OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

 

Welcome to Clinton
County, Ohio

BIOGRAPHIES
(Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio
Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915)
Contrib. by Sharon Wick

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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JAMES W. BABB.  One of the best-remembered farmers and business men of the past generation in Clinton county was the late James W. Babb, who at the time of his death owned and lived on a farm on the Vienna pike, in Union township.  Of Mr. Babb it may be said that he was a man of strong and active sympathies.  His temperament was warm and ardent, his feeling deep and intense.  These and other attractive characteristics unconsciously drew him an unusual number of devoted friends, upon whom under all circumstances he could rely and who, now that he has passed from earth, revere his memory.  He is remembered today as a manly man, of pleasing and dignified presence, influential in the circles in which he moved and cordial, friendly and kind in all the relations of life.  He stood as a conspicuous example of symmetrically-developed American manhood.
     James W. Babb was born on May 8, 1837, at Xenia, Ohio, and died on Nov. 30, 1896.  He was the son of James M. and Hannah (Smith) Babb, the former of whom was born on Jan. 17, 1811, and the latter of whom was born on June 4, 1817, both in Frederick county, Virginia.  James M. Babb was the son of Henry Mercer and Grace (McCool) Babb, and Henry was the son of Thomas and Blanche (Mercer) Babb, who were off shoots of an old English family in Virginia.  Hannah (Smith) Babb was the daughter of John S. and Susan (Crouse) Smith.
     James M.
and Hanna (Smith) Babb were married on Aug. 14, 1834, in Virginia, and immediately after their marriage made the journey to Xenia, Ohio, their wedding trip.  They began housekeeping at Xenia, where he became a carpenter and an influential citizen.  They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and lived and died in Xenia.  They had six children, all of whom are now deceased, namely: John Henry,  who was born on May 19, 1835, died on May 30, 1835; James W., was the second born; Mary Jane, 1839, died in 1841; Thomas M., Apr. 8, 1842, died on Mar. 14, 1895, and was for many years a partner of his brother, James W., in the saw-mill and building business; George H., Feb. 22, 1844, died on Feb. 15, 1915, made his home with his brother, James W.,  until the latter's death and afterwards lived with Mrs. Babb until his death, in the spring of 1915; Charles S., May 30, 1836, died in 1894.
     James M. Babb was married, secondly, to Susan McCreary on Feb. 16, 1853, and they had three children, all of whom are living, as follow: Leonidas, is a resident of Xenia, Ohio, and a carpenter by occupation; Grace, married David McClellan, of Greene county, Ohio; Eliza, married John McLean, and they reside near Jamestown, Ohio, on a farm.
     James W. Babb was first married to Angeline Hays, Feb. 11, 1858.  She died however, July 7, 1862, and he was married, secondly, on June 11, 1863, to Louisa Lacy, who is still living.
     Louisa Lacy was born on June 29, 1835, in Washington township, Clinton county, Ohio, the daughter of John Johnson, who was familiarly known as "Jack," and Ruth (Brown) Lacy. Mrs. Babb's father was born on Dec. 25, 1810, in Washington township, Clinton county, and died on Mar. 1, 1892.  The mother was born near Morrisville, in Washington township, Clinton county, Ohio, in 1811, and died in 1875.  The late "Jack" Lacy was the son of J. Johnson and Ruth (Clevenger) Lacy, natives of Frederick county, Virginia, where they were married early in the last century.  They came to Ohio in 1809 and settled in the present limits of Clinton county, where the village of Cuba now stands.  Here the elder Lacy kept a tavern for several years, finally settling in Washington township, where he died about he time of the breaking out of the Civil War, his wife having died some years previously.  His family consisted of ten children, of whom "Jack" Lacy was the eldest.  He received a limited education in the primitive schools of the day and purchasing land in Washington township in 1838, located no it in the fall of 1840.  In 1855 he purchased a small tract of land, which became the nucleus of a five hundred and twenty three acre farm, which he later owned.  He married Ruth Brown, in October, 1833.  They had eleven children, as follow: Mrs. Louisa (Lacy) Babb was the eldest; Henry, died in 1910; David Bell, born in December, 1840, married Mary Jane Crouse, is a farmer of Union township; Susan, married George Olvis, of Burtonville; Mary, married Clay Olvis, of Burtonville; Florence, married John Gray, of Wilmington; Sarah; died unmarried, at the age of twenty-seven; Finley is a resident of New Vienna; Levi, lives near Lytle, Ohio, where he is a farmer; Leroy, lives near Harveysville; one child died in infancy.
     Mrs. Babb's mother, who, before her marriage, was Ruth Brown, was the daughter of David Brown, one of four brothers, who settled early in Washington township.  David, Asa, Elisha and James Brown were natives of Massachusetts, born during the War of Independence, and who at the close of the war removed with their father to Owen county, Kentucky, where they grew to manhood.  Between 1807 and 1810 all removed from Owen county, Kentucky, to somewhere within the present limits of Washington township, purchasing land in Steel's, Carrington's and Johnsons's surveys, where they all resided for many yeas, rearing large families.  Asa died in 1843; David, 1844; Elisha, 1856, and James 1863.  David Brown and his wife, Jane Brown, were members of the Christian church.
    James W. Babb grew up in Xenia, Ohio, and became a carpenter by occupation and later a building contractor.  Subsequently, he operated a saw-mill at Paintersville, in Greene county, in partnership with his brother, Thomas M., for several years.  In 1894 he removed to his farm on the Vienna pike, in Union township, and in that year built a house.  Two years later he died.  His widow, Mrs. Louisa (Lacy) Babb, still lives on the farm.
    
While living at Paintersville, Mr. Babb served as justice of the peace for several years.  He was an uncompromising Republican.  He and his wife were active members of the Christian church.  They had no children, but two children had been born by Mr. Babb's former marriage.  One of these children, Amanda E., born on Jan. 30, 1862, died on Feb. 22,1811, unmarried.  Mary E., the eldest, born on Dec. 24, 1858, married John Leininger, a farmer of Union township.
     Mrs. Louisa (Lucy) Babb is a well-known woman, well informed, cultured and refined.  She is highly respected by the people of this township.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915
CLIFTON D. BAILEY. One of the most important industrial establishments in this part of the state of Ohio is the extensive plant of the Champion Bridge Company, at Wilmington, Clinton county, for which, for the past ten years, the gentleman whose name the reader notes above has been the superintendent and one of the important factors. Mr. Bailey was born in Clinton county and ever has had the interests of the county very dearly at heart. His position as superintendent of one of the chief industrial enterprises of the county gives him larger opportunity for the exercise of his wide influence in industrial affairs and it is undoubted that he has thus been able to do much for the community, a measure of service which it would be difficult properly to estimate. Needless to say he occupied a high place in the confidence and esteem of his associates in business and the highest regard of all who knew him.
Clifton D. Bailey was born on a farm near Dover, in Liberty township, Clinton county, Ohio, on Dec. 20, 1859, son of William and Maria (Tumlin) Bailey, both natives of this county, the former of whom was born on the same farm on which his son was born, in 1834, and died in 1865, and the latter of whom was born in Union township on July 1, 1839, and is still living.
     William Bailey was the son of George and Lydia Bailey, both natives of this county, members of pioneer families. George Bailey's father was Daniel Bailey, who emigrated from South Carolina to Ohio, becoming one of the very earliest settlers in Union town­ship. He and his wife were members of the Friends church and were active in all good works in the pioneer days of this county, having been accounted among the leaders of the social order in the community in which they settled. George Bailey was reared to manhood in Union township and then bought a farm in Liberty township, where he spent the rest of his life.   He also was a Quaker, following the faith of his parents, and was a man of large influence in his neighborhood; a thrifty and industrious farmer and an excellent citizen. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, of whom William was the second in order of birth. William Bailey was reared on the home farm, a part of which he continued to manage after his marriage, and there he spent the rest of his life. He married Maria Tumlin, a member of one of the old families of this county and died at the age of thirty-one, leaving a widow and two sons, Corwin A., who is a machinist, living at Wilmington, this county, and Clifton D., the immediate subject of this sketch. His widow married, secondly, George R. Acre, of Wilmington, a carpenter, but there was no issue to this second union
     Clifton D. Bailey was but six years of age when his father died and he was reared on his grandfather's farm, remaining there until he was eighteen years of age, at which time he went to Wilmington to learn the blacksmith trade in the shops of the Champion Bridge Company and has been connected with that concern ever since, save for three years when he was working at Hamilton, Ohio. In 1906 Mr. Bailey was made superin­tendent of the shops of the Champion Bridge Company and ever since has occupied that important and responsible position.
     On February 12, 1880, Clifton D. Bailey was united in marriage to Ella Johnson, who was born in Liberty township, this county, daughter of Harvey A. Johnson, a well-known Liberty township farmer, who still is living in that township, and to this union two children have been born, Elsie M., on May 18, 1883, and William A., September 5, 1884, living at Chicago Junction, Ohio, married Susan Haines and has two children.
Elsie M. Bailey was united in marriage on November 17, 1909, to Dr. Chester E. Kinzel, of Wilmington, present coroner of Clinton county, who was born in Zanesville, Ohio, on May 13, 1882, son of John W. and Christina (Mohler) Kinzel, both natives of Morgan county, this state, the former of whom was born in 1846 and died in 1900, and the latter of whom was born in 1852 and died in 1884. John Kinzel was a son of Charles and Lavina (Beckwith) Kinzel. The father of Charles was a German immigrant who came to America and located in the neighborhood of the city of Baltimore, where he became a farmer. Charles Kinzel, born in 1804, married Lavina Beckwith and about the year 1825 emigrated to Ohio, settling in Morgan county, where he bought a farm and operated extensive salt furnaces. He and his wife were the parents of seven children. Their son, John, married Christina Mohler, daughter of Caspar Mohler and wife, Germans who came to Ohio from Pennsylvania, settling in Morgan county, where they reared a family of ten children, and moved to Zanesville, this state, where Casper Mohler worked as a mechanic in a tile factory. He and his wife were the parents of three children: Harry G., a lawyer at Spokane. Washington; Dr. Chester E., of Wilmington, and Ida, who died at the age of two years. The mother of these children dying when Chester E. was three years of age, John Kinzel married, secondly, Mary Brown, of Zanesville, and continued to live in that city the rest of his life, his widow still living there.
     Chester E. Kinzel was reared in the home of an aunt, Mrs. Mary L. Deaver, of Morgan county, and received his elementary education in the public schools of that county. After a course in a normal school, he began teaching school and for three years was thus engaged, after which he entered the Starling Medical School, at Columbus, Ohio, and was graduated from that institution in 1906, in July of which year he came to this county, locating in Wilmington, where he engaged in the practice of his profession and has thus been engaged ever since. A year or two previous to the election of 1914, Doctor Kinzel had been appointed coroner of Clinton county, to fill out an unexpired term, and in the following election was elected to that office and is now serving the public in that capacity. Doctor Kinzel is a Republican and a member of the Masons, the Elks and the Eagles. He and his wife are the parents of one child, a son, William Nelson, born on September 4, 1913. (24)
     Mr. and Mrs. Bailey own and live in the famous old brick mansion on West Main street in Wilmington, which was built more than one hundred years ago and which was the birthplace of Addison Russell, whose memory ever will live in and about Wilmington. This fine old mansion Is still in good condition and is the scene of much genial hospitality, Mr. and Mrs. Bailey being fond of entertaining their friends.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915
EMERY R. BALES.  If one were in search of a representative business man of any community he would select a man of the type of Emery R. Bales, secretary and treasurer of the Wilmington Casting Company. Still a young man in years, Mr. Bales is, of course, enthusiastic, but he has other qualities that are just as necessary for the success of the man active in commercial and industrial pursuits. It, is by reason of this combination of characteristics that the success of the well-known firm has been achieved, for it is not inappropriate to say that this firm is, no doubt, the leading one of its kind in this vicinity. They are extensive manufacturers of gray-iron castings.
Emery R. Bales was born on a farm in Chester township, Clinton county, on April 23, 1882, a son of William H. and Cordelia J. (Faulkner) Bales, both of whom were natives of Greene county.
William H. Bales located in Chester township in 1881, and lived there until the fall of 1905. when he removed to Wilmington, where he died on January 11, 1906. The mother, whose industry and devotion lightened many a burden for the husband and children of this home, passed away in March, 1910. William H. and Cordelia J. Bales were the parents of live children, as follow: Emery R., the subject of this biography; Thomas M., professor in Wilmington College; Elisha Allen, deceased at the age of fourteen; Lorena F., of Wilmington, and llo H., of Wilmington.
     Emery R. Bales was fortunate in that he was able to acquire more than the education possible to the average boy, for after the common school course he was permitted to attend Wilmington College, interspersing farm work with the time spent in school. He was graduated from the college in 1904, and then taught school for one year in Sabina, Ohio. Mr. Bales next found employment in the First National Bank of Wilmington, and remained there for the next seven and one-half years, giving satisfaction in his work. In March. 1913. he decided to go into business for himself, and formed the partnership with E. E. Terrell, which continued to July 1, 1915. An extensive volume of business was built up, the special lines being real estate and insurance. This partnership was dissolved on July 1, 1915, that Mr. Bales might take up his interest in the castings company.
On March 23. 1910, Emery R. Bales was united in marriage with Elizabeth E. Magee, who was born in Chester township, a daughter of John and Mary Magee. Their only child is deceased.
     Mr. Bales has held many offices of honor, both in the business world and in the social and religious organizations with which he has been connected. He is at present treasurer of the Wilmington Homestead Company. He is a Mason of high standing, as is indicated by the fact that he has held all the offices in Lodge No. 52.
     Mr. Bales has allied himself with the Republican party as a mutter of deep conviction. He has also taken sincere interest in religious affairs and for years has had much to do with the success of the organization to which he belongs, this being the Methodist Episcopal denomination. Besides being secretary and treasurer of the church board he is also one of its stewards.
     Mr. Bales has applied his religious principles and training to business, and is known for his fair and honest dealing. He is genial in manner, makes friends easily, and is courteous and considerate always. Both he and his estimable wife are prominent in religious circles and in the social life of the city, to which they have contributed a high type of citizenship.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915
  JAMES F. BENNETT, a well known farmer and quarryman of Union township, this county, as well as a successful dealer in feed, wool and live stock, has not been extensively favored by inheritance and wealth, or the assistance of influential friends.  Nevertheless, by industry and the economical management of his business, he has obtained a comfortable station in life, and has made his influence felt in the community life of Clinton county, where he was born about sixty years ago.  Because of his honorable career and his steady progress as a farmer and business man, he is eminently entitled to rank as one of the representative men of this county.
     James F. Bennett was born on July 22, 1855, in Union township, this county, at a point one hundred yards from the home in which he is now living, the son of Levi T. and Sarah (Wilson) Bennett and wife, were separated by the death of the grandmother when their son, Levi T., was a mere lad.  After his first wife's death, Thomas Bennett married the second time and by his second marriage was the father of a numerous family.  In pioneer times he had come to Ohio from Maryland and located in the village of Deserted Camp.  He was a cabinet-maker by trade, and he and all of his family were devout and loyal members of the Friends church.  Late in life he removed to Springboro, in Warren county, this state, where he died at the age of ninety-five years.  The maternal grandparents of Mr. Bennett were Alexander and Sarah Wilson, who came from Pennsylvania to Ohio in pioneer times and settled in Union township, this county.  Alexander Wilson owned several farms and conducted a large general store, a short distance from Wilmington, where he handled all the produce which the farmers had to sell and bought live stock extensively.  He also lived to the age of ninety-five years.  His wife, who was an earnest member of the Christian church, passed away at the age of seventy-five.
     The late Levi T. Bennett was an infant when he was brought to Clinton county by his parents.  Later the family lived for a time in Clark County, Ohio, and after his mother's death, he made his home near Dover, this county, with the Moses Frazier family, who reared him to manhood.  He lived with this family until his marriage, after which event he purchased one hundred acres of land in Union township, where his son, James F., now lives.  Later he made the following addition to his farm; ninety acres from the George Haworth estate; twenty-five acres from the Wilson estate, and fifty-seven acres, which he bought from Jefferson Fritz, a total of two hundred and seventy-seven acres, all of which James F. Bennett now owns.  The late Levi T. Bennett was a Republican in politics, and took an active part in local public affairs, in which he exerted considerable influence.  He took especial pride in raising and feeding hogs for the market, and was very successful in that line.  Both he and his wife were earnest and faithful members of the Christian church.  They were the parents of three sons:  Alexander, who lives on a farm in Fayette County, Ohio; Thomas, a farmer of Union Township, this county, who died in 1913, and James F., the immediate subject of this review.
     James F. Bennett attended the public schools of his home township, and after finishing his common-school education took a course at the normal school at Lebanon, Ohio.  Afterwards he remained at home on his father's farm until his marriage, after which he purchased a farm west in Wilmington, where he lived for two years, at the expiration of which time he disposed of his farm and returned to his father's farm to manage the estate and take care of his parents, who were becoming feeble. Upon the death of his parents he inherited his share of the home farm and later purchased the interests of the other heirs.  Mr. Bennett still manages his farm and makes his home there, but about 1885 he started in to buy and sell live stock, and has been extensively engaged in that business since that time.  About 1890 he opened an office in Wilmington, and added wool-buying to his business.  Later he entered into a partnership with a Mr. Thompson, and this arrangement still continues, the firm maintaining an office on West Main street, in Wilmington, where they handle seeds and wool and buy and sell live stock.  Mr. Bennett is also developing a large stone quarry along the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, east of Wilmington, where he has installed a pulverizer for manufacturing lime to be used as fertilizer.  This is a large industry in this section of the state, and promises soon to develop into an even greater business than it is now.  Mr. Bennett also produces large quantities of cracked stone, which is used in road building.
     On June 6, 1877, James F. Bennett was married to Ida B. Pendry who was born in Liberty township, this county, a daughter of John and Myra (Jenkins) Pendry both of whom are deceased.  They were natives of this county, and were prominent residents of Union township.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 752
CHRISTOPHER C. BERNARD is a well-known farmer of Sabina, this county, whose great-grandfather, Thomas Bernard, was a prominent Virginia planter and wholesale dealer of Richmond, Virginia, and a soldier in the Revolutionary War, who fought at Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth, Stony Point and other places.
     Christopher C. Bernard was born on July 2, 1872, in Green township, this county, son of James K. and Kesiah (McVey) Bernard, both natives of Clinton county, the former of whom, born on June 10, 1835, in Green township, died on September 5, 1907, and the latter, born on January 10, 1838, in Wayne township, was the daughter of Christopher and Catherine (West) McVey. Mrs. James K. Bernard was one of eight children born to her parents and was the third in order of birth, the others being James, Henrietta, Robert, Edman, Benson, Eliza Jane and Alkana.
     The paternal grandparents of Christopher C. Bernard were George W. and Harriet (McConnell) Bernard, the former of whom was born on September 13, 1700, in Goochland county, Virginia, and the latter, October 12, 1810, in Brown county, Ohio. George W. Bernard emigrated from Virginia to Highland county, this state, in 1807, with his parents and in 1832, located on the farm in Green township, this county, where he spent the remainder of his life. He owned over four hundred acres of land and was engaged, in general farming. George W. and Harriet (McConnell) Bernard were the parents of nine children, Thomas F., James K., Mary E., John W., Matilda J., George W., Charles B., Martha H. and Elijah M. Harriet (McConnell) Bernard was the daughter of James and Sallie (Downing) McConnell, natives of Pennsylvania, who emigrated to Brown county, Ohio, later, in 1821, coming to Clinton county. George W. Bernard was the son of Thomas and Mary (Hicks) Bernard.
     The father of Thomas Bernard and the great-great-grandfather of Christopher C., the subject of this sketch, was William Bernard, a native of England, who married Mary Flemings. They were early settlers in Virginia and he owned three thousand acres of land. He was a wholesale dealer in Richmond, Virginia, and lost most of his property during the Revolutionary War. His son, Thomas, was a Revolutionary soldier, who fought in various important battles of that war.
     The late James K. Bernard was educated in the common schools of Green township and when a young man began farming in that township and farmed there practically all his life, having been the owner of about two thousand acres of choice land in Green and Wayne townships. In 1903 he retired and removed to New Vienna, where he spent the remaining four years of his life, passing away in 1907. His widow, the mother of Christopher C, still lives in New Vienna. They were the parents of nine children, as follow: John R„ who was born on July 23, 1862; George W., August 14, 1863, Harriett C., August 16, 1864; Charles O., October 30, 1865; Martha, February 23, 1867; James E., April 3, 1868; Christopher C., July 2, 1872; Coraetta, February 7, 1876, and Oscar, September 13, 1878. The late James K. Bernard was a Democrat.
     Christopher C. Bernard, who was educated in the public schools of Green township, began farming when a young man in Wayne township, and was engaged in farming there until September, 1003, at which time he retired from the farm and moved to Sabina, where he has lived ever since. He owns two hundred and seventy-seven acres of land in Wayne township, and is considered one of the foremost farmers of that section of the county.
     On December 19, 1894, Christopher C. Bernard was married to Edith Pierce, who was born on April 28, 1873, daughter of Hugh and Mary (McKay) Pierce, and to this union has been born one child, Trimble Pierce, born on December 12, 1902.
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard are members of the Methodist Protestant church, and Mr. Bernard has served on the official board of the church. He has also served one term as trustee of Richland township and is a member of the Clinton county school board. He is also a member of the Sabina school board. Politically, he is a Democrat. Fraternally, he belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. Christopher C. Bernard is a man of splendid appearance and a man of far more than average intelligence. He is popular among his fellow townsmen because of his genial personal manners.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 906
ELIJAH Q. BERNARD, a prosperous farmer of Green township, this county, was born in the township where he lives on December 30, 1874, son of Charles B. and Josie (Credon) Bernard, the latter of whom, a native of Wayne township, this county, is now deceased. Charles B. Bernard, after the death of his first wife, married Lummie Cox of Highland county, Ohio, by whom he has had five children: Bessie, who married Edward Larick; Jessie, deceased; James; Frank and Sallie. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Larick had one child, Bessie, now deceased. Elijah Q. Bernard is the only child born to his father's first marriage.
     Mr. Bernard was reared on the farm and was educated in the public schools of Green township. He is a farmer by occupation, and owns one hundred and thirty acres of land, where general farming and stockraising are carried on. This land is a part of the old homestead, where his grandfather, George Washington Bernard; settled upon coming to Clinton county and where his father was born. Elijah Q. Bernard is an up-to-date farmer in every respect, and is keenly interested in raising Percheron horses, at the present time owning one of the finest stallions in Clinton county.
     The complete history, of the Bernard family may be found in the biographical sketch of James K. Bernard presented elsewhere in this volume. Charles B. Bernard, father of Elijah Q., was born on January 17, 1846, in Clinton county, son of George Washington Bernard, one of the county's most active pioneers.
     On November 6, 1805, Elijah O. Bernard was married to Jessie Hunter, of Wayne township, this county, and to this union four children have been born, all of whom are living, as follow: Claude, Evelyn, Herbert, and Helen.
     Politically, Elijah Q. Bernard, is a Democrat. He is an active, enterprising citizen and he and his family are held in high regard in the neighborhood in which they live.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915  - Page 902
EVERT BERNARD is a prosperous farmer of Wilson township, this county, who is manager of a farm of one thousand acres of fertile land in Clinton county belonging to C. A. Bosworth, of Cincinnati. He was born in Richland township, this county, November 12, 1878, and is the son of Thomas Bernard.
     Reared on the farm and educated in the country schools, Evert Bernard was married to Eva De Long, who was born in Ross county, Ohio, the daughter of William and Eva (Richardson) De Long. William De Long was a well-educated man, and a teacher for some time in his early years. He was surveyor of Ross and Pike counties, Ohio, and owns eighty acres of land, on which he and his wife now live. After his marriage, Mr. Bernard located on the farm he now occupies. It is the farm upon which his father lived for a period of twenty-eight years.
     To Evert and Eva (De Long) Bernard four children have been born, Ruth, Russell, Almedia and John. Mr. and Mrs. Bernard are members of the Methodist Protestant church, and are active in the work of the Sunday school, Mr. Bernard at present being superintendent of the Reesville Methodist Protestant Sunday school. He has also served on the school board, and is fraternally a member of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 862
GEORGE W. BERNARD, the second child in the family of the late James K. and Kesiah (McVey) Bernard, is a well-known and well-to-do farmer of Green township, this county. The complete history of the Bernard family is given in the biographical sketch of Mr. Bernard's father, presented elsewhere in this volume. The present generation of this family, in Clinton county, have much to be grateful for in the careers of their distinguished ancestors, for they are descendants of a patriot of Revolutionary days, Thomas Bernard, who was a valiant soldier in the great struggle for independence. Moreover, the successive generations of the family have been conspicuous as business men of large ability in the various communities in which they have settled and lived. To a large degree, George W. Bernard, who is a representative of the fifth generation of the Bernard family in America, possesses the commendable traits of his ancestors. He is named for his grandfather, George Washington Bernard, who was an enterprising farmer in this county until his death, in 1894, at the age of ninety-five years.
     George W. Bernard was born in Green township, this county, August 14, 1863, and was reared on the farm and educated in the public schools of that township. Mr. Bernard now owns three hundred and ten acres of land and is a general farmer and stockman.
     On December 24, 1894, George W. Bernard was married to Cora Staubus, who was born in Virginia, daughter of Lewis J. and Mary (Clark) Staubus, later of this county, and to this union three children have been born, Aleda, Georgia and Lewis James.
     Mr. Bernard is a Democrat in politics, but has never aspired to office, having been too busy with his farm and his own personal affairs to give much time to politics. The Bernard family are members of the Friends church and active in the church work at Fairview.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 915
JAMES EDWARD BERNARD.  To a great extent the prosperity of the agricultural sections of our country is due to the honest industry and the sturdy persistence and unswerving economy of the individual citizen. Among this class may be mentioned James Edward Bernard, who, by reason of his years of indefatigable labor and honest effort, not only has acquired a well-deserved competence, but has also won and retained the high esteem of all with whom he has ever been associated.
     James E. Bernard was born near New Vienna, in Green township, Clinton county, Ohio, on April 11, 1868, a son of James K. and Keziah (McVay) Bernard, the former of whom was born in Green township, this county, in 1830, and died in September, 1907, and the latter of whom was born on January 18, 1838, and is still living.
     James K. Bernard was a son of George W. and Harriet C. (McConnell) Bernard, both natives of Virginia, the former of whom was born in 1799 and came to Highland county, Ohio, with his parents, Thomas Bernard and wife, in 1805, the family being one of the first to settle in this region, George W. Bernard being six years old at that time. Later the family came to Clinton county, locating in Wayne township. They were members of the Friends church, and were excellent farmers and useful citizens. Mr. Bernard's maternal grandparents, Christopher and Martha McVay, also came from Virginia to Clinton county, where they located on a farm in Wayne township. The family were members of the Christian church, and took an active part in the affairs of that denomination.
     The late James K. Bernard was born on a farm in Clinton county and became a very prosperous farmer, having been the owner of eighteen hundred and fifty acres of land in Clinton county, comprising twelve farms in all, which land, with the assistance of his sons, he accumulated by his own personal efforts. Late in life he retired from active farm life and moved to New Vienna, where his death occurred. His widow still lives in New Vienna. Before his death, James K. Bernard divided his land among his children, of whom there were nine, James Edward being the sixth in order of birth. John R. lives on a farm in Green township. George W. is also a farmer in Green township. Harriett C., who married James Carey, lives on a farm in Green township. Charles O. is a farmer in the same township. Mattie, who married Lon Hildebrand, is a resident of Wilmington, her husband being retired. Christopher C. lives at Sabina, Ohio, where he is a retired farmer. Cora, who married Charles Johnson, lives in Green township, and Oscar is retired and living in New Vienna, Ohio.
     James Edward Bernard was educated in the district schools near his home; but his educational advantages were limited, since he was able to attend school only two months each year. At the age of twenty-three, Mr. Bernard was married, and began life for himself by renting land from his father for one year. The next year he purchased one hundred and seventy-five acres in Wayne township, where he lived for eighteen years, subsequently adding forty acres to the original tract. In 1908 he sold his farm and removed to Wilmington, purchasing a farm near Clarksville, in Vernon township. In 1913 he sold this latter farm and purchased the Starbuck hardware store. After conducting this business for two years, Mr. Bernard sold out, in the spring of 1915, .and, with his family, moved to Wilmington, .where he purchased a comfortable house at 504 Walnut street, and he and his family now make their home there.
     On January 29, 1891, James E. Bernard was married to Emma Matthews, who was born in Clarksville, this county, the daughter of John W. and Olive Matthews, both of whom live at New Vienna, where the former is a retired farmer. To this union six children have been born, namely: Leone, born in December, 1893; Virgil, 1895; Stanley, 1897; George, 1899; Olive, 1901, and Harry, 1905.
     James Edward Bernard is a Democrat in politics, but owing to his extensive farming and business interests, has not taken an active part in political affairs. The Bernard family are all members of the Christian church. Fraternally, Mr. Bernard is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, and of the Modern Woodmen of America.
     In Wilmington, where Mr. Bernard has lived for several years, he is recognized as an honorable and upright citizen and is quite popular among his fellow townsmen. He takes a commendable interest in worthy public movements, and is connected with nil worthy public enterprises.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 478
JAMES K. BERNARD.  Among the citizens of Clinton county who belong to a past generation and who built up comfortable homes and surrounded themselves with valuable property, few attained a larger measure of success than the late James K. Bernard, one of the largest landowners and one of the most public-spirited citizens of Clinton county. With few opportunities, except what his own efforts were capable of mastering, and with many discouragements to overcome, he achieved a remarkable success in life, and, in the declining years of his life, enjoyed the satisfaction of knowing that the community had been benefited by his presence. He was regarded as a good business man, who possessed sound judgment and keen foresight; one who was, in every sense of the word, progressive, and always enjoyed the respect, esteem and confidence of those who knew him. His interest in public affairs and his upright life secured for him an enviable place in the life of this great county, in whose advancement he took such a conspicuous part.
     James K. Bernard was born on June 19, 1835, in Greene township, this county, and died at New Vienna in the same county, on September 5, 1907, at the age of seventy-two years, two months and seventeen days. He was the son of George Washington and Harriet (McConnell) Bernard, the former of whom was born in Goochland county, Virginia, September 13, 1799, and the latter, in Brown county, Ohio, October 12, 1810. George Washington Bernard was the son of Thomas and Mary Bernard, natives of Virginia. Thomas Bernard was the son of William Bernard, a native of England, who married Mary Fleming and was a prominent resident of the Old Dominion state. He owned three thousand acres of land in Virginia and also was extensively engaged in business at Richmond, that state, where he was a wholesale merchant. During the War of the Revolution, his store was robbed of nearly all of its goods. William and Mary (Fleming)} Bernard spent their last days in Virginia. Thomas Bernard was born in March, 1756, grew to manhood in Virginia, and served as a soldier through the War of the Revolution having been engaged in the battles of Brandywine, Germantown Monmouth, Stony Point, and others. In 1807 he married Mary Hicks and removed from Virginia to Ohio, settling in Highland county, near the Clinton county line. In those days wolves and deer were in abundance, and on one occasion he heard a loud bleating near his cabin which he thought was one of his calves in the merciless clutches of a wolf; hurrying to his cabin door, he beheld a wolf holding fast to a deer. The wolf at once loosed its prey and fled and the deer escaped in an opposite direction. In 1832 Thomas Bernard moved to Leesburg, where he died on June 11, 1833. His widow survived until May 22, 1847, when she died. At that time, she was a resident of Clinton county. They were the parents of three sons and five daughters, of whom two were living as late as 1882—George W. and Nancy, who married Thomas Riley.
     George W. Bernard, son of Thomas and Mary (Hicks) Bernard and father of James K. Bernard, the subject of this biographical sketch, was about eight years of age when his parents removed to the Ohio wilderness. Here he grew to manhood and became fully inured to the hardships of pioneer life. On March 28, 1831, he was married to Harriet McConnell, who was born in Brown county, Ohio, October 12, 1810, the daughter of James and Sallie (Downing) McConnell, natives of Pennsylvania, who were early settlers in Brown county, this state, and who removed to Clinton county about 1821. They were the parents of four sons and five daughters, four of whom were living as late as 1882. as follows: Thomas, Betsey, who married Isaac Wilson of Illinois, Harriet and Joseph M., the last named of whom resided in Oregon.
     To George W. and Harriet (McConnell) Bernard eleven children were born, nine of whom lived to full maturity, as follow: Thomas F., James K., Mary E., who married Joshua Wilson; John W., Matilda Jane, who married Edmund West, George W., Charles B., Martha H., who married Edward McVey, and Elijah M. In 1832, George W. Bernard located on the farm in this county where he spent practically the rest of his life, living to be the oldest man in Greene township, and to see all of his children married and settled in life. Although he had in his youth little opportunity for an education, he had supplemented his limited opportunities by special study and in later years was known as an unusually well-informed man. By energy, industry and economy, he acquired a large estate, amounting to something over thirteen hundred acres. He died at his home in Greene township in 1804, at the age of ninety-five years.
      James K. Bernard, the second child born to his parents, George W. and Harriet (McConnell) Bernard, grew up on the old homestead in Greene township, which is still held by the Bernard family, and received a limited education in the pioneer schools of his neighborhood. On October 10, 1801, he was married to Kezia McVey, who was born in Clinton county on January 10, 1838, a daughter of Christopher and Catharine (West) McVey, natives of Fayette and Brown counties, Ohio, respectively; both of whom were born in 1812.
     Christopher McVey was the son of James and Kezia McVey, both of whom were natives of Ireland and pioneer settlers in Clinton county, where both died. They were the parents of five sons and four daughters, William, Edmund, Christopher, Robert, John, Catharine, Josephine, Jane and Kezia. To Christopher and Catharine (West) McVey eight children were born. Henrietta, James, Kezia, Robert, Benson, Edmund, Eliza Jane and Elkana. Christopher McVey was a farmer and owned about one hundred and eighty acres of land in Greene township. He was a Republican and a member of the Christian church. He died in 1805, his wife having preceded him to the grave in 1853. Catharine West was the daughter of Robert and Henrietta West, who came from Pennsylvania to Clinton county in pioneer days and here they spent the rest of their lives. They had eight children, Nancy. Mary, Harrison, Benson, Eliza, Catharine and Sallie.
     To James K. and Kezia (McVey) Bernard were born ten children, namely: John R., born on July 23. 1802; George W., August 10, 1803: Harriet C., August 0. 1804: Charles O., October 30, 1805; Martha Ann, February 23, 1807; James Edmund, April 11, 1808; an infant, November 6, 1870; Christopher C., July 2, 1872; Cora E., February 22, 1870; Oscar E., September 13, 1878. Of these children, all are living save the infant.
     James K. Bernard located in Wayne township shortly before his marriage, and shortly after his marriage, on March 10, 1802, moved to his farm in Greene township, where he had a fine home and was extensively engaged in farming. He owned at one time about sixteen hundred acres of land, which he divided among his children, leaving his widow one hundred and eighty acres near New Vienna. Altogether, he had received from his father about twenty-five hundred dollars but aside from this help, accumulated the money with which the sixteen hundred acres were purchased, by his own effort and his was regarded as one of the most remarkable examples of success from small beginnings ever witnessed among the farmers of Clinton county.
     In 1903 Mr. and Mrs. Bernard removed to New Vienna, where they lived retired until Mr. Bernard's death in 1907. The late James K. Bernard was more than a successful farmer. He was a man of extraordinary vision, of indefatigable industry and possessed a unique ability to concentrate his attention on a given focus or a given end. His mind, once settled on the accomplishment of a definite goal, nothing could divert him from this purpose. Loved by his large family, honored by his neighbors and respected by the people of Clinton county, he died as only the man who has lived to good purpose can die, full of the honors of noble and useful service.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 776
JOHN W. BERNARD, a well-known retired farmer of Green township, this county, was born on October 6, 1838, the son of George Washington and Harriet (McConnell) Bernard. The complete history of the Bernard family is given in the biographical sketch of James E. Bernard, presented elsewhere in this volume.
     John W. Bernard, like his brothers and sisters, was reared on the farm and was educated in the neighborhood schools, spending his boyhood on the farm now occupied by Elijah Q. Bernard. At one time Mr. Bernard owned three hundred and sixty acres of land, but he has given all of it to his children, except one hundred and thirty-eight acres, which he still owns.
     In January, 1868, John W. Bernard was married to Louisa Kier, who was born in Highland county in 1844, the daughter of Mathias and Jane (Bell) Kier, now deceased. To this union eight children were born, as follow: William, a farmer in Green township, this county; Mary, the wife of Dr. Lorenzo Ayers, of Green township; Rosa, who married John Cox, of near Centerville, Ohio; Albert, who is unmarried and lives at home with his parents; Clara, who died at the age of sixteen, and Amy H., John F. and Abbie, who died in childhood.
     Mr. and Mrs. John W. Bernard are members of the Friends church. Mr. Bernard votes the Democratic ticket, Theirs have been lives full of good works, and in "the sunset time" of their lives they enjoy many and continuous evidences of the respect and esteem of the entire community in which they have lived so long and so usefully.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 755
MILTON BERNARD.  Among the enterprising agriculturists of this region must be counted Milton Bernard, a young and thrifty farmer of Richland township and an enterprising stockman, who is well known throughout Clinton county.
     Milton Bernard was born on July 31, 1875, at New Vienna, this county, the son of Thomas Jefferson and Almeda (Young) Bernard, the former of whom was born near New Antioch, this county, on October 12, 1832, and the latter of whom was born near Lees creek, in Wayne township, this county.
     The late Thomas J. Bernard, Jr., was the son of Thomas J. and Mary Bernard, the former of whom was a native of Virginia, but who emigrated to Ohio with his parents when a child of four years. After growing to manhood in this state, Thomas J. Bernard, Sr., married Mary McConnel, who was probably born in Kentucky. After his marriage, he located on Cowen's creek, and spent the greater part of the remainder of his life in Clinton county, being actively engaged in farming. He lived a few years in Brown county, and from there moved to near Lynchburg, where he died in February, 1868, at the age of sixty-seven years. His wife died in 1838, at the age of thirty-two years. They were the parents of live children: William P.; Sarah, who married William Elliott; Nancy and Thomas J. Following the death of his first wife, Thomas J. Bernard, Sr., married, secondly, Mrs. Eliza Atkinson, by whom he had six children, four of whom grew to maturity, Mary, who married Henry Brown, Caroline, Serelda and Grafton W.
     Of Thomas J. Bernard, the father of Milton Bernard, it may be said that he belonged to the Methodist Protestant church, and was active not only in religious work, but in public affairs. He lived to be eighty years old, and kept abreast of the times until his death, on June 25, 1914. His widow is still living at Sabina, and was seventy-eight years old in January, 1915. The late Thomas J. Bernard, who was a farmer by occupation, occupied the farm of C. A. Bosworth, of Cincinnati, as a tenant for twenty-eight years. Thomas J. and Almeda (Young) Bernard were the parents of eleven children, of whom four, Mary, the eldest, William, Ida and Elmer, the sixth, seventh and eighth born, are deceased. The living children are Clara, Laura, Sarah, Jennette, Milton and Eva and Evert (twins).
     Born and reared on the farm and educated in the common schools, Milton Bernard remained at home until his marriage, on August 26, 1893, to Alma Shepp, who was born on December 15, 1877, the daughter of John and Mary (Johnson) Shepp. John Shepp, a gardener by occupation, lived in Reesville. He and his wife were active in the local work of the Methodist Protestant church. Mr. Shepp held numerous local public offices and served as a Union soldier during the entire period of the Civil War. During one of the severe battles of that war, he was shot in the neck and carried the bullet to his grave. To Milton and Alma (Shepp) Bernard four children have been born, Esther, Paul, Thomas and Barbara. After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Milton Bernard located on the farm where they now live and which Mr. Bernard operates in partnership with his brother, Everett. They manage altogether one thousand and thirty-five acres of land, operating it on a sharing basis.
     Mr. and Mrs. Bernard are members of the Methodist Protestant church at Reesville, and Mr. Bernard is superintendent of the Sunday school. Fraternally, Mr. Bernard is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 821
THOMAS F. BERNARD.  It is a well-attested fact that the greatness of a community or state lies not in the machinery of government, or even in its institutions; but rather in the sterling qualities of the individual citizen, in his capacity for high and unselfish effort and his devotion to the public welfare. In these particulars, the venerable Thomas F. Bernard, of Wayne township, has conferred honor and dignity upon this county, and has been connected with the advancement of one of the most flourishing and progressive sections of the commonwealth. He is descended from distinguished ancestry, his grandfather having been a soldier in the American Revolution, and was with General Washington at the surrender of Cornwallis.
     Thomas F. Bernard was born on February 28, 1832, in Fairfield township, Highland county, Ohio, the son of George W. and Harriett (McConnell) Bernard, the former born on September 13, 1799, in Goochland county, Virginia, and the latter in Brown county, Ohio, the daughter of James McConnell.
     George W. Bernard was the son of Thomas F. and Mary (Hicks) Bernard, the former of whom was the son of William and Mary (Fleming) Bernard, of Goochland county, Virginia. William Bernard, who was a farmer and carpenter, and an extensive slave owner in the Old Dominion state, was a soldier in the Continental army during the Revolutionary War, serving under General Washington for five years. He participated in the battles of Germantown, Monmouth, Trenton, Stony Point and Yorktown. In 1807 he left Virginia and came to Ohio, having started from Virginia on April 10, 1807, and arriving In Ohio, on June 10, of the same year, having been just two months on the way. He and his wife spent the remainder of their lives in Highland county, this state. Thomas F. and Mary (Hicks) Bernard were the parents of eight children, John, George W., Thomas, Sallie, Bettie, Mary, Susannah and Nancy.
     George W. Bernard, the second son of Thomas F. Bernard, received only a limited education. On March 1, 1833, he came to Clinton county from Highland county, locating on a farm in Green township, subsequently becoming the owner of about five hundred acres of land. He did much clearing and draining and lived to a very ripe old age, passing away quietly on July 23, 1895, at the age of nearly ninety-six years. Nine children were born to George W. and Harriett (McConnell) Bernard, Thomas F., James K., Mary, Jane, John, Sallie, George, Charles and Elijah. George was a soldier in the Union army during the Civil War. The late George W. Bernard and his wife were members of the Friends church, while politically, Mr. Bernard was an adherent of the Democratic party.
     The rudiments of an education were obtained by Thomas F. Bernard in a log-cabin school house in Green township, this county. Having begun when a young man to work on his father's farm, in 1855, one year after his marriage, he purchased a farm of fifty acres in Wayne township. He has added to his land holdings gradually from year to year until he is now the owner of three hundred and fifty-eight acres of excellent land. During his active life Mr. Bernard was an extensive stockman, but retired from active farming in 1913.
     On October 15, 1854, Thomas F. Bernard was married to Sophia West, the daughter of Harrison and Jane West. Of the nine children born to this marriage, two, Martha Anna, the eldest, and William C., the eighth born, are deceased, the others being as follow: Harriett Jane, who became the wife of Jehu Steele; Mary E., the wife of Thomas Hagerty; Virginia, the wife of Jackson Fry; Minerva, the wife of William McKay; Charles E., who married Nettie Steele; Elizabeth, who became the wife of Elmer Page; Hugh, who married Bessie Achor, and Thomas J., who married Marley Achor. The mother of these children died on May 18, 1907.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 804
 
ABSALOM BORING.  Among the many excellent farmers of Clinton county who are now living retired in the county seat, Wilmington, Absalom Boring, who is a native of Green township, and who owns a farm of one hundred and sixty-one acres in that township, should be mentioned.  He comes of a family who settled in Clinton County in pioneer days, emigrating to this state from Virginia.
     Absalom Boring was born in Green township, Clinton county, Ohio, on Feb. 10, 1848, a son of Lafayette and Elsie (Collett) Boring, the former of whom was born in Virginia in 1812, and died in 1883, and the latter of whom was born in Kentucky, and died in 1852.  Mr. Boring's paternal grandparents were Thomas and Ruth Boring, both of whom were born and married in Virginia, and who, in 1824, settled in Green Township, this county, where they purchased a farm.  They were members of the Baptist church and prominent and influential in the affairs of that church in pioneer times.  The grandfather died in 1864 after living to rear a family of seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Mr. Boring's maternal grandparents died in Kentucky.
     Lafayette Boring was only twelve years of age when he was brought to Ohio from Virginia by his father and mother.  some time after attaining his majority and after his marriage, he purchased the home place and paid for it by his savings and profits from year to year.  Subsequently he added fifty-two acres to the home farm.  He was a Republican in politics, and was identified with the Baptist Church.  Mr. Boring's mother died when he was but four years old, and  after her death his father married, secondly, in 1853, Mrs. Mary (Hall) Lieurance, widow of William Lieurance, and she also is now deceased.  To the first marriage of Lafayette Boring six children were born, three of whom are now deceased.  Harriet died when a small child; Mary died in 1864 at the age of twenty, and Elizabeth, the second born, died in 1910.  the living children are Ruth, who is unmarried and makes her home with her brother, Absalom; John, who lives in Green township, this county, and is a farmer, and Absalom, the immediate subject of this review.  To the second marriage of Mr. Boring's father four children were born, all of whom are living: William, a farmer living in Liberty township, this county; Alice, who is the wife of George Skinner, is a resident of Wilmington; Lydia, the wife of Squire Beaty, lives in Green township, and Susan, the wife of Darius Morton, lives in Wilmington.
     Absalom Boring attended the public schools of Green township, but his educational advantages were limited, as he was compelled to assist his father with the work on the farm during the period when he might have attended school.  After living at home until he had reached his majority, he purchased, with the aid of his father, forty-eight acres of land in Green township, adding to his tract until he was the owner of one hundred and sixty-one acres.  He lived on this farm in Green township until 1904, when he retired from active farming, purchased a home on High street in Wilmington, and moved to that city.  He still owns his farm and gives it to his personal supervision.
     On Feb. 20, 1896, Absalom Boring was married to Catherine Mitchell, who was born in New Antioch, this county, a daughter of William and Ann Mitchell, both of whom are deceased.  William Mitchell was a well known cabinetmaker of this county.  Mrs. Boring died on Aug. 3, 1912, leaving her husband and one son, Carl M., who was born on Mar. 25, 1897.
     Absalom Boring is a Republican, but has never taken any special part in political affairs.  He has always been rated as a good citizen, a man of strictly moral habits, honorable and upright in all of the relations of life and enjoys the full confidence and esteem of his neighbors. 
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 591
JOHN C. BORING, the proprietor of seventy-three and one-half acres of land in Green township, this county, where he has lived continuously for the past twenty-two years, was born in that township on May 16, 1842, the son of Lafayette and Elsie (Collet) Boring Lafayette Boring was born in Harrison county, Virginia, Oct. 2, 1811, and his wife was born near Louisville, Kentucky.  The paternal grandparents of Mr. Boring were Thomas and Ruth Boring, pioneers of Clinton County, the former of whom died in 1864.  The maternal grandparents were John Collet and wife, both of whom died the state of Kentucky.
     Lafayette Boring was a young man when he came to Clinton county, Ohio.  He was a farmer in this county and owned one hundred and twenty-two acres of land.  He died in Green township, Feb. 11, 1883.  His wife had passed away many years previously, when their son, John C., was a small child.  They were the parents of five children, of whom two, Elizabeth, the first born, and Mary, the fourth in order of birth, are deceased.  The living children are Ruth, John C., and Absalom.
     John C. Boring, who was reared on a farm in Green township, and educated in the public schools, is a well-known citizen of that township.  He was married on Oct. 2, 1864, to Almira E. McKenzie, who was born in Union township, this county, the daughter of William and Lucinda (Morton) McKenzie, both natives of Clinton county, Ohio.  William McKenzie was a son of John McKenzie, a pioneer of this county and a prominent citizen in the early life of this section of the state.  William and Lucinda (Morton) McKenzie are both deceased.  To John C. Boring and wife five children were born, Nettie Jane, Mary Etta, Geneva Louisa, Minnie and Cordelia, all of whom are living.  The mother of these children died on Mar. 6, 1911.
     The venerable John C. Boring was a soldier in the Civil War, having enlisted on May 2, 1864, in Company K, One Hundred and Forty-ninth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  He served one hundred days, and took part in the battle of Frederick City.  Politically, he is an adherent of the principles of the Republican party.
     Mrs. Boring was an active member and worker in the Christian church at New Antioch, where he loss was most keenly felt.  She was a loving mother and devoted wife.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 902

WILLIAM M. BORING, now a prosperous an well-known farmer of Liberty township, this county, was born on Aug. 3, 1862, in Green township, this county, the son of Lafayette and Polly Lieurance (Hall) Boring, the latter of whom was Lafayette Boring's second wife.
     Lafayette Boring was born in Harrison county, Virginia, the son of Thomas and Ruth Boring, natives of Maryland.  Thomas Boring having been the son of Absalom and Sarah Boring, also natives of Maryland, who subsequently settled in Virginia, where Mrs. Boring died.  Absalom Boring then moved to Ohio and died in Clinton County after having attained the age of more than eighty years.  Thomas and Ruth Boring were married in Maryland and resided many years in that state, from which they moved to Harrison county, Virginia.  In 1830 they moved to Ohio and settled on a farm, where their son, Lafayette, later lived.  They were the parents of nine children.  Lafayette Boring was a young man when the family came to Clinton county.  About 1840 he married Ailsey Collett, who was born in Kentucky, the daughter of John Collett, a native of Pennsylvania, who immigrated to Kentucky in an early day, when the Indians were very troublesome, one of his brothers having been killed by the redskins.  To Lafayette Boring and his first wife the following children were born: Elizabeth, Ruth, Ann, John and Absalom.  After Mrs. Ailsey Boring's death, Lafayette Boring married, secondly, Mrs. Polly Lieurance, daughter of Tilman and Betsy Hall, natives of North Carolina, to which second union there were four children born, namely: William M., the subject of this sketch; Mary Alice, who married George Skinner, and lives in Wilmington, this county; Eliza Jane, who married Squire Beaty, and lies in Green township, this county, and Susan, who married Elias Morton, of Wilmington.  Lafayette Boring and wife were members of the Baptist church, and their children were reared in that faith.  He was a Republican in politics and owned one hundred and twenty acres of land in Green township.  He died about thirty years ago.
     William M. Boring was educated in the common schools of Clinton county and was reared on the farm.  He married Cora Early, who was born in this county, the daughter of George Early, a farmer of Liberty township and a prominent member of the Methodist church.  After his marriage, Mr. Boring located in Green township, on the home farm, and in 1913 bought one hundred and seventy-five acres of land where he now resides.  To him and his wife were born seven children, Ira, Ernest, Zella, 'Roy, Luella, Harry and Glenn, the latter of whom died at the age of eighteen months.  The mother of these children died on Decoration Day, 1915, and was buried at the Antioch burying ground.  Ira Boring married Alice Collins, and has two children, Lavonne and Mable Jane.  Ernest Boring married Ada Cast, and lives in Wilmington.
     Mr. Boring is a member of the Baptist church at Wilmington and is a well-known citizen of this county.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 773

AARON BOWMAN.  Some of our brainiest men and women have had little or no acquaintance with the interior of a school room, but they have not only taken advantage of every opportunity for gaining knowledge, but they have made opportunities for themselves.  They had that force of character that would not admit of the neglect to follow every avenue leading to an education.  We cannot but admire the man who wins out in spite of such a drawback.
     Aaron Bowman, farmer of Union township, Clinton county, Ohio, was born in Brown county, Ohio, Aug. 4, 1862.  He is a son of Benjamin and Mary Ann (Greeley) Bowman.  He received a meager education in the public school near his home in Brown county.  When he was fifteen years old, his parents moved to Kentucky, and in 1887 he came to Clinton county, where he was married.  After renting several farms in Green township, he purchased seventy acres in Green township, and lived there twelve years.  In 1911 he sold out, buying seventy-eight acres in Union township, on the Waynesville pike, where he has since resided.  He  remodeled his house, and it is one of the most attractive and comfortable homes in the neighborhood.  Mr. Bowman is a member of the Christian church, and is a democrat.
     Benjamin Bowman, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in 1821, in Brown county, Ohio, and died on June 30, 1902.  His wife was Mary Ann Greenley, who was born in 1831, and died in Dec. 1902.  He grew to manhood in Brown county on a farm.  He married, and soon after bought a farm in Brown county, which he sold in 1878, going from there to Kentucky settling in Clark county.  Here he rented land and farmed, devoting his special attention to the raising of tobacco.  He lived on the H. P. Thompson farm twelve years.  About 1890 the family came to Clinton county.  He died on the Ferren farm in Union township.  He and his wife were members of the Christian church.  They were the parents of ten children, namely:  Lucinda, Louis, James B., Nelson, Lucius M., Aaron, Nannie, Thomas, Harvey and Ida.  Lucinda became the wife of Whitmore Freeland, and lives in Indiana; Louis, died in Adams county, Ohio; James B., deceased, lived in Clinton county; Nelson lives in Clark county, Kentucky, and is a tobacco raiser; Lucius M. lives in Wilmington, Ohio, and is a retired farmer; Nannie became the wife of George Green, and lives in Nicholas county, Kentucky; Thomas lives in Kentucky; Harvey lives in Union township, and is a farmer; Ida died in 1903.
     The paternal grandparents were both probably born near Aberdeen, Ohio, as the family were early settlers there.  They were of German descent, Mr. Bowman was a farmer.
     Aaron Bowman was married on Nov. 12, 1892, to Miss Jennie Lieurance, who was born in Green township, Clinton county,Ohio, and is a daughter of William Henry and Rachel Anna (Pond) Lieurance.  Mrs. Bowman died on March 3, 1908, leaving one son, W. Ernest, born on August 29, 1893, who now lives in Cincinnati, where he works as a barber.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915
JOHN BRENNANNo better farm is to be found in Wilson township than the seventy-six acres which is owned by John Brennan, living on Rural Route No. 1, out of Sabina, Ohio.
     John Brennan was born on May 22, 1860, in Fayette county, Ohio, a son of Thomas and Margaret (Mitchell) Brennan, the former of whom was born in County Sligo, Ireland, in 1812, and the latter also a native of Ireland, born in county Wexford, the daughter of Patrick MitchellThomas Brennan was a son of Thomas Brennan, a native of Ireland and a devout member of the Catholic church, who never came to America.  Thomas Brennan, Jr., father of John, was educated in a private school in Ireland, and came to America about 1849, proceeding to Cincinnati, where for some time he worked on a railroad, which was being constructed at that time through this section of Ohio.  He later married Margaret Mitchell, and commenced farming in Clinton county about 1859.  Although he always thereafter was engaged in farming he never owned land.  He was a devout member of the Catholic church and died in that faith, his death occuring on November 25, 1895.  His wife had preceded him to the grave many years before, her death having occured in 1876, at the age of thirty-seven years.  They were the parents of six children, Mary, Catherine, John, Jerry, Margaret and Ann, of whom Mary and Margaret are now deceased.
     Educated in the common schools of this state, John Brenna has become a successful farmer of Wilson township, this county.  He was married in 1887 to Margaret Sullivan, a native of Ireland, the daughter of Thomas Sullivan, who is now living in Wilmington, Ohio.  Mr. and Mrs. Brennan have no children.  Mr. Brennan is the owner of seventy-six acres of land in Wilson township, where he lives.  This land is level and very rich.  Twelve years ago he built a comfortable and modern house, and four years ago erected a large and commodious barn, and has improved his farm in many ways, so that he now has a very neat and attractive place.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915
HENRY MOLYNEAUX BROWN, M. D.  Dr. Henry Molyneaux Brown, a well equipped and popular young physician of New Vienna, this county, is the son of a distinguished physician of Clinton county, who has been in the practice of medicine at New Vienna since his graduation from the Hahnemann Medical College at Philadelphia in March, 1879.  Henry Molyneaux Brown, after being graduated from the New Vienna High school, took a preparatory medical course at the University of Cincinnati and was graduated from the Ohio Miami Medical College in 1913.  Afterwards he spent one year as an interne in the Jewish hospital at Cincinnati and on July 1, 1914, established himself in the practice of medicine in his home town, where he has already acquired a flourishing practice.  He is a member of the Clinton County Medical Society, the Ohio State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and is popular in Clinton county, a young man for whom a fine future is predicted.  He is a member of the Masonic lodge at New Vienna.
     Henry M. Brown was born on Mar. 13, 1890, in New Vienna and reared in that city.  He is a son of Dr. Edward W. and Olive (Spear) Brown the former of whom was born at Oxford, in Butler county, Ohio, Oct. 21, 1856, and the latter, near Snow Hill, in Clinton county, the daughter of Washington and Lydia (Roush) Spear.  Washington Spear was the son of Zephaniah Spear, a pioneer in this county.  Mrs. Lydia Spear is deceased but Washington Spear is still living.
     Zephaniah Spear the grandfather of Mrs. Brown and the great-grandfather of Dr. Henry M. Brown, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Aug. 12, 1807, the son of Robinson and Elizabeth ('Bryan) Spear, natives of Pennsylvania.  Robinson Spear was the son of John and Mary Spear, natives of Pennsylvania.  Robinson Spear was the son of John and Mary Spear, the former of whom immigrated to America when a mere lad and settled in Pennsylvania, where he married a woman of German descent.  He lived and died in Pennsylvania, but his widow subsequently came to Ohio with her son, Robinson, and died in Brown county.  Robinson Spear grew to manhood and married in Pennsylvania.  In 1817 he and his family moved to Ohio and settled first in Ross county.  In 1821 they moved to Brown county and in 1827 to Guernsey county, Ohio, where he died in 1850.  His wife survived him, passing away in 1873 at the age of ninety-two years.  Robinson and Elizabeth (Bryan) Spear were the parents of eleven children, all of whom, except one, grew to maturity, married and settled in life, among these being Zephaniah, Mrs. Elizabeth Oliver, Mrs. Ellen Stewart, Mrs. Jane Ann Willis and Mrs. Prudence Willis.  Zephaniah was the third child born to his parents.  He followed the blacksmith's trade for ten years and afterwards engaged in farming.  He was married on Sept. 20, 1829, to Lovina Matthews, a daughter of Joel and Phoebe Matthews, natives of North Carolina.  Nine children were born to this union of whom six grew to maturity:  Mary Jane, the wife of M. L. Turner; Washington; Margaret, the wife of William Boatwright; Thompson; James A. and Jefferson D.  Washington Spear became the father of Mrs.. Olive Brown.  Starting in life without a dollar of capital, Zephaniah Spear became the owner of four hundred acres of land and was one of the substantial farmers of Clinton county.  He served as trustee and treasurer of Green township for several years and was a member of the Christian church.  Mrs. Lovina (Matthews) Spear died on Mar. 14, 1875, in her sixty-fourth year.  Washington Spear and Lydia Roush, daughter of George and Rachel Roush, of Highland county, were married on Dec. 1, 1859, and were the parents of three children, Ivy, Olive and Elizabeth.
     Dr. Edward W. Brown
is the son of Samuel R. and Sarah (Duval) Brown, the former of whom was a native of County Antrim, Ireland, and the latter of Highland county, Ohio.  Dr. Edward W. Brown's grandparents were Allen and Margaret Brown, natives of Ireland, the former of Scotch-Irish descent and the latter of French Huguenot descent.  In the days of the French persecution, there was a family of Huguenots by the name of Molyneaux, all of whom were killed except two sons, John and William, who hung out of the windows by their hands and by that means were unobserved by the soldiers.  Subsequently, there escaped to the sea coast and secreted themselves in a vessel that was about to set sail, they knew not where; but they were landed in Ireland, probably at Belfast.  From one of these brothers, Mrs. Margaret Brown was descended.  She was a lady of splendid education and attainments and possessed a remarkably strong and active mind.  About 1824 Allen Brown, with his family, immigrated to America and located at Point, Clermont county, Ohio.  After a few years of residence there, they moved to Highland county, Ohio, where Buford now stands, on the old Cincinnati and Chillicothe stage route.  There Allen Brown erected a large two-story log house in which he kept a tavern, where he resided until his death at the age of eighty-four years.  His wife survived him several years and died in her eighty-fifty year.  Allen Brown was a man of great energy  and did a prosperous business in his tavern.  He also had a farm of three hundred acres of fine land.  He and his wife were the parents of five sons and one daughter.  Four sons were living in 1882, Judge Thomas, John, who lived on the old home place, James and William.  Samuel R., the father of Dr. Edward W. Brown was about seven years old when the family moved to Ohio, and, being the eldest in the family county home of General Grant.  Later he entered the mercantile business at Buford, where he acquired a prosperous business.  He married Sarah Duval, the daughter of Judge John Duval and, after continuing in business at Buford for several years, exchanged his store and stock of goods for three hundred acres of land.  After one year's residence on his farm, he moved to Oxford, Ohio, where he again entered the mercantile business in partnership with a Mr. Newton, under the firm name of Newton & Brown this partnership continuing until 1864, when Mr. Brown moved to Hillsboro, having sold out his interest in the store to Mr. Newton, and resided there till 1869, when he returned to his farm.  He owned a farm of six hundred acres, having added three hundred acres by purchase while at Oxford.  He erected one of the largest and finest barns in the county and a fine, commodious house.  He died suddenly of heart disease on Dec. 22, 1881, in his sixty-fifth year and, and his death, there passed away one of the substantial and honorable business men of Brown county; one whose character and integrity stood untarnished.  His wife died on Dec. 13, 1880.  They were the parents of eight children, seven of whom grew to maturity, namely: Mrs. Maggie Sinks, John A., Anna, who married Dr. S. S. Salisbury of Los Angeles, California; Charles E., Edward W., James D. and Mary Belle.
     Edward W. Brown
assisted his father in business until sixteen years of age, receiving a limited common-school education.  He attended the high school at Hillsboro for two years and then worked on the farm until nineteen years of age, after which he began the study of medicine in the office of Dr. S. S. Salisbury, at Washington C. H., later entering Hahnemann Medical College at Philadelphia, from which he was graduated, after which he began the practice of his profession at New Vienna, where he has continued ever since.  To Dr. Edward W. and Olive (Spear) Brown four children have been born namely: Bernice L., born on Apr. 3, 1883, who died in August, 1913; Howard E., June 20, 1885, who was graduated from the New Vienna high school and is now located at Frankfort, in Ross county, this state, where he is the manager of the telephone plant; Helen Dual, who is now a student at Ohio University at Athens, and Dr. Henry M., the immediate subject of this sketch.
Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 721
OTTO G. BROWN

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 417

STEPHEN C. BROWN

Source: History of Clinton County, Ohio - Indianapolis, Ind. :: B.F. Bowen & Co., 1915 - Page 793

 
 
 
 

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