farmer of Gorham township, as is also Lawson.  Aaron Kuney attended the common schools of New York and Ohio and remained at the parental home until he had attained the age of fourteen years, when he secured employment in connection with construction work on the Lake Short and Michigan Southern Air-Line railroad, being identified with this line of work until Mar. 28, 1862, when he enlisted in Company B, Sixteenth Ohio volunteer infantry, at Columbus, Ohio, whence the command finally went to the national capital and over into Alexandria, Va., arriving in season to take part in the battle of the Wilderness.  Other important engagements in which Mr. Kuney participated were as follows:  Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, North Anna river, Gaines' Mills, Weldon Railroad, Yellow Tavern and Poplar Grove, as well as several engagements incidental to the siege of Petersburg.  The regiment was encamped within a mile from that city during the winter of 1864, and was present at the surrender of the city.  Mr. Kuney was twice wounded while in service, having received a gunshot wound in the right leg and another in the arm, both wounds having been inflicted by sharpshooters.  He remained at the post of duty until victory crowned the Union arms, having been mustered out of the United States service, at Washington, D. C., on the 28th of July, 1865, and having then proceeded with his command to Cleveland, Ohio, where he received his honorable discharge from the State service, Aug. 5, 1865.  He then returned to Fulton county, where he was variously employed for the ensuing four years, after which he served an apprenticeship at the trade of wagon-making, in Morenci, Mich.  He then opened a shop of his own at Handy, Fulton county, Ohio, where he remained three years.  Since that time his vocation has been that of farming in which he has met with much success.  In 1889 he purchased eighty acres of land in Gorham township, and later he purchased eighty acres lying contiguous on the south, in Franklin township, thus having one of the valuable farms of this part of the county.  In his political allegiance Mr. Kuney is a stanch Democrat, and he is affiliated with Stout Post No. 108, Grand Army of the Republic at Fayette.  July 27, 1876 Mr. Kuney was married to Miss Alice Nathnaugle, daughter of Benjamin Nathnaugle, a pioneer of Gorham township and now deceased.  Of this union have been born three sons, tow of whom are living: Carey S. and George L., the former being engaged in farming in Franklin township and the latter in Gorham township.  The youngest son, Bird D., is deceased.
Source : The County of Fulton - A History of Fulton County, Ohio - Publ.: Madison, Wis. Northwestern Historical Association - 1905 - Page 438

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