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BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
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BIOGRAPHIES

Source::
HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches,
Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of
Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the
Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of
Brown County; Constitution of the
United States, Miscellaneous
Matters, Etc., Etc.
ILLUSTRATED
Published:  Chicago:  W. H. Beers & Co.
1883
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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  Clark Twp. -
REV. JAMES B. LAWWILL, minister, Hamersville, is the son of B. B. and Dorcas (Jordan) Lawwill, natives of Ohio, the former of English, and the latter of Scotch-Irish descent.  He was born at Georgetown, but received his education in the public schools of Aberdeen.  He commenced his ministerial labors at the early age of eighteen years, and has since devoted his time, energy and talents to the cause he has espoused.  In 1874, he was regularly ordained a pastor of the Christian Church.  His first pastoral charge was Olive Chapel, Champaign Co., Ill.  In 1876, he took charge of the congregation at New Hope, and in 1877 he moved to this township, where he now has charge of Antioch Church and the church at Russellville.  On Oct. 3, 1873, he married Ellen Garrison, daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah Garrison.  She died in 1877, leaving one child - Leoma Bell.  In 1878 he married a younger sister of his first wife, and after two years of married life, he was again made a widower.  In 1882, he married Jennie Jester, daughter of Nathan and Eliza (Armstrong) Jester, of this county,  Mr. Lawwill owns a neat and substantial residence in this township, where he resides.  He is a member of the Odd Fellows fraternity, a very industrious minister, and man highly esteemed by his acquaintances.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  185
  Clark Twp. -
ABSALOM LEONARD, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, was born in Brown County, Ohio, Mar. 1, 1852.  He is the son of Marcus and Nancy J. (Curless) Leonard, native of Ohio; he of German and English, and she of German and Irish descent.  She died Feb. 17, 1873.  Our subject received a common school education in Clark Township, and in 1872 married Sarah Lowell, daughter of B. B. Lowell.  She died Sept. 25, 1881, leaving three children - Leander, Marcus B. and Goldy.  Mr. Leonard owns a farm in Illinois, on which he resided until the death of his wife, since which time he has lived with his father, who owns 205 acres of land in this township.  Our subject was the second of a family of six children.  He is a Democrat in politics.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  185
  Sterling Twp. -
ANDREW LEONARD, farmer, P. O. Eastwood, son of John and Margaret (Smith) Leonard, was born in Brown County, Ohio, May 19, 1824. and was married in 1851 to Margaret, daughter of Benjamin and Katie (Day) Reed, and by her had two children—Felissa, wife of Robert Erwin, and Thomas J., who married Laura B., daughter of Walter StevensMr. Leonard was raised a farmer, and, as was common in his day, only received a limited common school education, but his high moral character is attested by the fact that he never swore a profane oath, never was drunk and never had a lawsuit.  He is a Republican in politics, and has served as Trustee, Supervisor and School Director.  Mr. Leonard lives a quiet, peaceable life on his well-tilled little farm of ninety five acres.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  297
NOTE:  In this volume the last name is improperly spelled LEONABD.
  Perry, Twp. -
JOSEPH LEONARD, farmer, P. O. Fayetteville, son of Joseph and Mary J. Leonard, was born in Belgium in 1820.  In 1848, he came to the United States and settled in this township, where he farmed for Thomas Bamber three years.  In 1851, he was married in Cincinnati to Janette, daughter of Frank and Mary Nichols.  They have six children - Mary, Josephine, Joseph, Jane, Julia and Elizabeth.  About 1867, Mr. Leonard bought the farm of 100 acres of land where he now lives, seventy of which are under cultivation.  Himself and family are members of the Catholic Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  140
  Perry Twp. -
JOSEPH P. LEONARD, farmer, P. O. Fayetteville, son of John P. Leonard, was born in Green Township, this county, Mar. 25, 1855.  His parents came to this county in 1845.  He was married in this township in 1877, to Mary, daughter of Joseph J. and Catherine Mull, born in this township.  They have three children - Mary J., George J., and Laura E.  In February, 1882, Mr. Leonard bought a farm of forty-nine and one-half acres of land in this township, two and one-half miles east of Chasetown, about forty acres of which are under cultivation.  Himself and family are members of the Catholic Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  140
  Clark Twp.
ABRAM LIMING, farming, P. O. Hamersville, son of Abram and Mary Liming, was born in Clark Township, Brown Co., Ohio, May 28, 1833.  Abram Liming, Sr., was a son of Joseph Liming, one of the first settlers in Clark Township.  (See Township history.)  The subject of this sketch was married in 1859, to Nancy Jane, daughter of James Montgomery by whom he had five children - Emma Belle, Anna Eliza, Edward, Eugene and Wesley.  Mrs. Liming died in 1868, and Mr. Liming was married in 1871, to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Martin and Matilda (Creager) Reddick, of Sterling Township.  They have three children - Luella, Mary Elizabeth and Martin Reddick.  Mr. Liming was drafted in 1865, and paid $1,000 for a substitute.  He is one of our quiet, hard-working farmers - one of the kind of men that makes a community prosperous.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  186
  Clark Twp.
J. O. LIMING, farmer, P. O. Hamersville.  James Orange Liming, oldest son of Jasper and Margaret (Redmon) Liming, was born in Clark Township, Brown Co., Ohio, July 16, 1855, and was raised on a farm; and at an early age was inducted in the stock trade.  He graduated at the Lebanon Normal School, in the mathematical and engineering class.  He also commenced the study of law but did not complete his regular course, and decided to continue farming and stock-raising as the business was not so crowded as the bar, and gave better promise.  Mr. Liming was married, June 18, 1881, to Sabrah J., only daughter of Charles Oursler, who was born in Georgetown Nov. 25, 1862.  Mr. Liming was elected Justice of the Peace for Clark Township April, 1882; the youngest man ever elected in the township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  186
  Clark Twp.
J. W. LIMING, teacher, Hamersville.  Jasper W. Liming, son of Abram and Mary Liming, was born in Clark Twp., Brown Co., Ohio, Oct. 18, 1854.  The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm, until about of age, since which time he has been engaged in teaching.  He is taking a thorough course at Lebanon Normal School, teaching during the winter.  Mr. Liming is a member of De Soto Lodge, No. 374, I. O. O. F.  Also a member of the Christian Church, and has represented Excelsior Class twice in Conference, notwithstanding his youth.  Mr. Liming is a young man of more than ordinary ability, and a noble ambition.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  186
  Clark Twp.
J. B. LIVINGSTON, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, Sept. 1, 1834, and is a son of John Livingston.  He obtained a fair education in his boyhood days, and has been engaged in farming operations probably all of his life.  He is the owner of 208 acres of good land.  He was united in marriage in 1854, to Anna E. daughter of Davis Trout, and a native of Lewis Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  They have two children - Anna Belle and William A.  Mr. Livingston and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church at Feesburg.  He is an ardent Republican, and has served as School Director.  Mr. Livingston is a hard-working and industrious farmer, and one of the most enterprising farmers of Clark Township.  His residence and farm show neatness and precision, and are conclusive evidence of successful farming.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  186
  Clark Twp.
R. W. LIVINGSTON, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, was born in Adams County, Penn., Jan. 17, 1817.  His parents were John and Anna (King) Livingston, of Scotch-Irish descent, and born within four miles of Gettysburg.  In 1826, they came to Ohio, locating a short distance west of the Pennsylvania line.  In 1853, he came to Brown County, and in 1854, settled here permanently.  R. W. Livingston was reared a "farmer's boy," and after coming to Ohio, taught school on the Hamersville and Higginsport Pike, two and a half miles south of Hamersville.  Since that time he has been engaged in tilling the soil.  He has been very successful in his farming operations now possessing 230 acres of good land.  His political views are Republican, and he has been engaged in tilling the soil.  He has been very successful in his farming operations now possessing 230 acres of good land.  His political views are Republican, and he has served as Judge of Election on several occasions.  He was united in marriage in 1854, to Mary McLain, a native of Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Johnson McLain  They have five children - John M., married and a farmer of this township; Ann M., wife of W. C. Martin, a farmer and teacher; Maria J., at home; Rufus K. and Adam M.  Mrs. Livingstone departed this life Oct. 27, 1874.  She was a member of the Presbyterian Church in which body Mr. L. has been a Deacon for many years.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  186
  Sterling Twp. -
JOSEPH R. LONG, farmer and blacksmith, P. O. Eastwood, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Long, was born in Clermont County, Ohio, May 4, 1824.  His father was a native of Pennsylvania and came to Ohio in 1812.  His mother was also a native of Pennsylvania.  Mr. Long was married in 1843, to Lydia Ann, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Thomas) Newberry, of Brown County.  Her parents were natives of New Jersey.  They raised six children—Thomas, married Elizabeth Widner; Martha, wife of John Wilson, of Kansas; Maria, wife of Hiram Runion; Mary E., wife of Charles Martin, of Kansas; Charles, married Estella Ross; and Alice, wife of Albert A. Hughs.  Mr. Long was raised on a farm and served a regular apprenticeship to the blacksmith trade in Williamsburg, and carried on a shop ever since; he also carried on farming for the last eighteen years.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, class-leader, Trustee, and ordained a minister since 1867, a local preacher.  He is a member of the F. A. M., and served in several subordinate offices. Republican in politics, he served as Justice of the Peace, Treasurer of township, and at present Trustee.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 297
  Eagle Twp. -
NELSON LONG, Justice of the Peace, Fincastle, was born Sept. 3, 1832, in White Oak Township, Highland County, Ohio; his parents were James and Jane Long.  In his youth, he received but a limited education, but being of a studious nature, he has made himself familiar with many important topics of his day.  In Oct. 16, 1856, he married Martha McVay, daughter of Solomon McVay.  To them have been born one child, viz., Clara B.  In 1860, he moved to Eagle Township; he is at present engaged in the milling business, and resides in Fincastle.  He has served as Justice of the Peace in the township for five years; he is a man of prepossessing appearance, and well worthy the estimation in which he is held by the community in which he resides.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  227
  Pleasant Twp. -
D. W. C. LOUDON, Judge of Court of Common Pleas, Georgetown, was born in Georgetown, Ohio, May 29, 1827.  He is a son of Gen. James Loudon, prominent citizen of Brown County, now deceased, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this volume.  Judge Loudon’s mother was Elizabeth Chapman.  She is still living, in the enjoyment of good health, and resides in Georgetown, an honored and highly esteemed pioneer of Brown County, and a lady of culture and refinement. When five years of age, Judge Loudon accompanied his parents to a farm in Pleasant Township, where he passed his boyhood days. In early life, he attended the district schools of the neighborhood, but a desire for a better education induced him to attend the Ohio University, at Athens, from which he graduated in 1850. In 1846, he enlisted in the First Ohio Regiment Volunteers to the Mexican war, serving one year, and being mustered out as Quartermaster Sergeant.  In 1852, he purchased the Democratic Union, of Georgetown, of which he was the editor and publisher for two years.  He studied law with Lot Smith, of Athens County, Ohio, and David G. Devore, of Georgetown.  He was admitted to practice in the courts of Ohio in November, 1851, to the United States Circuit Court in 1860, and the United States Supreme Court in January, 1868.  He has since been engaged in the practice of his profession.  In 1861, Judge Loudon assisted in organizing the Seventieth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, accompanying it to the field as Lieutenant Colonel.  He was subsequently promoted Colonel, and served in the Fifteenth Corps, Army of the Tennessee, uuder Gen. Sherman.  He was discharged, on account of disability, in August, 1864; he returned to Georgetown, and resumed his practice.  In 1857, he was elected Probate Judge of Brown County, to fill a vacancy; he resigned this position in November, 1858.  In the fall of 1881, he was elected Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Brown County for a term of five years, commencing Feb. 9, 1882.  Previous to the war, Judge Loudon was a Democrat, but at that time joined the Union party; he voted with the Republicans till the Greeley campaign of 1872, when he became associated with the Liberal party.  Since 1876, he has been a member of the Greenback party; he is connected by membership with the Association of Mexican Veterans, Post of Ohio, and the Society Army of the Tennessee.  In his legal practice.  Judge Loudon has met with very fair success.  He was united in marriage, in April, 1852, to Hannah W. Bowles, a native of Southbridge, Mass.  They have five children—Fannie, Betty (wife of John M. Markley, an attorney of Georgetown), James, Anna P. and Julia B.  Mrs. Loudon and two older
daughters are members of the Presbyterian Church.  Judge Loudon is modest and retiring in his manner; a thorough scholar and an earnest student.  He is distinguished for his scholarly attainments, and his kindly manners endear him to all who know him. 
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 26
  Pleasant Twp. -
THOMAS J. LOUDON (deceased) was born in Pleasant Township, Brown County, Ohio, Nov. 15, 1839, and died while in the service of his country, Sept. 28, 1863, in the twenty-fourth year of his age.  He was the son of General James and Elizabeth Loudon, the seventh of a family of nine children.  He spent his boyhood days on his father’s farm, and was just attaining manhood when the war of rebellion opened.  He was impetuous and fearless in nature, and in the early days of the great national struggle entered the army and served on the staff of Gen. W. S. Smith; at the time of his death, he held a Captain’s commission.  His early military experience was had in Virginia, where he participated in the battle of Carnifax Ferry and other engagements.  His bold, dashing spirit admirably adapted him to the dangerous duties of the various expeditions which his position required him to make.  He at one time was with a train, which was captured some distance out from Memphis, Tenn., plundered, and the soldiers aboard taken prisoners.  Capt. Loudon and Capt. Lilley, of Columbus, Ohio, were the only two who eluded their captors and escaped.  The former climbed a tree in the adjoining woods and was a spectator of the rifling and burning of the train and baggage, including all his own effects.  With the assistance of some friendly negroes, he succeeded in finding his way back to the Union lines.  He was drowned in the Mississippi, at Milliken’s Bend, at the burning of the steamer Robert Campbell, Jr.  Gen. W. S. Smith, in describing the catastrophe of the burning, says: “I looked for Capt. Loudon, my Assistant Adjutant General, confident that he had escaped, as he was an expert swimmer.  I knew the noble fellow would be looking for me, but he was nowhere to be found.  The last I saw of him, he was standing on the very point of the bow, fully dressed and perfectly cool.  He afterward aided all he could in getting planks and staging overboard.  To Capt. Rose, who asked him if he could swim, he replied:  ‘Oh, yes, don’t give yourself any trouble on my account.’  On inquiry, I learned from an acquaintance of his that he had swam out to the Captain, who was clinging to a trunk to which another man also clung, and endeavored to help him, but found him sinking.  The two rolled the trunk, and I presume the Captain was rolled under. May kind Heaven grant him its sweetest rest from the stormy scenes of his brief life.  A gallant, noble spirit was his.”
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 27
  Pleasant Twp. -
V. M. LOUDON, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in Union Township Oct. 14, 1822, and is the son of Charles and Ellen (Sells') Loudon.  His father was born in Kentucky, of Scottish parentage, his mother in Pennsylvania, of Dutch parentage.  He received no other education than what the common schools afforded, and early turned his attention to boating and farming, and has since usually spent his summers on the farm and his winters on the river.  His farm consists of 125 acres, well improved.  While boating, he buys and sells plantation supplies in the South.  His political faith is in the Democratic party.  The year 1845 dates his marriage with Louisa Jordan, the daughter of James Jordan of this county.  Their children are Mary F., Lucy (wife of George Gardner, of Higginsport), John, George (now living in Kentucky), Lida (wife of O. P. Waterfield), Frank, Emma, Charles B. and Stella (deceased).
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 27
  Perry Twp. -
PETER LOUIS, farmer, P. O. Marathon, Clermont County, Ohio, was born in France in 1823.  When thirteen years old, he went to learn the tailor's trade.  In 1845, he came to this country and worked at his trade in New York City nearly two years, and then came to Cincinnati.  He was married at Stone Lake Church, Clermont Co., Ohio, in 1848, to Catherine, daughter of John and Elizabeth Gauche, born in France in 1830.  They have eight children - Mary E., Joseph, Ann, John E., Mary E., Augustus W., Francis A. and Catherine L.  In the fall of 1841, Mr. Louis bought a farm of eighty acres of land in the southwestern part of this township; now has 132 acres, 100 of which are under cultivation.  Mr. Louis still works at his trade at home; he has been Supervisor several years.  Himself and wife are members of the Catholic Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  140
  Lewis Twp. -
DR. WESLEY LOVE, physician, Higginsport, grandson of Alexander Love, whose history appears in this township, and son of Calvin Love, was born in 1837, in Lewis Township, and raised a farmer's boy.  He improved the opportunities afforded him in the common schools, and at the age of eighteen took up the study of his favorite profession, medicine, under Dr. Hugh McCasky, of Felicity, Clermont Co., Ohio, and entered the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati, in the winter of 1857, from which he graduated in 1859.  In April of the same year, he located at Sardinia, Brown County, where he entered upon the duties of his professional career, continuing very successful until Oct. 12, 1861, when he enlisted in the First Independent Battalion Ohio Volunteer Infantry, eighteen months later designated as the Eleventh Ohio Volunteer Cavalry.  When the battalion was fully organized, he was commissioned, Dec. 9, 1861, as First Lieutenant.  While thus engaged, he served ten months as Aid-de-Camp on Gen. James Craig's staff.  The Doctor's second commission was as Captain, on Feb. 17, 1863.  Subsequently, Dec. 7, 1864, he rose to Major of the Eleventh Regiment, and was mustered out of service Apr. 1, 1865, and returned home.  He, with his regiment, served during 1861 and 1862, in Missouri, thence ordered as far west as the Rocky Mountains, where they served two years and eight months, and while thus guarding the frontier, had several engagements with the Indians.  They guarded the party while surveying the Pacific Railroad, and protecting the United States mail route.  While in service, he voluntarily acted as Surgeon in connection with his command; this, however, was done in consequence of the company being on detached service.  Among the many hardships endured was the march from Fort Leavenworth of Fort Laramie, a distance of 600 miles, in twenty-eight days.  After serving between three and four years, he was fortunate enough to return home uninjured, and in 1865 located in Higginsport, and has continuously been engaged in the practice of his profession since, and has had fair success, which is the result of his knowledge of medicine and surgery.  In 1877, he was appointed Deputy Revenue Collector of the Sixth District of Ohio, and held the position until 1882.  His marriage was celebrated May 17, 1860, with Miss Amanda M. Marshall, by whom he had four children, three now living.  Her death occurred Feb. 3, 1874.  He married for his second companion Miss Elizabeth Elliott, who is a native of Brown County, Ohio.  The issue of this union is one child.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  106
  Lewis Twp. -
WILLIAM L. LOVE, retired farmer, P. O. Feesburg, is a son of Alexander Love, who will be mentioned in the township history more minutely, and who settled in the present limits of Brown County, Ohio, about the close of the last century, and, in 1805, married Ellen, daughter of Charles Canary, who was a very early settler in the vicinity.  He became a land owner Feb. 17, 1806, purchasing one hundred acres at $2.25 per acre; subsequently he joined to it thirty-three acres more.  The land is now owned by the youngest son, George Love.  Alexander and wife had born to them seven children, five sons and two daughters, viz., William, Charles, John, Andrew and George; the daughters were twins - Margaret and Ellen, both now deceased.  William, the elder of the family, was born Dc. 22, 1806, in Lewis Township, then Clermont, but now Brown County.  His education was obtained in the little log school but near the Ridge Church, elsewhere mentioned in this volume.  He was his father's most valuable assistant in clearing up the farm, where he remained until 1828, when he began life for himself, having had given him a horse, saddle and bridle, and a chance to make $200, on the farm.  He married, on May 7, 1829, Mary, daughter of Thomas West, who is mentioned in Clark Township.  She was born Aug. 12, 1809, and died Feb. 16, 1839, and was the mother of five children, viz., Alexander, deceased; Sarah Ann, deceased wife of William Houser; Cynthianna, wife of Lewis Bolender; Leander and Thomas.  Our subject married for his second wife Eliza, third daughter of Thomas West, Aug. 15, 1839.  She was born in Lewis Township, Mar. 22, 1820.  To this union have been given eight children, as follows:  Clarissa, born Dec. 25, 1842; George A., Aug. 26, 1844; Margaret E., Sept. 16, 1845; Martha J., Dec. 19, 1848; James M., July 6, 1852; Barbara S., Oct. 7, 1854; Mary F., Aug. 1, 1856; William L., Oct. 28, 1860.  Barbara and Martha are deceased.  About the time of William's first marriage, he bought land in Clermont County, where he resided until 1879, when he sold it and purchased his present farm of eighty acres in his native township.  During his entire life of over three-fourths of a century, he has never entered or allowed himself to be crowded into any litigations, but has tried to live upright and honest.  He has avoided all public notoriety, but, while a resident of Clermont County, held a few township offices.  Politically, he is a Democrat.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  106
  Clark Twp. -
THOMAS LUCAS, clerk, Hamersville, was born in the village of Hamersville, where he now resides, Jan. 18, 1856.  He is the son of J. W. and Louisa J. (Moore) Lucas; he a native of Pennsylvania, she of Virginia, and both of English descent.  The former came to Brown County in 1847, and the latter in 1840.  Our subject obtained a common school education, in that capacity.  He has full control of the store, and employs no help, being assisted in his duties by his wife Emma, a daughter of Rev. S. B. Smith, whom he married, in 1881.  They have one child, Eunice E. Stella.  Mr. Lucas is in politics a Democrat.  He is a young man of good address, polite and affable, and with more than ordinary business ability.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  186
  Pleasant Twp. -
GEORGE LYON, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in Pleasant Township, Brown County, Ohio, Sept. 13, 1826.  He was the oldest son of Robert Lyon, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this volume.  George was reared on a farm and lived with his father till 25 years old.  He received a common school education, and lived with his father till 25 years old.  He received a common school education, and also attended college, at Cincinnati, for a short time. He attended school one term in Georgetown, while Gen. Grant was in school.  He says that the General was a bad boy to play "teeter" with; for when Grant would be down, and the other boy up, Grant would get off to see the other fellow "caplunk," as he called it.  That might have been fun for Grant, but Esquire Grant says it was hard on him, for he had received two or three bumps in that way.  He has given his attention to farming and is the owner of 97 acres of land.  Mr. L. is a Republican in politics.  He has served as Justice of the Peace for twenty years in Pleasant Township.  He was married, in 1856 or 1857, to Harriet Dillman, native of Brown County, Ohio, daughter of Conrad Dillman, of German descent.  This union has been blessed with a family of children, all of whom are living - Charles D. (a farmer in Pleasant Township), Anna, Lucy, W. H., Minnie and Emma.  W. H. bought a farm of 20 acres, when he was in his seventeenth year.  Mr. L. is a kind father and has the good will of all his neighbors.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  28
  Pleasant Twp. -
ROBERT LYON
(deceased) was born in Pleasant Township in 1803; the son of William and Anna (Brown) Lyon, who were early pioneers of this township, and a sketch of whom is given in the history of Pleasant Township.  William Lyon came to this township in 1796.  Robert was raised on his father's farm five and one-fourth miles south of Georgetown, attending school in the rude log cabins thereabouts.  He selected farming as his occupation, and became an extensive land-holder, at one time owning 921 acres.  He died in 1854.  In 1841, he married Rachel, daughter of Jesse and Mary (York) Printy.  Jesse Printy's father was a native-born Irishman, who served in the Revolutionary war; his (Jesse's) mother was a native of Sweden.  Jesse emigrated to Pleasant Township in 1810, and died in 1882 at the advanced age of ninety-eight years.  He had seen Pleasant Township converted from the dense wilderness into a prosperous and bounteous country.  His wife was a Pennsylvanian by birth.  The union of whom are living.  The eldest child, William, was born Apr. 5, 1842, received his education in Pleasant Township and engaged in farming six miles south of Georgetown.  His farm is beautifully located on a rise of ground, and from his residence he has a view of the Ohio River for a distance of ten miles.  He is a democrat.  He was twice married first to Evaline Chapman, daughter of Isaac Chapman.  By this marriage he has five children - Ada, Lola, Robert, Edward and Gillian.  Mrs. Lyon died in 1876, and, in 1879, William married Mary, daughter of John Kuntz.  One child, Alfred, is the fruit of this union.  Robert Lyon's second child, Louis, born in 1845, is the present manager of the homestead of 310 acres.  He received his education at the Western Union College and Military Academy in Whiteside County, Ill.  He also attended the Ohio University one year.  He was married, in 1868, to the daughter of Rev. J. P. Daughterty, Rachel A., by whom he has one daughter, Jessie.  The remaining children of the subject of this sketch are Mary (wife of Capt. Charles D. Thompson, of Georgetown), Dan (deceased), Anna (deceased), and Ruth (wife of U. G. Rees, a Georgetown merchant).
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  27

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