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BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
History & Genealogy

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BIOGRAPHIES

Source::
HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches,
Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of
Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the
Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of
Brown County; Constitution of the
United States, Miscellaneous
Matters, Etc., Etc.
ILLUSTRATED
Published:  Chicago:  W. H. Beers & Co.
1883
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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  Huntington Twp.
D. W. EARLY, farmer, P. O. Hiett, was born in Kentucky in 1820; he is a son of D. W., Sr., and Elizabeth (Lynn) Early; he was born in Virginia, and at the age of fourteen came to Kentucky alone, with nothing but an ax.  She (Elizabeth Lynn) was born in Pennsylvania, and was daughter of Andrew Lynn, who also located in Kentucky in an early day.  In 1836, D. W. Early, with his family, came to this township and settled where our subject now resides, and where he died in 1862, aged eighty-nine years.  He and wife were members of the Presbyterian Church, and very exemplary Christian people.  Four children came to this county with them, viz.:  Elizabeth, Martha, Amanda and D. W.  They had three other children - Sallie, Euphemia and Andrew.  Mrs. Early died in 1860, aged seventy-eight years.  Mr. Early served in the war of 1812.  Our subject was married in 1849, to Sarah J., daughter of John and Sarah Hook, and by her had four children, viz.:  John L., Walter D., Charles and George.  Mr. and Mrs. Early are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which they have belonged since 1860.  John Hook was born Apr. 6, 1787; died July 4, 1867; Sarah, his wife died Oct. 7, 1843, aged forty-two years and two months.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 155
  Clark Twp. -
JOHN EARLY, Hamersville, station agent of the Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad, was born in Clermont County, Ohio, Nov. 9, 1818.  His parents were Thomas Early and Mary Stevens, native of Maryland, and of English descent.  The former, in 1814, carried the first wagon load of produce from Brown County to Cincinnati.  He subsequently removed to Texas, where he was afterward killed by a man named Isaac B. Desha.  The latter expiated his crime on the gallows, being probably the first man ever hung in Texas.  This was in 1829.  There were nine children in the family at the time of his father's sudden death, of which our subject was the fifth.  His father was a school teacher and himself and brother attended school, although it was only a log schoolhouse of those primitive times.  He was reared on a farm, and in 1838 was married to Rebecca, daughter of Hugh Wisley, and a native of Brown County.  After marriage, he rented a piece of land, on which he farmed for four years.  He then commenced blacksmithing at $75 per month and boarding himself, and followed that for two years.  He then rented a farm near Georgetown, and borrowed money to buy his farming tools.  He remained there three years, working  hard and exercising great economy.  In 1847, he removed to Hamersville, and followed his trade of blacksmithing till 1868.  He was farming the last four or five years of this time.  He took a contract for carrying the mail from Hamersville to Higginsport, remaining in this business many years.  He has been agent of the C., G. & P. R. R. at Hamersville since the completion of the road to that point.  He is connected with the Masonic fraternity.  Mr. Early has been thrice married.  Four children were born to his first union, two living, Melissa, wife of Thomas Molen, of this township, and Nancy, wife of Thomas Statman, of Hamersville.  Mrs. Early died in 1848.  He was again married in 1850, to Catherine, daughter of Robert Ellis, and a native of Brown County.  Five children were given them - Mary E., wife of John Moore, a blacksmith of Hamersville; Martin; Hanson Lee; Melitia, wife of J. Hannah; and Olive, widow of Columbus Poe (deceased).  This wife died Aug. 18, 1866.  Mr. Early's third marriage were in May, 1873, to Rebecca, daughter of John Gallaher, a native of Kentucky, as was also her parents.  Mr. Early is the owner of 130 acres of land and property in New Hope.  He is Republican in politics and was Township Assessor many years.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  184
  Union Twp. -
ORANGE EDWARDS, retired farmer, P. O. Ripley.  James Edwards was the grandfather of our subject.  He was a native of Aberdeen, Scotland.  He came to America previous to the Revolutionary war, in which four of his sons served on the side of liberty.  His wife's maiden name was Elizabeth Jacobs, also of Scotland.  They raised a family of twelve children, all of whom lived to be men and women.  In 1794, James entered Kenton Station, near Maysville, Ky., near which he purchased a farm.  He joined his son at Aberdeen, where he purchased one thousand acres of land and laid out that town, naming it after his birthplace in Scotland.  He died at the age of ninety-nine years.  Orange Edwards was born in Byrd Township Oct. 3, 1819, and is the son of George and Susannah (Downing) Edwards, both natives of Virginia.  George Edwards was the first regularly commissioned officer in Brown County; soon after coming to Aberdeen, he took command of a volunteer company to protect themselves against the Indians.  In the war of 1812, he raised a regiment under the general call and entered the service as Colonel of the Second Ohio Volunteers.  He was ordered to report to the Lakes, the regiment being obliged to cut their way through the woods.  As far as is known, only one man is living at this time (1882) that belonged to that regiment - his name is James Carr, of Brown County.  Col. Edwards represented this county in the Legislature for eight successive years, having, prior to that time, served as Justice of the Peace for many years.  In 1844, he moved to the house of his son, in Union Township, where he died in the ninety-ninth year of his age.  Col. Edwards and his wife had a family of fourteen children, seven of whom are living.  Orange Edwards, whose name appears at the head of this article, received a thorough education at the schools of Georgetown in Brown County.  He was a scholar in the same class with Gen. U. S. Grant.  After the completion of his studies, he engaged in teaching school for some three years.  In 1855, he formed a partnership with John Coslett in the milling business near Ripley.  Ten years afterward, he disposed of his mill interest and returned to his farm in Union Township.  In 1882, he left his farm and moved to Ripley, where he resides, leading a retired life.  During the war of the rebellion, Mr. Edwards served as Colonel of the home organization for the protection of the border, and was a Presidential Elector on the election of President Hayes.  He was married, in 1842, to Miss Catharine La Favre from this union there were eight children; four of them are now living, as follows:  William H., who received an appointment and served six or seven years in the Treasury Department at Washington, D. C.  He also served as Secretary of Legation in South America for two years, also as Secretary of the U. S. Minister at Rio Janeiro, and as Charge d'Affaires at that point, for some time.  On his return, he was appointed Consul General  at St. Petersburg, Russia, which position he filled to the satisfaction of the Government.  He is at present engaged on the French Claims Commission, in the Government service.  Charles M. is a practicing lawyer at Cincinnati.  Leander A. and George W. are both living at home.  Mr. Edwards lost his wife by death in 1860.  He was married again, in 1862, to Miss Mary, daughter of Robert McMillen a native of Ripley, this county.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  61
  Byrd Twp. -
WILLIAM H. H. EDWARDS, farmer, P. O. Russellville, next to the youngest son of Darias and Jane Edwards, was born in Byrd Township July 17, 1840.  Oct. 10, 1861, he rallied to his country's call, and enlisted in Company A, Seventieth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  He took part in the following engagements: Shiloh, Corinth, Vicksburg, LaGrange, Jackson and Lookout Mountain.  He Veteranized, and Jan. 5, 1864, re-enlisted in the same company, and went on Sherman's long and toilsome march to the sea.  He fought in all the battles up to Statesboro, Ga., where he, with fifteen others, was captured.  He was confined in Florence prison three months till March, 1865, when he was paroled.  He was honorably discharged June 15, 1865.  He was married Dec. 24, 1869, to Miss Lizzie T. Spears, a daughter of Spencer Spears.  Three children were given to bless this union - Spencer D., Arthur E., and Archie H. (twins).  Mr. and Mrs. Edwards are members of the Christian Church.  He owns a good farm of 120 acres.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  302
  Perry Twp. -
FREDERICK EICHLER, physician, Fayetteville, son of Peter and Madalena (Long) Eichler, was born in Prussia, Aug. 4, 1828.  He studied in the high schools of Treves till seventeen years old, then studied pharmacy four years.  He then took to the study of medicine and graduated from Bonn University in 1853.  He was married in 1856, and came to this country the same year and settled in Danville, Highland Co., Ohio, where he practiced three years.  In 1859, he came to this village, where he has since enjoyed a good practice.  He owns his residence, office and two lots.  Mr. and Mrs. Eichler have two children - Henrietta and Julius F.  Mr. Eichler is a member of the Brown County Medical History.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  135
  Clark Twp. -
DIMMIT C. ELLIOTT, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, son of William and Elisa (Simons) Elliott, was born Sept. 4, 1842.  His father was born in Pennsylvania, of Welsh descent, his mother a native of same State of German descent.  Mr. Elliott enlisted Oct. 1, 1861, in Company I, First Light Artillery, and perhaps saw as much hard services as any man in the county - participating in eleven hotly contested battles, besides many, and some pretty sharp skirmishes, viz., Cross Keys, second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge, Resaca, Ga.,. Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek and the capture of Atlanta, the march from the Cumberland to Atlanta being almost a continual battle, in which the light artillery played a conspicuous part.  Mr. Elliott's health was considerably shuttered during the service, and he is now receiving a pension.  He was married at the close of the war, in 1865, to Izora, daughter of Oliver Crawford.  They have had seven children, six of whom are still living.  the oldest boy, George, was killed at the age of seven years, by a saw log rolling over him.  The living are Missouri C., Eliza B., Olive, Mattie May, Albert and Luella.  Mr. Elliott and wife are members of the M. E. Church, of which he is Steward and Trustee.  He is also a Superintendent and teacher in the Sunday school.  He is a Republican in politics, a warm friend to education and School Director.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  183
  Clark Twp. -
JEROME W. ELLIOTT, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, a son of William and Eliza (Simons) Elliott was born in Adams County, Ohio, Sept. 10, 1833, and removed with his father to Brown County the same year.  William Elliott, a son of James Elliott, a soldier of the war of 1812, was of German descent and a native of Pennsylvania.  The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm and received only a common school education.  He was married, Sept. 28, 1854, to Hannah, daughter of Absalom and Nancy (Owen) Halfhill, natives of New Jersey.  They had born to them five children - Margaret, died at fifteen months old; Granville O., born May 20, 1860, married Lydia, daughter of John B. and Margaret Young; Clement, born Apr. 22, 1863, and married Martha, daughter of William and Jane Pride; Charles William; John, died at ten months old.  Mr. Elliott is a Democrat, and one of the present Board of Township Trustees, to which place he has been several times elected, also a member of the Board of School Directors, in which he has long served.  He has been a member of De Soto Lodge, No. 374, I. O. O. F., since 1870, and has discharged the duties of all the different offices of the lodge.  He is also a member of Georgetown Encampment, having received his degrees in Felicity Camp in 1874.  Mr. Elliott's modesty and sterling integrity make him universally esteemed and he contentedly cultivates his nice little farm.  His wife is a member of the Christian Union Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  183
  Pleasant Twp. -
G. L. ELLIS, Recorder of Brown County, Georgetown, was born at Pleasant Township, Brown County, Ohio, Dec. 13, 1850.  His grandfather, Noah Ellis, was a native of Virginia, and came to Ohio when a boy.  He was a farmer of Brown County till his death, in his seventieth year.  Mr. Ellis father is John E. Ellis, also a native of this county, and at present a farmer of Pleasant Township.  His mother was Mary Wright, a native of this county, and a daughter of John Wright, also a native of Virginia.  Mrs. Ellis is also living. Our subject was reared on a farm, and when fourteen years of age, was taken with a severe attack of intermittent fiver, and white swelling, from which he was a constant sufferer for three years.  During this period, he lived in a darkened room, seeing the light of day but very little.  His disease prostrated him to such an extent, that on two occasions he was supposed to be dead, and his grave ordered dug by his father.  Upon final recovery, he was too weak to do any labor for the succeeding three years.  He then attended school, and subsequently taught steadily for six years, attending school in the spring months. On Sept. 11, 1879, he married Clara A. Snedaker, a native of Feesburg, Lewis Township, this county.  Mr. Ellis has been a Democrat through life, and in October. 1881, was elected Recorder of Brown County.  He took possession of his office Jan. 2, 1882.  Mr. and Mrs. Ellis had one daughter born to them, now deceased.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 12
  Pleasant Twp. -
GEORGE M. ELLIS, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in Pleasant Township, Mar. 15, 1828.  He is a son of Samuel and Sally (Ellis) Ellis.  Though bearing the same name before marriage, his parents were not akin to each other.  He was reared to manhood in this townships, gaining the education that the country schools afforded in his youth.  Farming then became his life work and he now owns a desirable little farm.  He is a member of the Democratic party.  In 1850, he and Emily Jones, a native of Brown County, were made one by the holy bonds of matrimony, and their home has been cheered with three children - Mollie, Hattie and Albert.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  13
  Pleasant Twp. -
JOHN E. ELLIS, farmer, P. O. Georgetown, was born in Pleasant Township May 24, 1817; the son of Noah and Margaret (Evans) Ellis, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania, his parentage being Irish; hers Scotch and Irish.  Noah was in the war of 1812.  John E. was reared in the country the limited education his neighborhood afforded.  He adopted farming as his life pursuit, and has made a success of it.  In 1837, he was married to Mary Wright, born in1818, the daughter of Robert and Lydia (Waters) Wright.  Her father was of Irish; her mother of Dutch extraction.  Their children are Samuel, Lydia (wife of Samuel Burris, of Clark Township), Matilda, Arminda (wife of Matthew Dooley), G. L., Sally May (wife of of Henry Andrews), Margaret A. (wife of William Page), Charles and Alcinda Isolina Douraman Devargus Dust.  This rather remarkable name of the youngest child has this origin.  Her eldest brother had been on a visit to Pike's Peak and out west met a wanted his baby sister named after her, but his father had seen an American heroine, so good and kind to disabled soldiers that he wished to perpetuate her name in his family.  They comprised the matter by giving her both names.  The family is noted for great physical development.  they average weight of the children exceeds two hundred pounds; three of the girls have a combined weight of 647 pounds, while the young lady who revels in the quintuple given name, now a blooming lass of twenty summers, tips the scales at something over 200 pounds.  Mr. and Mrs. Ellis are members of the Union Church.  He is a Democrat.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 12
  Pleasant Twp. -
N. W. ELLIS, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in Pleasant Township Sept. 27, 1826, the son of Samuel and Sarah Ellis, both of English descent and pioneers of this township.  His education is what the common schools afforded; his occupation is farming and dealing in tobacco.  Mr. Ellis has traveled extensively through the West, and at one time owned a mill in Kansas, which was destroyed by fire in 1879 at a loss to him of $5,000.  He is the possessor of 130 acres of well-improved land in the southern part of the township, and in his business transactions has been successful.  In 1849, he was married to Elizabeth Jane Frost, who died in 1865.  By this marriage he had four children - Samantha B. (wife of W. A. Thomas), Emma Ann, Allie J. and Charlie.  Mr. Ellis  was a second time married to a daughter of Nehemiah and Sarah (Barr) Matthews, who are natives of the Sunny South.  Mr. Matthews  was of English extraction, his wife of German.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  14
  Pleasant Twp. -
A. M. ELLSBERRY

Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  135

  Scott Twp. -
WILLIAM ESPEY, farmer and Justice of the Peace, P. O. New Hope, son of Eli Espey, was born in Indiana in August, 1821.  He received a common school education, and has devoted the greater part of his life to farming, but spent six years in early life at wool carding, and five years as a storekeeper in White Oak Valley.  In connection with his farm operations he operated a threshing machine for thirty seasons.  He owns 141 acres of land, on which he recently completed a handsome residence. In 1846, he married Lorinda, daughter of Samuel Berry, a wealthy and influential
farmer of Pleasant Township. Mr. and Mrs. Espey are both members of the Methodist Church, in which she has been a member since eleven years of age, and in which he has held several offices.  He was appointed Postmaster of White Oak Valley in 1852, and served fourteen years.  He is a Democrat, and now occupies the office of a Justice of the Peace.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  248
  Perry Twp. -
JOSEPH MAIR ETIENNE (deceased), son of John and Margaret (Barber) Mair Etienne, was born in Lorraine, France, in 1811.  In 1830, he came to this country.  He was a tailor by trade, and worked as journeyman in different cities through the Eastern and Western States.  In the spring of 1840, he opened a general store in Vincennes, Ind., which he kept three years.  He was married there in 1842 to Mary Gomean, born in Lorraine, France.  They had five children, two living - Joseph and Elizabeth.  In 1843, they came to this township and opened a general store near where the family now reside.  They continued the business very successfully, and were well liked by the people.  In 1874, they closed, as their family were married and left home.  Mr. Mair Etienne died Mar. 3, 1881, since which time his widow has resided on the homestead.  The family are all members of the Catholic Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  135
  Perry Twp. -
JOSEPH MAIR ETIENNE, farmer, P. O. Vera Cruz, son of Joseph and Mary Mair Etienne, was born in this township, on the farm where he now lives, Apr. 25, 1846.  He was reared on the farm, and was married in this township to Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel and Sarah Work, born in Clermont County, Ohio.  They have two children, born in this township - Mary, born Dec. 9, 1874, and Frances, born Dec. 29, 1880.  Joseph now owns fifty-eight acres of the homestead, on which he has built a fine house.  Himself and family are members of the Catholic Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  135
  Huntington Twp. -
AMOS EVANS (deceased), son of John and Mary (Housh) Evans; was born in Huntington Township.  He was married to Angeline, the daughter of Samuel and Tenie Wilson.  They settled on land now owned by John S. Thompson, and made it a permanent home during his life.  Amos was a member of the Eighty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and enlisted in August, 1862.  He was sent to the front, and saw active service until January, 1863.  At Point Pleasant, W. Va., he shipped with the fleet on the boat B. C. Levi, lashed abreast Silver Side No. 2, and landed in Nashville, Tenn., Fe. 9, 1863, at which place he was left aboard the boat unable to go ashore.  Upon the return of his companions, he was missing, and no trace nor vestige was ever found concerning him.  He enlisted as a musician.  He was the father of six children, three of whom are living - Jane (Thompson), John W. and Jacob.  The deceased are Leban, Griffith and Naomi.  He was a farmer and miller by occupation, and an excellent mechanic.  He was generally successful in business.  The living children reside in this township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  158
  Huntington Twp. -
HON. ANDREW EVANS (deceased).  The deceased, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Huntington Township, Dec. 9, 1809; he was the son of John Evans, Jr., and Mary (Housh) Evans.  John Evans, Jr., was the son of John Evans, Sr., who was born Dec. 1, 1737, and died in Maryland, May 18, 1802, and Hannah (Griffith) Evans,  his wife, who was born Jan. 25, 1738, and died Apr. 27, 1816.  John Evans, Jr., who was born in Nov. 17, 1770, came West in 1792, and located in the vicinity of the Blue Licks in Kentucky.  In the fall of 1800, he came to this township, and purchased 535 acres, where he built a cabin into which he moved his family in the following spring.  His family consisted of eleven children, viz.: Abraham, Benjamin, John, Andrew, Thomas, Amos, William, Hannah, Laban, Diana and Griffith, the latter being the only survivor.  Benjamin became prominently identified with the politics of the county; he was one of the Associate Judges of the county, filled the office of County Auditor from 1829 to 1831, and represented the Fourth Senatorial District in the Senate of the State.  His father, John Evans, Jr., was a vigorous, enterprising man, and served as one of the Commissioners of the county from 1808 to 1826; he was also Township Trustee for many years; and filled other minor offices of the township.  He enlisted as a private in the war of 1812, and participated in the "Lake expedition."  Andrew Evans, the subject of this sketch, spent his boyhood days on the farm, receiving but a meager education, but being a boy of rare intelligence, he availed himself of every opportunity to learn, and succeeded in obtaining a better store of knowledge than could usually be obtained in the imperfect schools of his day.  Upon arriving at a suitable age, he took his place at the forge with his father, who was a blacksmith, and under the latter's instruction soon became a skillful artisan.  Possessing much natural ingenuity, he was enabled to produce with little effort any piece of mechanism his fertile brain devised.  He was married, June 3, 1837, to Mary, daughter of William and Mary (Daniels) Hiett, and by her had the following children: Samuel, whose biography appears in this work; William H. and Abraham F., twins, whose biographies also appear in this work, Indiana; John B., deceased; Amos A., deceased; Mary; Isabella E.; Ann D., deceased; Joseph H. and Lee A., sketches of the latter two also appearing in this work.  Mrs. Evans was born Apr. 21, 1815.  Mr. Evans filled several offices in the township, among which was that of Justice of the Peace; in the twelve consecutive years that he occupied this office, his decrees, judgments and other official acts met with the warmest approbation of the citizens of the township, and he only had to indicate his desire for the office to be re-elected.  In the fall of 1864, he was elected to represent the county in the Legislature of the State, and in this capacity continued during the legislative years of 1864 and 1865.  He was the first Republican incumbent of that office ever elected from Brown County.  The duties of this office were discharged with great precision, and in a manner to reflect honor on the officer as well as credit to his constituents.  His term of service was during the administration of Gov. Brough, and his untiring efforts in behalf of the soldiers and of those dependent on them, met with the warmest praise from the Governor, who spoke of Mr. Evans as a man who forgot self in his interest for others.  Mr. Evans was reared in the old Jacksonian school of Democracy to which party he was a strong adherant until the questions of State Sovereignty and Slavery were agitated, when he renounced his allegiance to that party, and attached himself to the Republicans, who always found in him a ready and enthusiastic partisan.  In his business affairs, he exercised rare good judgment, which with his natural sagacity and perseverance, enabled him to accumulate a comfortable competency.  For nearly three-quarters of a century, he went in and out before the people of this township, and by his kindness, affability and great generosity, he endeared himself to all with whom he came in contact.  He was a man of strong conviction, and expressed his opinions without regard to public sentiment.  With a determined and positive nature, he adhered strictly to the principles of right without regard to the feelings or interests of any.  He was a man whose every act was tempered by kindness and Christian benevolence.  In his death, society lost a kind and courteous gentleman, the community a good citizen, and his family a loving and indulgent parent.  During the latter years of his life, he connected himself to the Huntington Presbyterian Church, in which he became a valued, energetic and consistent member.  He was made a Ruling Elder, at the time he joined the church, and continued to serve the church in that capacity until his death.  The following touching words were suggested to his son, Dr. W. H. Evans, by a night visit to his father's tomb:
     "How softly now the night's shadows fall
      All nature seems at rest;
      Home of the dead, how silent all
      Lie, with my father blest."

Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  155

  Pleasant Twp. -
D. W. C. EVANS, farmer, P. O. Georgetown, was born in Pleasant Township, on the farm he now occupies, one mile south of Georgetown, Dec. 5, 1830.  His father, Elijah Evans, was born in Pennsylvania.  His mother, Lucinda (Curry) Evans, was a native of Rockingham County, Va.  Her father, Robert Curry, emigrated from Virginia to Brown County in 1801, and settled on the 1,000 acre survey of Maj. James Curry, his uncle, from whom he purchased the patent for the land.  The subject of this sketch owns 130 acres of this tract, and lives here with his sister.  He was the ninth of a family of ten children - William (deceased, who was a farmer), Phebe, (deceased, who was the wife of W. McClure),  Robert (deceased, Sarah, wife of James Henderson, of Hamilton County), Jemima, Elizabeth, Albert G. (deceased), Mary Louisa (wife of R. D. Hewitt), D. W. C. and Judia Ann (wife of William S. Laycock).  All the children lived t attain their majority, and all were members of the Christian Church.  D. W. C. has made farming the business of his life, and is greatly attached to it.  He takes pride in keeping about him good horses.  His political principles are Democratic.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  15
  Pleasant Twp. -
DUNCAN EVANS, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in 1826, and raised in Pleasant Township, this county.  His father, John B. Evans, was born in Kentucky in 1800, and in 1801 came with his parents to this township, settling four miles south of Georgetown, where he was raised and spent his life as a farmer.  John B. was married, in 1823, to Sarah Moore, a native of Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Jonathan Moroe who emigrated to Brown County in 1805.  Of their ten children seven are now living, five in Pleasant Township, one in Lewis Township, and one a physician in Colorado.  Duncan is living on the old place; he learned the blacksmith trade in early life, and worked it at six years.  In 1850, he was married to Mary A. Martin, a native of Brown County.  She was born in 1832, and is a daughter of Samuel Martin.  They have had eleven children, of whom the following survive:  Emma F. (wife of J. J. Warner), Louella, Charlie, Sallie, Mollie and Jennie D.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  15
  Union Twp. -
J. H. EVANS, farmer, P. O. Ripley, was born on the old Evans homestead, in Huntington Township, Feb. 15, 1854, and is a son of the Hon. Andrew Evans of whom mention is made in the biographical department of Huntington Township.  He was reared on the farm, and in the district schools received a good, practical education.  He remained at the old home until his twenty-second birthday, Feb. 15, 1876, at which time He was married to Miss Louisa B. the daughter of Samuel Dragoo ( a son of Samuel Dragoo, old settler ).  After his marriage, he remained one year on the home farm, when he removed to his present place of residence.  He owns 269 acres of well improved and highly cultivated land.  He and his wife are members of the Huntington Presbyterian Church to which they have been connected for some time.  He is also a member of the I. O. O. F., Union Lodge of Ripley, No. 118.  They have three children, namely,  Charles P., Ross H. and Archie L.  Mrs. Evans was born Mar. 22, 1857, in Union Township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  62
  Huntington Twp. -
LEE A. EVANS, farmer, P. O. Hiett, was born on the old home farm Oct. 16, 1858, and is a son of the late Hon. Andrew Evans.  His early life was passed on the farm and in the district schools, where he received the rudiments of an education which was developed by a course of study at the Lebanon Normal Institute.  He has taught two terms in the schools of this and of Union Townships, and was successful as an educator.  He is a young man of fine musical talent.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  158
  Pleasant Twp. -
DR. S. P. EVANS, Georgetown, was born in Jackson Township, Brown County, Mar. 23, 1823.  His father, Samuel Evans, was a native of Monongalia County, Va., who located at Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1811 or 1812.  During the first general call for volunteers in the war of 1812, he offered his services, and served six months as a Second Lieutenant, under Capt. Abraham Sheppard of Huntington Township, this county.  In December, 1813, he located on the farm in Jackson Township, where our subject was born.  He was there engaged in agricultural pursuits all through life, and died the death of an honored pioneer, Mar. 5, 1864.  Dr. Evans' mother was Harriet Wilson, who departed this life Nov. 4, 1855.  Our subject is one of a family of eight children, four of what are living; he passed his boyhood and early manhood days on the old homestead, remaining there till November, 1851, when he married Caroline Smith, a native of Adams County, Ohio.  Soon after marriage, he removed to Winchester, Adams Co., Ohio, where he resided till the fall of 1854; he there studied dentistry, and enjoyed a good practice for over twelve years.  In 1864, he removed back to Jackson Township, purchased the home farm of 355 acres, and there resided until June, 1878, when he removed to Georgetown.  In the fall of 1880, he purchased his present property, where himself and wife intend to pass the remainder of life.  In his agricultural operations and the practice of his profession, Dr. Evans has been moderately successful, and accumulated enough to live in peace and comfort.  He was an original member and organizer of the Christian Union Church of Jackson Township, and has church.  They have two children - Worth R., an attorney at law, of Georgetown, and E. W., studying medicine with his father.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  14
  Huntington Twp. -
SAMUEL EVANS, farmer and Justice of the Peace, P. O. Hiett.  The gentleman, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in this township Apr. 18, 1834, and is a son of the late Hon. Andrew Evans.  At the age of thirteen years, he began learning the blacksmith trade, and served an apprenticeship of seven years.  He followed the trade and milling until Feb. 18, 1862, at which time he volunteered in Company F, Seventieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was soon after in the front; he was Assistant Engineer in the construction of Fort Pickering; when completed, he was detailed armorer of the armory at Memphis, Tenn., until Nov. 26, 1862.  On May 11, 1863, at Moscow, Tenn., he was detailed to assist in recruiting  a colored regiment, which was sworn into service June 6, 1863, our subject becoming Second Lieutenant of Company B, Fifty-ninth United States Colored Infantry.  Oct. 2, of the same year, he was promoted for meritorious service to a First Lieutenancy, and assigned to Company H.  This regiment did good service, and its officers and men were always cool and courageous.  In the winter of 1864 and 1865, he was detailed to command one hundred men to help suppress a guerrilla warfare, in which he had many hair breadth escapes.  Aug. 23, 1865, he was detailed Provost Marshal at Jackson, Tenn., and had command of the post, and had charge of the Freedman's bureau, serving there until Jan. 25, 1866, when he was mustered out of service, and was discharged Jan. 31, 1866.  His war record is one that reflects great credit on him for bravery and the dauntless courage he always exhibited in combat.  He passed through a host of battles, but was never seriously injured.  Upon his return to civil life, he resumed the labors he had left when he entered the service, and his labors have been crowned with success; he has been identified with many of the offices of the township; was elected Justice of the Peace in 1872; a position he has since held, with the exception of one year (1878).  In settling up estates, he has had a large experience - probably more than any other man of his age in the county; he is a member of the George B. Bailey Post of the Grand Army of the Republic; also a worthy member in the lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, which he joined in 1879.  On Oct. 24, 1867, he was married to Margaret E., the daughter of William and Elizabeth (Cochran) Shelton, who has borne him five children, viz., Ulysses S. G., Mary L., Andrew W., Joseph S. and Charles H.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  156
  Union Twp. -
WILLIAM B. EVANS, banker, Ripley.  The subject of this sketch is the only child of Daniel P. and Anna (Barnett) Evans.  He was born and educated in Brown County, and, at the time of his father's death, assumed charge of his business affairs in the Farmers' National Bank, and soon after was chosen to the position of Teller, where he has since presided with the dignity and honor of his inheritance.  Although a young man, Mr. E. is held in high estimation by the people, and those with whom he is associated.  A thorough business man, his abilities and judgment are recognized in public and private enterprises, as well as in affairs of a business relation.  He was selected by the people as a Representative to the Board of Education in April, 1882, and has always taken an active interest in educational and church advancement.  From youth, he has been associated with the Presbyterian Church of Ripley, and a co-worker in all benevolent operations.  His father, with George (a brother), came to this country in 1811.  Both were raised in Bucks County, Penn., but came from Lexington, Ky., where they had resided a short time.  Daniel P. became engaged as clerk in his brother's store in Ripley, and subsequently became engaged in the mercantile trade, which he followed until the organization of the Farmers' State Bank, of which he was the founder.  In this institution, he became closely identified, and devoted the entire remainder of his life to its advancement and success.  He was a man of sterling worth, irreproachable character, and was highly esteemed and beloved in the circles of his business and the extended acquaintance in which he moved.  He was prominently identified in the Presbyterian Church, and felt a deep interest in church and educational affairs.  His death which occurred in 1877, removed from the community a man whose presence had always been felt, an associate, a Christian and a man.  His estimable widow survives his loss, and resides with her son, in this city.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  62
  Huntington Twp. -
WILLIAM H. EVANS, physician and surgeon, P. O. Hiett, Dr. W. H. and Abraham F. Evans were born Oct. 8, 1835, in Huntington Township and were twin sons of the late Hon. Andrew Evans, to whose sketch the reader is referred.  The boyhood days of each were passed on their father's farm and together they attended the neighborhood school which afforded them the advantages of a common school education which was developed by a course of study in a local grammer school, which completed their literary education.  They took a part in the performances of the labor on the farm, and during the winter season were engaged in a flouring mill then operated by their father.  Thus their boyhood passed until they arrived at the age of maturity.  At this period, and A. F. began the study of medicine.  Sept. 23, 1857, W. H. was united in marriage to Amanda, the daughter of Robert and Johanna (Cooper) Scott, of this county.  The avocation of milling and farming he followed until 1860, at which time he removed to West Point, Tippecanoe Co., Ind., where be following farming one season.   During this time (November 1, 1860), he lost by death his wife, aged twenty-two years five months and thirteen days.  Two children had been born to them, namely, Samuel W., born July 12, 1858, and Andrew, born Oct. 19, 1860.  After the death of his wife, he disposed of his effects and with his two motherless babes, returned to his former home.  The following year his two children died - Samuel, Oct. 6, 1861, and Andrew A., Sept. 19, 1861.  Taking up the study of medicine with Dr. Guthrie, a physician of Aberdeen, he prosecuted his research in the science of medicine until his enlistment Aug. 12, 1862, in Company E, of the Eighty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  In the organization of the regiment, he was appointed a duty Sergeant.  Soon after, the regiment removed to the front, and he followed the fortunes of the same in all of the marching and countermarching, and was a participant in the numerous engagements of the regiment up to Aug. 15, 1863, at which time he was commissioned Hospital Steward of his regiment.  This dates prior a few days to the memorable and sanguine battle of Chickamauga, during which he was engaged in carrying from the field of carnage those of our wounded boys who fell in that frightful holocaust of death.  His knowledge of surgery enabled him to be of inestimable value of many whose wounds were of such a character that would admit of no delay in dressing and careful attention.  For his heroism and strict attention to the performances of his dangerous and arduous labors upon this field and many other of a like character, he received from many of his superiors, valuable testimonials for meritorious conduct and unflinching bravery that carried him into the most dangerous places in the discharge of duty.  At Chickamauga, his regiment was fearfully decimated, coming from out the conflict with its banner scarred and tattered by the leaden missiles of death which laid many of its rank and file in a soldier's grave in a field they so nobly fought to win.  Many more only escaped the instant death of bullet and saber thrust, but to fall into the hands of merciless and ungenerous foes, and to suffer incarceration in the awful prison pens, whose torture was worse than the inflicted punishments of the old inquisition.  Following in the wake of this battle came the hotly contested actions of Missionary Ridge, Rocky Face, Tunnel Hill, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro and Sherman's march to the seas, in all of which the regiment was engaged.  Dec. 24, 1864, he was detailed Hospital Steward of the Fourteenth Corps, and remained in Savannah until the following March, when the war closed.  He joined the army at Goldsboro and was discharged near Washington D. C., June 7, 1865.  Upon his return to civil life, he read medicine with John W. Guthrie, of Aberdeen, until October following, when he went to Cleveland, Ohio, to Charity Hospital Medical College, and attended lectures there under the tutorship of Prof. R. N. Barr, then Surgeon General of Ohio.  He received a unanimous vote for the degree of Doctor of Medicine and was graduated Feb. 21, 1866, and honored with a diploma.  He returned to this township and began the practice.  He married Maria, the daughter of Hon. John T. Gaines, Dec. 5, 1867.  He moved to Hiett Sept. 30, 1868.  To them five children have been born - W. T. Sherman, and Ph. H. Sheridan, twins, born Oct. 1, 1868; Esther Early, born Aug. 22, 1874; Minnie Myrtle, born Feb. 16, 1876, and Wylie Weber, born Nov. 30, 1878.  He has a house and a lot of six and one-half acres; he joined the Christian Church at Bethlehem, in 1856, and was the first of his family to join the church; he was a licentiate minister of the Ohio Christian Conference for twelve years, when he resigned; he was the Republican nominee for Sheriff in 1870, and was defeated, the county being largely Democratic; he was the Republican nominee of his (Fourth) district for State Senator in 1881, and was defeated by a reduced Democratic majority; he has practiced his profession successfully and was always temperate.  Dr. A. F. Evans, deceased, twin brother to Dr. W. H. Evans, was a graduate of the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio.  Mar. 7, 1860, he was married to Eliza, the daughter of Charles Kimble, of this county, after which he established himself in the practice of medicine at Pleasant Hill, Ind., till the spring of 1861, when he was taken sick and was greatly reduced physically.  His brother, W. H. brought him to Aberdeen, Ohio, where he died May 14, 1862.  Two children were born to them - Luna and Anna F.  He was connected to the order of Masonry, and was an accepted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  157
  Eagle Twp. -
CAREY C. EYLER, farmer, P. O. Fincastle, was born in March, 1838, in Eagle Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  His parents were Henry and Mary Eyler, of whom we have made mention in his work.  He was reared to man's estate on a farm, and received a fair English education.  In December, 1861, he married Mary E., daughter of Joseph and Melsena Rees, whose Sketch appears in this work.  They have five living children, viz.:  Amos L., Joseph C., Henry W., Inez W. and Wellington R.  Mr. Eyler has served as Land Appraiser of Eagle Township, also as Treasurer; he is the owner of 100 acres of land in a fine state of cultivation, located in the northern portion of the township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  225
  Jackson Twp. -
JOHN W. EYLER, farmer, P. O. South Fincastle.  Henry Eyler, father of our subject, was born Sept. 25, 1801, in Adams County, Ohio.  In 1825, he married Mary Miller, by whom he had nine children, of whom six are still living, viz., Joseph M., John W., Carrie C., Henry B. Hugh L., and Latha J.  About the year 1834, he moved to Brown County, and settled in Eagle Township, near Fincastle, where he remained till, perhaps, 1865, when he moved to Jackson Township, north of Carlisle Village, where he remained until his death in August, 1869.  He had served as Trustee of Eagle Township, was a member of the Christian Church, and his death, was a source of regret to all who knew him.  John W. Eyler our subject, was born Sept. 2, 1832, in New Market Township, Highland County; he was reared on a farm, and received but a limited education.  In May, 1854, he married Nancy McVey, daughter of Solomon McVey (deceased).  To them have been born three children, two of whom are still living - Emma J. and Rachel E.  (married to Dr. Baird of Fincastle).  In the autumn of 1871, he moved to the northern portion of Jackson Township, where he still resides.  He served as Trustee of Jackson Township in 1881, and was re-elected in 1882.  He is of a pleasant agreeable disposition, and has the spirit of a true gentleman.  He is the owner of 100 acres of land, pleasantly located, and in a good state of cultivation.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 276

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