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BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
History & Genealogy

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BIOGRAPHIES

Source::
HISTORY OF BROWN COUNTY, OHIO
A History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches,
Schools, Etc.; General and Local Statistics; Portraits of
Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the
Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Map of
Brown County; Constitution of the
United States, Miscellaneous
Matters, Etc., Etc.
ILLUSTRATED
Published:  Chicago:  W. H. Beers & Co.
1883
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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  Pleasant Twp. -
A. P. CAHALL, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in Pleasant Township., Mar. 26, 1845, the son of Thomas, Jr., and Rachel E. (Kilpatrick) Cahall.  His father and grandfather were early settlers of this county.  A. P. was reared on the farm, and in early live was a school teacher.  He has received a liberal education, attending the Pennsylvania Medical College and other educational institutions.  He has devoted himself to the farm, and succeeded remarkably in the occupation.  He began life with a team and $400, rented land of his father, raised corn and wheat enough to pay all expenses, and the first year sold his tobacco for $1,126; the second year his tobacco crop yielded $1,300; the third year, $1,450; and the fourth, $1,607.  In six years he had paid his father $4,700 for rent, and sold $11,000 worth of tobacco.  In 1869, he married Emma L. Daugherty, of Union Township, daughter of Rev. J. P. Daugherty, present pastor of the Higginsport Christian Church.  They have five children - Zua, Mattie L., L. P., Ida, and Homer E.  Himself and wife are members of the Christian Church at Higginsport.  He is a Democrat, and has twice been Assessor of this township.  He now owns 133 acres of land.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  8
  Pleasant Twp. -
NELSON CAHALL, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in Pleasant Township May 31, 1830, the son of Thomas and Sarah (Parker) CahallJames Cahall, the grandfather of Nelson, was one of the earliest pioneers of Lewis Township.  He had served through the Revolutionary war to its close, witnessing the surrender of Lord Cornwallis.  At its close, like many other active spirits, he wandered westward, and finally reached the north banks of the Ohio, in this county.  He was a man of strong mind and possessed powerful physical abilities, living to the age of one hundred and five years.  His wife died at the advanced age of ninety-eight years, after a married life of eighty years' duration.  The day Mr. Cahall attained his one hundredth year, he went to the harvest field where his men were at work, picked up a sickle, and leading his men, reaped a swath of the golden grain.  He had a sound set of teeth in his head at this time, not having lost a single one; nor was there a gray hair on his head.  He had three sons - James, Thomas and Solomon.  They married three sisters named Parker.  James wedded Margaret, Solomon wedded Betty, and Thomas, Sarah.  All raised families, and most of the Cahalls now in Brown County are their descendants.  They are all honest, hard-working farmers, and own a aggregate of about 2,000 acres.  They are attentive to their business, and only one, it is said, ever held an office - that of Assessor.  Nelson Cahall, like his relatives, has devoted himself strictly to rural life; he owns 140 acres of good land on the Ripley pike, three miles east of Higginsport.  He was married in 1850, to Nancy J., daughter of Jesse and Catharine (Drake) Heizer, early settlers of Brown County.  Mr. and Mrs. Cahall are members of the Christian Church, in the Sabbath School of which he has been Superintendent.  Their children are William, Louise, Jesse, Sarah J., Thomas, Warren N., Elenor and L. W.  Mr. Cahall votes with the Democratic party.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  8
  Union Twp. -
ROBERT CAHALL, farmer, P. O. Levanna, is a grandson of James Cahall a native of Pennsylvania, who emigrated to Kentucky at an early day and located near Minerva, where he resided until 1814, at which time he moved to Brown County and settled on Bullskin Creek, where he passed the remainder of his life.  His maternal grandparent, James Parker, was a native of Ireland.  He was a State pioneer to Ohio, and settled on the Indian territory in 1798.  His location was afterward laid out in Clermont County, where he resided until his death.  Thomas Cahall, the father of our subject, was born near Philadelphia, Penn., in 1790.  He moved with his parents to this county, and made his final settlement in Pleasant Township, where he died in January, 1871.  His life companion, Sarah (Parker) Cahall, was a native Virginia, and died in March, 1871.  They raised a family of eleven children, all of whom grew to manhood and womanhood.  Of this number eight are living, six being old-time residenters, of Brown County.  Mr. C. settled on his present estate of 191 acres in 1860.  He numbers among the oldest living residents of the county and has lived in single blessedness all his days; his character is irreproachable, and his social qualifications and genial disposition commend him to all.  With an extended acquaintance and hosts of friends, the memory of Robert Cahall will live long after he may have passed away.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  55
  Pleasant Twp. -
THOMAS CAHALL (deceased) was born in this county Sept. 18, 1819.  His parents were Thomas and Sarah (Parker) Cahall.  His father was a Kentuckian, his mother a native of Ireland.  His youth was spent in the common schools, and when he approached manhood he devoted himself to farming.  Beginning a poor boy, he acquired property by hard toil, and at the time of his decease, in 1875, was owner of 500 acres.  In 1839, he married Rachel Cahall, daughter of A. P. and Elizabeth (Harding) Cahall.  She was born in 1822.  Her parents were of Maryland birth, her father of English, and her mother of German extraction.  The subject of this sketch had twelve children - Robert W. (deceased), James H. (deceased), A. P. Caroline, Elizabeth P. (deceased), Thompson Milton, Augustus L., Mary T., Parry, Sarah Ella, Flora A. and E. M.  The entire family are members of the Christian Church.  Six children live in this township.  Mrs. Cahall still occupies the home farm and operates it successfully.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  7
  Pleasant Twp. -
THOMAS S. CAHALL, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in Union Township June 1, 1831.  His father, Solomon Cahall, was born in Maryland, and was of Scotch-Irish descent; his mother, Elizabeth (Parker) Cahall, was of Irish parentage.  Both were early settlers of Brown County.  Solomon Cahall was a boatman, and conveyed cargoes to New Orleans, and walked back to Maysville, Ky., eighteen times.  Thomas S. was one of a family of nine children.  He acquired an education at the log schoolhouses sufficient to enable him to teach school, but after two years' teaching, he applied himself exclusively to farming, and now owns a well-improved farm of 118 acres.  Politically, Mr. Cahall favors Republican administration.  He was married in 1858, to Sarah A. Dunham, a daughter of Stephen Dunham, of this county.  Their children are Minnie, C. F. A., William, Edwin and Bessie.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  7
  Pleasant Twp. -
WILLIAM PERRY CAHALL, farmer, P. O. Higginsport, was born in Union Township, Brown Co., Ohio, Jan. 14, 1825.  He is the son of Thomas and Sarah (Parker) Cahall.  His education embraced the studies taught in the subscription schools in vogue during his youth.  In early life, William developed a fondness for public reading, and became very proficient in the art, so much so that he has frequently been called out to read at public gatherings in his district.  He keeps himself well informed of what is transpiring in the world.  His life has been spent on the farm, and he is the proprietor of a pleasant, well-improved little place of 100 acres.  Aug. 26, 1875, he married Virginia Ann Phillips, sister of Columbus Phillips, of this township.  His marital bliss, however, was of short duration, for death called his beloved companion home the year following.  Mr. Cahall is a Democrat, and has never sought nor held office.  He is of a cheerful and contented disposition, temperate in his habits and diligent in business.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  8
  Union Twp. -
HON. ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, M. D. (deceased).  One of the most distinguished pioneers of Brown County was Hon. Alexander Campbell, the first physician of Ripley.  He was born in Greenbrier County, Va., in 1774, and removed near Lexington, Ky., and his parents when a boy.  He was a colleague with Henry Clay at Pisgah, nine miles southwest of Lexington.  He read medicine and attended lectures in Lexington Medical College, while the distinguished Kentucky orator practiced law there.  Aug. 6, 1801, he was united in marriage with Miss Nancy Dunlap.  Soon after this event, he removed to Cynthiana, Ky., and practiced his profession two years; then, in 1803, he came to Brown County and located 300 acres of land in Union Township.  He established a store and ran it in connection with his profession till 1815, when he removed to Ripley, then known as Staunton.  Here he continued mercantile pursuits as one of the first merchants of Ripley, going to Philadelphia, Penn., on horseback, to purchase goods.  He was Ripley's first physician.  In his profession he stood eminent, and established a wide and successful practice.  At one time, he was tendered the Professorship of one of the most important branches of medicine in the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati, but owing to his vast practice he declined.  He was chosen a Representative and served in the Legislature when that body convened at Chillicothe.  He was subsequently elected to the State Senate, and in that body he filled the office of that important capacity for four years.  During his Congressional duties, as there were no railroads, he rode on horseback all the way to Washington, D. C.  His labors in Congress were worthy and efficient and highly merited the approbation of his constituents.  He was Mayor of Ripley from 1830-40, where his death occurred Nov. 5, 1857.  He was a man of upcompromising anti-slavery principles, and their earnest defender and promoter.  As a citizen he was loyal to the best interests of his city and county, and earnestly devoted to the high trusts with which the people had honored him.  He died esteemed for his many noble traits of character and the purity and usefulness of his life.  His son J. A. Campbell now owns and occupies a part of the old Campbell homestead.  He was born in Ripley June 27, 1819.  He studied medicine with his father and in 1850 learned telegraphy, which he followed for five years.  In 1862, he located on his present farm, where he has since resided.  In 1856, he was married to Frances, daughter of Elijah and Matilda Sniffin, and a native of Ripley, where she was born Feb. 22, 1834.  Three children were the fruits of this union - Matilda N., born Jan. 11, 1858; Mollie N., born Oct. 31,1859, and Thomas C. born May 18, 1861.  Mr. Campbell was one of the organizers of the Ripley Fire Department and was engineer for twenty years.  He was also connected with the Ripley Band for fifteen years.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 56
  Union Twp. -
CHARLES FENELON CAMPBELL (deceased) was born at Lexington, Va., Sept. 13, 1803.  His father was a farmer and a practicing physician. His mother was a sister of Dr. Archibald Alexander, President of Princeton University.  There were five son and three daughters in the family.  One of the sons became a preacher, two lawyers, and one a doctor, while one died young.  The subject of his sketch graduated at Washington College, Lexington, Va., and afterward graduated at a military school at that point. Studying law, he was admitted to the bar, and removed to Ohio to practice, choosing a Northern State in preference, because of slavery at the South, though his parents were slaveholders.  In 1824, he located at Georgetown, Brown Co., Ohio, for the practice of his chosen profession.  Remaining at Georgetown a short time, he removed to Ripley, where he spent the remainder of his days.  His tastes were of a literary character, and, in 1840, he published the Ohio Whig at Ripley. In 1849, he purchased a controlling interest in the Ripley Bee, which he edited up to the time of his death.  As a writer, he was graceful, logical and fair, and his editorials were copied throughout the State.  As a lawyer, he was noted for his thorough understanding of the principles of law, and he was consulted by the members of his profession throughout the county.  As a practitioner, he was not successful as the world views success.  He was conscientious, and dissuaded rather than encouraged men to engage in law suits, and his fees were so moderate that he did himself injustice.  Although a member of a profession that is often censured for its lack of strict integrity, he won the sobriquet of  “Honest Charley,” and went to his grave universally esteemed and respected.  Talented, educated, and in the strictest sense a man of honor and integrity, he was one who would have graced any public position; but his modest character kept him from even pushing his claims upon the public, and such honors as he wore came to him unsought.  He was elected Mayor of his village, Justice of the Peace, and Probate Judge of the county, and was once a candidate for State Senator.  Being an ardent Whig and Republican, and those parties being in the minority in his county, his chances for political preferment were small, yet he was always an ardent advocate of his party.  When the war broke out, though nearly sixty years of age, he was active in the raising and drilling of troops, his military education making him one of a very few who were then capacitated for that work.  In 1831, he was married to Harriett E. Kephart at Ripley, who still survives him.  To them were born six children, five sons and one daughter—Angus K., Frank T., J. Q. A., William Archie, Charles H. and Mary A.  The five sons have all edited papers in Ohio and Iowa, and J. Q. A. is still editing the Bellefontaine (Ohio) Republican, which he has edited ever since the war.  Angus K. is an attorney at Newton, Iowa; Frank T. has served two terms as Lieutenant Governor of Iowa; William A. is a prominent business man at Lima, Ohio, and Charles D. is Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue for the Fourth United States District of Ohio at Bellefontaine.  Mary Antoinetta was married to James W. Christie, since deceased, and lives with her mother at Ripley, and is a teacher in the Union schools.  Three of the sons — Frank T., J. Q. A.—and William A. served in the army, and C. D., who was too young to enter the service, in the Home Guards.  The subject of this sketch died at Georgetown, Ohio, Aug. 2, 1864, of fever while serving as Probate Judge of the county, leaving to his children a character and memory more precious and more cherished than any material possessions or worldly fortune could have been, and his name will always be held in respect by the community with whom he spent this life.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  56
  Perry Twp. -
JAMES B. CAMPBELL, saloon and billiard hall, Fayetteville, son of James and Margaret (Call) Campbell, was born in Perry Township, three miles southeast of Fayetteville, Feb. 14, 1858.  When eighteen years old, he attended the Hillsboro, Winchester and Georgetown schools, six months each; he then taught school two terms.  In October, 1881, he built his present place of business, sample room and billiard hall on Pike street, 60x25 feet, two stories; the upper story is used for a ball-room and court room; here he keeps the choicest brands of liquors, cigars, tobaccos, etc., and is doing a flourishing business; he is a member of the Catholic Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  133
  Huntington Twp. -
JAMES M. CAMPBELL, deceased, was born in Bath County, Ky., in 1822, and was a son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Davis) Campbell, of Tennessee, who were afterward citizens of the county.  Our subject was married to Sarah L. Howe, Jan. 29, 1844, and resided on the farm until his enlistment in 1862, in Company F, Seventh Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. He saw active service until captured near Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 25, 1864 when he was incarcerated in the Andersonville Prison, in which he died Apr. 15, 1864.  To Mr. and Mrs. Campbell were born six children, viz.: William N., Mary A., Louisa, Thomas M., Joanna, and AmandaWilliam N. enlisted in 1864, in Company G, Seventieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served his country until the close of the war.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  152
  Perry Twp. -
JOHN CAMPBELL, farmer, P. O. Fayetteville, son of James and Margaret Campbell, was born in Donegal County, Ireland, in 1808.  In 1837, he came to this county and worked in the coal mines of Northampton County, Penn., with his brother James, several months, when they went to Maysville, Ky., where they were engaged on public works.  In 1841, he returned to Ireland, and the following year he married, to Hannah Boyle.  They have ten children, all born in this township - Ann, Margaret, Mary, Catherine, Ellen, Celia, James, Charles, Daniel and John.  In 1843, the year following his marriage, he returned to this country and settled in this township on a farm of 143 acres, which his brother had bought for him during hi absence; he has built a fine brisk residence, and made a number of other improvements.  The family are all members of the Catholic Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  133
  Huntington Twp. -
JOHN B. CAMPBELL, retired, Aberdeen, was born in Aberdeen in 1805, and is a son of Evan and Margaret (Byers) Campbell.  His father was born in Pennsylvania, and was a son of Matthew Campbell.  His father was born in Pennsylvania, and was a son of Matthew Campbell, a native of Scotland, who came to this country before the Revolution.  IN 1804, Evan Campbell settled in Aberdeen and bought a large tract of land; he was a ship-carpenter by trade, and a hard working man; he and his wife were members of the Methodist Church.  To them were born nine children, viz., John B., Shelby, Evaline, Jane, and Exhira (living); the following are deceased, viz.: Amanda, Margaret, Power and William.  Mr. Campbell was born Apr. 2, 1780, and died Dec. 20, 1859.  His wife died May 13, 1849, aged sixty-one years eleven months and twenty-days.  Mr. Campbell was an old river man and following boating extensively.  When old enough, our subject went on the river, and has followed flatboating and steamboating for more than thirty years; he saw the first steamboat that plowed the waters of the Ohio.  He was married to Lydia, the daughter of Elijah and Elizabeth (Wentworth) Church.  After marriage, he located in Aberdeen, where his family has since resided.  Both parents are members of the Methodist Church, to which they have belonged for more than forty years.  Eleven children have been born to them, eight living, viz., Theresa, Caroline, Jane, Mary, Fanny, Jessie, Benjamin, and Charles.  The deceased are Louisiana, Isabella  and John.  Mr. Church came from New York about 1812; he was a stonemason, and he died Mar. 12, 1852.  She died June 11, 1859.  They were parents of eleven children, of whom Mrs. Church alone survives.  Matthew Campbell died June 18, 1819.  Evan Campbell was married the second time to Nancy Johnson.  Benjamin Campbell, son of John B. Campbell, was born in 1848, and enlisted Sept. 15, 1864, in Company K, "Merrill's Horse," which belonged to the Second Missouri Regiment, Gen. Fremont's Body Guard.  He saw active service; was in a number of engagements; was commissioned Corporal Feb. 1, 1865, and discharged Sept. 19 1865.  Aug. 11, 1872, he was married to Anna, the daughter of John Parks, by whom he has had five children, viz., Nellie, Lewis, Irene, Eugene, and Edward.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  151
  Jackson Twp. -
LAFAYETTE B. CAMPBELL, blacksmith, Ash Ridge.  Jacob S. Campbell (deceased), father of our subject, was born June 6, 1817, in Harrison County, Va.  In his youth, he learned the trade of blacksmithing, which he followed the greater portion of his life.  He came to Brown County, Franklin Township, and located at Arnheim in 1839, where he remained several years.  From Arnheim he moved to Pink Hill, Jackson Township, where he remained but a short time.  In March, 1862, he moved to Carlisle Village, where he remained until his decease in February, 1877.  While at Arnheim, on Oct. 29, 1840, he married Jennie L. Long, daughter of Joseph Long.  To them were born ten children; the following are the names of those still living:  George M., Anna, Asenath A., William A., Lafayette B., Delila A. and Charles S.  Mr. Campbell has served as Clerk and Treasurer of Franklin Township, and Trustee of Jackson Township.  Politically, his views were Democratic.  His widow survives him, and at present is living at Carlisle Village.  Lafayette B. Campbell our subject, was born Aug. 26, 1856, in Franklin Township, Brown County, and received but a limited education.  On Mar. 30, 1882, he married Sylvie Dunn, daughter of R. B. Dunn, Esq  He at present is engaged in blacksmithing at Carlisle Village.  He is a good workman, and guarantees satisfaction.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 275
  Pleasant Twp. -
R. E. CAMPBELL, of Campbell & Fite, attorneys at law, Georgetown, was born in Jackson Township, Brown County, Ohio, Mar. 23, 1854.  His father, William Campbell, is a native of Adams County, Ohio, and at present a farmer of Jackson Township, this county.  Mr. Campbell's mother was Fanny Evans, a native of Brown County.  Mr. Campbell grew to manhood on the fall of 1880 Albert G. Fite was admitted as a law partner.  The firm of Campbell & Fite enjoy a fair practice, and are highly esteemed by the citizens of Georgetown and vicinity.  Mr. Campbell is Democratic in politics, and in early life served one term as Clerk of Jackson Township.  He was united in marriage, Sept. 5, 1879, to M. Lizzie, daughter of Dyas Gilbert, of Huntington Township, Brown County, Ohio.  They have one son - William D.  Mrs. Campbell is a member of the M. E. Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 9
  Perry Twp. -
EUGENE CARLIER, carpenter, Fayetteville, son of Matthew and Margaret Carlier, was born in Belgium in 1822.  In 1852, his parents, two brothers and one sisters came to this country and settled in this township, where the three sons, Eugene, Frank and Joseph, bought fifty-five acres of land, three miles southeast of Fayetteville.  Mr. Carlier was married in this township, Oct. 12, 1858, to Jane C. Dennis, by whom he has four children - Nicholas, Jestine, Eugene and Joseph. Mr. Carlier now has a fine farm of 160 acres, about 100 of which are under cultivation; he also has two acres in the northeastern part of the village; his sons do the farming, while Mr. Carlier works at his trade, having followed it a number of years.  The family are members of the Catholic Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  133
  Clark Twp. -
D. R. CASE, P. O. Hamersville, a teacher by profession and a farmer by occupation, is a life resident of Brown Co., Ohio.  He was born Jan. 18, 1850, and is a son of Henry Case and Mary J. (Lake) Case, natives of Ohio and of English ancestry.  Mr. Case was reared on a farm, and his early literary education was received in the district schools of Highland and Brown Counties.  He subsequently attended the graded schools at Georgetown, and for two years was a student at the National Normal University, at Lebanon, Ohio.  When twenty years of age, he commenced teaching school, and has taught each year since, spending the summer months in the cultivation of the soil - Hamersville and Feesburg, have been the principal points in his educational operations.  Mr. Case is a Republican.  In 1875 he was joined in the bonds of holy wedlock, to Frances McBeth, daughter of Squire McBeth, this township.  They have two children.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  181
  Perry Twp. -
THOMAS CLARKE, farmer, P. O. St. Martin's, son of Miles and Margaret Clarke, was born in Ireland Aug. 12, 1832; he came to the United States in 1852, and worked at the carpenter's trade is Cincinnati several years, having learned the trade in Ireland; he was married in Cincinnati, in 1858, to Eliza Brogan, by whom he has had ten children, nine still living; their names are as follows: Miles, John, Mary, William, Aggie, Joseph, Theresa, Francis and Carrie.  They came to this township in 1861, and several years later, bought fifty-six acres of land where he now lives, in the northeastern part of the township.  The family are members of the Catholic church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  133

John Cochran
(Deceased)
Huntington Twp. -
  GEN. JOHN COCHRAN (deceased), one of the most distinguished of the early citizens of Brown County, was born in Franklin County, Penn., Sept. 19, 1781.  His father, William Cochran, an early pioneer of Brown County, was a native of Ireland, and born in County Antrim, in 1722.  He was married in his native country to Elizabeth Boothe, and about the middle of the last century emigrated to America.  He served in the Revolutionary war and resided for some time in Pennsylvania, afterward in Kentucky, and about 1795 or 1796 came to the Northwest Territory and settled on the East Fork of Eagle Creek, near the present eastern boundary of Brown County.  He died in March, 1814, aged ninety-two years.  His wife, Elizabeth, died Oct. 21, 1823.  John was about nine years old when his father came to Kentucky.  He lived for a few years in the vicinity of the old settlement at Washington.  When a small boy he was at Fort Washington, on the site of Cincinnati, and saw corn growing on what is now Fourth street of the Queen City.  He was with his father on his settlement north of the Ohio, as above stated, and when about eighteen years old became overseer of the Kanawha salt works, where he continued about seven years.  Salt was one of the necessaries of life which it was most difficult for the pioneers of Kentucky and the Northwest Territory to obtain.  John Cochran is said to have shipped the first boat load of salt down the Ohio to Louisville, Ky.  He came to what is now Brown County about 1805 or 1806. He married Tamer Howard, daughter of Cyrus and Milly Howard, who was born in Montgomery County, Va.  Her father for some years kept the ferry between Aberdeen and Limestone.  John Cochran purchased a farm from Nathaniel Beasley, about six miles northeast of Aberdeen, on the East Fork of Eagle Creek, in what is now Huntington Township, on which he resided for a greater portion of the remaining years of his life.  He served in the war of 1812 as Deputy Sergeant in the Commissary Department.  He took much interest in the old militia musters and passed through all the grades from Captain to Brigadier General.  He was known as Gen. Cochran.  In the year 1824, he was first elected a Representative to the Legislature, and was re-elected in 1826, 1827 and 1828.  In 1829, he was elected Senator from Brown and Adams counties, and was re-elected in 1830, thus serving six full terms in the General Assembly.  Gen. Cochran had but little education from books in his early years, never attending school but three months in his life.  He was, however, self educated.  He was a man of strong mind and remarkable powers of memory.  In his recollection of dates he was seldom found to be in error.  He carefully cultivated his memory in his early business transactions by imprinting facts on his mind, and he became marked for the tenacity with which he could retain anything he heard or read.  Gen. Cochran was the father of thirteen children, five sons and eight daughters - Joseph, John, Milly, William, Mary, Elizabeth, James, Tamer, Ellen, Thomas J., Sarah J., Malinda and Lydia.  Of them, ten are now living.  Mrs. Cochran died in 1855.  She was an esteemed member of the Christian Church.  Gn. Cochran was a Mason, and assisted he met with good success, and died in possession of considerable property.  In his old age he resided for a time in Illinois, but he returned to Brown County and lived with his children.  His death occurred at the residence of his son-in-law, William Shelton, in Adams County.  He lived eighty-three years and died on his birthday, Sept. 19, 1864.  His remains, with those of his wife, repose in the cemetery at Ebenezer Church.  Gen. Cochran left behind him a high reputation for ability, sound judgment and patriotism, and his name finds a place among the honored men of Brown County.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  152
  Clark Twp. -
ANDREW COFFMAN, farmer, P. O. Hamersville, was born in Maryland Nov. 13, 1818.  His parents were John Coffman and Susan Coffman, but no relation to each other before their marriage.  They came to Brown County in 1820, where they resided till death.  The former died at the age of ninety-four years four months and twenty days.  Mr. Coffman was reared on the old homestead farm, and has been engaged in farming during his life.  He commenced life for himself by working on a farm for $14 per month.  He worked this way for four years and nine months, and had then saved about $500.  He bought some woodland, and upon reaching his twenty-first year, had cleared about twenty-five acres.  He has been quite successful in his farming operations, now owning a good farm of 190 acres.  His political views are Republican, and he has served several years as Director of his school district.  He was married, Oct. 14, 1843, to Mary A., daughter of Christian Gray.  They have five children - Susan, Nelson B. (a teacher of a graded school in California), James W., (a farmer), Emma (wife of Charles Thompson, a farmer of Clark Township), and Sherman.  Mrs. Coffman is a member of the M. E. Church.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  181
  Green Twp. -
JAMES H. COLLINS, farmer, P. O. Five Mile, was born July 27, 1837, in Clermont County, Ohio.  His parents were Thomas and Elizabeth Collins.  Our subject was reared to manhood on a farm, and received a fair English education.  In March 23, 1863, was celebrated his wedding, he leading to the marriage altar Miss Susan McKinnie, daughter of Josiah McKinnie, of Clermont County.  To them have been born four children, three of whom are now living - Albert F., Carrie W. and Anna L.  In 1863, shortly after his marriage, Mr. Collins located in the northern portion of Green Township, Brown County, where he now resides.  He is a member of the Christian Church, a member of the Grange Lodge, No. 980, at Maple College, and the owner of 108 acres of land.  Thomas Collins, father of our subject, was born in March 1808, in Delaware, and when quite young, with his parents, emigrated to Ohio.  His parents were among the early settlers in Clermont County, having settled in Goshen Township, where they remained until their decease.  Thomas was there reared, amid the stirring scenes of pioneer life, and in March, 1836, married Elizabeth Murphy, by whom he had six children, three of whom are now living - James H., John and Samuel.  He remained in Clermont County until his decease, on Apr. 3, 1882.  Josiah McKinnie, father of Mrs. Collins, was born in Pennsylvania, where he married Elizabeth Armel, by whom he had nine children, seven are now living, viz., Thomas B., Lydia A., Susannah E., Samuel B., Ellen J., Walter L. and Emma B.  The date of his settlement in Stone Lick Township, Clermont Co., Ohio, we have failed to ascertain accurately, but in all probability it may have been in the year 1844 or 1845.  He is still a resident of Clermont County.  His wife has been deceased many years, and left behind her a wealth of love and affection.  We are pleased to give our subject a place among the many men of his township who are so well represented in this history, and whose memory can thus be perpetuated while time shall last.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  260
  Perry Twp. -
CHARLES CONRARD, farmer, P. O. Fayetteville, son of Joseph and Mary A. Conrard, was born in France in 1825.  In 1832, his parents came to this country and settled in this township, about one mile southwest of Vera Cruz, where they bought sixty acres of land; his father died in 1874, and his mother in 1852; he was married in this township in 1850, to Frances Berger.  They have had nine children, six living - Catherine, Mary A., Josephine, Julius, Louisa and Edmund.  The deceased were Charles, Frances L. and Fannie.  In 1852, Mr. Conrard bought 115 acres of the farm where he now lives, upon which he moved his family.  By industry and economy he has added to it till he now possesses 450 acres of fine land, 300 of which are under cultivation.  The family are members of the Catholic Church of Fayetteville.  Mr. Conrard's father was an old soldier under Napoleon I.  After serving two years, he was captured and sent to Spain, where he has held as a prisoner ten years; he taught school a number of years before and after he was in the war.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  133
  Perry Twp. -
JOSEPH CONRARD, undertaker and wagon-maker, Fayetteville, son of Joseph and Mary A. Conrard, was born in France Feb. 15, 1831.  In 1832, his parents came to this country and settled in this township, three miles west of Fayetteville, where they bought a farm of fifty-two acres.  Joseph  was reared on the farm till twenty-one years of age, when he went to Vera Cruz and learned the wagon-making trade.  He worked at his trade in Lynchburg, Highland Co., Ohio, three years; three years in Cincinnati pattern-making; then went to Newport, Ky., and opened a wagon shop, where he remained eight years.  He then returned to Fayetteville and opened a shop on Pine street.  In 1873, he bought his present site, quarter acre, corner Pike and Russell streets, where he built his shop, and also owns blacksmith shop adjoining.  He makes wagons, carriages, buggies, etc., also does general repairing.  He is also the village undertaker.  In the spring of 1882, he opened a furniture store, where he keeps a good assortment of house-furnishing goods.  He was married in Cincinnati in 1855, to Catherine, daughter of Harrison and Mary Bevens, born in this township.  They have eight children - Charles, Lillie, Katie, John, William, Joseph, Mary and Gertrude.  Mr. Conrard has a residence and quarter acre of land in the southeast part of village.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  133
  Green Twp. -
JACOB M. COOK, manufacturer, Mt. Oreb.  Amos Cook, father of our subject, was born in Pennsylvania, and, when a young man, learned the trade of wagon-making, which he followed until he was perhaps forty years of age.  He married Anna Mathews, by whom he had en children, six of whom are now living - William T., Samuel M., Ann E., Jane, Jacob N. and Hannah L.  They came to Clermont County, Ohio, about 1829, where they remained eleven years; then came to Clark Township, Brown County, where they remained a short time, when they returned to Clermont County, where they remained until his decease, in 1842.  His widow survived him until 1872.  Our subject was born in January, 1831, in Clermont County, and received a common school education.  In 1875, he went to Tennessee, and for four years was engaged in the lumber business; he then returned to Green Township, Brown County, and at present is engaged in the manufacturing line, making chair material, hames and shingles, as well as sawing all kinds of lumber.  His place of business is in the western portion of Green Township.  Politically, he is a Republican; he is the owner of 450 acres of land.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  260
  Clark Twp. -
S. M. COOK, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Bethel, was born in the State of Maryland Mar. 1, 1815, and was educated in the common schools of that State.  HE followed his early occupation of wagon-maker until 1842, since which time he has devoted his time and attention to farming, now owning the farm on which he resides.  He was married in 1842 to Adeline D. Thompson, daughter of Elisha Thompson, a native of the State of Maine.  To this union, seven children were born - Perry T. (now residing in Kentucky), Cyrus T. (a resident of Brown County), Amos B., Jennie, Mollie, Bessie and C. W.  Mr. and Mrs. Cook are both members of the Christian Church in which he as been Deacon and Elder.  He is a Republican in politics and has been a Trustee and Treasurer of the township.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  181
  Clark Twp. -
WILLIAM T. COOK, farmer, P. O. Bethel, was born in Maryland Mar. 14, 1813; his parents were Amos and Anna (Matthews) Cook, natives of Pennsylvania, of English, Scotch and Irish descent.  They emigrated from Maryland to Ohio in 1828, and settled in Clermont County, where the father died in 1841.  The mother died in Brown County, in 1870, aged eighty-four years.  The father was a wagon-maker and farmer by occupation.  They had a family of eleven children, of whom eight reached their majority; their names were as follows: Charles (deceased), James (died in 1838), William T., Samuel N. (a farmer of this township), Jessie B. (died aged ten years), Amos B. (died in youth), Jacob M. (proprietor of saw-mill and chair factory), Anna E. (wife of Dr. Benjamin Catterton, of Indiana), Sarah (died in 1872), Jane and Hannah; the two latter are living with our subject who has never married and who is wonderfully attached to his brothers and sisters.  He came to this county in 1852, and helped to build and Thornton Mill in which he had an interest until just before it burned.  He subsequently purchased a farm and has since devoted his attention to farming.  He is a well-read and thoroughly posted gentlemen, a Republican in politics but not radical in his views, and withal a very popular citizen.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  181
  Huntington Twp. -
H. L. P. COOPER, farmer, P. O. Aberdeen, was born where he now lives, on the old home farm of Jacob Cooper, Dec. 6, 1852, and is a son of Jacob Cooper, an old settler, whose sketch appears in this work; he was reared on the farm and in the district school received an ordinary education; he was married, Dec. 9, 1879, to Jessie F., the daughter of I. H. Worstell (whose sketch appears in this book), and located upon the old home farm, where he now resides.  He owns 100 acres of well improved and highly cultivated land.  Mrs. Cooper is a member of the Christian Church at Bethlehem.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  154
  Huntington Twp. -
JACOB COOPER (deceased) was born in Monmouth County, N. J., Nov. 30, 1805, and was a son of William and Elizabeth (Richmond) Cooper natives of the same State.  The latter was a daughter of John Richmond, of German descent, while the Cooper family descended from the English.  In 1812, William Cooper with his wife and twelve children, emigrated to this county, with team and wagon, and purchased 103 acres of land in this township, upon which he lived and died.  Their children were as follows:  John, who died in Sandusky, Ohio, during the war of 1812; Joanna (deceased), Margaret, Sidney (killed by Indians), Thomas, Mary, Charles, Ellen, Zenas, Jacob, Eliza, Peter and David, who was born here.  Our subject was but seven years old when his parents came to this township, so his younger days were spent in assisting in the labors of the farm.  He was married to Margaret, the daughter of David and Ann (Dragoo) Flaugher, old settlers, in the year 1827.  After his marriage he purchased seventy-five acres of land adjoining his father-in-law, to which he added by purchasing 130 acres.  On this place he lived during his life and died Dec. 30, 1880.  He was a man of good judgment, quick discernment, and was honored with some of the offices of the township.  To them were born thirteen children, six living, namely: Elizabeth, Catherine, Zenas, Philip, Ezekiel M., and Harrison.  They are all residents of the township.  Belteshazer Dragoo was a son of Benjamin Dragoo, the first settler in the county.  He, Benjamin, joined the Shakers.  Ezekiel Cooper as born in this township June 6, 1841, and was a son of Jacob Cooper.  His boyhood was passed on the farm and in the district schools; he received  a good practical education.  He was married Dec. 29, 1864, to Ella, the daughter of Dr. D. S. Guthrie, Higginsport, this county, whose sketch appears in the Lewis Township biographies.  After his marriage he resided on the farm Joseph Fulton now occupies, and which he, at that time, purchased; four years afterward he sold it and purchased 103 acres where he now resides, to which he has since added fourteen acres.  The farm is well and tastily improved, and in an excellent state of cultivation.  To Mr. and Mrs. Cooper four children have been born, three of whom are now living, namely: Mary E., Joseph L. and John R.  Jacob D., the third child, departed this life Dec. 15, 1879, aged five years, seven months and eight days.  Mr. Cooper has held the offices of Trustee and Township  Clerk.  Mrs. Cooper was born in New Market, Highland County, Ohio, Nov. 9, 1848.  Mr. and Mrs. Cooper are members of the Bethlehem Christian Church, with which they have been associated for more than twenty yeas.  He is also a member of Aberdeen Lodge, No. 149, F. & A. M.  Jacob, the father of E. M. Cooper, was a member of  the same church and the same lodge.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  153
  Huntington Twp. -
PHILLIP W. COOPER, farmer, P. O. Aberdeen, was born in this township Feb. 14, 1838, and is a son of Jacob Cooper, an old settler; he was married, Mar. 1, 1866, to Tabitha, the daughter of Jacob and Abi (Neal) Marsh, after which he settled on Three-Mile Creek, where he lived ten years, then purchased 150 acres of land where he now lives; he and his estimable wife are members of the Church, to which they have been connected for twenty years.  Seven children have been born to them, six of whom are living, viz., Margaret, Nannie T., William W., Abi A., Albert B., Jacob L. and Martha E.  Margaret died Nov. 10, 1879, aged twelve years.  Jacob Marsh was the son of Abraham and Elizabeth Marsh was the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Warner) Neal nee Brichel; her father, Martin Brichel, was a son of William Brichel, a native of Ireland, who settled in Virginia.  To Jacob Marsh and wife were born the following children: Tabitha, William A. and Walter C., twins, Calvin T., Milliard F., Martha C., Benjamin, N. B., Henry M. and Cora L.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  154
  Green Twp. -
CRAWFORD & MILLER, merchants, Mount Oreb.  FRANK MILLER, the older member of this firm, was born Jan. 5, 1852, in Perry Township, Brown County; his parents are Christian and Agnes Miller, deceased.  Having received a rudimentary education, he attended for some time the normal school at Lebanon, and subsequently taught school several years.  In 1879, he married Martha E. Crawford, daughter of Jackson and Elizabeth A. Crawford.  To them has been born one child - Burch.  He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Lodge No. 291, at Mount Oreb.
     CHARLES L. CRAWFORD, younger member of this firm, was born in January, 1853, in Green Township, Brown County; he is a son of Jackson and Elizabeth A. Crawford; his youthful days were spent on a farm, and he received a fair English education.  In December, 1878, he was united in marriage to Miss Mollie A. Boggess.  This union has been blessed with two children, viz., Claude and Ada L.  In May, 1879, he formed a partnership with Mr. Frank Miller, in the mercantile business, under the now well-known firm title of Crawford & Miller.  They deal in dry goods, groceries, fancy articles, etc., and are recognized among the leading merchants of the county, having a large and commodious store room, and carrying a large and fine stock of goods.  They are meeting with marked financial success, their trade being continually on the increase.  We take pleasure in representing the interests of this firm in this work.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  261
  Sterling Twp. -
V. B. CREAGER, farmer, P. O. Eastwood, son of Joseph and Harriet (Stiles) Creager, was born in Clermont County, Ohio, Nov. 1, 1835.  His father was a native of New Jersey, and his mother of Vermont; they came to Ohio about the year 1820.  Both were of German descent. Mr. Creager was raised on a farm and educated in the common schools.  He was married, Nov. 18, 1858, to Charlotte, daughter of Reuben and Levina Harbaugh, a native of Clermont County, of German descent.  They have but one child, Peter H., born May 14, 1861, and now in business in Cincinnati.  Mr. Creager was a Sergeant of Company K, One Hundred and Sixtieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served in the Shenandoah Valley.  He is a Republican, has served five years as Township Clerk, and is serving the third term of Justice of the Peace.  His father was Justice of the Peace of the township for some years.  Joseph Creager was a son of William and Sarah (Nitzer) CreagerMr. Nitzer was a soldier in the Revolution.  Harriet Stiles was a daughter of Benjamin and Margery (Brewster) Stiles, her mother being a sister to Ephraim Brewster, who was a Surgeon in the war of 1812, and drowned in Lake Champlain.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page 295
  Jefferson Twp. -
JOHN P. CROPPER, farmer, P. O. Russellville.  Handy J. Cropper, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Maryland in June, 1804.  His parents were John and Eliza Cropper, who emigrated from Maryland to Adams County, Ohio, and settled in Sprig Township about the year 1819.  When a mere infant, his mother died.  He received but a limited education, and on April 15, 1830, married Jane Boyls, daughter of Thomas and Annie Boyls, by whom he had seven children - Thomas B., John P., Sarah A., Nancy J. (deceased), Emeline, Lucinda and Reuben O.  He was a man of industrious habits and of an energetic nature.  In political issues, he cast his lot with the Democratic party.  He was a member of the M. E. Church, and died Dec. 9, 1876.  John P., second child of Handy J. Cropper, and subject of this sketch, was born in December, 1832, in Adams County, and received but a rudimentary education.  In October, 1852, he married Hester J. Ellis, born Mar. 11, 1833, a lady of culture and rare intelligence, and a daughter of Walker and Evaline Ellis, of Pleasant Township, Brown County.  This union has been blessed with nine children, viz.: Eva J., Lucy F., Walker R., Handy J., Wilson M., Samuel R., John M., Martha E. (deceased) and Thomas W.  Eva J. is the wife of Dr. James H. Williamson, of Higginsport, Brown County.  Lucy F., officiates as Organist in the Presbyterian Chapel at Russellville.  In the spring of 1864, Mr. Cropper bought 115 acres of land where he at present is located, and by his good management, economy and industry has added to his first purchase sufficient land to include in all 200 acres.  He has served for three years as Justice the Peace for Jefferson Township, has been Township Trustee, and was elected Land Appraiser for 1880.  He has been a member of the Board of Agriculture for Brown County, and is a member of the F. & A. M., Lodge, Russellville, Ohio.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  236
  Eagle Twp. -
JOHN A. CROSS, deceased, was born in May, 1842, in Eagle Township, Brown Co., Ohio.  He was the son of Jesse and Hannah (Alexander) Cross; was reared to man's estate on a farm, and received but a limited education.  ON June 12, 1867, he married Louisa Kinzer, born Sept. 25, 1844, daughter of David and Elizabeth Kinzer.  To them have been born two children - Jesse and Charles.  He has served as Trustee of this township, and filled with credit other official positions.  During the war of the rebellion, he enlisted in the Seventh Ohio Cavalry; while in the service, he contracted an illness which finally caused his death.  He was a kind and loving father and indulgent husband.  He departed this life Nov. 5, 1878.  His widow survives him, and resides on her farm of sixty-seven acres, pleasantly situated near South Fincastle.
Source: The History of Brown County Ohio - Chicago - W. H. Beers & Co. - 1883 - Page  225

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