OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

 

Welcome to Clinton
County, Ohio

BIOGRAPHIES
(Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio
Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915)
Contrib. by Sharon Wick

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
FRANK W. HADLEY, who for more than a quarter of a century, has been engaged in the mercantile business in Clinton County and who is now the proprietor of a hardware and grocery business at New Vienna and vice-president and director of the New Vienna Bank, was born in Clark township, this county, May 19, 1865, the son of William and Rebecca Jane (Hunt) Hadley, both of whom also were born in Clinton county, the former near Sligo on Mar. 14, 1832, and the latter, near Martinsville.
     William Hadley was a farmer and merchant of Wilmington and for many years was in partnership with Mathew Fife.  He died in Clark township on Oct. 8, 1900.  His wife is also deceased.  He was a Republican and he and his wife and family were members of the Friends church.  They were the parents of four children, of whom Ida B. died at the age of seventeen years; Emma S. is the wife of S. C. Haines, of Detroit, Michigan; Frank W. is the subject of this sketch and Anna died in infancy.  The paternal grandparents of Mr. Hadley were Jonathan and Margaret Hunt, who wee early settlers in Clark township, but who later moved to near Richmond, Indiana, where both died.
     Born and reared on a farm and educated in the public schools of Clinton county, especially in the Martinsville public schools and in the high school at that place, Frank W. Hadley taught school for several years.  Later he attended the Cincinnati College of Pharmacy and was engaged in the drug business at Martinsville, this county, for eleven years, beginning business there in 1890, operating a general store in connection with the drug business.  In 1901 he moved to New Vienna and engaged in the hardware and grocery business, his store occupying a double room with a fifty-foot front.
     On June 20, 1894, Frank W. Hadley was married to Winna Woodmansee, of New Vienna, daughter of Robert J. and Caroline (Hussey) Woodmansee, to which union one child has been born in Miriam born on July 4, 1899.
     Robert J. Woodmansee, the father of Mrs. Hadley, was born on June 4, 1845, in Highland county, this state, three miles east of New Vienna, where he now lives.  He is the son of Joseph and Abigail (Jeffries) Woodmansee, the former of whom was born at Toms river, New Jersey, in 1806 and who died in 1868, and the latter born at the same place.  Mrs. Hadley's paternal great-grandparents were Francis and Hannah Woodmansee, natives of toms River, New Jersey, who migrated to Highland county, Ohio, about 1839, Francis Woodmansee and his only son, Joseph, purchasing land there in partnership.  The former engaged in the brick business and erected a magnificent house on the old Woodmansee homestead, which is still standing.  Joseph Woodmansee, the father of Robert J., owned sixteen hundred acres of land in Highland county and was a member of the Methodist Church.  He was educated in New Jersey and after coming to Ohio about 1839, farmed in Highland County the remainder of his life.  He owned two hundred and sixty acres of land and a grist-mill at New Vienna for four or five years.  He also owned a saw mill at New Vienna.  To Joseph and Abigail (Jeffries) Woodmansee six children were born: Alice, Francis, Jesse, Adolphus, Robert J. and Alonzo.  The family were members of the Methodist church and Joseph Woodmansee voted the Republican ticket.  Robert J. Woodmansee has been a farmer all of his life, but has lived most of the time in New Vienna, having gone there with his father in 1859.  He owns two hundred acres of land in Highland county, where his son, Brent now lives.   He married Caroline Hussey, daughter of Nathan Hussey, to which union three children were born: Fred, who married Jennie Clark and has one daughter, Jennie May; Brent, who married Maud Hunt, and Mrs. HadleyRobert J. Woodmansee and wife are members of the Methodist church.  He votes the Republican ticket and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.
     Mr. Hadley is also a Republican in politics, but has never aspired to public office.  Fraternally he is a member of Independent Order of Odd Fellows, including the subordinate and the encampment branches.  Mr. and Mrs. Hadley are members of the Methodist Church at New Vienna.
DANIEL WEBSTER HAINES, one of the leading members of the Chester township school board for the past decade, is a man of pleasing personality, well known and highly respected, as well as a successful farmer, who owns one hundred and fifty-five acres of land in that township and one hundred and sixty acres in Vernon township.  By marriage, Mr. Haines is connected with the famous McKay family, whose ancestry goes back to the first settlement made in Clinton county.  The Haines family maintain a home in Wilmington, where they live a part of the time.
     Daniel Webster Haines was born in Greene county, Ohio, on April 22, 1863, a son of EBER and MARY (MENDENHALL) HAINES, the former born in Caesars Creek township, Green county, on Jan. 20, 1825, and the latter born at West Milton, Miami county, this state, daughter of Thaddeus and Priscilla (Sturgeon) Mendenhall.  Eber Haines was a son of Zimri and Elizabeth (Compton) Haines, natives of New Jersey and North Carolina, respectively.  The latter came with her parents in a wagon from North Carolina in New Burlington, Ohio, when only four years of age.  Zimri Haines emigrated from New Jersey to Pennsylvania, where he learned the trade of a cabinet-maker.  Later he emigrated to Greene county, Ohio, where he spent the remainder of his life.  He and his wife were the parents of ten children, Samuel, Elizabeth, Sarah, Maria, Elwood, Eber, Eli, Clapton, Asaph and Phoebe.  The family were earnest members of the Friends church, while politically, Zimri Haines was an old time Whig.
     The sixth child of Zimri and Elizabeth (Compton) Haines was Eber, the father of Daniel Webster Haines.   Eber Haines was a farmer all his life.  After removing to Clinton county, in 1882, he began preaching, at the age of forty-five, and continued as a local minister in the Friends church until his death, on Dec. 19, 1911.  Daniel Webster Haines is one of ten children born to his parents, the others being as follows:  Lydia Ellen, who died when young; Margaret, who married John Turner; Zimri D., who married Alice McKay; Thaddeus a., who married Eliza Mary Hiatt; Priscilla, who married Jacob B. McKay; Daniel W. twin brother of Wilomena, the latter of whom died early in life; Mary, who was the wife of William Hiatt, died at the age of twenty-eight, and Eber W., a well-known farmer of Chester township.
     Daniel Webster Haines, who received his elementary education in the common schools of Paintersville, Greene county, later pursued his educational training in Chester township, this county, and when a young man began farming in that township.  He continued farming there until 1903, at which time he purchased the old Mahlon Wall farm, consisting of ninety-six acres, and to this tract he has added from time to time until he is now the owner of one hundred and forty-five acres to Chester township and one hundred and sixty acres in Vernon township.  He is an extensive breeder of Duroc Jersey hogs, as well as a feeder of cattle.
     On Oct. 15, 1891, Daniel W. Haines was married to Estella McKay, who was born on July 5, 1865, the daughter of Alfred and Sarah L. (Miars) McKayMrs. Haines' father was a farmer in Liberty township and served as county commissioner of Clinton county for several years.  He also served as county surveyor.  Mrs. Haines was one of two children born to her parents.  Her brother, Ray, is deceased.
     To Daniel W. and Estella (McKay) Haines one son has been born, Elden R., born on June 10, 1893, who is a graduate of Wilmington College, and is living at home with his parents.
     Mr. and Mrs. Haines are members of the Friends church, and Mr. Haines votes the Republican ticket.  They take an earnest interest in all good works in their neighborhood and are held in high regard throughout the vicinity.
~ Page 760
EBER WATTS HAINES.  Among the well-known young farmers of Chester township, Clinton county, Ohio, is Eber Watts Haines, who is the owner of one hundred and four and one-quarter acres of land, and who, several years ago, was engaged in conducting a general store at Lumberton, Ohio.  Since 1909, however, he has devoted his attention exclusively to farming.  He is a scion of a very old family in this county, and one whose ancestry had very much to do with clearing the forests and draining the swamps.  Eber Watts Haines was born on Feb. 28, 1872, in Caesars Creek township, Greene county, Ohio.  His parents were Eber and Mary (Mendenhall) Haines, the former of whom was born on Jan. 20, 1825, in Caesars Creek township, Greene county, and the latter was a daughter of Thaddeus and Priscilla (Sturgeon) Mendenhall.
    
The paternal grandparents of Mr. Haines  were Zimri and Elizabeth (Compton) Haines, the former a native of New Jersey, and the latter a native of North Carolina, who came with her parents when four years old to New Burlington, Ohio.  Zimri Haines emigrated first from New Jersey to Pennsylvania, and there learned the cabinetmaker's trade.  Later he immigrated to Greene county, Ohio, where he lived the remainder of his life.  He was the father of nine children, Samuel, Elizabeth, Sarah, Maria, Elwood, Eber and Clayton, Aseph and Pheobe.  He voted the Whig ticket and was a member of the Society of Friends.
     Eber Haines received a good education in the common schools of Greene county, and followed farming in Caesars Creek township, in that county, until 1882, when he removed to Chester township, Clinton county.  When about forty-five years of age, he began preaching in the local Friends church, and continued a minister in that faith until his death, Dec. 19, 1911.  He lived to perform the marriage ceremony for many of his grandchildren.  The following children were born to Eber and Mary (Mendenhall) Haines:  Lydia Ellen, who died while young; Margaret, the wife of John Turner; Zimri D., who married Alice McKay; Thaddeus A., who married Eliza Mary Hiatt; Priscilla, the wife of Jacob B. McKay; Daniel W. and Wilomena, twins, the former of whom married Estella McKay, and the latter died early in life; Mary, the wife of William Hiatt, died at the age of twenty-eight years; and Eber W., the immediate subject of this sketch.
     Eber W. Haines was for some time a student at Wilmington College after leaving the common schools, and finished his education in that excellent institution.  His career as a farmer was begun in Chester township, where he now lives, and where he owns one hundred and four and one-quarter acres of land.  In 1906 he purchased the general store at Lumberton and conducted this business for two years, but in 1909 returned to the farm where he has since lived.
     In 1906, Eber W. Haines married Mary Morris, the daughter of Allen and Louisa (Doan) Morris, the former of whom was a farmer of Clinton county.  Mrs. Haines was one of four children born to her parents.  The others are: Elias H., who married Amelia Stille; John, who married Mary Nye; and Lee, who married Luetta Farris, in 1912.  Mrs. Haines' paternal grandfather was John Morris.  Mr. and Mrs. Eber W. Haines are the parents of one son, Eber Allen, born on Jan. 18, 1910.  The family are all members of the Friends church, Mrs. Haines, however, retaining her membership in the Methodist church.
     In 1905, about a year before his marriage, Mr. Haines spent the winter at Wauchula, Florida, with his parents and elder sister.  His mother died there unexpectedly, Dec. 27, 1905.  Three years later his father spent the winter on Marco Island.
~ Page 642
ELI HAINES.  Of the many respected citizens and successful farmers now living retired in Wilmington, Ohio, Eli Haines, who owns a farm of one hundred and twenty-three acres in Clinton county, should be mentioned.  He is descended from one of the very earliest settlers of this county, his great-grandfather, Jacob Haines, who was a native of Pennsylvania, having come to Ohio in 1803, and to Clinton county in the spring of 1804.
     Eli Haines was born on Aug. 9, 1857, in Caesars Creek township, Greene county, Ohio, the son of Samuel and Mary (Bales) Haines, the former of whom was born in 1818, near New Burlington, Ohio, and died in October, 1903, and the latter of whom was born in Greene county, Ohio, in 1820, and died in 1906.
     Mr. Haines's paternal grandparents were Zimri and Elizabeth (Compton) Haines, the former of whom came from New Jersey with his parents.  He was married near New Burlington, Ohio, and, having learned the cabinet-maker's trade in Philadelphia, followed this trade to some extent in early life.  After coming to Ohio, he became a farmer, buying his land very cheaply.  During the early years of his life, he owned about twelve hundred acres of land.  He and his wife were members of the Friends church.  He died at the age of eighty-seven, and she at a very advanced age.
     Jacob Haines, who may be regarded as the founder of the Haines family in Ohio was born in Pennsylvania, Feb. 19, 1778, and when a young man moved with his parents to Guilford county, North Carolina.  In 1800 he was married to Mary Leonard and three years later came to Ohio, remaining at Waynesville for a short time, after which he came to Union township, Clinton county, in the spring of 1804.  His family consisted of his wife and one child, Zimri, who spent most of his life in this county.  Jacob Haines passed away on June 17, 1854.
     The maternal grandfather of Eli Haines was Elisha Bales, who lived in Greene county, Ohio on the middle fork of Caesars creek, where he owned a farm of two hundred acres. 
     Samuel Haines grew up in Greene county, Ohio, and after inheriting a part of his father's home farm, added to it until he owned five hundred acres.  HE was a prominent man in local politics in Greene county and held several township offices.  He was a Republican and a member of the Friends church, both he and his wife being elders in  the church.  They had eleven children, two of whom died in infancy and four of whom died in later life, namely: Amos, who died when a young man and who was a prominent church worker; Sarah, who married H. C. Faulkner and died in May, 1913; Zimri, who died of typhoid fever at the age of thirty-three; Elisha, who also died of typhoid fever after his marriage.  The living children are: Eunice, who married Ed Bales, of Greene county, Ohio; Eli, the subject of this sketch; Hannah, who is the widow of Professor Calvin, and lives in Spring Valley, Ohio, and Alfred, who is a farmer of Greene county.
     Eli Haines attended the public schools of Paintersville, Ohio, and lived at home on the farm until he was married.  He purchased one hundred and twenty-three acres of the home farm and still owns that tract of land.  In October, 1908, he purchased twenty-seven acres of land at the edge of Wilmington, Ohio, where he built a modern house and now has a comfortable home.
     On September 20, 1882, Eli Haines was married to Louisa E. Faulkner, who was born in Greene county, Ohio, one mile from her husband's birthplace, the daughter of Allen and Elizabeth A. Faulkner, both of whom are still living, he being ninety years of age and she eighty-eight.  Mr. and Mrs. Haines have had four children, one of whom is deceased, Homer, who was born in 1888, and died on February 13, 1901.  The living children are:  Lizzie Mary born on June 23, 1884, who married J. R. Middleton and lives on a farm in Caesars Creek township, Greene county; Bernice, July 2, 18893, who is a school teacher; and Sylvester, August 28, 1904.
     Mr. and Mrs. Haines
and family are members of the Friends church and he was an elder in the church.  He is identified with the Republican party.
~ Page 630
FRANK HAINES - Page not available yet.  Will have in near future

~ Page 517

ZIMRI F. HAINES.  As early as the seventeenth century the Haines family was well established in England, and in that time spelled their name Hayne.  They came from Ayuho-on-ye-Hill, Oxon, Northamptonshire, England.  The armorial ensigns of the family date back to 607, Richard Haines was a member of the Society of Friends prior to 1676, and with his wife, Margaret, and four children, Richard, Jr., William, Thomas and Mary, sailed for America, April 27, 1682.  During the voyage the father died and was buried at sea, and after his death, another son, Joseph, was born in mid-ocean.  The mother and her five children landed at Burlington, New Jersey.  Of the five children born to Richard Haines and wife, Thomas, who was born in 1675 in England, was married in 1692, to Elizabeth (Austin) Haines, George  was born about 1709 in New Jersey.  He married Margareat Lamb, and they had one child, Isaac Haines and his wife, Elizabeth, were the parents of one son, Isaac, Jr., who died on Dec. 8, 1853, and to this union ten children were born, Isaac, Zimri, Elizabeth, Keziah, Rachel, Israel, Susannah, Granville, Abigail and Mordecai.  Of these children, Zimri, the second in order of birth, was born on July 1, 1789, in New Jersey, and died on Aug. 26, 1868, in Ohio.  He married Elizabeth Compton, who was born on July 25, 1800, and who died on June 6, 1886.  She was a native of North Carolina and came from that state to Ohio in a wagon with her parents when she was but four years of age, the family locating in the New Burlington neighborhood in this county.  Zimri Haines emigrated from New Jersey to Pennsylvania, where he learned the trade of a cabinet-maker.  Later he emigrated to Greene county, Ohio, where he lived the remainder of his life.  He and his wife were the parents of twelve children, Samuel, Elwood, Eber, Clayton, Asseph, Eli, Elizabeth, Zimri, Sarah, Phoebe, Rebecca A. and Mary Ann.
   
Of the above children, Eli,  the father of Zimri F. Haines, was born on Aug. 12, 1827, in Caesar's Creek township, Greene county.  He was reared on a farm and received his education in the district schools.  On November 24, 1858, he was married by the Friends ceremony in Highland county, to Emily S. McPherson, who was born in Highland county on February 7, 1837, the daughter of Stephen and Mary McPherson.  She was a distant relative of General McPherson, who was a prominent figure in the Union army during the Civil War.  Eli Haines and wife were the parents of six children, Stephen A. and Mary Elizabeth (both deceased); Jennie M., Zimri F., Eleanora and Jesse Curtis.
     Zimri F. Haines
, the subject of this sketch, was born on Feb. 9, 1868, in Chester township, this county.  He was educated in the public schools of Chester township, first attending the Buck Run school and later the school at New Burlington.  When a young man, he began farming in Wayne township, Warren county, Ohio, and about 1898 moved to Chester township, Clinton county, where he is now living, and where he owns two hundred and thirty-five acres of land.  He is engaged in general farming and stock raising.
     On Feb. 6, 1890, Zimri F. Haines was married to Ella C. Compton, the daughter of Amos and Anna (Mendenhall) Compton, farmers of Greene county, Ohio.  Mrs. Haines is the youngest of a family of nine children born to her parents.  Four of these children, Emma, Mary E., Recia A.  and Walton, are deceased.  Besides Mrs. Haines, the living children are Samuel T., William E., Martha and Lucy A.
     Mr. and Mrs. Haines
are the parents of three children, Everett E., born  on Jan. 24, 1893; Luther G., Jan. 23, 1897, and Homer H., May 16, 1901.
     Mr. and Mrs. Haines are members of the Friends church and Mr. Haines is a trustee and an elder in the church, having served in these capacities for several years.  He is independent in politics.
~ Page 865
WILLIAM FRANKLIN HAIR.  After thirteen years of faithful and devoted service as a teacher in the public schools of Clinton county, William Franklin Hair, better known among the intimate, friends of "Frank" Hair, entered upon the life of a farmer and has found much pleasure and satisfaction in tilling his well-kept place in Washington township.  Studious in his habits, attentive to the latest developments and agricultural science, Mr. Hair has conducted his farming operations with a high measure of intelligence and, though his place is not as extensive as some of the farms in his neighborhood, he has prospered and has no fear of the wolf bowling at his door.  He has a delightful home in Washington township, in which he takes much pleasure and where he and his good wife greet their friends with the most cordial hospitality.
     William Franklin Hair was born on a farm near the village of Westboro, in Jefferson township, Clinton county, Ohio, on January 28, 1807, son of George W. and Permilia (Garrett) Hair, the former a native of Brown county, this state, and the later a native of Jefferson township, this county.
     George W. Hair was the son of Titus and Nancy (Sapp) Hair, the former of whom was born in Washington County, Virginia, and the latter of Clermont county, this state, daughter of George Sapp, a pioneer of that county.  Titus Hair came to Ohio from Virginia with his parents in the year 1808, the family locating in Clermont county, where Titus Hair grew up as a cabinetmaker, later becoming a farmer.  About the year 1855 he moved to this county, buying a farm of about one hundred acres near the village of Westboro.  He also continued to work at his trade of cabinetmaking and became one of the best-known citizens in that neighborhood.  Later he moved to Clark township, buying a farm near the village of Lynchburg, where he spent the remainder of his life.   His son, George W. Hair, married Parmelia Garrett, of this county, a daughter of Henry and Nancy (Johns) Garrett, the former of whom was born in Virginia, the son of William Garrett, who came, with his wife and children on horseback from Virginia to this county and located on a farm in the southwest portion of the county, where he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring in 1864.  Henry Garrett grew up on his father's farm and married Nancy Johns, member of one of the pioneer families of the neighborhood, and it was the daughter of this union who was the mother of Frank HairHenry Garrett died in 1849, before reaching middle age.  George W. Hair became one of Clinton county's well-known farmers, his operations mostly being carried on in Clark township.  He was exempted from service during the Civil War on account of ill health and his death occurred in 1876.   He and his wife were members of the New Light church and their three children were reared in the faith of that communion.  These three children were Frank, the immediate subject of this sketch, Hay W., and Nancy E.
     William Franklin Hair
received his education in the public schools of this county and when twenty-three years of age began teaching school, continuing this close personal service in behalf of the public for a period of thirteen years, 1880-93, becoming one of the best-known teachers in Clinton county.  He then decided to become a farmer and following out his design bought the farm of eighty-three acres in Washington township on which he is now living, and where he confidently expects to spend the remainder of his days.  He is successfully engaged in general farming and is regarded as one of the substantial men of his community.
     In 1800 Frank Hair was united in marriage to Mary E. Vandervort, who was born in Green township, this county, daughter to T. H. Vandervort, a well-known resident of Antioch and take an active interest in all the good works of their neighborhood, being regarded as among the leaders in the community life thereabout.  This amiable couple are in a position to look on the bright side of life and they bring to their relations with their neighbors a wholesome kindliness of spirit that makes them prime favorites with all thereabout, the two being held in the very highest regard throughout the entire countryside.
     Mr. Hair did well his duty to the public during his long service as a teacher, many former youngsters in this county, now grown to useful manhood and womanhood, acknowledging with gratitude the great debt they owe to the early instructions of this conscientious teacher; and in his later years he is doing equally well his duty toward the body politic by continually advocating all measures designed to promote the welfare of all the people his sage counsels receiving the most respectful consideration on the part of his neighbors, who repose the utmost confidence in his judgment in matters relating to the common welfare.
HORACE M. HALL is a successful contractor and builder of Blanchester, this county.  He was born on Dec. 10, 1865, in Preble county, Ohio, the son of Andrew J. and Martha A. (Elliott) Hall, the former a native of Clinton county, and the latter a native of Preble county.  The paternal grandparents of Horace M. Hall came from the French frontier in Europe, and, after coming to America, located in Clinton county, where they were early settlers.  The maternal grandparents of Horace M. Hall, were William and Mary (Hall) Elliott, natives of Virginia.  William Elliott died in that state and after his death, his widow came to Ohio, passing away in Preble county, Ohio, in 1872.  William Elliott was a soldier in the War of 1812.
     Andrew J. Hall, the father of Horace M., a native of Clinton county, was educated in the common schools of this county but left Clinton county some time before the Civil War and settled in Preble county, where he enlisted in the Thirty-fifth Regiment, Ohio volunteer Infantry, in which he served three years and four months.  In the battle of Chickamauga be was twice wounded, a bullet passing through his shoulder and another through his hip.  Four children were born to Andrew J. and Martha A. Hall, Charles, Horace M., Prudence and Alice.
     Horace M. Hall,
who was educated in the common schools of Preble county, learned paper-making in Middleton, and followed this occupation for about five years.  Later he learned the carpenter's trade at Cincinnati and has been engaged in this trade ever sine, having moved to Blanchester in 1895, just after the town was destroyed by fire.  It is an interesting fact that the first house he built after arriving in Blanchester is the one in which he now lives.  For many years he has been a contractor and builder and has erected many buildings in that part of the county.
     On September 22, 1896, Horace M. Hall was married to Cora Willoughby, of Blanchester, who has borne him three children, Corliss, Mary and Marjorie.
     The Hall family, with the exception of Mr. Hall, are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.  Mr. Hall is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.  He has served as councilman of Blanchester and is now a member of the board of public affairs.  Formerly, he served as deputy assessor of that township.  He is a man who has many friends in that section of Clinton County.
ISAIAH MORRIS HAWORTH, the subject of this sketch, attended the district schools at Dover and later in Wilmington two years, and then at the Dutch district school in Union township.  He had but a limited education and as a young man he worked on his father's farm for several years and then bought what is now known as the Charles Hunnicutt farm which he soon sold and bought a one-hundred-acre tract of the Thomas West farm, where he lived until he sold this tract and in 1883 he bought the present farm across the road from the George D. Haworth farm at Starbucktown, Union township.  He then rented his farm and went to Hendricks county, Indiana, for eighteen months, after which he returned to his present home.  There is a little over one hundred acres in this tract, which was formerly the old West homestead.  The house was remodeled by Mr. Haworth.
    
On Sept. 20, 1871, Isaiah Morris Haworth was married to Mary Johnson, who was born in the Center neighborhood of Union township.  They were the last couple to be married by the Friends ceremony in the old Center meeting house.  Mary Johnson was the daughter of Louis and Rachel (Stanton) Johnson.  Louis Johnson was the son of Louis, Sr., and Mary Johnson, natives of Virginia, who emigrated to Ohio, and was born near Port William, Ohio, on Nov. 13, 1821, and died on Dec. 5, 1908.  Rachel Stanton, who came from Virginia and settled in Wilmington, Ohio, where for many years he was a hatter.  Rachel Stanton was born in Wilmington, Ohio, on Jan. 15, 1818, and died in Jan. 10, 1899.
     Louis Johnson, Jr., and wife were farmers and owned a farm in the Center neighborhood which they cultivated for years until their retirement, when they moved into Wilmington, where they died.  They had the followoing children:  Ahira, who lives in Wilmington; Sarah Ann; Mary, the wife of the subject of this sketch; Joseph, who lived in Indiana on a farm; and Mrs. Elizabeth Sprouse, who lives on a farm in Union township.
     Isaiah Morris and Mary (Johnson) Haworth were the parents of six children, of whom three are dead and three living, as follows:  Adelbert R., who was born on July 31, 1872, and died on Sept. 19, 1872; Delena Ann, August 30, 1873, married Charles Hunnicutt and now lives in Wilmington, Ohio; Rachel C., Aug. 17, 1875, died on May 4, 1887; Alton M., July 2, 1877, is a farmer now living on the Port William road in Liberty township on the old George Bailey farm; Alice E., Aug. 11, 1880, married Dr. C. B. Thomas and lives in Plainfield, Indiana; and Marietta, Oct. 14, 1882, died on Dec. 11, 1884.
     Isaiah Morris Haworth was, as are all his family, attached to the Friends church, of Wilmington, Ohio.  Mr. Haworth was a Republican in politics, and was conservative in his beliefs.  He was humble and unseeking in his attitude toward his fellow men and was held in the very highest esteem by all who knew him.  He was one of the men who has indeed proved that true religion and true citizenship go hand-in-hand, and whenever he was called on gave full evidence "that a friend in need is a friend indeed."
ODOS L. HAWORTH.  The late Odos L. Haworth was a well-known business man of Blanchester, this county, a prominent restaurant keeper of that town. He was born at Wilmington, this county, the son of Thomas and Mary (Drake) Haworth, and died on September 22, 1912. Thomas Haworth was born on June 19, 1844, and died on March 28, 1909. He was married on March 5, 1872, to Mary Drake, who was born on September 16, 1848, the daughter of Daniel and Ann (Messereu) Drake.   Thomas Haworth was engaged in farming all of his life in Clinton county and owned seventy-three acres of land in Union township. He and his wife were the parents of four children, of whom Odos L. was the eldest, the others being Ralph W., Clarence L. and Edith D., wife of Orvall Wall. Thomas Haworth was the son of Richard M. and Elizabeth (West) Haworth, the former of whom was a native of Clinton county, born at Dover in 1824, and one of the early farmers of this county. He was the son of Mahlon and Phoebe (Frazier) Haworth, the former of whom was born in Frederick county, Virginia, on October 23, 1775, later emigrating to Tennessee and still later coming to this county, locating at Dover about 1803.
     Odos L. Haworth entered the Star restaurant with, his father in Sabina in 1896 and was in business tt that point for about two years, moving to Blanchester in 1898, where he continued in the same business the rest of his life. The business is now conducted by his widow. At the age of nineteen years, Odos L. Haworth took up the study of telegraphy at the Cincinnati & Muskingum Valley railroad station at Wilmington and after having become proficient as a telegraph operator, worked at Roseville, Washington and Wilmington, becoming express agent, with William McMillan, at the latter point and was twenty-one years old when he entered into partnership with his father in the management of the Star restaurant.
     On April 22, 1894, Odos L. Haworth was married to Ada R. Staubus, who was born at Wilmington, daughter of Louis J. and Mary J. (Clark) Staubus. Louis J. Staubus was born on March 2, 1849, In Augusta county, Virginia, and was married on December 22, 1870, to Mary J. Clark, who was born in Augusta county, Virginia, on June 19, 1849, daughter of William D. and Rachel R. (Miller) Clark. Louis J. Staubus was the son of Jacob Staubus, a native of Germany, who came to America with his parents at the age of four years, locating in Augusta county, Virginia, where he became a farmer and where he and his wife, Regina Swatzel, died. They were the parents of five children, John C, William, David, Louis J. and Ellen. Louis J. Staubus was educated in the common schools of Augusta county, Virginia, and came to Ohio when a young man. After living in this state for several years he returned to Virginia, where he was married, and about 1874 he and his wife moved from Highland county, Ohio, to Reevesville. He has been a contract plasterer all of his life. Mr. and  Mrs. Louis J. Staubus are the parents of nine children, namely: Cora, who married George Bernard; Ada R., who married Odos L. Haworth; Leona E., who died at the age of six years; Worthy, who married Olive West; Samuel P., who died in infancy; Lottie Lee, who became the wife of James Bernard; Anna L. who is the wife of Harry Brook; Emma, who married Granville Gano, and Royal D., who married Gayle Brown. Mr. and Mrs. Staubus are members of the Methodist church, and he votes the Democratic ticket.
     To Odos L. and Ada R. (Staubus) Haworth were born two children, Leah Rannells and Dorothy Virginia.
     Odos L. Haworth was a well-known citizen of Clinton county, a man who was honorable and upright in all of the relations of life, who was admired by his fellow townsmen and respected for his cordial and friendly attitude toward the public at large, and his death in 1912 was mourned by many friends.
(Pg. 470)
RICHARD M. HAWORTH, the father of the subject of this sketch, was the youngest child of Mahlon and Phoebe Haworth and was nursing on his mother's breast when she was fifty years old.  He inherited the homestead of one hundred and sixty acres and took care of his parents until their death.  He inherited the homestead of one hundred and sixty acres and took care of his parents until their death.  In 1859 he traded with his brother George D. for a farm east of Wilmington.  He increased his holdings, until at one time, he had five farms of over five hundred acres in all.  He invested very heavily in the pork-packing business in Wilmington, Ohio, and reverses caused the loss of almost his entire property.  In 1883 he moved to Hendricks county, Indiana, near Plainfield, and bought a small farm on the edge of Morgan county, where he did general farming.  He was twice married; his first wife, Elizabeth M. West, was the mother of the following children:  Thomas M., who died in 1910, on his farm adjoining the subject's farm; James M., who died in youth; Isaiah M., subject of this sketch; Frances Elizabeth and Caroline Evalyn, who both died in infancy; Harriet Ellen, who married Orlando Hadley, of Wilmington; and Anna E., who was born on Oct. 12, 1862, and died on Aug. 22, 1882.  The second wife of Richard M. Haworth was Jane Janney, who was reared at Martinsville, Ohio, and who was the mother of two children: Lenora P., who was born on Nov. 6, 1866, and who married Calvin Newlin and lives on a farm near Plainfield, Indiana; and Clinton R., who was born on March 23, 1869, and now lives near Plainfield, Indiana.  Richard M. Haworth was a Republican and a stanch member of the Friends church.
    The parents of Elizabeth M. West were Thomas and Detamer (Hadley) West, natives of North Carolina and members of the Friends church.  They were the parents of the following children, all of whom are now dead: Sarah, who married David Pyle; Elizabeth M., who was the mother of the subject of this sketch; Jeremiah, who died at the age of sixteen; Mary, who married Doctor Bond and lived in Iowa; Isaiah, who lived on a farm where the subject of this sketch now lives, and Elden, who married Micajah Moore and lived in Adams township, Clinton county.
ERNEST R. HAZARD, a well-known young citizen of Martinsville, this county, who is the proprietor of a lumber, feed and coal yard at that place, was formerly an officer in the Philippine constabulary and saw extensive service in the Philippine Islands and elsewhere.  Ernest R. Hazard was born in Wilmington, this county, on May 24, 1880, the son of Jonas Seth and Mary (Buntain) Hazard, the former of whom was born near Sligo, this county, and the latter of whom was the daughter of William and Susanna (Jenkins) Buntain Jonas S. Hazard is the son of Henry and Elizabeth (Wells) Hazard, natives of Union township, this county, and Douglas county, Illinois, respectively.  Henry Hazard was educated in the common schools of Union township and became a carpenter and miller by trade.  he was also a bridge builder and constructed the bridge across the Scioto river.  He owned a grist mill and saw mill in Adams township and died at Ogden.  To Henry and Elizabeth Hazard were born nine children, Robert F., John W., Allen S., Jonas Seth, Calvin H., Sarah S., James R. Bijah T. and Caleb H.  They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
     Jonas Seth Hazard, the father of Ernest R., who was born Jan. 9, 1850, near Sligo, in Adams township, this county, was educated in the common schools of Adams township and has been a farmer and carpenter all of his life.  For forty-five years, he worked at the carpenter's trade but retired from contract carpentering in 1911.  During his active career he did much of the building in Wilmington, having moved to that place about 1880.  In 1912 he purchased sixty-two acres of land in Adams township, but rents the farm.  He married Mary Buntain, the daughter of William and Susanna (Jenkins) Buntain, to which union were born two children, Belle Boyd, who married Launtie Hadley, and Ernest R., the subject of this sketch.  The Hazard family are members of the Friends church and Jonas S. Hazard votes the Republican ticket.
     Educated in the public schools of Wilmington, Ernest R. Hazard worked for a short time at the tinner's trade.  When he was seventeen years old, he went ot Palestine, Illinois, and after being there for six months, enlisted in Battery E, Sixth United States Artillery on Mar. 21, 1898.  After serving for three years he was discharged in the Philippine Islands.  Afterward he served about three months on the Metropolitan police force of Manila, resigning to accept the position as overseer of the yard watchmen of the Manila & Dagupan railway at Caloocan, Philippine Islands.  After holding this position for about three months, he became a member of the Philippines constabulary, accepting a commission as second lieutenant and inspector of the constabulary.  He held this position for about one year and later became first lieutenant.  In 1906 he returned to the United States and engaged in the restaurant business at Wilmington for four years.  In 1910 he sold out, moved to Martinsville, where he bought an established lumber, feed and coal yard, which he now owns and manages.
     On June 30, 1907, Ernest R. Hazard was married to Pearl Certain, of Wilmington, the daughter of D. M. and Luellen (Gallaher) Certain, of that city, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Mary Ellen.
     Fraternally, Ernest R. Hazard is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics.  Mr. and Mrs. Hazard are members of the Friends church.  Mr. Hazard recently was built a fine modern home on College Heights at Martinsville, and he and his family are very comfortably and pleasantly situated there.  They are held in high regard throughout that section of the county, and enjoy the respect and esteem of all who know them.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 555
FRANK T. HAZARD, a successful hardware salesman of Wilmington, Ohio, was born on July 9, 1855, in Union township, Clinton county, Ohio, the son of Zebulun and Phoebe (Wolary) Hazard, the former of whom was born in Clinton county in 1826, and who died in 1861, and the latter of whom was born in Union township on the Waynesville pike in 1827, and died in 1870.  Zebulun Hazard's parents were John and Rebecca (Conger) Hazard, who were born and married in Virginia, descended from English stock.  They were devoted members of the Friends Church.  John Hazard came to Clinton county, Ohio, in 1820 and settled on what is now known as the Petticord farm, one mile east of Wilmington.  He died at the age of sixty-five years, after rearing a family of ten children.  His wife lived to be ninety-two years of age.
     Phoebe Wolary was the daughter of Michael Wolary, who was born in Maryland, and who, about 1825, settled west of Wilmington, Ohio, on what is now known as the Leonard farm.  He and his wife lived to advanced ages.  Zebulun Hazard was a farmer and rented land.  He died at the age of thirty-five years near Dover in Clinton county, Ohio.  He had been first married to a Miss Dwiggins, who had borne him three children, all of whom are dead.  His wife had been previously married to Isaiah Dwiggins, and had one child by that marriage, Isaiah, who died at the age of fifty years in Kansas, where he was a farmer.
     Frank T. Hazard was the only child to his parents.  After the death of his father his mother married, secondly, Moses Hudson, who died five years later.  Frank T. Hazard's mother died when he was fifteen years old and he made his home during his early manhood with his uncle, Louis Lewis.  As a young man he worked as a farm hand and was subsequently married and rented land for four years, finally purchasing a farm in Union township, where he lived for three years.  Upon selling out in 1887 he came to Wilmington, where he worked for one year in the David People's hardware store.  On Jan. 1, 1889, he began working in J. W. Sparks's hardware store and is now the head salesman in this store.
     On October 26, 1876, Frank T. Hazzard was married to Luella Miars, a native of Union township, Clinton County, Ohio, born on Dec. 6, 1856, the daughter of Isaiah and Matilda (Babb) Miars, both natives of Clinton County.  Mrs. Hazard's father is deceased, but her mother is still living.  Her father was a farmer in Union township north of Wilmington.  Mr. and Mrs. Hazard have been the parents of two children.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page  522
LOREN M. HAZARD.  Almost from the time of the very beginning of the social order of Clinton County, the Hazard family has been honorably represented here.  The first of the name to locate in Clinton county was John Hazard, a Virginian, of English descent, who married Rebecca Conger, also a native of Virginia, of colonial stock, and emigrated to Ohio, locating in Clinton county in 1820, settling on a farm one mile east of the ten struggling village of Wilmington, which farm is known in that neighborhood today as the Petticord place.  John Hazard and his wife were prominent figures in that section during pioneer days and did much to bring about proper social and civic conditions in the formative period of the neighborhood.  After rearing a family of ten children, John Hazard died, at the age of sixty-five years.  One of the sons  of John and Rebecca (Conger) Hazard was Zebulon Hazard, born in this county in 1826, who died at the early age of thirty-five years.  Zebulon Hazard was twice married, his first wife, who was the widow of Isaiah Dwiggins, bearing him three children, all of whom died without issue.  Upon her death he married, secondly, Phoebe Wolary, daughter of Michael Wolary, a native of Maryland, who, with hi wife, settled on a farm west of Wilmington, in this county, about the year 1825, where they spent the rest of their lives, both living to advanced ages.  To Zebulon and Phoebe (Wolary) Hazard but one child was born, a son, Frank T.  Upon the death of Zebulon Hazard, in 1861, his widow married, secondly, Moses Hudson, dying five years later, without further issue.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 535
CHARLES HODSON.  Highland county enjoys the distinction of numbering among her citizens a well-known farmer now in the prime of life, who won second prize at the national corn show held a few years ago in North Carolina.  Charles Hodson, a resident of Fairfield township, not only won second prize at the national corn show, but he has won first prize at the Ohio state corn show on Reed's Yellow Dent, and Johnson county, Indiana, white corn.  Mr. Hodson is also an extensive cattle and hog breeder and specializes in Jersey cattle and in Duroc-Jersey hogs.
     Charles Hodson was born on Feb. 17, 1877, the son of Joseph W. and Lillie (Jones) Hodson, the former of whom was born in Highland county, Ohio, on October 15, 1854, and the latter, in Lexington, Kentucky, in 1856.  Joseph W. Hodson was the son of Joseph and Sarah (Lamb) Hodson, natives, respectively, of Highland county, Ohio, and Guilford county, North Carolina.  Joseph Hodson was the son of Solomon and Cecelia Hodson, who emigrated from North Carolina to Highland county, Ohio, in pioneer times.  Sarah Lamb's parents were also pioneers in Highland county, where both died.  Joseph Hodson was a farmer by occupation, a Republican in politics, early in life, but later a Prohibitionist.  He and his wife were members of the Friends church.  To them were born eleven children of whom Joseph W., was the ninth, the others being Eli, Mary, Martha, Jonathan, Rachel Ann, Josl, Josiah, Lewis, Milton and Ella.
     Joseph W. Hodson was reared on a farm and was educated in the public schools.  He has four acres in Wayne township, where he now lives.  He votes the Prohibition ticket.  On Feb. 17, 1876, he was married to Lillie Jones, a native of Lexington, Kentucky, and the daughter of John and Celia (Thompson) Jones, both of whom were natives of England.  After settling in Lexington, Kentucky, John Jones engaged in the mercantile business.  He was burned to death in that city some years ago and his widow died soon afterward.  To Joseph W. and Lillie (Jones) Hodson six children have been born, of whom Charles, the subject of this sketch, is the eldest, the others being Bertsel, Harry, John (who died in infancy), Cammie (who died in infancy), and Clemma, who died in 1911, at the age of twenty-four years.
     Charles Hodson was reared on a farm and was educated in the district schools and in the Highland high school.  He owns one hundred and forty-one acres of land and lives in Fairfield township, Highland county, where he raises Duroc-Jersey hogs and Jersey cattle.
     On Oct. 6, 1900, Charles Hodson was married to Lena May Fisher, who was born in Green township, Clinton county, on Jan. 11, 1878, the daughter of Amos and Ruth Ann (Terrell) Fisher, the former of whom is deceased and the latter of whom is still living on the old homestead in Green township.  Amos Fisher was born on the farm owned by his parents, John and Hannah Fisher, in Green township, on Apr. 1, 1846.  John Fisher was born in Highland county on Oct. 29, 1820, the son of Cephas and Rachel Fisher, natives of Pennsylvania.  His grandparents were James and Jane Fisher, also natives of Highland county, Ohio.  Cephas Fisher was twice married, the first time to Rachel Stanbury, who died on May 5, 1844, leaving three children, Mrs. Rebecca Atkinson, of Story county, Iowa; Cephas, of Henry county, Iowa, and John, the father of Amos.  Cephas Fisher married, secondly, Mrs. Jane Atkinson.  He died on Dec. 30, 1862, at the age of eighty-four years.  On Sept. 25, 1845, John Fisher was married to Hannah Atkinson, who was born in Clinton County on June 2, 1827, a daughter of John and Jane Atkinson, natives of Ohio and Pennsylvania, respectively.  John Atkinson died in April, 1839.  Ten children were born to John and Hannah (Atkinson) Fisher, Amos being the first born.  Among the others were Amy, who married William McFadden; Harriet Ellen; Joseph; Phoebe Jane, who married William F. Waddle; Thomas; Rachel Alice; William Henry and Azariah.
     On Jan. 15, 1874, Amos Fisher married Ruth Ann Terrell, who was born on Nov. 8, 1844, the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Williams) Terrell, natives of Highland county.  Her maternal grandparents were William and Phoebe Williams, of North Carolina, who settled in Highland county.  John and Elizabeth Terrell were the parents of seven children, Hampton W., Ruth Ann, Phoebe Jane, David E., Mary Edna, Flora A., and Pleasant M.  Amos and Ruth Ann (Terrell) Fisher were the parents of four children, Elver J., born on Apr. 30, 1875; Lena May, Jan. 11, 1878; Amos Clyde, June 29, 1880, and Hannah Elizabeth, Oct. 9, 1884.
     To Charles and Lena May (Fisher) Hodson five children have been born namely: Lloyd Delos,
born on July 26, 1901; Wilbur Amos, Jan. 29, 1904; Harold Charles, Jan. 18, 1906; Dorothy Marie, July 11, 1911, and Wahneta May, Feb. 23, 1914.
     Politically, Mr. Hodson is a Republican, but he has never aspired to office.  The Hodson family are all members of the Friends Church.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 919
WILLIAM A. HUDSON, now an enterprising and well-known farmer and successful business man of Westboro, this county, was born on Sept. 15, 1857, in Brown county, Ohio, the son of Charles and Sarah (Lear) Hudson, both natives of that county, Charles Hudson was the son of Shelby and Polly Hudson, natives of Indiana, and early settlers in Brown county, Ohio, where they were farmers.  Sarah Lear was the daughter of Joshua Lear, also an early settler in Brown county.
     Charles Hudson received his education in the pioneer schools of Brown county, and some years after his marriage came to Clinton county, where he purchased a farm in Marion township, comprising sixty-eight acres, upon which he spent the remainder of his life.  The Hudson family at that time were all members of the Methodist Episcopal church.  To Charles and Sarah (Lear) Hudson were born seven children, of whom William A. was the second in order of birth, the other children being Millie, George, Lillie, Wilford, John and Luella.
     William A. Hudson, who was brought to Clinton county by his parents when about five years of age, was reared on a farm in Marion township, and received his education in the public schools of that township.  Upon reaching manhood he engaged in farming in Jefferson township, where he lived for some time.  Although Mr. Hudson is still interested in farming and owns thirty-three acres near the village of Westboro, he has been engaged in recent years in dealing in white-oak timber, and in 1913 established a coal, cement-post and drain-tile business in the village of Westboro, where he enjoys a flourishing business, which is a distinct recognition of his standing as an honorable citizen in the community.
     On Mar. 11, 1883, William A. Hudson was married to Ella Garner, a sister of Jesse Garner, whose biographical sketch, presented elsewhere in this volume, sets out the family history of the Garners in full.  To Mr. Hudson and wife two children have been born, Howard and Elbridge, the former of whom is the cashier of the Merchants and Farmers Bank, of Blanchester, this county, and the latter a rural mail carrier out of Westboro.  Mrs. Hudson is a member of the Friends church.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 770
JARRETT HUFFMAN is a prosperous farmer of Jefferson township, and owns one hundred and eight acres of land, where he now lives.  He was born in Highland county, Ohio, in 1861, the son of John and Nancy (Johnson) Huffman, natives of Adams county, Ohio, and Highland county, respectively.  The paternal grandfather of Jarret Huffman was Humphry Huffman, a native of the Old Dominion state and an early settler in Ohio.  He was a farmer in Highland county and died on his farm.  Late in life he moved to Illinois and his wife died while they were making the journey to that state.  Later he returned to Ohio.  Mr. Huffman's maternal grandparents were early settlers in Highland county, Ohio.  His maternal great-grandfather, Jerod Hopkins, was a native of Maine and an early settler in Highland county.
     John Huffman, the father of Jarret, was educated in the pioneer schools of the Buckeye state, when greased paper was used in log cabins for windows.  He became a farmer and followed this occupation in Highland county and later in Clinton county.  In 1888 he located near Sabina and later moved to a farm near Westboro.  Still later he returned to Sabina and died near that town.  His widow is still living.  He was a soldier in the Civil War and he and his wife had a family of eleven children.
     Jarret Huffman, who was educated in Highland county, Ohio, worked by the month before his marriage and three years after his marriage.  In 1907 he purchased twenty-one acres of land near Sabina, but later sold that tract and purchased fifty acres near Westboro.  He then purchased one hundred and eight acres in Jefferson townships, where he now lives.  After buying the last tract, he disposed of the fifty acres near Westboro.  Mr. Huffman is engaged in general farming.
     In April, 1886, Jarret Huffman was married to Esther Carter, who was born near Sabina, the daughter of John Millican Carter, a farmer of Wilson township, and to this union five children have been born, Leotis, Ethel, Maude, Verna Clinton, Cora Esther and Stella Florence.  The Huffman family are members of the Friends church and take an active interest in church work.  They are a highly respected family in the neighborhood where they live.
 
JOHN T. HUMPHREYS.  In analyzing the career of the agriculturist, it is invariably found to be true that unless he is the recipient of estates, his success is the natural outcome of hard work and careful management.  While this is so in the case of the gentleman above mentioned, his has not been a selfish attention to his vocation, for he has ever borne in mind the fact that society had claims upon him, and to this demand he has responded with an altruism that makes the community his debtor. 
     John T. Humphreys, now a well-known farmer of this county, was born on July 8, 1851, in Warren county, Ohio, the son of John L. Humphreys, a brother of David A. Humphreys, whose history appears elsewhere in this volume and is thoroughly identified with the history of Vernon township, having located there with his parents in 1856, when he was but five years of age.  He pursued his studies in the public schools of the township, and in early manhood devoted himself to the cultivation of the soil.  He prospered and at the present time owns thirteen hundred and thirty-nine acres in Vernon township, part of this holding being the farm which belonged to his father, and which he bought.
     On Jan. 31, 1879, John T. Humphreys married Jennie M. Hartman, who was born in this county on April 22, 1860, the daughter of James and Allie (Townsend) Hartman.  James Hartman was born on Nov. 22, 1821, the son of Gaynor Hartman, a pioneer of Clinton county.  He died on June 21, 1908.  His wife, who was born on Aug. 3, 1832, also is deceased, and Mrs. Humphreys died on May 24, 1910.  To Mr. and Mrs. Humphreys were born five children, Arthur (deceased); Everett, Charley, Fred and Ruth.
    
Both Mr. and Mrs. Humphreys were for many years active in the social life of the community in which they lived.  Mrs. Humphreys was a Baptist in faith, while her husband attended the Methodist Episcopal church.  As to the phases of his social and political life, Mr. Humhreys always has taken keen interest in the success of the Republican party, for whose welfare he works.  He is a believer in fraternal orders and their purposes, and is a member of the Knights of Pythias.
     The present sketch forms an appropriate part of this county history, for it concerns a man of sterling qualities, of strong, interesting personality, and one whose career has been of quiet usefulness.
WILSON HUNNICUT.  The farmers of this country are the backbone of its commercial life, and, as primary producers, are the class upon which, not only the industrial managers, the transporters, the merchants and the banks depend largely for the prosperity, but good farming is likewise the keel of our commercial life and happiness.  Wilson Hunnicutt, a retired farmer who is now living in Wilmington, begun with a moderate-sized farm, which he bought on credit, and during his active career was able to accumulate six hundred acres in Liberty and Union townships, a very commendable record, and one of which he has every reason to be very proud.
     Wilson Hunnicutt was born on August 18, 1848, in Liberty township, two miles southwest of Port William, the son of Thomas and Susanna (Bailey) Hunnicut, the former of whom was born in Prince George county, Virginia, July 10, 1811, and who died on April 10, 1876, and the later born near Dover, Union township, Clinton county, Ohio, February 9, 1810, and who died on October 15, 1896.
     The paternal grandparents of Wilson Hunnicutt were Thomas, Sr., and Elizabeth Hunnicutt.  The Hunnicutts were of Scotch-Irish descent and were natives of Prince George county, Virginia.  He was a planter in Virginia and died in that state on February 15, 1823, a man well respected and widely known.  His wife lived several years longer, passing away in 1845.  They were prominent and influential members of the Friends church and were, therefore, opposed to slavery, although they lived in a region where slavery was common.  Mr. Hunnicutt's maternal grandparents were Daniel and Mary (Haworth) Bailey, the former of whom was born in Prince George county, Virginia, came to Clinton county in 1804, at a time when he was a young man.  Here he purchased a farm four miles north of Wilmington and cultivated it until his death in 1844.  He was a very tall, stoutly built and rugged man.  The family of Daniel and Mary Bailey were stanch Quakers.
     Thomas Hunnicutt, Jr., enjoyed only limited opportunities to obtain an education, but made good sue of every opportunity presented to him, and became a well-informed man, largely by home study.  When he was sixteen years of age he came to Clinton county, arriving on June 10, 1827, from Virginia, with his mother, brothers and sisters and a colony of others.  His mother purchased a farm of one hundred acres in Liberty township, and, after Thomas, Jr., was a man, he purchased a tract of land located in what was in those days a swamp, one mile north of his mother's farm.  He became with seventy acres of land, which he ditched thoroughly and improved, and later he owned six hundred acres.  In 1835 he was married to Susanna Bailey and they had eight children.  Thomas Hunnicutt, Jr., was well known as a stock raiser, and was appointed on many committees at fairs to judge hogs, he having been a successful feeder and well known in this county for his success.  He and his wife were devout Christians and active in the work of the Quaker church.  Early in life he had been appointed an elder in the Dover monthly meetings.  Politically, he was identified with the Republican party.
     The eight children born to Thomas, Jr., and Susanna Hunnicutt became widely separated.  Four of the children, Catherine, David, John Oliver and Anna Eliza, are deceased.  Catherine married William Underwood, also deceased, and lived in Liberty township.  John Oliver died in 1874.  Anna Eliza, who was the youngest, married Henry C. McPherson, who is also deceased.  The living children are Daniel B., Mary Elizabeth, Wilson and Thomas E.  Daniel b. lives in Douglas county, Kansas, where he is a retired farmer.  He is a veteran of the Civil War.  Mary Elizabeth is a widow of John F. Spear and lives at Dayton, Ohio.  Thomas E. lives in Whittier, California; his wife died in 1898.
     Wilson Hunnicutt attended the Liberty township public schools, and later in life the Martinsville high school.  After attending the high school for some time he became a student at the Spiceland Academy, at Spiceland, Indiana, an institution maintained by the Friends.  After finishing his education he lived at home until his marriage.  His father sold him a farm on credit, comprising one hundred and twenty-two acres, and he added to this farm until he owned five hundred acres in Liberty and Union townships.  In 1902 Mr. Hunnicutt retired from active farm work and moved to Wilmington, Ohio, where he is now living at 531 North South street.
     On August 3, 1871, Mr. Hunnicutt was married to Mary M. Gallimore, who was born in Wilson township, Clinton county, Ohio, and who is the daughter of Elisha and Eliza (Grear) Gillimore, both of whom are deceased.  He was born in North Carolina and his wife was a native of Clinton county.  They were members of the Friends church, and he was an excellent farmer, and at one time owned one thousand acres of land.  Mr. and Mrs. Hunnicutt have had three children:  Franklin who is referred to elsewhere in this volume;  Nora H., who married Dennis Stephens and lives on the Hunnicutt home place; and Bertha May, who married Alton M. Haworth, and who died on May 28, 1912.
     Politically, Mr. Hunnicutt is a Republican and served as a school director for fifteen years while living in the country.  He is an elder of the Dover monthly meeting.  Wilson Hunnicutt is a very worthy man and a good citizen, a man who has been industrious, honorable and fair in his relations with his fellows.  Naturally, he is a highly respected citizen of Clinton county.
ROBERT EDGAR HUNT, an enterprising farmer of Liberty township, this county, who owns a splendid-looking home on the Xenia pike, was born on April'15, 1856, in Martinsville, the son of Cyrus and Margaret (Donaldson) Hunt, who were married in 1852. The former was a native of Clinton county and the latter of Ireland, who came to Clinton county with her parents. Her father departed to return to Ireland and no member of the, family has since been able to discover what became of him. Cyrus, Hunt was the son of Robert and Ruth (Madden) Hunt, natives of this county, the latter of whom was an aunt of Moses G., Solomon and Rachel Madden, whose biographical sketches, presented elsewhere in this volume, give the history of the Madden family. Robert Hunt was a farmer in Clinton county and was an extensive stock buyer, in an early day having been profitably engaged in driving cattle and hogs to Cincinnati. He was prominent in the pioneer Quaker church of this county and died in 1856 at the age of fifty-five years. Robert and Ruth (Madden) Hunt had ten children, of whom Cyrus, the eldest, was the father of Robert Edgar, the subject of this sketch, the other children being George, Nathan, Henry, Elizabeth, Mary, Edith, Rachel, Ann and Lydia.
     Cyrus Hunt received a common school education in the public schools of Clinton county and taught school practically all of his life. He became a well-read man and was a natural leader in the community in which he lived. As a member of the Friends church, he was active in religious work and was also active in civic affairs. In the days before the Civil War, he was prominent in the "underground railroad" movement and was one of the leaders in the local anti-slavery agitation of that period. For four years he taught a territorial Indian school in the west and died in Kansas in February, 1898. Cyrus and Margaret (Donaldson) Hunt were the parents of four children, Oliver, Robert Edgar, Palmer and Gladys. Oliver is a resident of Oklahoma and has been married twice, the first time to Alice Hiatt, by whom he had three sons, and the second time to Ola Hinshaw. Palmer, who is also a resident of Oklahoma, is unmarried. Gladys is unmarried and lives with her mother.
     Robert Edgar Hunt was educated in the common schools and was reared on the farm. On October 24, 1878, he was married to Lavinia Hiatt, who was born on the farm where Mr. and Mrs. Hunt now live, the daughter of Allen and Susan (Folger) Hiatt. Allen Hiatt was a farmer and large landowner in Clinton county, having been the owner, altogether, of about five hundred acres of land.
     To Robert E. and Lavinia (Hiatt) Hunt five children have been born, Gladys, Susan, Bernard, Alice and Doris. Gladys married Alvin Hartman, of Clinton county, and has three children, George E., Conard and Alice. Bernard, who lives on the old home place, in Liberty township, married Edith Hurley and has two children, Esther and Elizabeth. The remainder of the children are unmarried.
     After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Hunt moved to the farm of one hundred acres in Liberty township, where they now live. They enjoy a comfortable competence and are highly respected citizens of the township.
 
 

CLICK HERE to Return to
CLINTON COUNTY, OHIO

CLICK HERE to Return to
OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

This Webpage has been created by Sharon Wick exclusively for Ohio Genealogy Express  2008
Submitters retain all copyrights