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BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
History & Genealogy

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BIOGRAPHIES

Source::
HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches,
Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of
Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the
Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of
Brown County; Constitution of the
United States, Miscellaneous
Matters, Etc., Etc.
ILLUSTRATED
Published:  Chicago:  W. H. Beers & Co.
1883
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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  Clark Twp. -
JAMES C. DAVIS, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, was born in Clark Township, Brown County, Ohio, Oct. 29, 1854.  His grandfather, Hugh Davis, was born in Ireland, but of German Irish decent.  His maternal grandfather, Robert Alden, was a pioneer of this county.  His parents were James F. and Elizabeth (Allen) Davis, natives of Pleasant Township, in this county; the former was Commissioner of Brown County for six years.  The subject of this notice grew to manhood on a farm, and has been engaged in agricultural pursuits the greater part of his life.  In 1872, he enlisted in the Fourth U. S. Infantry, of the regular army, and while in Wyoming Territory was wounded by the Indiana, and was subsequently discharged.  He was married, in 1878 to Mary daughter of H. B. and Aseath (Sharp) Sidwell, the former a native of Ohio, and the latter of Virginia.  They have one child, Inie LeahMrs. Davis' grandfather was John Sidwell.  Mr. Davis and wife are well respected in the community where they reside.  The latter is a member of the M. E. Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  182
  Lewis Twp. -
BENJAMIN F. DAY, farmer, P. O. Feesburg, is a son of Mark and Lina E. (Carter) Day, who were natives of Pennsylvania, and in early life came to Bracken County, Ky., where they married, in 1801, and eleven years later, moved to Ohio with five children, viz.:  William, Asa, Susan, Anna and John C.  Mark and family settled on F. Taylor's survey, on the farm now owned by our subject, and were the first permanent settlers on the farm, now owned by our subject, and were the first permanent settlers on the farm, which, of course, was all in the wilds of nature.  They soon leveled the trees, and opened a spot on which to erect a log hut, wherein they moved and began life in earnest.  It was not long until several acres of tillable land was the result of their own labor, as they had invested all their means in the 100 acres, and could not hire help.  Mark lived to see most of his farm under cultivation, and endured many privations.  During life he possessed good health, and was of large and robust frame.  In 1851, he died, aged nearly eighty-one years. His wife survived until about 1871, when she, too, entered her final rest.  Of their fifteen children, thirteen became heads of families, and six are now living, viz.:  Benjamin F., Mary E., Joseph L., Conrod B., George W. and Malinda. Benjamin F. is the eldest living, and few at the age of sixty-seven years can say as he can—that he was born and raised on, and now owns, the home farm, never having resided anywhere save on the farm of his birth.  It consists of 122 acres, and is fairly improved.  Their buildings have been destroyed by fire several times.  He is one of the well-to-do farmers of Lewis Township, and politically is a Democrat, as was his father before him.  He and wife are both members of the Christian Church, and are the parents of six children, of whom five are now living, viz.: Maria J., Mary F., William A., Mark E. and Samuel E.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 98
  Pleasant Twp. -
HUGH P. DAY, farmer, P. O. Georgetown, was born in Pleasant Township, Mar. 30, 1837, son of Isaac and Miriam (Mann) Day.  They were natives of Brown County and of English descent.  Mr. Day is the fifth child of a family of seven.  He is engaged in farming on his place of 108¾ acres, situated one and one-fourth miles east of Georgetown.  His educational instruction was what the common schools afforded.  In the year 1874, he was united in wedlock to Sarah Blair, a native of this county, and daughter of James Blair.  Their marriage has been blessed with two children - Marion and Margaret.  Mr. and Mrs. Day are members of the Presbyterian Church at Georgetown.  His political preferences are with the Democratic party.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  11
  Pike Twp. -
JAMES DAY
, farmer, P. O. Mount Oreb, was born in Brown County, Ohio, Jan. 11, 1817, and is a son of Christopher and Hannah Day, who were married in 1808.  James Day is one among the oldest pioneers of Brown County now living, having been sixty-five years old the 11th of January last (1882).  He was raised to farm life in Brown County, Ohio, and received a common school education; he remained at home until twenty-four years of age, when he married Phoebe Kendall, after which he engaged in farming for himself, and is now successfully cultivating his farm in Pike Township, which consists of 108 acres of land.  Nine children have been born to them, of whom eight now survive - Augustus, Caroline, Christopher, Leban, Charles, Benjamin P., Hester and RachelJames Day's record is such that his children may point to it with pride, and they may well profit by his experience.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  216
  Pike Twp. -
JAMES M. DAY
, retired farmer, P. O. Mt. Oreb.  This gentleman is one of the oldest native and continuous residents of the county now living, having been sixty-eight years old the 23d of May last (1882).  He owns 100 acres of land where he now resides, located partly in Pike and Scott Townships.  He is a son of Mark and Elizabeth Day, who settled in Brown County, Ohio, in a very early day.  James M. Day was raised a farmer; thus he has continued through life, always taking a great interest in agricultural pursuits.  On the 15th of October, 1835, he was united in marriage with Lizzie Brooks.  Mr. Day has served as Township Trustee and member of the local School Board a number of years.  Mr. and Mrs. Day are the parents of ten children, of whom five now survive - Lucinda, Eliza, Alfred, Mary Etta and James W.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  215
  Green Twp. -
JOHN C. DAY
, farmer, P. O. Mount Oreb.  Our subject was born in Williamsburg Township, Clermont County, Sept. 25, 1828.  He is a son of Samuel and Miriam Day of whom we have made mention in this work.  This gentleman has from his youth up devoted his time to agricultural pursuits.  On Nov. 6, 1856, was solemnized his wedding, he leading to the marriage altar, Miss Sarah J. League who was born Mar. 13, 1840, and a daughter of Coleman W. and Nancy League.  By this union there have been born six children, five of whom are now living - Emma E., Coleman H., Mary A., Susan P. and Samuel B.  Mr. Day is a member of the I. O. O. F., Lodge No. 291, at Mount Oreb, and at present he is engaged in teh manufacturing of tile for draining purposes.  He is the owner of 100 acre of land, under a good state of cultivation.  Coleman W. League, father of Mrs. Day, was born in Virginia in 1810, and in 1814, with his widowed mother and uncle, he came to Clark Township, Clinton County, where he remained until January, 1845, when he came to Brown County; his mother died in 1846.  He married Nancy Moon, daughter of Samuel and Martha B. Moon, and by this union had three children, two now living—Elizabeth A., now Mrs. Jackson Crawford; and the wife of our subject.   He died in January, 1875; his widow survives him, now living in Green Township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 261
  Pleasant Twp. -
JOHN CLINTON DAY, farmer, was born in Pleasant Township, this county, Dec. 20, 1831.  He is a son of Isaac E. and Miriam (Mann) Day, natives of Brown County.  His father was a prominent farmer of Pleasant Township, and resolved to give his son a good education.  He was sent to the Ohio Wesleyan University, at Delaware, where he remained some time.  He then returned home, and engaged in agricultural pursuits, which he has made his life work.  He owns 150 acres of good land, the result of years of toil and industry.  Mr. Day is a Democrat in politics, and has been a School Director for fifteen years in succession.  He was united in marriage in 1858, to Mary E., daughter of G. H. Bahrer, a native of Brown County.  The latter is of German and English parentage.  Mr. Day and wife have eleven children, all at home - Edgar E., Leonora F., Eva A., Minnie E., Richard Lee, Frank O., Julian E., Ernet E., Cora E. and Jasper Alwin (twins), and Lula Dell.  Mrs. Day is a member of the Disciples' Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  10
  Union Twp. -
JOSEPH B. DAY, farmer, P. O. Ripley, son of John Day and Rachel (Dye) Day, born in Pleasant Township Mar. 15, 1815.  His father was a native of Maryland, and came to Brown County in early times; his mother's parents, John and Ray Dye, were also natives of Maryland.  They migrated to this countyin 1795, on horseback, and located in Pleasant Township.  Mr. Dye was a Revolutionary patriot, he having served from the beginning to the termination of the American Revolution, under Gen. George Washington.  Our subject was reared a "farmer boy," and received only a common school education.  In 1841, he removed to Union Township, and, in 1857, located on the farm that he now occupies.  He was first married to Miss Mary Shults, daughter of Jacob Shults, by whom he had one child.  Mary J., born Jan. 4, 1842, wife of William Day, of Kansas.  Mrs. Day departed this life January, 1842, and Apr. 6, 1847, he was united in marriage with Elizabeth W. Tally, a native of Mason County, Ky., and a daughter of William and Martha Tully.  She was born Jan. 25, 1827.  Of eleven children by this marriage ten are living, viz., John N., born Feb. 20, 1848, married Maggie W. Harrison, and have three children - Daisy L., Joseph E. and Ada W., Charles W. born Aug. 5, 1861, married Luella Burgett; Martha F., born Dec. 8, 1852, wife of Byron A. Jones; Elizabeth A., born Mar. 23, 1854, wife of Thomas N. Cahill; Joseph E., born Nov. 16, 1855, married Elizabeth J. Crawford; Rachel A., born Feg. 3, 1858; Matilda A., born Jan. 21, 1860, wife of J. B. Frost; Giles L., born May 15, 1862; George H., born Nov. 18, 1865; and Luetta, born Apr. 6, 1873; William T. born Oct. 4, 1849, and died Apr. 11, 1875.  When fifteen years of age, Mr. Day made his first trip by flat-boat to New Orleans with Capt. John Allison, of Ripley.  He continued flat-boat transportation to the Crescent City till of age, when he engaged in farming, which he has since followed.  In 1839, he engaged in buying and selling horses, and for fifteen years was the leading horse-dealer of Brown County.  The leading feature of his avocation is tobacco-growing.  He and his wife are members of the New-Light Church of Pisgah.  Politically, he is Democratic.  He owns a farm of 188 acres, and has been successful.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 58
  Green Twp. -
JOSEPH E. H. DAY
, farmer and teacher, P. O. Mount Oreb. The subject of this sketch was born in September, 1833, in Clermont County, Ohio.  In his youth, he received a good English education, which enabled him to teach school for probably twenty-five years.  In August, 1861, he enlisted in the Twenty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company K, and was attached to the Army of the Tennesee.  He participated in the battles of New Madrid, the siege of Corinth, Iuka, and the siege of Atlanta, where he received a wound on the right foot, which disabled him for some time; he was honorably discharged in August, 1864.  In May, 1868, he married Susan Sweet, daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Sweet.  To them have been born four children, viz., Maggie, James F., Walter H. and Grace.  In 1868, he went to Omaha, where he spent nearly one year, then to Kansas, where he remained eight years.  He subsequently returned to Brown County, and is now located in Green Township.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and contributes liberally to enterprises which prove beneficial to the county.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 262
  Green Twp. -
SAMUEL A. DAY
, farmer, P. O. Mt. Oreb, was born May 24, 1845, in Green Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  His parents are Samuel and Miriam Day.  He has, from his youth up, been engaged in agricultural pursuits.  In January, 1862, he enlisted in the Forty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which formed a part of the Army of the Tennessee, and subsequently became attached to the Army of the Gulf.  He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, the siege of Vicksburg and Mansfield.  At the latter battle, in April, 1864, he was taken a prisoner by the Confederates, and confined in Camp Ford Prison, Texas, for six and one-half months, when an exchange of prisoners took place, which secured for him his freedom. He again joined his regiment, which was subsequently consolidated with the Eighty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which he became one of the supernumerary non-commissioned officers.  He received an honorable discharge in January, 1865.  On Jan. 2, 1866, he married Lucretia Bryant, by whom he has one child— Lizzie A. Mr. Day is the owner of thirty and a quarter acres of land located in the southern portion of Green Township, and is a member of the M. E. Church. Samuel Day, father of our subject, was born in November, 1802, in Clermont County.  He married Miriam Hayward, by whom he had ten children, nine of whom are still living—George W., John C., Mary E., Joseph E. H., Harvey W., Susan J., Samuel A., David L. and Hanson L.  In 1832 or 1833, Mr. Day located in the southern portion of Green Township, Brown County, where he at present resides.  He has served as Township Trustee, Justice of the Peace and Township Clerk, and is the owner of 216 acres of land.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 262
  Clark Twp. -
W. H. DAY, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, was born in this township, Oct. 31, 1841.  His parents were Jesse and Martha (Lambert) Day, the former a native of North Carolina, and the latter of Ohio.  The former located 127½ acres of land in Clark Township, where he resided till death.  The subject of this notice was reared and educated in Clark Township, receiving the benefits of a good English education.  He has been engaged in agricultural pursuits during life, and has been fairly successful.  He was united in marriage in 1867, to Emma, daughter of Adam and Naomi Applegate, who were early settlers of Brown County.  One child was sent to bless this union, a son, Jesse E.  Mrs. Day departed this life in 1879.  She was a consistent member of the M. E. Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  182
  Pleasant Twp. -
A. W. DAVIS, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Higginsport, was born Aug. 26, 1826, in Pleasant Township, four and one-half miles south of Georgetown, the son of I. and Lydia (Parker) Davis.  His father was born in Kentucky, of German parentage; his mother in Ohio, of Scottish descent.  His grandfather, Issachar Davis, settled on the farm A. W. now occupies, in 1802, and his father occupied it after his grandfather's death.  On the farm are three apple trees planted by Issachar Davis in 1805; they still bear fruit once in two years.  Mr. Davis has turned his attention to agriculture, as his ancestry did before him.  He is Republican in politics and a member of the Christian Church.  His residence was destroyed by fire in 1876, and was rebuilt at a cost of $1,800.  He was married in 1849 to Amanda, daughter of Forsyth McCanaughy.  Their children are Belle J., Edward E., Anna L., Lulu J., Carrie F.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  10
  Pike Twp. -
ELMORE DEAN, farmer, P. O. Surryville, was born in Clark Township, Brown County, Ohio, Aug. 1, 1836, and is a son of Isaac and Rebecca Dean, who were both natives of Pennsylvania.  They emigrated to Ohio in an early day, and settled in Clark Township, Brown County, where they remained until their death—Isaac died in 1864 and Rebecca in January, 1872.  Elmore engaged in farming for himself as renter at the age of twenty-one years; this he continued until he purchased eighty-four acres of land in Clark Township, and, thinking that he could better his location, he sold and bought 133 acres in Pike Township in 1867—the farm where he now resides.  Through Mr. Dean’s perseverance and industry, his farm is in a high state of cultivation.  He was united in marriage with Jemima M. Smith Oct. 3, 1859; he is a member of the Masonic order, at New Harmony, Brown County, and has been Township Trustee of Pike Township; he acquired a common school education.  Mr. and Mrs. Dean are the parents of seven children, of whom five are living—George C., Florence B., Edwin E., Don T. and Carrie E.  Mr. Dean is still actively engaged in farming, and enjoys the confidence of all who know him.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 216
  Pleasant Twp. -
BENJAMIN DELANEY is one of the oldest and most prominent colored citizens of Brown County.  He is a son of Benjamin and Juda (Rogers) Delaney, and is about eighty years of age.  His father was a slave, and very old when the Emancipation Proclamation set him free.  Our subject was raised in Brown County, and in early life was employed as a hand on the river boats.  He has been a farmer since, and his economy and perseverance are fitly represented in the farm of 109 acres which he possesses.  He is Republican, politically, and has been a School Director.  Mr. Delaney married Emily Harrison who bore him eight children, five living:  Amanda, wife of George Hughes, a blacksmith, of Pleasant Township; Josephine, wife of Edward Jennison, a farmer, of Union Township; Sallie, wife of Caleb Snead, a farmer, of Union Township; Martha, wife of James Brown, a farmer, of Pleasant Township; and Luella, wife of Harrison Payne, a farmer, of Pleasant Township.  Mr. Delaney educated all of his children at home.  Himself and wife have lived together about fifty years.  She is a member of the M. E. Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  11
  Clark Twp.
HARMON DEMARIS, farmer, P. O. Maple, son of John and Abigail (Shaw) Demaris, and was born in Clermont Co., Ohio, May 19, 1820.  His parents were natives of New Jersey, and came to Ohio about 1816.  Mr. Demaris was raised on a farm and was married in January, 1845, to Mary, daughter of William and Martha Turner.  They had born them seven children, viz.:  William, born Oct. 5, 1845, married Mary Jane Murry, and died at the age of twenty-eight years.  John Elijah, born Oct. 30, 1847, married Edna Leach; Martha Jane, born Dec. 19, 1849, wife of Isaac Abbott; Sophia, born Mar. 19, 1852; James Thornton born Jan. 20, 1854, married to Elizabeth Jane Crawford; Charles W., born Jun. 2, 1856, married to Matilda, daughter of Richard Ride; Henry, twin of Charles, died at eighteen days.  His wife Mary, died Sept. 15, 1864, and he married Elizabeth, daughter of Owen and Ruth Forkner, Jan. 29, 1866, who was born in Grant County, Ky., June 11, 1841; she bore him three children - Tena,  born May 13, 1868, Ephraim, born Mar. 12, 1870, and Jesse, July 8, 1873.  Mr. Demaris is a member of DeSoto Lodge, 3874, I. O. O. F., since 1870.  An honest industrious, quiet citizen.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  182
  Pleasant Twp. -
WILLIAM H. P. DENNY, editor of the Georgetown Gazette, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, June 3, 1811, and was the son of George and Sarah (Higgins) Denny.  His father, George Denny, one of the first printers and editors of Ohio, emigrated from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati before the close of last century, and worked as a printer on  the Centinel of the Northeast Territory, the first newspaper printed at Cincinnati, afterward on the Western Star, at Lebanon, for Judge John McLean, and later, was editor and publisher of the Scioto Gazette, at Chillicothe, from 1806 to 1816.  George Denny and his wife both died on the same night at Wilmington, Ohio, in 1823.  Young William, when only nine years of age, commenced learning the art of printing in the office of the Ohio Interior Gazette, published at Zenia by Kendall & Denny.  In 1821, he removed with his father to Wilmington, and set typhoon the Galaxy until the death of his father, when the paper passed into the hands of Hon. J. N. Reynolds, with whom he worked for a short time.  In the winter of 1824, he was an apprentice to Cameron & Sellers, in the publication of the Western Star, at Lebanon.  Subsequently, he worked as a printer at Xenia, and at Cincinnati, on the Crisis and Emporium, at Columbus on the State Journal, and again at the Cincinnati on the Liberty Hall and Cincinnati Gazette.  In 1829, then in his eighteenth year, he commenced at Wilmington the Clintonian, which he continued until 1831, when he sold out to John Crichfield, and removed to Louisville, Ky., and became foreman for George D. Prentice, of the Louisville Journal.  He remained in that city until 1834.  In 1835, in partnership with Jacob Morris, he published the Western Star at Lebanon.  For twenty-six years he was connected with the Star as apprentice, editor and publisher.  From 1846 until 1858, he was the sole publisher of that paper.  From 1858 until 1861, he published the Dayton Daily and Weekly Gazette.  In 1861, he started the Circleville Union, which he published for six years.  In 1871, he purchased the Wilmington Journal, and continued it until 1878, when he returned to Lebanon and started the Lebanon Gazette, which he disposed of, and in 1880, established the Georgetown Gazette, which he still publishes.  While a resident of Warren County, he represented Warren and Greene Counties in the Ohio Senate in the years 1841-42 and 1843-44.  In 1856, he was a Presidential Elector on the Fremont ticket, and was Postmaster at Circleville from 1865 to 1872.  In politics, he has been an Anti-slavery Whig and a Republican.  Mr. Denny is probably the oldest newspaper man in the State of Ohio, having been engaged in the printing business, with but brief intervals, for sixty-two years, and as an editor for more than fifty years.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  11
  Clark Twp. -
FRANK DE VORE, farmer, P. O. Georgetown, was born in Pleasant Township, Brown County, Ohio, Mar. 20, 1847, he was the son of Abner and Louise Maria (Gardner) De Vore, natives of Ohio, to which State his grandfather was a pioneer.  Our subject received a good common school education, and attended the National Normal University at Lebanan, Ohio, from which he graduated in 1865.  He was raised on a farm and has been a farmer all his life, with the exception of ten years after leaving school when he was engaged in selling sewing machines.  He was married in 1867 to Sarah L. Richards, a daughter of Charles Richards, a native of Clark Township.  This union was blessed with seven children, Viz.: Louise M., Henry A., Joseph L. (deceased.,) Lillie F., Bertha, Edward and CharlesMr. and Mrs. De Vore are members of the M. E. Church.  He is a Republican and a member of the Grange.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  182
  Franklin Twp. -
DAVID G. DEVORE, retired lawyer, P. O. Georgetown, was born in Union Township, Brown Co., Ohio, Mar. 31, 1808.  He is the seventh of ten children born to David and Alice (Mann) Devore.  His father, a native of Washington County, Penn., followed agricultural pursuits through life.  He moved to Kentucky at an early date, and settled at Kenton's Station.  In 1800, he removed to Union Township, Brown Co., Ohio, where he resided until his demise.  Many of his ancestors were active participants in the Revolutionary struggle, notably, Nicholas Devore, his paternal grandfather, who was one of the famous Morgan rifleman, and an actor during Crawford's defeat.  His mother was a native of New Jersey, and a daughter of Christopher Mann, a prominent pioneer of Kentucky, and Brown County, Ohio.  Until his nineteenth year was attained, Mr. Devore worked on a farm at the old homestead, on Red Oak Creek, Union Township, Brown County.  During those years, he received a liberal education in various select schools, and in 1827, entered the Ohio University at Athens.  There he diligently pursued a course of classical studies; was graduated in 1831, with the first honors of his class.  He then returned to Brown County and began the reading of law under the supervision of Archibald Leggett, a prominent attorney of Ripley, Ohio.  After continuing his studies with this preceptor for about six months, he moved to George town, where he resumed his reading under the guidance of Thomas L. Hamer, an able pioneer attorney of this county.  In 1833, he passed the required examination and was admitted to the bar.  Hon Thomas Corwin was on that occasion one of the examiners.  Entering at once on the active practice of his profession in partnership with Thomas L. Hamer, at Georgetown, he, in conjunction with his associate, rapidly secured an extensive legal practice.  In 1833, he was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Brown County, and in this position served faithfully for two years.  Of late years, he has almost retired from general practice, and has interested himself in agricultural pursuits.  He resides with his son, James M., on the farm northeast of Georgetown.  Politically, Mr. Devore is a supporter of Greenback principles, but cast his first vote in favor of Gen. Andrew Jackson.  Religiously, he is a member of the Christian Union organization.  He has always been a firm friend to the temperance cause, and has never connected himself with any secret societies.  While in the practice of his chosen profession, Mr. Devore has always acknowledged to be one of the ablest members of the bar of Brown County.  Mr. Devore was united in marriage, May 24, 1837, to Rebecca Murray, a native of Morgan County, Ohio, and a daughter of Thomas Murray (then deceased), an early pioneer of that county.  Eight children were born to this union, five living - Lucy (wife of William Snedaker), David (clerk in the Cincinnati dry goods house), James M. (on the home farm), Rebecca J. (a teacher in the Georgetown public schools), and Sarah Phillips (at Glendale, Ohio).  Mrs. Devore departed this life Aug. 12, 1866.  She was a consistent member of the M. E. Church, and a faithful attendant on its services.  Mr. Devore's grandfather died at the advanced age of ninety-seven years, and a year previous to his death, raised, by his own individual labor, over four hundred bushels of corn; his father lived to be eighty-seven, and his mother eighty-four years old, and as our subject is yet in very good health, he bids fair to follow in the footsteps of his ancestors.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  200
  Union Twp. -
N. S. DEVORE, crockery and queensware, Ripley.  The name Devore (Deara) is of French origin.  The ancesters of the family who emigrated to America settled in Pennsylvania.  Nicholas Devore, the great grandparent of our subject, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and served under Washington from the first.  His wife's maiden name of Sarah Decker, whose family also rank in Revolutionary fame; he moved to the West in 1787, and was among the pilgrims who entered Kenton Station, near Maysville, Ky.  Subsequently, he moved and settled at Blue Lick Fort among the Indians, where he died in 1813.  David Devore, the grandparent of our subject, came to the territory of Brown County in 1800, and settled at Red Oak, where he passed his life.  He was among the most intelligent and progressive, as well as active farmers of the day., and acquired a handsome estate through his own industry and perseverance; he lived to raise a family of ten children, six sons and four daughters, four of whom are living; his death is recorded in 1860.  N. S. Devore, whose name appears at the head of this sketch, is the oldest living son of David and Esther (West) Devore, and was born in this county in 1846.  David was born in Brown County in 1806, and is the oldest living son.  A portion of his early life was spent on the farm, and until 1850, at which time the national bank system was inaugurated, and he became one of the original stockholders of the First National Bank of Ripley, in which he had always taken an active interest, until his health failed, and in declining years he transferred its duties to his son, N. S., who has since filled that position.  Mr. Devore has been an invalid for several years, and most of the time confined to his home, surrounded by the comforts and care of his family.  His wife's father, William West, settled in Brown County in 1804, and erected the first house in Decatur, Byrd Township, where he resided until his death.  Of the twelve children born to this generation, four are living.  N. S. Devore established himself in the grocery business in this city in 1868, which he pursued until he opened his present business in crockery and queensware in 1879, it being the only china bazar in the city.  He deals considerably in real estate and brokerage, and is considered one of the active and enterprising men of the city.  He is a Director of the First National Bank, and is well and favorably known.  He was married, Apr. 18, 1877, to Miss Eva M., daughter of Rev. C. W. Garoutte, an official and publisher at Dayton, Ohio.  Their children are Earl G., Fred F. and Alma.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  59
  Union Twp. -
DAVID DIXON, farmer, P. O. Ripley, is a grandson of William Dixon, who was born in Virginia, and who, with a colony, founded a settlement in Mason County, Ky., in 1789.  They afterwards moved to Limestone, now Maysville, and built a fort near Blanchard's Pond.  Two of this colony, Cornelius Washburn and William Dixon, crossed the river at Logan's Gap, and erected a hut on Eagle Creek; this settlement was made in 1793, and they were the first white settlers to locate on the territory of Brown County.  William Dixon afterward settled on the Stephenson land, where he raised of family of seven boys and three girls.  He served in the Revolutionary war seven years, and lived in this county until his death.  He was a very large, portly man, while his wife, formerly Miss Grizzy A. Bell, was a small woman, weighing only ninety pounds; she was of Scotch descent, and he was of Irish extraction.  William Dixon, Jr., father to our subject, was born in Mason County, Ky., in 1790; he was married in 1813 to Miss Susannah Hardester, a native of Pennsylvania, who bore him six children; she died Jan. 25, 1831.  Two years afterward, he was married to Mrs. Mary, a widow of John Henry, her maiden name was Carr William, Jr., died in this county Sept. 25, 1867.  He was Justice of the Peace for twenty-two successive years, and was known throughout the county of Squire Dixon.  David Dixon, the subject of this sketch, is the oldest son of William Dixon, Jr., and was born on the homestead in this county in 1815.  He remained at home until his marriage, Feb. 11, 1837, to Miss Eleanor, daughter of Caldwell Tweed, and grand-daughter of Archibald Tweed, an early pioneer; nine children have been born to them, seven living.  Robert, the eldest son, enlisted in 1861, in the Seventh Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and served one year; re-enlisted in 1862 in the same regiment, and was captured by the enemy in November, 1863, at Rogersville, Tenn.; he was confined in prison at Florence, N. C., where he died from exposure and starvation, Nov. 26, 1864.  William S. enlisted as First Lieutenant in 1863 in the Eighty-sixth Regiment Ohio Infantry, and served until the close of the war.  Archibald c. enlisted in 1862 in the Seventh Regiment Ohio Volunteer Cavalry; taken prisoner at the battle of Franklin, Tenn.; was confined at Cahaba, Ala.; transferred to Vicksburg on parole, and on the 25ht of April was shipped on board the gun-boat Sultana, which was blown up Dec. 28, 1864, and he was among the lost.  Marion  served in hundred days' service; Ella, Susan B., Ida M., Charles F. and George.  Mr. Dixon was Justice of the Peace some years ago, and resigned; he leads a quiet life and is a member of the Christian Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  60
  Jackson Twp. -
SAMUEL DIXON, farmer, P. O. Winchester, was born December 18, 1818, in Brown County, Ohio.  He parents were among the early settlers of brown County.  He was reared on a farm and received but a limited education; on June 4, 1840, he married Lettie A. Reynolds, daughter of Joseph Reynolds, who, also, was one of the first settlers of Brown County, having settled in the neighborhood of Carlisle Village at a very early day.  This union has been blessed with nine children, five of whom are still living, viz.:  Samuel K. married Belle M. Short, by whom he has two children - Arthur A. and Vernon C.; Columbus E. married Mary Records, daughter of Andrew and Bella Records; they have two children - Ettie L. and Myrtle; Fidelia married Aaron Edenfield, by whom she has four children - Cora, Alta, Walter and Charles; Alice married Alexander Bayless, by whom she has two children - Bertha L. and Lola B.; and Joseph B. married Elizabeth Young, by whom he has one child - Rueanna.  About 1850, Mr. Dixon, with his family, moved from Fincastle, where he had been living perhaps two years, to the northeastern portion of Jackson Township, where he now resides.  He has served, as township Trustee, is a member, and the owner of seventy-eight acres of land.  The Dixon family are noted for their industry, perseverance and uprightness in dealing with their fellow-men.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  275
  Union Twp. -
W. A. DIXON, physician, Ripley, is a grandson of William Dixon, a native of Ireland, who with a brother embarked to America and enlisted in the Revolutionary war, where the brother was killed.  William Dixon, with a colony, founded a settlement in the territory of Mason County, Ky., in 1789.  The colony, (six in number) emigrated to Limestone, now Maysville, Ky., and erected a fort near Blanchard's Pond, and in 1793, he, with one Cornelius Washburn, crossed the river at Logan's Gap and built a hut on Eagle Creek, one mile from the river.  He lived in this cabin years, and finally settled on what was known as the Stephenson lands, now embracing the fertile lands of Henry Martin.  He was a man of portly proportions, and was married to Miss Grizzy A. Bell, of Scottish blood, who balanced the scales at ninety pounds.  They raised a family of ten children, seen boys and three girls.  He was in the service of the Revolutionary war seven years, and resided in this county during the remainder of his life.  William Dixon, Jr., the father of our subject, was born in Mason County, Ky., in 1790.  He was raised on the homestead, and performed active service in the war of 1812.  In 1813, he was joined in marriage to Miss Susannah Hardester, a native of Pennsylvania, who died Jan. 25, 1831.  Six children were born to them, five of whom are living.  He was again married, to Mrs. Mary (Carr), widow of John Henry, deceased.  The land upon which he settled is now occupied by E. Flaugher.  He was Justice of the Peace for thirty years, and was widely and familiarlly known as Squire Dixon.  He acted as a general guardian and collector, having a peculiar faculty for this kind of work, being held in high esteem by the people.  His demise occurred in this county Sept. 25, 1867.  The subject of this sketch is the youngest son of William and Mary Dixon, and was born in Union Township, Brown County, in 1835.  He secured his early education in the common schools of Ripley, and in 1856 entered the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, Ohio, and pursued his studies for three years.  He attended law school one year at  Indianapolis, Ind., and in 1861 was elected to teach the High School of Ripley, and taught one year.  He attended medical lectures at the Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, Penn., in the winter of 1862-63.  From the medical board at Columbus, Ohio, he secured a certificate of qualification and entered the army as Contract Surgeon, with orders to report to Gen Sherman,  at Resaca, Ga.  He was assigned duty under the Medical Director of the Cumberland Surgeon, and remained in that department of service until the close of the war.  IN 1865, he attended a course of medical lectures at the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, from which he graduated the same year.  Returning to peaceful pursuits, he began the practice of his profession at Decatur, Byrd Township.  In 1874, he removed to Ripley, where he has since followed a successful practice.  The Doctor was married in 1861, in this city, to Miss Rebecca C., daughter of E. W. Devore.  To this union six children have been born, all of whom are living, viz.:  Mary V., Martha, Archie, Jessie, Bettie and Kittie.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  59
  Pike Twp. -
CHARLES C DONLEY
, merchant, Surryville, was born near Point Isabel, in Clermont County, Ohio, Jan. 18, 1852, son of James W. Donley.  He came with his father to Pike Township when a small child, remained with him on the farm until the fall of 1871, when he left his home and began his career 'as a school teacher, first teaching near Brookville, Bracken Co., Ky.; the next year, taught at Rock Spring, Ky.; during the next two years, in Pike Township, during which time he attended two sessions at the National Normal School, at Lebanon, Ohio, and, in the fall of 1875, he entered the State Normal School at Carlisle, Ky., and completed the scientific course of instruction prescribed by that institution; teaching again in the fall and winter of 1876 and 1877 at Foster, Ky., and the next year was Principal of the school at Neville, Ohio.  He then purchased his present property in Surryville in 1878, engaging in the mercantile business, and in June, 1879, he lost his property by fire; he rebuilt his store and dwelling in the same year, and has continued in the store business until the present time.  He taught school again in the fall and winter of 1881 and 1882.  He was married, in June, 1878, to Josie L. Robinson, who died in her twenty-second year, in June, 1880.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  216
  Pike Twp. -
J. W. DONLEY
, farmer, P. O. Surryville, was born in Clermont County, Ohio, Jan. 24, 1825, and is a son of John Donley, who was born in Kentucky in 1801.  Our subject was raised a farmer, and has always been engaged in agricultural pursuits, owning at the present sixty-one acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, with excellent buildings erected on the same; he acquired a good common school education in the common schools; he is filling the position of Postmaster at Surryville, Ohio. He was united in marriage with Elizabeth J. Straight Oct. 1, 1849.  To this union seven children have been born, of whom six are living, viz., Alonzo L., Charles C., Belle, Nannie, Alice C. and Georgie A.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  216
  Jefferson Twp. -
ELMER M. DRAKE, farmer, P. O. Red Oak.  Enoch B. and Rachel Drake, grandparents of the subject of this sketch, emigrated from Kentucky to what is now known as Brown County, Ohio, about the year 1812.  Enoch B. in his youth learned the trade of a tailor, which he followed the greater part of his life.  He settled in what is now known as Jefferson Township, near Peola Spring, about two miles south of Russellville.  The farm on which he located had but a small portion ready for cultivation, and contained a log cabin.  He remained where he settled during the remainder of his days.  By his first wife he had ten children, one of whom is still living, viz.: Noah, in Pendleton County, Ky.  She died about the year 1843.  She then married Nancy Carr, who died in 1857, and he departed this life in January, 1862.  He was a member of the Baptist Church, in which he officiated as Deacon.  Enoch B. Drake, Jr., father of our subject, was born Oct. 3, 1815, on the old homestead where his father settled.  In August, 1834, he married Sarah Martin, born July 16, 1815, by whom he had seven children, viz.: Elmer M., George W., John C., Hetty J. (deceased), Isabella, Sarah E., and David G.  He lived the greater part of his life near the old homestead.  He traded considerably in stock, and his boys, in the meantime, under his management, worked the farm.  He was a men of reliable character, a member of the Christian Church, and died Dec 28, 1877.  His widow still survives him, now in her sixty-seventh year.  Elmer M., our subject, was born Oct. 3, 1835, on the homestead farm where he was reared to manhood, and where he received but a limited education, but by being a constant reader, and having a love for good books, he has made himself familiar with many of the important topics of his day.  On October 5, 1854, he married Angeline Davis, born Apr. 18, 1836, and daughter of John C. and Susannah Davis.  This union was blessed with four children, two are still living.  In October, 1856, he moved to Illinois, McLean County, where he bought eighty acres of land, and remained there perhaps three years, when, owing to the loss of two of his children, himself and wife having also contracted an illness occasioned by the impurities of the atmosphere, he returned to Brown County, Ohio.  About two years after his return to Ohio, he enlisted in the Seventh Ohio Cavalry, which subsequently merged into the Eleventh, under Col. William O. Collins.  In the spring of 1862, the regiment was ordered to Fort Laramie, from where they operated principally in the Rocky Mountains against the Indians, to protect emigrants and the United States mails.  He was discharged at Omaha City in April, 1865, and returned home to Brown County.  In January, 1867, his wife died; he then married, in December, 1858, Mary J. Ball, by whom he had six children, four of whom are still living.  She died in November, 1881.  In 1873, he bought the farm on which he now resides, located in the southern part of Jefferson township, which he has in a good state of cultivation.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  236
  Lewis Twp. -
G. W. DRAKE, ex-County Treasurer, Higginsport, is a son of Cornelius Drake, who was born in New jersey in 1781, and a grandson of John Drake, who participated in the continental war, and assisted in liberating our country from English tyranny.  Cornelius  was raised to farming, which received his lifetime attention.  He reached his majority in his native State, but early in the present century came to Mason County, Ky., where he married Frances (commonly called (Fanny) Witherspoon, a native of Culpepper County, Va.  She was born in 1785, and came to Kentucky in her teens, with her parents.  Soon after Cornelius and Fanny were married, they settled in Pleasant Township, Brown County, Ohio, where they ever after remained; he died of cholera June 14, 1833, and Fanny remained his widow nearly forty years, when she, too, entered her final rest.  They were the parents of fifteen children, ten boys and five girls.  Of that number, five sons and three daughters are now living.  One of the deceased sons died of cholera in the same year as his father.  Of those living, George W. is the second youngest, and was born April 8, 1826, in Pleasant Township, of which he has always been a resident.  He was left fatherless at an early age, and was reared exclusively by his widowed mother, with whom he lived as long as she kept house.  His life, was devoted to farming, boating and carpentering, until 1873, when, in October of that year, he was elected to the office of County Treasurer.  Two years later, he was re-elected to the same office, serving four consecutive years.  While in office, he purchased a tract of 1,500 acres of timber land in Fleming County, Ky., where he engaged in saw-milling, soon after the expiration of his official term.  He built a hut and remained two years, yet retained his citizenship in Ohio.  During the year 1881, he was engaged in handling leaf tobacco.  Mr. Drake started in life with no assistance, but with a capital of energy and determination, linked with judicious management, he rose to his present position.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  98
  Jefferson Twp. -
ROBERT C. DRAKE, farmer, P. O. Russellville, was born Oct. 7, 1836, in Pleasant Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  He is the son of Francis and Sarah Drake.  His grandfather, Henry Drake, was an early settler of Brown County.  Robert C. was reared to manhood on a farm, and received an ordinary district school education.  In 1862, he enlisted in the Fifty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which was attached to the Army of the Cumberland.  He participated in the battles of Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, and fighting around New Hope Church, Marietta, Ga., Peach Tree Creek 1865.  After receiving his discharge, he retuned to his home in Pleasant Township.  In September, 1866, he married Flora E. Young, daughter of Robert L and Mary Young, deceased.  To them have been born seven children - Mary L., Sarah B., George F., Alfred T., Jesse D. Ella F. and Robert L.  In 1872, he moved to the farm on which he at present resides, in the southwestern portion of Jefferson Township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  237
  Pleasant Twp. -
JACKSON DUGIN, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in this township Oct. 22, 1815, son of Joseph and Debora (Norman) Dugin; his mother was of Scotch, his father of Irish descent, and they were early settlers of Brown County.  Mr. Dugin, after attending the subscription schools in the vicinity, engaged in flat-boating, and has made twenty trips to New Orleans.  He was married Aug. 12, 1840, to Elizabeth Drake, a native of this county.  Their children, seven in number, are all living.  They are Anna S. (wife of J. W. Wall), Adeline, Shafer, Charles L., Porter (wife of Robert Drake), Alice (wife of Elmer Lucas) and Bradford.  Mr. Dugin is a prominent Mason, and has been a member of the order for thirty-seven years.  He has been Master Mason of the Higginsport Lodge seven years, and is a member of both Chapter and Council.  Both himself and wife are members of the Christian Church, of which he has been Trustee; also member of the building committee before he joined the church.  His political faith is Democratic.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  12
  Pleasant Twp. -
F. W. DUNHAM, farmer, P. O. Georgetown, was born in Perry Township, this county, and is the son of Gideon and Susannah (Heasley) Dunham.  Gideon Dunham was born in Kentucky, of English parentage.  His wife, Susannah, was a native of this county, and was of welsh extraction.  The subject of this sketch received a collegiate education at the Ohio Wesleyan University.  His father was a merchant, and F. W. spent his early life clerking for him; he subsequently accepted a position as salesman at Cincinnati, then opened a grocery business for himself in that city, and for sixteen years conducted it with a marked degree of success.  His sales during one year amounted to more than $300,000, a sum, it is believed, equaled by no other house.  He was a partner with William Glenn & Son.  In 1878, he sold his business, purchased a farm one mile east of Georgetown, and has since that year engaged in the lighter pursuits of agriculture.  His means he has amassed by his own exertions.  In 1870, he was married to Miss Alice M. Horner, daughter of Thomas Horner, of Cincinnati.  They have two children - Lucy and Frank W.  Mr. and Mrs. Dunham are members of the Georgetown M. E. Church.  He is a Republican, and at present Trustee of this township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  12
  Pike Twp. -
GEORGE L. DUNN, farmer, P. O. White Oak, was born in Brown County, Ohio, June 18, 1854, and is a son of Ira B. and Sarah E. Dunn, who were the parents of seven children, of whom six now survive.  George is the first son and first child, and is considered one of our most prosperous young farmers, endowed with the good business characteristics of his father, and is every way worthy of representation in this work.  He began life for himself at twenty-two years of age, engaging in farming; this he continued for one year, when he took the agency of the Cincinnati & Eastern Railroad, a position which he occupied for four years; he acquired his education in the State Normal School at Carlisle, Ky.  He was married, Apr. 8, 1876, to Emma Pickering, and their home has been blessed with three children - Lawrence T., Ira Frank and Henry Harley.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  217
  Washington Twp. -
JAMES B. DUNN
, farmer, P. O. Brownstown, was born in Washington Township, Feb. 12, 1851.  He is a son of Joseph C., and Tamar Dunn.  His lather was born Apr. 4, 1819, and his mother July 13, 1822.  They were married July 9, 1840.  Mr. Dunn died in November, 1872, and his wife in January, 1867.  Our subject is the second son and fifth child of a family of ten children.  He was married Aug. 28, 1872, to Susie V. Straight, by whom he has had three children —Marion A., born Nov. 14, 1873, and Sarah L., born June 20, 1876; Emma N. born Jan. 10, 1879, and died Jan.  31, 1882.  Mr. Dunn and lady are connected with the M. E. Church, and Christian Union Church.  He is associated with the Grange, and is a Republican.  He owns a farm of seventy-five acres, and pursues the avocation of farming.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  286
  Washington Twp. -
JAMES H. DUNN
, farmer, P. O. Brownstown. The largest landholder and one of the wealthiest men of Brown County is Mr. James H. Dunn.  He was born near Youngstown, Ohio, Feb, 2, 1808.  His grandfather on his mother’s side, Robert Hamilton, came from Ireland in 1776, enlisted in the Revolutionary war and served till its close.  He died in 1837, aged eighty years. Clarkson and Elizabeth Dunn, the parents of our subject were natives of Maryland.  Mr. Dunn was a soldier in the war of 1812, and in 1816, with his wife and three children descended the Ohio River in a flat-boat and landed at Ripley.  He removed to the old county seat on Straight Creek, and in 1817 located near Georgetown, and two years later near Sardinia.  He was for many years Trustee of the township, and was a prominent man.  He died in September, 1852, and six years later Mrs. D. departed this life.  James is the eldest son and child of a family of six children.  He was reared a farmer boy, and for an education had access to the schools of the district, which were held in rude log cabins.  When twenty years old he learned saddletree-making, which he followed winters for two years.   In 1830, he bought a farm of 100 acres and afterward  sold it.  In 1838, he purchased 670 acres of Survey No. 3,519 from Gen. Thomas L. Hamer.  The following year he made a trip to Marion County, Ind., for the purpose of purchasing land, but returned and located on his land.  For nine years previous to this, he was engaged in the cabinet business with Robert Hamilton.  Since that time Mr. Dunn has followed farming and stock-raising, and dealing with success almost unparalleled by any other person in Brown County.  In 1880, he owned 2,700 acres of land, and at the present time he owns but 2,422 acres, having divided among his children.  In 1862, he was the third largest tax-payer in Brown County.  He is financially one of the most reliable solid citizens of Brown County.  He is one of the heaviest stockholders in the First National Bank of Georgetown and is one of its chosen Directors.  His political affiliations are with the Democratic party.  His marriage occurred Sept. 28, 1830, with Elizabeth, daughter of Edward and Elizabeth DayMrs. Dunn was born in Clermont County May 1, 1812.  Eleven children were born to this union—Ira B.; Abigail, wife of Louis Bingham; Julia A., wife of Marion Tracy; Elizabeth, wife of Martin Courts; Perry F.; Ormon F.; Margaret E., wife of Hanson Vance; James C.; John W.; Joseph E.; and Caroline F., wife of James Cumberland.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  285
  Washington Twp. -
NATHAN S. DUNN
, P. O. Sardinia, proprietor of Cincinnati and Eastern Hotel, Sardinia, was born in Washington, May 29, 1844.  His father, Henry Dunn, was a native of Franklin, and his mother Lydia Purdum, of Washington.  Henry Dunn’s parents, Henry and Nancy Dunn, were natives of the “Old Dominion,” and emigrated to Brown County among the early pioneers, and settled in Franklin.  In 1836, they moved to Illinois, and the following year returned to this county.  Mr. Dunn died in May, 1865, and Mrs. Dunn in 1859.  Henry Dunn, Jr., was reared to manhood in Brown County.  He filled the office of Trustee of Washington Township for six years, and was a stanch Republican.  His death occurred Oct. 6, 1867, his wife having preceeded him in October, 1857.  Mr. Dunn was an earnest and active member of the M. E. Church, and was prominently identified with it and its missions till his death.    He assisted in organizing the church of his neighborhood, and aided liberally in its erection.  He was the father of four sons and two daughters, of whom our subject is the eldest.  He was reared on a farm.  When only eighteen—Aug. 12, 1862 - he enlisted as a member of Company E, Fiftieth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  He served in the Western Department, and fought at Perryville, and other engagements, and May 29, 1864, he joined Sherman, on his Atlanta campaign, and participated in all the chief engagements, including the siege of Atlanta, where he was disabled by having his foot partially amputated by a cannon ball.  He was confined in a hospital till Mar. 17, 1865, when discharged.  He served as Corporal till Aug. 3, 1864, when he was appointed Sergeant, and acted in that capacity till discharged from the service.  After his discharge, he engaged as clerk for McIntyre & Dunn, with whom he remained till 1867, when he was married, and took charge of the Marshall House, which he has since run with success, providing first-class accommodations to the traveling public.  Nov. 14, 1867, he was married to Miss Rebecca J. Marshall, daughter of William and Rebecca Marshall, and a sister of Maj. L. G. Marshall, formerly of Georgetown.  Mrs. Dunn was born near Georgetown July 18, 1837.  Mr. and Mrs. Dunn are members of the M. E. Church, and highly respected and esteemed in Sardinia.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  286
  Washington Twp. -
ROBERT DUNN, farmer, P. O. Brownstown, son of Clarkson Elizabeth Dunn, was born in Washington Township, Dec. 29, 1815.  When twenty years of age, he learned cabinet-making trade, which he followed for seven years.  He then engaged in farming, which comprises his present avocation, residing a part of the time in Franklin Township.  In 1874, he located on his present farm.  He was married, Nov. 11, 1844, to Miss Elmina Shaw, a native of Brown County, born June, 1824, and a daughter of Sylvester and Elizabeth Shaw.  Ten children were the fruits of this union— Dennis C., born Sept. 11, 1842; Isadora, born Sept. 20, 1844, wife of Thomas BareEmma, born Dec. 31, 1846, wife of John TracyLaura, born Oct. 20, 1848, wife of Robert Moore; Elizabeth (deceased), born Sept. 9, 1851, wife of Noah EllisEulaha, born Aug. 20, 1854, wife of J. R. Wardlow; Susan A., born June 2, 1860, wife of P. W. Wardlow; Thurman E., born Feb. 7, 1857;  Robert L., born Oct. 30, 1863, and Wilber F., born May 14, 1866.  Mrs. Dunn departed this life June 14, 1877;  and Mar. 21, 1880, he married Frances A. Shaw, a daughter of Anthony and Temperance ShawMrs. Dunn was born Feb. 27, 1834.  She is a member of the Christian Church.  Mr. Dunn is connected with the Grange.  He was Justice of the Peace two terms.  He owns a farm of 187 acres of land; is engaged in agriculture.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  286
  Clark Twp. -
JOHN B. DUTTON (deceased), son of Solomon Dutton, was born in Brown County, Ohio, Jan. 24, 1832.  He was raised on a farm and received a common school education, and was married to Nancy A. Hendrixson Mar. 2, 1852; Nancy A. was youngest daughter of George and Alice (Courts) Hendrixson, of Scott Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  Mr. Hendrixson was a member of the M. E. Church, and Justice of the Peace for many years, and perhaps more universally loved and respected than any man in his township.  Mr. Dutton was an industrious and thrifty farmer, and he and his wife were members of the M. P. Church.  He died Mar. 4, 1878.  He left eight children - Allie E., wife of Cyrus Redmon; John R., married Anna E., daughter of Joseph McChesney; Charles A., married Florence B., daughter of Elmore Dean; Louie E., wife of Eugene Ogden; Emily, single and at home; Carrie A., and Jesse Lee.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  182

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