OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS

A Part of Genealogy Express

 

Welcome to
BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
History & Genealogy

.

BIOGRAPHIES

Source::
HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches,
Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of
Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the
Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of
Brown County; Constitution of the
United States, Miscellaneous
Matters, Etc., Etc.
ILLUSTRATED
Published:  Chicago:  W. H. Beers & Co.
1883
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO 1883 BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX >
< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO LIST OF BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES >
 

  Clark Twp. -
JAMES S. SALISBURY, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Hamersville, was born in Pleasant Township, this county, Oct. 28, 1832.  His parents were Thomas Salisbury, a native of Pennsylvania, and Martha (Martin) Salisbury, a native of Ohio and a sister of Judge Martin.  He was reared on a farm, and received a common school education.  He commenced life by farming; rented land, after which he purchased fifty acres, concluding to settle in this county after and examination of three or four States.  He resides on the Ohio pike, where he owns 180¼ acres of land, most of which is under a perfect state of cultivation.  He was married, in 1858, to Theresa Gray, daughter of Rev. Samuel Gray, a minister of the Christian Church.  This union was blest with seven children - Albert g., Martha Etta, Mary Louella, Thomas L. (deceased), James W., an infant (deceased), and Sarah M.  The three eldest , with the parents, are members of the M. E. Church, in which Mr. S. was Trustee and a class-leader for ten years..  His relatives on both sides were Presbyterians and Republicans.  He has made all he has by his own efforts, and is a much respected citizen.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 191
  Scott Twp. -
J. R. SCOTT, farmer, P. O. New Hope, was born in England June 29, 1815, and emigrated to America with his parents, Thomas and Ann (Leahman) Scott, when he was quite young.  They first settled in Edwards County, Ill., but subsequently moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where our subject received a good common school education.  He was the fourth child of a family of eighteen children, and at the age of fourteen years was put to work at the butcher’s trade.  He soon opened a shop of his own, and for nearly twenty-eight years sold meat in the markets of Cincinnati.  Since 1854, he has been engaged in farming in Scott Township, where he owns 141 acres of land.  He was Township Treasurer when the rebel Gen. Morgan made his raid through South ern Ohio, and of course received a call from that brigand robber.  In 1838, Mr. Scott married Margaret Gibson, a daughter of George Gibson, of Brown County, and by her had nine children—W. G., a physician in Pueblo, Colo.; Thomas, a soldier in the Seventh Ohio Infantry, died in Indiana, in 1879; Mary Ann (deceased); Albert, who lost his life in the service of his country; Elizabeth (deceased); Mattie, wife of M. Watson, of Indiana; Sarah A., wife of George Brooks; J. B., a farmer in Iowa, and George at home with his parents.  The parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he has been Trustee, class-leader and Superintendent of the Sabbath school.  He is a Republican and a charter member of the Odd Fellows Lodge.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 255
  Huntington Twp. -
JOHN C. SCOTT, farmer, P. O. Aberdeen, was born in this township Apr. 26, 1813, and is a son of Robert and Joanna (Cooper) Scott.  His father was born in Kentucky, and was a son of John, Sr., a native of Virginia, who settled in Kentucky about 1795, and in this township in either 1801 or 1802, in which he lived till his death.  Robert was married to the daughter of William Cooper, and lived in this township till his death, which occurred at the age of fifty-six years. He was a Trustee of the township, and held other minor offices.  During the old muster days, he was Major of a military company.  To him were born thirteen children—John, William, Jane, Nancy, Elizabeth, Martha, Exhira  Amanda (deceased), wife of Dr. W. H. Evans; Isabelle, and four died in childhood.  Feb. 9, 1837, our subject was married to Millie A. Howard, and in 1838 settled where he now lives.  He owns 415 acres of land, which is in excellent farming condition.  He and wife are members of the Christian Church, to which they have belonged for forty years.  Ten children have been born to them, seven living—James R., John W., Ellen, Martha, Mary, Millie and Franklin; the deceased are William, Tamar and RenyJohn W. was a member of the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and saw active service throughout the war.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 175
  Lewis Twp. -
SALLEE SISTERS, P. O. Higginsport.  Eliza J. and Martha Sallee are daughters of James H. and Maria (Jones) Sallee, and grand-daughters of Abraham and Lucy (Nelson) Sallee, the two latter natives of France, where they were reared and married, but soon after set sail for America and settled in Kentucky, where George Bartlow now lives, opposite Higginsport, in 1795.  They both died in that State, at advanced age.  Of their children, James H. was the fourth, and was born in Kentucky July 23, 1898; he grew to maturity in his native State, and Sept. 1, 1819, married Maria Jones who was a native of Fauquier County, Va., born May 30, 1801.  She remained in her native State until 1815, and having at this time lost her parents, she came to Kentucky.  She was the eldest of three children.  Four years after, she and James H. were united.  They came to Ohio, locating near Felicity, in Clermont County, where he purchased land, but in 1827 came to Lewis Township, Brown County, and bought 150 acres of land in R. K. Mead's Survey, No. 1661.  To this he added through life, until 211 acres was the amount.  He began to clear his farm with but little or no assistance, but with a will and determination he succeeded.  He labored long and hard, and on December 1, 1869, ended the earthly career of one of Lewis Township's noble citizens.  His wife died July 22, 1876.  They were both members of the church of the Disciples in Georgetown.  He was a man of firm principles, although he had few educational privileges when a youth.  In riper years, he was a hard student and became a well-posted citizen.  His nine children all reached maturity, viz.:  Abraham, William, Lucy, Robert C., Eliza J., Emily F., Martha, John L., and the youngest, Nannie, wife of Judge Tarbell, of Georgetown.  Abraham was at one time surveyor of this county, but now resides in Dixon, Ill.  William educated himself, and labored as a minister in the Disciples church a period of nearly forty years, and died, Nov. 1, 1879.  Robert C. is a practical druggist.  Lucy is the wife of Josiah Eakin, now in Illinois.  Emily T., is the wife of George McLean, also, in Illinois.  The two sisters, whose names head this sketch, reside on and own the old homestead, and manage its cultivation.  They are lovers of good books and are well informed.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  114
  Perry Twp. -
PATRICK SAVAGE, attorney, Fayetteville, son of George and Sarah A. (Cane) Savage, was born in Perry Township, near the Ursuline Convent, May 4, 1844.  He was reared on a farm till eighteen years of age, when he was bound to Judge Sloane, Hillsboro, Highland Co., Ohio.  He remained about one week, when himself and another student, James Vickers, concluded to run away, and as the war of the rebellion was then raging, they enrolled their names.  Patrick enlisted in Cincinnati, in the Seventy Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Capt. Lewis.  He was in thirty-six engagements, including skirmishes, and after serving three years he was discharged at Nashville, and returned to Fayetteville and read law under James H. Thompson, of Hillsboro, and was admitted to the bar at Georgetown, Sept. 11, 1868, and has since practiced in this village, where he is enjoying a good practice.  He was married here, Jan. 6, 1869, to Rosa A., daughter of Joseph and Rosa A. Brulport, born in Boston, Clermont Co., Ohio, in 1851.  They have three children living - George F., Rosa B. and Clifford; two deceased, Francis and Clarence.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  145
  Union Twp. -
J. M. SCHWALLIE is a native of Brown County, where he was born in 1853.  His parents, Jacob and Mary M. (Kraener) Schwallie, were native of Alsace, Germany, who embarked to America in 1830, and soon after made this settlement in Union Township, and thereby becoming pioneers, where Jacob resided until the close of his life in 1878.  His estimable wife survives him and resides at Russellville.  The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm, which avocation he closely followed until 1880, when he became engaged in raising and selling tobacco.  By industry and close economy, he had been enabled to purchase 11½ acres near Ripley, upon which he has erected a storehouse and is doing a safe and profitable trade.  During the year 1881, he shipped to Cincinnati, Ohio, 115,000 pounds of tobacco, and the demand is greater than the supply.  He was married, in 1881, to Miss Elizabeth Fox, a native of Hamilton County, Ohio.  The family are members of the Catholic Church, and are highly respected.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  84
  Huntington Twp. -
ROBERT SCOTT, JR., (deceased), was born in this township in the year 1835, and was a son of Robert Scott, Sr., of whose family mention is made.  Our subject was reared to farm pursuits, and was married to Margaret Brookover June 18, 1865, after which he settled on the farm where his widow and her second husband now live, and where he died Mar. 29, 1872.  He was a member of Charter Oak Lodge, F. and A. M.  To them three children were born - Edward C., Ira I. (deceased) and EzekielMrs. S. was married , the second time, to John Carrigan July 1, 1879, and by him ahs had one child - Andrew R.  Mr. C. was born Dec. 16, 1839, and is a son of James and Mary (Gray) Carrigan.  Mrs. C. and her husband are members of the Christian Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  175
  Lewis Twp. -
BENJAMIN SELLS, JR., farmer, P. O. Feesburg.  Benjamin Sells, the grandfather of this gentleman, emigrated from Pennsylvania to Ohio in the early part of the present century, settling in the present limits of Clermont County.  His wife was Catherine, daughter of Charles Baum an early pioneer of Lewis Township, Brown County, who is mentioned in the body of this history.  Of their children, Samuel, the father of our subject, was born and raised in Ohio, and after having endured many years' hard labor, died.  Benjamin, Jr., was born on the farm he now owns, in the year 1835; he was raised to farm life and enjoyed the usual common school privileges.  He gave his father the benefit of his time until his marriage with Emily Chapman, a native of Clermont County, in 1856.  She died in 1862, the mother of three children - Ella, Mary S. and Emma.  In 1864, Mr. Sells married for his second companion, Lucy Joslin, to whom has been born six children, viz., John, William, Bertha, Harvey, Silva and Ida.  Mr. Sells still continued his boyhood occupation (farming) and owns 100 acres of good land fairly improved, and, as most of the land of Lewis Township is reasonably well adapted to the raising of tobacco, he makes that his principal crop.  He is a man of medium size, possesses a fair constitution, and is politically inclined to the Democratic party.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  114

S. B. Sheldon, M.D.
Sterling Twp. -
  DR. S. B. SHELDON, physician, P. O. Five Mile, youngest child of Thomas and Mary Sheldon, was born in Tate Township, Clermont Co., Ohio, Dec. 16, 1842, and was raised on a farm, and received a good common schools education.  He enlisted as a private December, 1861, in the Forty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; was veteranized in 1864, and was discharged in January, 1865.  He participated in the following hard-fought battles: Shiloh, Corinth, Holly Springs, Yazoo Swamp, Arkansas Post, Magnolia Hills, Champion Hills, Black River Bridge, siege of Vicksburg and Jackson.  He graduated in Miami School of Medicine and Surgery, Cincinnati, in 1869, and commenced the practice of medicine.  He was married, Dec. 25, 1872, to Ruth A., daughter of James and Elizabeth Dennison of Cincinnati, and sister of Dr. Dennison, of Westboro.  Dr. Sheldon is a respected member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity; he is a well-read physician, and enjoys an extensive practice.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  301
  Sterling Twp. -
JUDGE THOMAS SHELDON, farmer, P. O. Five Mile, son of Thomas and Mary (Burr) Sheldon, was born Aug. 11, 1807, in the State of New Jersey, of English and Welsh descent, and came with his parents to Ohio, in 1818.  He was married in 1831 to Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Bradbury, a native of Clermont County, of English descent; her parents came to Ohio about 1800.  They had born to them six children - Mary S., still single; Caroline, wife of A. Scott, of Green Township; Elizabeth, wife of Edler C. W. Garoutte of Dayton; Lydia B., wife of Alfred Conner, of Perry Township; Anna H. of Tayler Conner, of Sterling Township; and Dr. S. B. Sheldon.  Judge Sheldon settled in Tate Township, Clermont County, Ohio, in 1833, and served as Justice of the Peace eleven years, when he was appointed Associate Justice on the Common Pleas bench of Clermont County, and served seven years.  He was Trustee of Tate Township.  He removed to Brown County in 1853, and has been Trustee of Sterling Township, and Justice of the Peace six years, also a Notary Public over forty years.  His business ability and sterling honesty have kept him in business all his life, but he always operated a nicely kept farm.  He is a member of the Christian Church, licensed to preach in 1840 and Clerk of the General Conference thirty-one years.  He lost his first wife and married Mary, daughter of Thomas Fitzwater, and widow of J. J. Thompson, July 4, 1874.  Few men can look back on a more busy or well-spent life than Judge Sheldon, who is venerated and respected by all.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  300
  Lewis Twp. -
B. B. SHINKLE, Farmer, P. O. Higginsport.  To another of the descendants of a worthy pioneer family of Lewis Township we dedicate this shetch.  He is a son of Michael Shinkle, whose biography appears in this volume, and a native of this township where he was born Apr. 2, 1843.  The early part of his life was spent at home, assisting his father in the rural duties, and attending the winter schools in the country district.  He was raised by Christian and loving parents, and now adheres to the church of his choice - Christian - his wife also being a member of the same denomination.  Her maiden name was Eliza Mefford, and to her he was joined in wedlock Jan. 16, 1868.  To this union have been given three children, viz.:  Charlie C., George E. and Albert L.  Mr. Shinkle's principal crop is tobacco, the staple crop of the county.  Mrs. Shinkle is a descendant of a pioneer family of Union township, Brown County, Ohio.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 116
  Clark Twp. -
GEORGE W. SHINKLE, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, son of John L. and Malinda (Jones) Shinkle, was born in Clark Twp., this county, Mar. 23, 1848.  His grandfather, Christian Shinkle, was among the early settlers of what is now Lewis Township, emigrating from the State of Pennsylvania and settling on what was known as Shinkle's Ridge, in this county, prior to 1810.  John L. Shinkle, son of Christian and father of George W., was born in Lewis Township, Sept. 25, 1810, and his wife, Malinda (Jones) Shinkle, was born in Clermont Co., Ohio, Sept. 17, 1819, her father having emigrated from the State of Kentucky.  John L. is by trade a cabinet-maker, having learned that trade at Higginsport, and there followed it for a number of years.  The children born to John L. and Malinda Shinkle are Louisa J., Lewis M., Letha E., Thomas J., George W. and John C.  In 1847, the father of our subject removed to Clark township, and, in connection with farming, carried on a nursery for a number of years.  Himself and wife are now residents of Clark Township.  In politics he is a Republican.  Our subject was reared on a farm, and received the usual district school education known to farmers' sons, and having arrived at manhood he was united in marriage with Martha, daughter of Oliver and Barbara Crawford, Apr. 14,1870, and to them were born Maggie and Minerva G.  The wife died Oct. 17, 1877.  On the 28th of November, 1878, Mr. Shinkle was married to Elizabeth, daughter of William and Caroline (Wood) Leach, the former a native of Kentucky, who was born in 1807, and the latter a native of Ohio.  The wife of our subject was born in Lewis Township Jan. 1, 1847.  Their children are Willard E. and Silva E.  Mr. Shinkle has been engaged in farming all his life, and for a number of years carried on the nursery began by his father.  Both himself and wife are members of the Christian Church, and, in politics, he is a Republican.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 191
  Lewis Twp. -
M. H. SHINKLE, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, is a son of Michael Shinkle, whose sketch appears above, and was born Jan. 2, 1848, in Lewis Township, Brown County, Ohio.  Like many other sons of the pioneer families, he assisted on the farm at home until of age.   In the meantime he had opportunities for a fair education, which he improved, and finished his school career at the National Normal School of Lebanon, Ohio.  Though amply prepared to teach, he never engaged in the profession, but preferred the common routine of a farmer's life, in cultivating the crops - corn, wheat and tobacco; of the latter he raises quite extensively.  He is one of the well-to-do young farmers of Lewis Township, and owns 193 acres of good land.  On Dec. 6, 1876, he was married to Josephine Park, of Higginsport, where she was born Nov. 20, 184.  She is a descendant of William Park, mentioned in Russel Park's sketch in this township.  She was raised and educated in her native village, and was engaged in the profession of teaching from sixteen to within one year of her marriage.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 116
  Lewis Twp. -
MICHAEL SHINKLE, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, is a grandson of Christian Shinkle, who is mentioned in the pioneer history of this township.  He was the father of thirteen children, of which John B. was the eldest son, and was born in Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia, in the year 1789, where he reached his sixteenth year.  At this time, his father emigrated to Ohio, where he matured amid the primeval forest of the State, assisting in all the pioneer family duties and giving his time to his parents until about the year 1812,when he married Susanna Gray whose parents were early settlers near Felicity.  He was a Democrat.  Early in life, he became a supporter of Christianity and joined the Christian Church, under the ministerial service of Elder Gardner. In this, his chosen denomination, he reared his family, who imbibed the same doctrine.  He died, a worthy citizen much respected, in the year 1844, and his wife, in 1865.  Their children were nine in number, of whom six grew to maturity.  Of the family, our subject is one of three sons, and is the second eldest of the family; he was born Mar. 6, 1815, in what is now Lewis Township, Brown Co., Ohio, and is one among the oldest native born citizens now living in the township.  In early life he endured many privations, but now in advanced age he enjoys the fruits of his labors.  His education was acquired in the common schools of his day, but from fourteen years of age he devoted his time to teaming until his majority, when, on Dec. 1, 1836, he united in marriage with Miss Sally A., daughter of Elder Matthew Gardner; she was born Dec. 5, 1815, in Brown County, where she has ever since resided.  Soon after their marriage, they settled on the farm where they now live.  He has devoted his entire life to farming, and is one of the well-to-do citizens of the township.  He and wife have been members of the Christian Church for many years, and he has been a Trustee.  Their children were eight in number, of whom six are now living, and all married.  The youngest, Michael E., was born Feb. 7, 1854, and still resides on the old home farm.  During his early life enjoyed the benefits of the common school and assisted his father.  In 1876, he married Miss Sarah Marsh, by whom he has had two children.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 115
  Lewis Twp. -
WALTER L. SHINKLE, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, is a son of Michael Shinkle, whose sketch appears above.  He was born Sept. 13, 1837, in Lewis Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  Here he grew to manhood under his parents' care, and gave them his time until his majority, when, on Nov. 30, 1858, he united in marriage with Miss N. E. Nowlin a native of Dearborn County, Ind., born in October, 1837.  To this union has been given five children.  Soon after their marriage, he settled on the farm where he now lives and began its cultivation, and with the exception of a few short intervals has resided there since.  He has devoted about ten years of his time as a tobacco merchant, and recently has devoted some time to carpentering, being handy with tools and having a taste for this pursuit, which he coupled with farming and tobacco-raising.  His life and manner of living has given him rank among the leading citizens of the township.  He is a Trustee of the township.  The interest shown by him in educational affairs deserves special mention, as he is especially interested in the education of the rising generations, and has been a member of the Board of Education since 1868, and Superintendent of the colored school since its organization in the township.  He and wife are both members of the Christian Church, in which he now serves as Deacon and Church Clerk.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 115
  Pleasant Twp. -
FREDERICK SHUSTER, miller, P. O. Georgetown, born in Germany July 12, 1825, the son of J. F. Shuster.  He received his education in the common schools of Adams County.  At the age of twelve years, he concluded to learn the tanner’s trade, and left home to find a place.  Arriving at Georgetown he engaged himself to Jesse R. Grant, father of Gen. Grant, and remained with him a year, when Mr. Grant sold out, and the subject of this sketch turned his attention to milling, and has followed it ever since.  He worked by the month for ten or twelve years, and since that time, has owned and controlled a mill of his own.  He is the proprietor of the “ Tunnel Mill,” about a mile west from Georgetown, erected in 1843 at a cost of $2,500.  The mill is propelled by both steam and water, and has four run of buhrs.  He also owns twenty acres adjacent, the total value of the property being $5,000.  Mr. Shuster was married, in 1850, to Jacobina Kohler, a native of Germany.   They have six children—William J., John G., Frederick, Elizabeth, Mary and Maggie.  Mr. and Mrs. Shuster are both members of the Georgetown M. E. Church, of which he has been Class Leader, Steward and Trustee.  His politics are Republican.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 39
  Union Twp. -
WILLIAM H. SLY, attorney, Ripley, is a son of Joseph and Eliza (Laymon) Sly, and grandson of Jacob Sly who pioneered his way to Cincinnati in 1792, and made his residence in the old block house until he had selected a home on the East fork of the Little Miami, in Clermont County, where he cleared a farm, raised a family, and lived his allotted years.  On this farm, Joseph was born, who, in 1826, moved and settled on Glady Run, Brown County, where he and his companion lived to attained the age of seventy-four years.  The subject of this sketch was born on the homestead Feb. 12, 1824.  His early years were spent in working on the farm and securing such education as could be gathered in the winter months from the rude cabin schoolhouses of that day.  By perseverance and close application to study, he obtained a good common school education.  In 1844, he began the study of law in the office of Sheets & Howard, of Batavia.  After three years of legal tuition, he was admitted to the bar.  Subsequently, he was engaged in teaching school, and on May 1, 1851, began the practice of his profession at Fayetteville, Ohio.  In the summer of 1855, he removed to Georgetown, and in the fall of the same year was elected Prosecuting Attorney.  This office he filled two years with great satisfaction to his constituents.  In April, 1869, he settled in Ripley, and has since been successfully engaged in his professional calling.  His service one year (1873) as Grand Master of the State I. O. O. F., Mayor of Ripley two years, and his rank in Masonic fraternity afford evidence of his esteemed citizenship and professional abilities.  Mr. Sly has always been an active participant in political affairs, and taken a deep interest in public and private enterprise.  During the rebellion, his energies were directed in raising the Fourth Ohio Cavalry, and was elected First Lieutenant but resigned the position.  His marriage to Miss Mary E. Gray, daughter of John and Nancy Gray, occurred Sept. 12, 1855.  To this union five children were born, three of whom are living - Annie, William R. and Jennie G.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  85
  Lewis Twp. -
C. W. F. SMITH, cultivator of small fruits, grapes and tobacco, P. O. Augusta, Ky., was born June 17, 1822, in Mecklenburg, Germany, and is a son of John Jacob and Christiana Smith, who were both natives of that country, where she died in 1879.  John was by occupation a turner, and turned many articles of great value from ivory, horn and fine metals.  His military service was under Napoleon.  He was the father of eleven children, five of whom are now living, one being a professor in a university.  John came to the United States in 1838, and remained in Philadelphia until 1847, when he came to Augusta, Ky., where he followed his trade until his death, in 1852.  He had almost reached the allotted time of man - threescore and ten years.  Our subject is the seventh child, and he as well as his other brothers and sisters came to America subsequently to their father at different intervals.  He brought his sister Philipine to the United States, in 1841, stopping in Philadelphia, where he, in 1842, enlisted in the United States Navy as a musician, and made a trip with Caleb Cushing to China, remaining in service three years, and making a trip around the globe.  His sailing aggregated 67,000 miles.  His discharge dates 1845, at Norfolk, Va.  He then followed his profession (teaching music), until 1853, when he settled in Brown County and bought his present farm of twenty-five acres, in Lewis Township.   He then began cultivating grapes, but finding it different to what he expected, and that it did not justify him to devote his entire time thus, he resumed the teaching of music a part of the time, and finally began the raising of tobacco and other small fruits, which receives his attention at present.  In 1857, he married Johanna Cramer, a native of Germany, born in 1837, but since 1850, a resident of the United States.  The issue of this union is nine children, eight of whom are still livng, and under the parent roof.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 116

F. M. Smith
Green Twp. -
  F. M. SMITH, Mt. Oreb.  A little less than a century ago, where we now live in the enjoyment of churches, schools, railroads, telegraphs, daily mails, manufactories, National banks, and in fact nearly everything which tends to make up civilization, and to give to life enjoyment, lived another peculiar people, known as the red men of the forest.  Here he pitched his wigwam beside the flowing stream, and the young Indian warrior wooed and won his dusky mate.  Here the wild beast roamed at will, and was seldom molested in his forest home among the hills and along the valleys.  Contentment reigned supreme, and the Indian was monarch of all he surveyed.  But at an unguarded hour the civilizer crossed the beautiful Ohio, pitched his tent upon its shore, and proceeded to take possession of the fertile spot now known as Brown County; and with the oft repeated blows from the pioneer's ax the giant trees fell as doth the grass before the scythe.  With strong arms and brave hearts, homes were established in the face of the savage and to the dismay of the wild beast, and now as we look upon the broad meadows covered with green verdure and golden fields of grain, and enjoy our pleasant homes, our hearts swell with gratitude to our fathers who braved the storms and disappointments of a then new and unbroken country, and established for us a free government.  Among the early settlers of Brown County were Benjamin and Rachel Smith, who were both born in Maryland of Scotch and English parentage.  From Maryland they emigrated to Kentucky, where they lived several yeas; in 1804, they came to Brown County, Ohio, and settled where Georgetown at present is built.  They cast their lot with others who preceded them, and made a purchase of a considerable tract of land.  They had nine children whose names were respectively James, Nancy, Benjamin, Rachel, Mary, Benton, Rebecca, Nicholas and Elizabeth.  However, the father did not live long to enjoy his home; for, soon after the close of the war of 1812, he died, leaving his family in comfortable circumstances.  The children proceeded to add to what was left them by their father, and gradually increased their possessions of this world's goods.  But that spirit which characterized their father was inherited by the children, and they began to think of pitching their tents toward the setting sun; so they continued to travel Westward until several of the families are represented in California.  However, one Nicholas, the youngest son and father of the subject of this sketch, remained in this county.  He was born in September, 1801, and when twenty-four years old, married Mrs. Sally Richards, a widow with two sons - John and William.  They enjoyed the blessings of wedded life for more than half a century, when death called him away to the bright land above from whence no traveller returneth.  He was the father of ten children, of whom four are now living - Alexander, resides in Illinois; James G., Rebecca J. and Francis M., our subject, who still lives near the old homestead.  Richard fell, defending the flag of the Union in the late rebellion, at the battle of Pittsburg Landing, in April, 1862.  About 1830, Nicholas Smith moved to what is now known as Green Township, and began to establish for himself a home in the forest.  He participated in the organization of the first Methodist Episcopal Church in the township, of which he was a member, also a member of the first Sunday school, and is said to have been the second Whig voter in Green Township.  He had served as Justice of the Peace, and was respected and honored by all who knew him.  His wife, Sally, was born in Maryland Apr. 13, 1800, and is of English descent.  With her parents, Richard and Rebecca Spires, she came to Ohio in 1812.  She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church when first organized in Brown County.  She is still living and enjoying good health at the ripe old age of eighty-two years.  Their son, Francis M., subject of this sketch, the youngest child and seventh son of the family, was born in Brown County July 10, 1844, at the old homestead, two miles north of Mt. Oreb.  He received a good common school education, and when twenty yeas old began teaching school, which he followed for perhaps three years.  When twenty-four years old, he went on a Western tour, visited a brother in Illinois and returned home in March, 1868.  On Feb. 16, 1870, he married Miss Sarah E. Rice, daughter of Benjamin and Eliza Rice, now of Clermont County, Ohio.  At an early day, July 3, 1871, death entered his home, robbed him of the companion of his youth, and his home became broken up.   On Oct. 28, 1871, he formed with Joseph Clare, Esq., of Bethel, Ohio, a partnership in the mercantile business at Mt. Oreb, and continued therein six years, a portion of the time they having the only store in town.  In April, 1875, our subject was again married; this time to Mrs. Mary E. Cochran, widow of the late John G. Cochran, son of Joseph Cochran, President of the First National Bank at Georgetown, Ohio.  She was the mother of two children - Ella and Peggie.  Soon after his marriage, Mr. Smith quite the mercantile business and retired to his farm north of and adjoining Mt. Oreb, where he now resides.  He became identified with the Cincinnati & Eastern Railway Company, in the infancy also one of the incorporators of the Columbus & Ohio River Railway Company, and was elected one of its Directors at the first election held by the company, and now holds the office of Secretary.  He has been repeated elected and re-elected to office in Green Township, notwithstanding his being a Republican and the township largely Democratic.  He has also been connected with nearly every public enterprise which would prove beneficial to the township in which he resides.  Mr. Smith has for nearly nineteen years been identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church; has held nearly every office in the church, and has repeatedly been elected lay delegate to the Annual Conference.  He is now in the ninth year of his superintendency of the Methodist Episcopal Sunday school at Mt. Oreb, which is in a flourishing condition.  He has on child living - Sallie V., born June 14, 1876.  As a leading and respected citizen of Brown County, there are none who are more worthy of representation in this work.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  269
  Scott Twp. -
JAMES J. SMITH.  Mr. Smith is about a year younger than Henry Young, and these two gentlemen are the oldest persons in the township.  Mr. Smith is one of those fortunate persons who have a real history, that is to say, an eventful life whose incidents are not all merely personal.  He was born Sept. 8, 1803, in what at that time was called Tinkey Bottoms, in Hamilton County, Ohio. His mother’s maiden name was Morris, and she was a sister of Hon. Thomas Morris, who acquired fame in the Senate of the United States by the fearless advocacy of certain political innovations of his day.  Her father was Isaac Morris, a native of Harrison County, Va., and as Mr. Smith styles it, an “old-side Baptist” preacher.  Mr. Smith’s father dying when he was only six years of age, he was left to the care of relatives, and thus became the ward of his uncle Thomas Morris.  At the age of ten years, he was placed in the office of the Western American, a paper published at Williamsburg, Clermont Co., Ohio, by Mr. Morris, to learn the art of printing.  Here he was diligently employed for a year, and then was intrusted with the distribution of the paper to the much scattered subscribers of the county, although he was scarcely more than eleven years old at the time.  He did not ride part of the distance on stage coach, or cart, or in a buggy or wagon, but made the entire voyage on horseback through a wilderness where roads were not one of the conveniences of traveling.  While in the family of his uncle, Thomas L. Hamer, then a student of law, joined it to read law in the office of Mr. Morris.  The friendship and intimacy that sprung up between the young printer’s apprentice and the young law student and future statesman continued till the death of the latter in Mexico after a meteoric career, crowded with brilliant achievements.  Prior to the year 1829, Mr. Smith was employed in different printing offices, sometimes as journeyman, and others as superintendent.  He and Mr. Hamer owned and conducted the Benefactor, a weekly published at Georgetown, Thomas L. Hamer, editor, and James J. Smith, printer.  Subsequently, he served one year in the office of the Ohio Monitor, published in Columbus, and one year in the State Printing Office, also in Columbus.  He worked one year in the office of the Star, printed in Cincinnati, and, finally, in 1827 or 1828, co-operated with Samuel Medary in the management of the Ohio Sun, printed at Bethel, Clermont Co., Ohio.  Mr. Smith was married to Rosanna Wood, of Clermont County, Sept. 16, 1835, John Quinlan, Justice of the Peace, officiating.  He has been several times chosen Justice of the Peace, has filled nearly every office in the township, was elected Auditor of Brown County in 1840, and re-elected in 1842, has a commission of Coroner dated 1836, and signed by Gov. Lucas, and was appointed by John Patterson, United States Marshal, to take the sixth census in 1840.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  255
  Clark Twp. -
S. B. SMITH, minister, Hamersville.  Samuel Bernard Smith, a son of William and Elizabeth (Hoover) Smith, was born in Bath County, Va., Mar. 24, 1820, both natives of Virginia.  Grandfather Hoover was a native of Germany; served six years and nine months in the Revolutionary war, and died in 1844 at the advanced age of 107 years.  The subject of this sketch, while young, had the advantage of only a meager common school education, and came to Ohio in 1841 and engaged in the ministry two years later, and which he was engaged for thirty-six years, serving two years as Presiding Elder of the M. P. Conference.  Mr. Smith was one of the mild, quiet, persuasive preachers, and never inclined to be stormy, but the high estimation in which he was held is attested by the honor conferred by being twice Presiding Elder.  He was retired to the superannuated list in 1879.  Mr. Smith was married, in 1846, to Ellen Jane, widow of Samuel Davis, and daughter of Robert and Margaret (White) Kennedy (see Clark Township history).  They have five children - Samuel K. (married and living at Piketon, Ohio, and Principal of Schools), Ella Bell (widow of Elsberry Young, killed by the falling of the C., G. & P. R. R. Bridge across the Little Miami July 24, 1877), Emma (wife of Thomas M. Lucas), Charles Garwood, Jessie Estella.  Grandfather William Smith, of English descent, was a soldier in Gen. Marion's army, and lived to be one hundred and four years old.  Mr. Smith is an honored member of Fayette Lodge, No. 107, F. & A. M.  Was initiated in West Union Lodge No. 43, I. O. O. F., and is now a P. G. of De Soto Lodge, No. 374, and officiating Chaplain.  Mr. Smith is an honest, quiet citizen, who only needs to be known to be esteemed.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  192
  Jefferson Twp. -
SAMUEL A. SMITH, farmer, P. O. Russellville, was born June 26, 1831, in Highland County, Ohio.  He was the youngest child of John J. and Ruth Smith; was reared to manhood on a farm and received but a limited education.  In February, 1854, he was united in marriage to Mary J. Howland, born Nov. 8, 1830, daughter of Izarus and Sarah Howland.  They have had nine children, seven of whom are still living, viz.:  Izatus, William H., Hettie, Mary, Ruth A., Emma and Edminston.  In the fall of 1858, he settled on a farm in the eastern portion of Jefferson Township, where he still lives.  His farm is in a high state of cultivation, and thereon he has erected commodious and substantial buildings.  He has been successful as an agriculturalist, owing to his good management and having a thorough knowledge of those principles upon which the successful agriculturist must rely.  He has served as Trustee for Jefferson Township, is a member of the Methodist Church, a Republican, and the owner of about 230 acres of land.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 243
  Lewis Twp. -
JACOB SNIDER, farmer, P. O. Felicity, Clermont Co., Ohio, is a son of Christian Snider, who was born near Reading, Penn., and in early life learned the tailor's trade, but followed it comparatively little after reaching Ohio early in the present century.  In his native State, he married, about 1802, Catharine, daughter of Jacob Miller, who is mentioned in Samuel Wise's sketch of this township.  The settlement of Christian and wife dates in the same year as the Wise settlement - 1806.  They located on part of the 1,000 acres in the forks of Bullskin Creek, having at that time two children.  The 160 acres of land given him by his father-in-law was all in the woods, but in due time they had a few acres cleared on which could be raised the most necessary crops for a living, and with energy and industry the little opening grew to a large open and productive farm.  Thus they trod the path of life in union until 1855, when his death occurred; she followed in about one decade.  Their connection with the Presbyterian Church dates to an early period of their lives.  They reared a family of six children, of whom four now survive, viz.:  David, John, Eliza A., Ruggles and our subject, Jacob.  He was born in Center County, Penn., Mar.3, 1803, but from the date of emigration above given, he resided in what is now Brown County, Ohio.  Here he has passed over three-fourths of a century.  His marriage was celebrated Jan. 1, 1833, with Rachel Park, who was born Dec. 29, 1812.  To this union have been given seven children of whom six are now living, viz.:  Laura E., Elizabeth J., William R., Mary E., Martha P. and Emma N., the third and fourth being twins, one of whom, William R., Mary E., Martha P. and Emma N., the third and fourth being twins, one of whom, William R., the only son, was born May 12, 1842, in Lewis Township.  He received a common school education, and on Sept. 2, 1862, enlisted in Company C, Eighty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, entering his first engagement at Chickamauga, where he was captured; afterward released, and participated in the battle of Jonesboro, and many skirmishes.  He was in Sherman's march from Atlanta to the sea, and passed out of service at the close of the rebellion, receiving his discharge at Columbus, Ohio.  He returned home and resumed his former occupation (farming), which he still follows.  In 1867, he married Martha P. Coswell, to whom were born five children.  On Oct. 9, 1876, she was seriously injured by the horns of a cow, from which effect she died on the second succeeding day, October 11.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 116
  Pleasant Twp. -
JACOB SNIDER, P. O. Georgetown, a successful farmer of this townships, was born in Pennsylvania in December, 1830.  His parents, Jacob and Elizabeth (Shilp) Snider, were natives of Bavaria, Germany.  They came to America in 1826, locating at Ironton, Ohio, where they resided until 1846, when they came to Brown County.  They then settled on a farm on Straight Creek, in Jackson Township, where our subject was reared.  He early chose farming for his future life-work, and rented some land giving a third of the grain for rent.  He next purchased a threshing machine, which he operated some time, also dealing in stock.  He subsequently purchased a farm of 223 acres in Washington Township, where he resided many years, and sold to purchase his present farm in Pleasant Township.  Mr. Snider has been a hard worker, but has been careful with his earnings.  Politically, he is a Democrat, and while a resident of Washington Township served as School Director.  He was married, in 1852, to Mary, daughter of Anthony Shaw, of Franklin Township, in this county.  They have six children—William A., Daniel, Michael, Adam, Sarah E. and EmmaMr. Snider and wife are members of the Christian Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 40
  Huntington Twp. -
O. B. SPEARS, tobacconist, Aberdeen.  In the year 1879, Mr. Spears located in Aberdeen and engaged in the tobacco trade, and has since dealt largely in the article.  During the tree years he has been engaged, he has purchased on an average about 125,000 pounds per annum.  For five years previous to his coming to Aberdeen, he was engaged in the same business, handling in the meantime large quantities.  He was born in Brown County, Ohio, in 1849, and is a son of Spencer Spears, whose sketch appears in the history of Union Township.  The boyhood of our subject was spent on the farm till he attained his majority, at which time he began handling tobacco.  He is a member of the Gretna Green Lodge, No. 99, K. P., to which he has become connected some years, and is an honored and worthy member.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  176
  Clark Twp. -
LAFAYETTE SPIRES, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, youngest son of John and Rebecca (Hill) Spires, was born in Clark Township Nov. 24, 1844.  His father, John Spires, was born in Westmoreland Co., Penn., Mar. 27, 1803.  He was a son of Richard and Rebecca (Gentle) SpiresRichard Spires, a native of Maryland, was of English descent and a soldier under Gen. Washington for three years, during which time he was severely wounded.  He came to Ohio in 1810, and lived to be over ninety years old.  Mrs. Spires' mother, Rebecca, was a daughter of John Hill, a native of Ireland.  Her mother, Pitzer, a native of Kentucky, came to Ohio among the first settlers of Eagle Creek.  The subject of this sketch was married, Sept. 11, 1866, to Anna Mary, daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth (Laycock) Liming.  Isaac Liming, a son of Abram and Phœbe (Still) Liming, was a native of Clermont Co., Ohio, of Irish and Scotch descent.  Elizabeth Laycock, a daughter of Levi and Mary (Washburn) Laycock, was a native of Brown Co., Ohio.  Levi Laycock was a soldier during the war of 1812.  Abram and Phœbe Liming were married in Philadelphia, and a few years later, when they emigrated to Clermont Co., Ohio, Mrs. Liming rode the entire distance on horseback and carried her babe in her lap.  Mrs. Spires was born in Clermont Co., Ohio, Nov. 15, 1848.  Their children are James Franklin Spires, born Mar. 10, 1868, and Ada May Spires, born May 19, 1870.  Mrs. Spires is a member of the Christian Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  192
  Jefferson Twp. -
JACOB W. STAYTON, farmer, P. O. Higginsport.  Prior to the Continental war, three Stayton brothers (whose names are not now to be had) emigrated from Wales to America.  On the way, one of them stopped on an island, afterward named in honor of him, and still bears the same name.  The other two pressed on to their intended destination.  One of these two was the grandfather of our subject.  He settled on the eastern shore of Maryland, where he married Hannah Bonwell.  After a companionship of several years, he died, leaving a widow and nine children..  In 1796, the widow and family emigrated to Kentucky, locating at Augusta, where, it is thought Hannah married a Mr. Stinson, and both died in Kentucky.  When the emigration from Maryland took place, Jacob was almost matured, and came through by land with the wagons and stock.  He remained in Kentucky until 1805, when he came to Lewis Township, Brown (then Clermont) County, Ohio.  In the same year he married Mary, daughter of Solomon Wise; she was a relative of the late Gov. Wise, of Virginia, the State in which she was born and there she lived until the year of her marriage.  Jacob Stayton and wife first settled on the farm now owned by F. M. Bartlow, where he had previously taken a lease.  Subsequently, he took a lease on the farm now owned by Joseph Heizer and on this they remained until about 1812 or 1813, when he purchased ninety acres in the James Herron Survey.  To this he added, through life, until he became a man of large estate, which he liberally divided with his children.  He was heavy set, medium size, and possessed a remarkable constitution.  He was a man of few pretensions; lived unostentatious and was best satisfied at home on his farm.  He buried his wife in the fall of 1851, and died in 1863.  He embraced the religion of the Christian Church, at Higginsport, in his old age, in which faith he died.  He and wife had the following family of children:  Mary, Solomon, Nancy, Hannah, Martha, Margaret, Jacob W., Priscilla and Joseph.  Of this number, eight married and became heads of families; three are now deceased.  J. W., our subject, was born Aug. 24, 1819, in Lewis Township, where he was educated in the common schools, and taught the rudiments of farming.  To the latter, he has given his lifelong attention.  He was married, in 1844, to Elizabeth, daughter of Peter Barr.  She was born in Brown County, Ohio, Mar. 8, 1822.  To this union have been given seven children, three now living.  J. W. and wife first settled on the farm they now own.  Their land consists of 245 acres, well improved and under good cultivation.  He and wife are both members of the Christian Church at Feesburg.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 117
  Franklin Twp. -
PHILIP STEPHAN, P. O. Ash Ridge, a prominent farmer of Franklin Township, was born in France Oct. 12, 1836.  His father, John J. Stephan, was also a native of France, and a farmer by occupation.  He came to America about 1837, locating on the farm now occupied by our subject, where he resided till his death, in March, 1880.  He married Sarah Bohl, a native of France, who ore him three children.  Mrs. Stephan is still living, enjoying good health, and resides at Cailisle, in her eighty-second year.  Philip is the only child living of the three born to his parents.  He grew to manhood on the farm, receiving a fair common school education.  When twenty-four years of age, he rented Peter Devore's farm in Pleasant Township, where he resided five years.  He then purchased 113 acres of his father's farm, where he has since resided.  He subsequently bought eighty-four acres in Jackson Township0, and sixty-four acres of woodland in Franklin Township, both farms adjoining his first purchase.  Mr. Stephan is a prominent Democrat of the township; in 1876, was elected Trustee, and has since occupied that position.  He is connected by membership with the Protestant Evangelical Lutheran Church of Arnheim, in which body he has acceptably filled many positions.  He was married in November, 1857, to Catherine Arn, a native of this county.  They have had three children - Jacob J., Philip F. and Catherine M.  Mrs. Stephan and the children are also members of the Lutheran Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  211
  Pleasant Twp. -
ADAM STEPHEN, Georgetown, one of the most prominent grocers of the village, was born in the kingdom of Bavaria June 12, 1829.  His father died when our subject was quite young.  His mother was Mary (Baker) Stephen.  She was the mother of two children - our subject, and a sister Sarah (now the wife of Jacob Kancher, of Cleveland, Ohio.  Mr. Stephen accompanied his mother and sister to America in 1830.  The three located on a farm in Franklin Township, near Arnheim, this county, where Mrs. Stephen died in 1850.  Mr. Stephen was reared on a farm and when fifteen years of age went to Dover, Ky., where he remained some time.  In 1847, he worked on a farm in Mason County, Ky., for $6 per month, and soon after volunteered to go to the Mexican war, but the company was full and his services were not needed.  In 1849, he removed to Georgetown, where he resided till 1853.  He had learned the cooper's trade, and in the latter year went to Quincy, Ill., where he worked at his trade six months.  He then went to Aurora and Peoria, in the same State, and thence to Georgetown, where he has since resided.  He worked at his trade for eighteen years altogether, and then engaged in the saloon and boarding house business, which he followed for five years.  In 1872, he engaged in the grocery business, and has succeeded in building up a large and profitable trade.  Mr. Stephen owns a very nice two story brick residence on North Main street, the "old George Shields farm," of 187 acres; the "Old Thomas L. Hamer and Devore property," the "old Hamer homestead" of eight acres, and many village lots.  Mr. Stephen has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since 1856, and is a charter member of Confidence Lodge No. 307, I. O. O. F., of Georgetown.  Mr. Stephen was united in marriage, in 1865, to Elizabeth Reohn, a native of Wurtemberg.  She died in 1863.  Mr. Stephen was again married, in 1865, to Sarah Clump, a native of Wurtemberg also.  Seven children have been given them, living - Frank, Elizabeth, Albert G., King William, Charlie and HattieMr. Stephen and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.  Mr. S. is also connected with the K. of P. Lodge.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  41
  Green Twp. -
JOSEPH STEPHENS, farmer, P. O. Five Mile.  John B. Stephens, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Belgium, where he married Theresa Fasty, by whom he had two children - Joseph and Rosalie.  In March, 1847, he emigrated to America, came to Brown County, Ohio, and settled in the northern portion of Green Township, where our subject now resides.  He settled in the woods, but with undaunted courage and the energy which characterized the pioneer of his day, he began to clear off his land, and to-day it is in a high state of cultivation.  He died Sept. 2, 1864; his wife survived him until 1878.  Joseph Stephens, subject of this sketch, was born Jan. 23, 1835, in Belgium, and, when about twelve years old, with his parents, he came to America.  In January, 1857, he married Jennie C. Baune, daughter of Jacob J. and Catherine Baune, and by her has had eight children - Mary, Frank, Philip, Mary J., John, Rosa, Jennie and Theresa.  Mr. Stephens has served as Justice of the Peace for Green Township nine years, and on all occasions gave his decision in favor of justice with unswerving firmness.  HE is the owner of ninety-five acres of land, and is recognized as one of the leading agriculturists of Green Township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  270
  Huntington Twp. -
F. M. STEPHENSON, farmer, P. O. Ripley, was born in Union Township in the year 1843, and is a son of Mills and Eleanor (Flaugher) Stephenson, old settlers, whose sketches appear in this book.  She is a daughter of David Flaugher, of whom mention is made in this work.  The early life of our subject was passed in this and Union Townships, and he received a common school education.  He was married, Dec. 16, 1875, to Sarah E., the daughter of Hon. E. M. Fitch, an old settler, of whom mention is made in this work.  After his marriage, he lived two years at Logan's Gap, where he was engaged in handling and pressing tobacco, after which he removed to his farm, but still continued to handle tobacco.  He owns 165 acres of well improved land, which has been accumulated by him since living on the farm.  He still continues in the tobacco business, began to 1873.  He has been Trustee of this Township two terms, and is a member of Ripley Lodge, No. 71, F. and A. M., and Chapter No. 82.  He has the following children:  Portia, Clay, Black, Marian, Oliver, and Eleanor West.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  176
  Union Twp. -
LEMUEL STEPHENSON, farmer, P. O. Ripley, fourth son of Robert P. and Mary Stephenson, was born on his father's farm, near Ripley, Mar. 18, 1832.  He was reared on a farm and educated in the schools of Delaware, Ohio.  He taught school one term, then engaged in the grocery business in Ripley with Ephraim Stephenson, and pursued it one year, then returned to his farm and followed agriculture and horticulture up to 1874, when he turned his attention to the dairy business, his present avocation.  He was married, Feb. 21, 1856, to Miss Sarah E. Devore, daughter of Nicholas and Hestoria Devore Mrs. S. was born in the county and died Feb. 23, 1858, leaving one child - George W., now deceased.  Mr. S. again married Dec. 22, 1860.  This time to Miss Emily Wilson, daughter of Jacob T. Wilson a native of Huntington Township, where she was born Feb. 9, 1838.  Four children were the fruits of this union, of these three are living - Mary M. born Nov. 13, 1861, wife of W. T. VanceAmasa, born Oct. 12, 1865; and Anna L., born Aug. 21, 1869; Wady (deceased), born Aug. 27, 1863, and died Aug. 1, 1864.  Mr. Stephenson and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Politically, he is an advocate of Democracy.  During the late war, he was Captain of Company B, of the Brown County Militia.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  87
  Union Twp. -
ROBERT P. STEPHENSON, Ripley, was born in Union Township, June 21, 1801.  His father, Col. Mills Stephenson, was born in Delaware, and came to Mason County, Ky., in 1792, and in 1794 crossed to the Ohio side and located near Ripley.  He bought a farm of 100 acres and settled on it.  He served in the Indian war, and through the war of 1812 as Colonel.  He built Fort Stephenson in Ohio, and by the order of the Governor it was given his name.  As a man, Col. Stephenson was prominent in his day, and as a citizen he labored in the good of the people and in the interest of the county.  His death occurred June 16, 1822.  Mrs. Stephenson, his wife formerly Miss Jane Kilpatrick, was a daughter of Frank Kilpatrick, who was a native of Ireland.  He came to America, and in 1791 came down the Ohio River in a flat boat with his two daughters - Isabell and Jane, aged ten and twelve years respectively.  When just above Maysville, then known as Limestone, Ky., the Indians endeavored to decoy them ashore, but failing in the attempt they fired two balls into him, one entering his head and the other his heart, killing him instantly.  His daughters came on to Limestone, where they saw their father buried.  They were taken by a Richard Applegate of Mason County, and reared to womanhood.  Isabell married James Stephenson and Jane married Col. Mills Stephenson.  The latter died June 30, 1815.  Robert P., the subject of this sketch, was reared to manhood on his father's farm, and received his educational training in the common schools.  He aided his father in clearing up a farm and in effecting many improvements.  Sept. 23, 1819, he was married to Mary Wallace, a daughter of Thomas and Catherine Wallace, who were natives of Ireland and Pennsylvania.  They came to Mason County, Ky., in 1791, and lived on the "Old Washington trace" till 1815, when they came to Brown County.  Mrs. Stephenson was born n Mason County, Ky., June 9, 1801.  Eleven children were the fruits of this marriage, seven of  whom are living - Thomas, Lemuel, Young, Mary A. (wife of Abner Howard), Robert A., Catherine J. (wife of Edward Martin), and William R.; Mills, Elizabeth, Ephraim and Jane are deceased.  In 1835, Mr. Stephenson located on his present farm, which he cleared up and improved himself with the aid of his children.  He assisted in many of the prominent public improvements of the township and county.  He now owns a farm of 128 acres of well-improved land.  He was one of the earliest and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  In politics, he is a supporter of the doctrines and principles of Democracy.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  86
  Union Twp. -
THOMAS STEPHENSON, farmer, P. O. Ripley, son of Robert P. and Mary Stephenson, was born on the old Stephenson homestead, near Ripley, July 2, 1826.  He was reared on his father's farm and received his training in the common schools of his native place.  His marriage occurred Sept. 12, 1850, with Miss Elmira J. Wiles, born in Union Township Aug. 29, 1829, and a daughter of Joseph B. and Harriet Wiles.  Eleven children were the issue of this union, of these all but one are living - Harriet A., a school teacher; Mary E., a teacher, Julietta, wife of George Miller, of Springfield; Edwin E., Florence G., Edith W., Lucy C., Newton J., Daisy A. and Myrta M.  Jocasta A. is deceased.  In 1850, Mr. Stephenson located on the farm he now occupies and has since resided on it, except five years he lived on the old homestead.  Mr. Stephenson's occupation has always been that of an agriculturist, giving his principal attention to cultivating tobacco, which he has raised successfully for thirty-five years.  He owns a farm of eighty-three acres of good land.  Mrs. S. is united with the Christian Church.  His political views are Democratic.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  87
  Union Twp. -
WILLIAM R. STEPHENSON, farmer, P. O. Ripley, son of Robert P. and Mary Stephenson, was born near Ripley May 12, 1843.  He was brought up to farming and was educated in the common schools of the neighborhood.  He took a commercial course in Grundy's College and graduated in March, 1864.  He began reading law, in 1872, with W. H. Sly, of Ripley, and was admitted to practice in the Circuit Court in September 1874.  He practiced his profession there one year, then engaged in buying and shipping tobacco at Logan's Gap till 1880.  He resumed his law practice in Ripley, and, in the early part of 1881, took charge of his father's farm.  Nov. 7, 1879, he was married to Miss Sarah B. Myers,, daughter of James and Salina Myers.  Two children were born to this marriage, viz.: Myrtie L. and James R.  Mr. Stephenson is identified with the Masonic body and Knights of Pythias.  Politically, he is a Democrat.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  87
  Pleasant Twp. -
Y. STEPHENSON, Georgetown, a prominent physician of Georgetown and Brown County, was born in Union Township, Brown County, Ohio, April 19, 1834.  He is a son of R. P.... Stephenson, who was also born in Union Township in 1801.  His father was Mill Stephenson probably a native of Delaware, and from whom Fort Stephenson was named.  He located in what is now Union Township, Brown County, Ohio, about the latter part of the eighteenth century, and there lived till his death.  His son, R. P. Stephenson, the father of our subject, was a boat-builder; also ran a saw-mill in early life, but has mainly been engaged in farming.  He married Elizabeth Wallace, a native of this county.  Nine children have been given them, seven living.  Both parents are living, and each in their eighty-first year.  Dr. Stephenson was the fifth child and fourth son of these parents, and was reared on the homestead farm.  He received a liberal education at the Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, remaining there four years.  At the commencement of the civil war, he returned to Brown County, and soon after obtained a situation as teacher in a district school.  He followed the profession of teaching probably sixteen years altogether.  He read medicine at Dr. Beasley, of Ripley, remaining with him two years.  He attended a course of medical lectures at the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati, and subsequently at the Starling Medical College of Columbus, Ohio, graduating from the latter institution in the spring of 1865.  He first located at Bentonville, Adams County, Ohio, and a year later at Georgetown, where he has since resided.  Dr. Stephenson has met with very good success in his practice.  He has always evinced considerable interest in educational matters throughout the entire county.  He was Principal of the Georgetown Public Schools for three years, and the Higginsport Schools two years.  He was President of the Brown County Teacher's Institute for four years; has been a member of the Georgetown Board of Education ten years, and is its oldest member in point of service.  He is also connected with the Brown County Academy of Medicine; of the Knights of Pythias, and the Lodge of Encampment of Odd Fellows.  Politically, he is a strong and earnest Democrat.  Dr. Stephenson was married, in the fall of 1856, to Susan Vananda, a native of Ohio.  Both are members of the M. E. Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  41
  Sterling Twp. -
WILLIAMS N. STEWARD, merchant and farmer, P. O. Crosstown, son of Thomas and Elizabeth (McIntosh) Steward, was born in Sterling Township Oct. 14, 1834.  His father and mother were natives of New York, and came to Ohio in 1820.  He was raised on a farm until sixteen years old, when he commenced the carpenter trade, at which he has worked at intervals ever since.  He was married, February, 1855, to Malissa, daughter of Peter Malott, and a native of Clermont County, of German descent, by whom he had three children—Annie, wife of James McKewer, of Clermont County; Posy E., single and is running a blacksmith shop in this township; and William Sherman, single and works on the farm.  Mr. Steward keeps a general assortment of goods, and is doing a thriving business; he also owns a well-cultivated farm.  Thomas Steward, father of William, made the first brick made in Georgetown.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 301
  Clark Twp. -
DR. JOSEPH C. STIERS, Postmaster, Hamersville, was formerly a well-known practicing physician of Hamersville and Brown County.  He was born in Clermont County, Ohio, Oct. 21, 1820.  His parents were Ralph and Elizabeth (Aldrich) Stiers, natives of Pennsylvania, of German and English descent.  The former was a soldier in the war of 1812.  His grandfather Aldrich enlisted under Gen. Washington in the Revolutionary army, when but seventeen years of age.  Dr. Stiers' paternal grandfather, Jacob Stiers, was an early settler in Pennsylvania and twice married.  His first wife and children were captured by the Indians, and the mother and children all killed except two daughters.  These were carried into captivity and one finally suffered the same fate as the preceding ones.  The remaining daughter grew to womanhood among the savages, and was subsequently discovered by her relations.  They endeavored to induce her to return to her old home, but it had been so many years since she had been abducted, that she did not recognize her father.  She asked to see a step-brother, and when brought before her, she lifted his hat and discovered a knife wound on his head which she had inflicted in her childhood days.  Thus she knew it was her brother, but still refused to go back to her friends.  She believed she could never again accustom herself to the habits and customs of the white people, and remained with the Indians until her death.  Dr. Stiers came to Brown County in 1848, and located at Hamersville.  His early education was obtained in the common schools, and subsequently he attended the Ohio College of Medicine, at Cincinnati.  He commenced the practice of his profession at Hamersville, the year of his location in this county.  He is a member of the Allopathic School of Medicine.  For fourteen years he practiced his profession, and administered to rich and poor alike, never holding back on account of a person's financial standing, but, full of sympathy and kindness, he treated all alike.  During the last seven years of his practice, he rode night and day, only being at home one whole night in this period of time.  In 1860, premonitory symptoms of that dreaded disease, amanrosis appeared in his eyes, and within two years his eyesight totally left him.  This terrible affliction called forth and sympathy and kindness of his many friends and neighbors, and although the Doctor was forced to give up his practice, yet his subsequent life, with this one exception, has been peaceful and quiet.  He and his wife are well known in Hamersville and the surrounding country and beloved for their kind hearts and cheerful dispositions.  He owns the property where he now resides, also the small store on the premises.  In 1880, he was appointed Postmaster, and the duties of that office are faithfully attended to by his son, Robert, a young man of good morals and industrious habits.  The Doctor was united in marriage, in 1851, to Emily J. Moore, born at Hamersville Mar. 16, 1832, and daughter of Eliakim and Jane (Francis) Moore, of German and Scotch descent.  They have two children - Robert M., born Mar. 2, 1864, and Anna M., born Dec. 12, 1871.  These children were born after the Doctor's eyesight disappeared, and he has never enjoyed the privilege of seeing their forms and features.  Since this affliction, the Doctor has been a faithful and earnest expounder of the Gospel, and is a man of more than ordinary intelligence.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  192
  Huntington Twp. -
JOHN W. SWISHER, P. O. Hiett, was born in this township in 1834, and is a son of J. and Mary (Haines) Swisher old settlers.  Jacob Swisher, father of Jeremiah, also settled in this county in an early day.  Our subject was reared on the farm, on which he worked till 1862, when he enlisted in Company E, Eighty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; he saw active service throughout the war, and participated in a number of hard-fought battles.  He accompanied Sherman's army to the sea, and received two slight wounds.  He was discharged at Washington, D. C., in 1865.  Upon his return to civil life, he settled in the township where he has since resided, and been engaged in the agency business.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  175

.

.

CLICK HERE to RETURN to
BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
CLICK HERE to Return to
OHIO GENEALOGY EXPRESS
FREE GENEALOGY RESEARCH is My MISSION
GENEALOGY EXPRESS
This Webpage has been created by Sharon Wick exclusively for Genealogy Express  ©2008
Submitters retain all copyrights