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ASHTABULA COUNTY,
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AIMEE GREENE ABBOTT ranks among the well known and highly esteemed women of Ashtabula County.  She is a native of Andover, born Jan. 1, 1873, and the daughter of Elmer and Lucretia (Lindsley) Green.
     Elmer Green was born in Cherry Valley Township, Ashtabula County Nov. 23, 1840, and was a leading attorney of the county for more than 50 years.  He attended Grand River College and Chicago University, after which he began the practice of his profession at Freeport, Ill.  Nine years later he removed to Andover, where he spent the remainder of his life.  Mr. Green was a member of the Masonic Lodge and a prominent citizen of his community during his life.  He served as president of the board of education for nine years and also as justice of the peace.  Mr. and Mrs. Greene, both now deceased, were the parents of one child, Aimee, the subject of this sketch.
     Aimee (Greene) Abbott was educated in the schools of Andover and attended Jefferson Institute, after which she engaged in teaching at Williamsfield and Andover.  Mrs. Abbott was later graduated from a New England university in Boston.
     On Jan. 30, 1900, Miss Greene was united in marriage with Charles E. Abbott, a native of New York, born March 27, 1860.  They have two adopted children: Ruth Thompson, who lives in New York; and Gregory Jett, who is now with the navy.
     Mrs. Abbott is a member of the Congregational Church.  She has traveled throughout the world extensively and is a magazine writer of note.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page

ARLIE B. ABRAMSON is a veteran of the World War and a prominent and successful young business man of Ashtabula.  He is owner and proprietor of three stores in Conneaut, which are known as the Boston Stores.  Mr. Abraham was born in Cleveland, Sept. 6, 1894, and is the son of Abe and Esther (Rosenstein) Abramson.
     Abe Abramson
, well known merchant of Painesville, was born in Poland and came to this country when a young man, locating in Philadelphia, where he lived for several years before moving to Cleveland.  He removed from Cleveland to Painesville in 1903 and established his present business, which is now the largest department store in that city.  There are four children in the Abramson family, as follows:  Ralph, lives in Painesville, is a World War veteran, having served overseas; Ralph, lives in Painesville, is a World War veteran, having served overseas; Arlie B., the subject of this sketch: Ruth, deceased; and Miriam who will be graduated from Western Reserve University in Cleveland in 1925.
     Arlie B. Abramson received his education in the public schools of Painesville and his first business venture was in his father's store as a clerk.  In 1916 Mr. Abramson came to Conneaut, where he became a business partner of M. C. Levitt until Feb. 23, 1924, at which time Mr. Abramson purchased Mr. Levitt's interest in the business.  He owns several pieces of valuable city property as well as his place of business.  Mr. Abramson's stores are located at 215 Main Street, 209 Main Street and 217 Main Street.
     During the World War Mr. Abramson enlisted for service on June 14, 1917.  He was among the first men from Lake County and was sent to Camp Taylor, Kentucky, and from there to Camp Funston, Kansas.  Mr. Abramson was discharged at Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio, on April 10, 1919, having received the rank of corporal.
     Mr. Abramson belongs to the American Legion, the Elks Lodge and the Chamber of Commerce.  He has always taken an active interest in athletics and promotes a baseball team, which is known as the Boston Store Team.  Mr. Abramson is a capable and progressive man and an excellent citizen. 
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page  1062
THOMAS ADAMS, of Ashtabula, Ohio, the oldest conductor, in point of service, on the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railroad, Franklin division, and a most affable and popular gentleman, was born in Lamoille county, Vermont, forty miles from Burlington, June 28, 1833.  His ancestors came to America in its earliest history, before it had achieved independence of the mother country.  His great-great-grandfather on his mother's side, Thomas Smith, was one of the first settlers in New Hampshire, having come from Londonderry in the north of Ireland.  James Adams, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Hillsborough county, New Hampshire, in 1792.  He was a carpenter and joiner by trade and a most popular and worthy man.  He married Susanna Smith, one of thirteen children of Thomas and Esther (Poland) Smith, both natives of New Hampshire, where the former was born in 1776 and died in 1856, having passed his entire life on the farm where his birth occurred, and which had been the home of the family for many generations.  The mother of the subject of this sketch died in 1843, after which the father returned to his native county in the Granite State, where he died in 1852, aged sixty years.  They were the parents of six children: Lydia, who married J. B. Swan; Lucy, unmarried, residing in Providence, Rhode Island; James, who married Lucy Morgan, and died at middle age, leaving two sons, both of whom are now deceased; Mary, wife of Allen Earl, of Painesville, Ohio; Ann, who died unmarried; and Thomas, the subject of this sketch.
     The latter passed the first ten years of his life in his native county, when, upon the death of his mother, he accompanied his father to the latter's native county of Hillsborough, New Hampshire.  Here he remained until he was twenty years of age, receiving his education in the common schools and enjoying the higher instruction of a cultured home and the watchful care of an honored and honorable father.  The year following the latter's death, young Thomas Adams turned his steps toward the setting sun, seeking, as so many had done before him, a home in the great State of Ohio.  He first secured employment in the foundry at Painesville, where he worked one season.  He then entered the service of the Cleveland & Erie Railroad Company (now the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, as brakeman, in which capacity he worked five years, running from Cleveland, Ohio, to Erie, Pennsylvania.  At the end of this time, his faithful and efficient services were regarded by his promotion to the position of conductor, in which he has labored ever since.  During the first ten years of his service, his headquarters were at Cleveland, Ohio, then Jamestown, Pennsylvania, two years then Franklin, Pennsylvania, five years, and he then removed with his family to Ashtabula, where he has since resided, gaining by his uniform uprightness of character and courtesy the universal good will of his fellow-men.
     In September, 1861, Mr. Adams was married, in Erie, Pennsylvania, to Miss Mary Walbridge, a lady of many estimable qualities.  She was one of five children of W. and Rachel (Bugbee) Walbridge.  The former, born in Massachusetts in 1800, was a moulder by trade, but later became a hotel-keep0er and farmer, his death occurring in Pennsylvania in 1878.  By his first marriage, Mr. Adams had two children: Millie S., born in 1863, now living; and Frank, born in 1867, who died the following year.  In 1878 this little family were bereaved of the care of the devoted wife and mother, whose death carried mourning to many hearts outside of the home circle, which knew and appreciated her worth of character.  In Ashtabula, in November, 1881, Mr. Adams was married to Miss Emily Johnson, a lady of domestic tastes and social accomplishments.  Her parents, Arthur and Margaret Johnson had the following children: Robert; Hamilton; Phoebe, who married Savage, Carlos; Charles; Emily; Frances, wife of E. R. Phinney; Anson; Nellie, deceased; and Mrs. Adams.  Mr. Adams has no children by his second marriage.
     In politics, Mr. Adams is thoroughly in touch with the Republican party.  In religion, the family lean towards the faith of the Baptist Church.  In the enjoyment of a comfortable income, surrounded by an interesting family and many warm friends, Mr. Adams may be said to have gained the highest success in life, which is not gauged by pecuniary accumulations alone, but by all those amenities which go to satisfy the human soul.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 284
GEORGE P. ADDICOTT, who has lived on the same farm in Orwell Township during his entire life, ranks among the substantial farmers of Ashtabula County.  He was born June 25, 1874, and is the son of James and Jane (Beer) Addicott.
     James Addicott
came to this country from England, where he was born, and located in Ashtabula County.  He became a prosperous farmer and was widely known throughout the community.  He was born in 1825 and died July 19, 1910.  His wife was also a native of England and is now 94 years of age.  To Mr. and Mrs. Addicott eight children were born, as follows:  Esther Brower, lives at Orwell; Lizzie Meigs, lives at Orwell; Charles, lives in Wayne Township, Ashtabula County; Anna (Dole) deceased; Walter, lives at Colebrook; Sarah Jones, lives at East Orwell; George P., the subject of this sketch; and Gertrude, who died at the age of 14 years.
     George P. Addicott attended the schools of Orwell and has always been interested in general farming and stock raising.  He operates 72 acres of land and has a well improved farm.
     On Oct. 24, 1918, Mr. Addicott was united in marriage with Miss Beatrice Cummins, daughter of James and Helen Avery Cummins,  a native of Windsor, Ohio, born in September, 1884.  They have one son, Robert James, who was born Aug. 22, 1920.
     Mr. Addicott is a Republican.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page
QUINTUS FLAMINIUS ATKINS, the oldest son of Josiah Atkins, Sr., and Mary Gillett Atkins, was born May 10, 1785, in Wolcott, New Haven county, Connecticut. His father, descended from an English family of good repute, was a man of more than usual bodily vigor and energy.
     His mother, Mary Gillett, a daughter of Captain Zaccheus Gillett, and sister of Rev. Alexander Gillett, the first settled minister in Wolcott (then called Farmingbury), was a woman of superior intelligence and many virtues.
     Josiah Atkins was the youngest son of Joseph Atkins, one of the early find honored settlers in Wolcott, a man foremost in every good word and work, during a residence of many years.
     During the years 1798 and 1799, a war with France seeming probable, an army was raised by the United States government, into which the subject of our sketch, at the age of seventeen years, enlisted. The regiment to which he belonged was encamped in or near New Haven, Connecticut. The war-cloud having passed away the forces were disbanded, and our young soldier sought employment in the west.
     In 1801 and 1802 he worked at road-making on the "Genesee turnpike," in central New York.
     In October, 1809, he joined a party of emigrants from Connecticut, bound for the then land of promise, "New Connecticut." They arrived in Morgan, Ashtabula County, in November, 1802.
     Two settlers (with their families) had preceded them by a few months, viz., Timothy R. Hawley, a surveyor, and agent for the proprietors of the town, and Captain John Wright.
     Mr. Atkins selected a farm in the east part of the town, but during the first year worked chiefly for others, chopping and clearing lands, making roads, etc.
     On the 22d of February, 1804, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Wright, the youngest daughter of Captain John Wright, above named.
     During a considerable part of the year 1805 lie was engaged in carrying the United States mail between Cleveland and Detroit, his usual route being from Cleveland to Sandusky. This difficult and dangerous service was performed on foot through the wilderness, carrying the mail, a gun and axe. It required great courage and perseverance; but he was a man who never objected to any necessary service or duty, no matter what its hardships or privations.
     In the spring of 1806, Rev. Joseph Badger, then a missionary to the northwestern Indians, engaged Mr. and Mrs. Atkins as assistants at the missionary station at Sandusky.
     Having built a boat on Grand river in Austinburg, and loaded it with supplies for the mission, the party, consisting of Rev. Mr. Badger, Mr. and Mrs. Atkins: and their little daughter, Emily (afterwards Mrs. Colonel George Turner, of Geneva, Ohio), descended the river to its mouth, where they were joined by a party of Indians, who, with their families, in canoes, accompanied the missionary party along the southern shore of Lake Erie to Sandusky. Here they remained about one and a half years, when repeated attacks of ague and fever forced them to abandon the mission and return to Morgan. During 1808 he was again engaged in carrying the mails on foot, in a more rapid manner than before, called the "express mail." His route was between Cleveland and Vermilion river.
     In June, 1811, the county of Ashtabula was organized, and Mr. Atkins was appointed its sheriff, serving until July, 1813, when he resigned to enter the United States service, as a lieutenant in the northwestern army under General W. H. Harrison.
     Previous to this service, however, in the fall of 1812, while sheriff, he, with other prominent citizens exempt from military services by age or official duties, viz., Colonel Eliphalet Austin, Major Levi Gaylord, Captain Roger Nettleton, Matthew Hubbard, Esq., Samuel Hendry, Esq., and many others, spent some time as mounted volunteers in scouting the country about Sandusky bay and Huron river, then threatened with invasion by the British forces and their Indian allies. Their effective service, it was believed, prevented an attack upon Camp Avery, an unfinished and therefore weak stockade upon Huron river.
     Upon the reduction of the army to a peace establishment, in 1815, Lieutenant Atkins received an honorable discharge from the service, and returned to his farm in Morgan.
     At the first general election after the close of the war (October, 1815), Mr. Atkins was again elected sheriff, and removed his family to Jefferson, where he continued to reside for the ensuing twenty-three years, save a brief sojourn on the lake-shore, in Geneva, about the year 1830.
     Having served as sheriff the legal limit of four years, he was appointed, in the winter of 1819-20, to the then new office of county auditor, and served in that capacity until March, 1822.
     At the next session of the Ohio legislature (1823-24) he was appointed to superintend the building of a turnpike-road through the "Maumee Swamp," so called, and to survey and sell the lands granted by congress to the State of Ohio, for the purpose of building said road. He was engaged in the duties of that appointment until the road was completed, occupying about three years.
     He next turned his attention to the Ohio canal, then being built from Cleveland to Portsmouth. In company with a young man of some previous experience on the Erie canal, New York, a considerable job was undertaken, which proved a much more expensive and difficult work than had been anticipated by engineers or contractors, involving a very heavy loss. To add to the difficulty, his partner, having possessed himself of all the company funds, suddenly decamped to parts unknown. This misfortune and treachery forced Mr. Atkins into hopeless insolvency. He voluntarily placed in the hands of a trustee, for the payment of his liabilities, all the savings of his previous life, and having a large family, was unable in after-years to do much towards retrieving his ill fortune.
     In 1835 and 1836 he was in the employ of the "Arcole Furnace Company," in Madison, Ohio, and was a careful and efficient agent in its then large business.
     In the autumn of 1836 he went to Olean, New York, in the employ of a land company, to take charge of a considerable property, comprising most of East Olean, with grist- and saw-mills, pine lands, etc.
     The reverses of 1837-38 so crippled the company that it was forced to sell the property, and early in 1839, Mr. Atkins removed to the farm of Edward Wade, in Brooklyn, near Ohio city, now Cleveland. At this place he resided most of the time until 1854. While residing there he was appointed an associate judge of the court of common pleas of Cuyahoga county, and held the office until, by a change in the constitution, that court was abolished. In February, 1853, his amiable and much-respected wife, Mrs. Sarah Wright Atkins, died at their home in Brooklyn, they having lived together in the marital relation forty-nine years.
     Subsequently he resided for a time with his son, Captain A. R. Atkins, in Chicago and Racine, but usually had a home with his daughters, Mrs. H. R. Gaylord, in Geneva, and Mrs. P. Judson, in Brooklyn.
     He died at "Barber Cottage," Brooklyn, then the home of Mr. Judson, January 23, 1859, in the seventy-seventh year of his age.
     During a large part of his life Mr. Atkins was an active and efficient promoter of religious observances, and during all his later years was an earnest and unwearied laborer for the abolition of slavery. At first he held aloof on the ground of its impracticability; but the tendency of pro-slavery opinion to enforce its views with stale eggs and other objectionable arguments soon brought him to the side of the party weak in numbers, but using only reasonable arguments. He was a sturdy believer in free speech, and held mobs in utter abhorrence.
     Between the years 1841 and 1853, Mr. Atkins devoted much time and means in aid of the anti-slavery movement in northern Ohio and western New York. His earnest and able addresses doubtless assisted in awakening the public mind in the localities he visited to the great wrong and injustice of the institution of slavery then darkening the whole country.
     In a long service as justice of the peace in Jefferson, and later, as a judge of the courts in Cleveland, when party spirit was often bitter and unreasoning, his sterling love of justice and his dealing was ever apparent. And although his friendships and aversions were strong, he never permitted them to affect his legal administration of justice.
     Through a long life his bodily and mental powers were vigorous, and whatever he undertook to do, whether chopping and clearing lands, splitting rails (in his younger days he was a famous "chopper and rail-splitter"), making roads, carrying mails on, foot through the wilderness, or arresting desperate criminals as sheriff, all was thoroughly well done.
     In his later years Mr. Atkins often wrote for the press; his contributions of most general interest probably being "Recollections of Pioneer Life in Northeastern Ohio," "Road-Making in Central New York at the Beginning of the Present Century," "A Trip through Iowa in its Early Days," and "Recollections of Military Service about Huron River and Sandusky Bay in the War of 1811-15."
     Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Atkins, ten (one son and nine daughters) lived to maturity. The son, Captain Arthur R. Atkins, is married and resides in Chicago. Five of the daughters are still living, in 1878, vie., Mrs. Stella M. Gaylord, in Saginaw, Michigan; Mrs. Ophelia Bostwick, in Oberlin, Ohio; Mrs. Mary Lynch, in Santa Barbara, California; Mrs. Martha Todd, in Tabor, Iowa; and Mrs. Bertha Judson, in Cleveland, Ohio.
     Helen Atkins died in Brooklyn, Ohio, in 1839; Mrs. Emily Turner, in Geneva, in 1841; Mrs. Flora Wheeler, in Portville, New York, in 1850; and Mrs. Sarah L. Wade, in Brooklyn, Ohio, in 1852.
     The grandchildren and great-grandchildren of Mr. and Mrs. Atkins are numerous, intelligent, and actively engaged in various pursuits in life. They reside in the States of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, California, and Texas. They comprise clergymen, lawyers, college professors and teachers, railroad-builders and managers, manufacturers, mill-owners and lumbermen, ship-builders, ship-owners, and ship-captains, who have sailed on all our lakes and on every ocean and nearly every sea on the globe.
     One of the latter, Matthew Turner, a native of Geneva, Ohio, while engaged in commerce between San Francisco and the Amoor river, in Siberia, in the year 1863, was the first to discover and open to the traffic of the world the Pacific cod-fisheries, in the Gulf of Tartary and on the coast of Kamschatka and subsequently about the Aleutian islands.
Source #3 - 1798 History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - Page 113 [Photo Available]
C. G. ALDERMAN, a well known farmer of Windsor Township, is a member of a family that has been actively identified with Ashtabula County for many years.  He was born on this farm in Windsor Township, Dec. 26, 1870, and is the son of C. M. and Luella (Skinner) Alderman/
     C. M. Alderman
was born at Windsor, March 30, 1844, the son of T. J. and Caroline AldermanT. J. Alderman was also a native of Windsor, born Dec. 15, 1817, the son of Timothy L. Anderson, who came to this county from Connecticut in 1804.  T. J. Alderman was married on Oct. 5, 1843.  To this union two children were born:  C. M. father of the subject of this sketch; and Lucy J. Hurlburt.
     C. M. Alderman
, deceased, was a veteran of the Civil War, having served with Company K, One Hundred and Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  After the close of the war he returned to the homestead at Windsor, where he engaged in farming.  On Oct. 20, 1868, he was married to Miss Luella Skinner, who was born in Ashtabula County, April 2, 1846, the daughter of Jeptha and Eliza (Alderman) Skinner.  Mr. Skinner was born Dec. 23, 1796, and died Oct. 5, 1855.  His wife was born Feb. 6, 1821, and died in 1872.  They had four children:  Freeman, Clara, Miles Co., and Luella Alderman.  C. M. Alderman died May 25, 1914.  He was a Republican.  To Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Alderman were born two children:  C. G., the subject of this sketch; and L. C. , born in April, 1873, resides on the home place with his brother.
     C. G. Alderman was reared and educated on his father's farm and has always lived in Windsor Township.  For several years he operated a mill and since his marriage has engaged in farming.  He owns the old home place of 397 acres and specializes in dairy farming.  He is also a grain farmer.  The Alderman farm is well improved and is one of the fine stock  farms of Ashtabula County.
     On Oct. 29, 1893, Mr. Alderman was united in marriage with Miss Nevia Moore, a native of Bunker Hill, Ashtabula, born Sept. 30, 1875, and the daughter of J. B. and Amelia (Abram) Moore.  Mr. Moore was born in Ohio and died March 4,  1896, at the age of forty-eight years.  His wife, who was born Oct. 8, 1855, died March 7, 1924.  They were the parents of the following children:  Mrs. Alderman; Luella Merriman, lives in Cleveland; Alice J. Moore, lives at Warren, Ohio; Ninon G. Phelps, lives at Jefferson; W. R., lives at Waynesburg, Ohio; and Bernice H. Godfrey, lives at Warren, Ohio.  To Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Alderman, two children were born:  Wayne G., born March 3, 1897, lives at home, was married Aug. 24, 1922, to Marie Bemik, and they have two children, Merlin, born Aug. 16, 1923, and Marlin a twin; and Gladys L. Horton, born July 16, 1899, lives at Stoneville, Ohio, has two children, Harlan W., born Sept. 18 1921, and Milford C., born July 20, 1924.
     Mr. Alderman is a Republican and a member of the Grange.  He is among the substantial and highly respected citizens of Ashtabula County.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page 1087
ELSWORTH A. ALDERMAN, a Civil War veteran, is a member of one of Ashtabula County's oldest families.  He was born in a log cabin, on a farm in Windsor Township, Aug. 10, 1844, the eldest child of Isaac Newton and Elizabeth (Bacon) Alderman.
    
His paternal grandparents were Elijah, Jr., and Rosanna (Phelps) Alderman.  His maternal grandparents, Grove and Betsey (Hoskins) Bacon and these ancestors all came from Connecticut in about the year 1810.
     Isaac Newton Alderman was born in Windsor, Nov. 23, 1823, and died April 2, 1899 having lived most of his life in Windsor either as a farmer or mail carrier for Uncle Sam.
     Elsworth A. Alderman received a fair education in the district schools of those days, and in 1862, the day before he was eighteen, he volunteered for service in the Civil War.  He enlisted with Company K, 105th O. V. T. and was sent to Lexington, Ky.  Retreating from there the regiment saw its first hard fighting at Perryville, Ky., where one-third of its numbers were lost.  He was taken prisoner near Murfreesborough, Tenn., and upon his release joined his regiment at Missionary Ridge.  After taking part in the "Atlanta Campaign," which lasted one hundred and twenty days, during which his regiment was under fire eight-three days, he left Atlanta Nov. 14, 1864 and "Sherman's March to the Sea, " and arrived in Savannah on Christmas Day.  After a short rest his regiment started thru the Carolinas, meeting engagements at Bentonville, Goldsboro, and Raleigh.  A short distance from Raleigh, Gen. Johnston surrendered and the war was over.  Discharged in June, 1865 he returned to Windsor, where he has since resided.
     Aug. 17, 1866, Mr. Alderman was married to Miss Florence Turner, who was born in Windsor, May 29, 1844 and died Dec. 21, 1924, the only daughter of Warren and Laura Lovira (Skinner) Turner.  To them three children were born:  Ada L., born March 13, 1867, now a retired school teacher; Bernard K., born Oct. 9, 1871, and died May 16, 1912, became a very skillful electrical engineer; and Coridon W., born Sept. 26, 1875, lives near the home place in Windsor, and has two children, Helen Estelle, born Sept. 13, 1906, and Donald Emory, born March 13, 1912.
     Mr. Alderman's home place "Maple Gorge Farm," was purchased by him and his wife in 1873 and for over fifty years a grove of fine old rock maples in a gorge, has produced thousands of gallons of delicious maple syrup, which has been shipped to all parts of the United States.
     Mr. Alderman, who has been township trustee, and a member of the local School Board for many years, is a respected citizen of his county, and has a host of friends.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page
D. B. ALDRICH, M. D., a practicing physician at Ashtabula Harbor, Ohio, was born in Saratoga county, New York, Apr. 25, 1861.  His parents, Hudson and Sallie (Johnson) Aldrich, were both natives of the Empire State, where they passed their lives.  The former's father, Benoni Aldrich, also a native of New York State, was a descendant of an early and influential family of America.  Hudson Aldrich and the mother of the subject of this sketch had six sons and two daughters.  The devoted wife and mother died when young, and the father now lives on a farm in New York State.  In the occupation of farming he has passed his life, being widely known and universally regarded and industrious and worthy man.
     Dr. Aldrich, whose name heads this sketch, spent his youth of the home farm and attended the country schools of his vicinity.  When nineteen years of age, he left home to enter Union Christian College, at Merom, Indiana, where he continued for some time, paying his expenses by doing anything which came to hand.  He afterward went to Oberlin (Ohio) College, where he remained one year.  He then taught school two terms, after which he began study of medicine at the Western Reserve Medical College, at Cleveland, where he took a three years' course, graduating in 1889.  Thus amply qualified for his professional duties, he began practice in Ashtabula Harbor, in which he has successfully continued.  He is conscientious and painstaking in his work, is endowed with steady nerves and cool judgment, facts which have gained for him good standing among the medical fraternity, and secured for him a good patronage and many friends.
     In 1889, Dr. Aldrich was married to Miss Nettie Johnson, a lady of domestic tastes and social accomplishments, a resident of Dover, Ohio, and they have two children.  He and wife are worthy members of the Congregational Church.
     Fraternally, the Doctor is a member in good standing of the Ashtabula County Medical Association and the Knights of Pythias.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 842
E. T. C. ALDRICH, who is engaged in the insurance business at Mentor, Ohio, resides at his attractive country home, "Eastside," which adjoins the General Garfield homestead, "Lawn Field," on the east.
     Mr. Aldrich comes of an old New England family, and of his life and ancestry we make record as follows:
     E. T. C. Aldrich was born in Franklin, Tompkins county, New York, Nov. 18, 1827, son of William S. Aldrich, who was born in Providence, Rhode Island, Oct. 3, 1803, and grandson of Tilson Aldrich, a native of Cumberland, Rhode Island, and a son of a Revolutionary soldier who fought at Bunker Hill.  Tilson Aldrich went to Tompkins county, New York, in 1816, where he was engaged in work at his trade, that of tanner and currier and cotton manufacturer.  In the spring of 1835 he moved with his son William S. to Ellery, Chautauqua county,  that State, where he followed farming the rest of his life.  He died in February, 1858.  He was a Quaker.
     William S. Aldrich, a farmer by occupation, a farmer by occupation, moved from Chautauqua county, New York, to Mentor, Ohio, in the spring of 1866, and here he spent the remaining years of his life and died Oct. 30, 1876. While a resident of Dryden, New York, he was captain of a battery for several years, receiving his commission in 1828.  He also served as Township Supervisor for a number of years, and was well known and highly respected.  His wife, whose maiden name was Maria C. Cantine, was born in Tompkins county, New York, Sept. 27, 1804, and died Feb. 5, 1892.  Her father was born in New York and her mother was a native of France.  William S. Aldrich and his wife had a family of one son and two daughters, the subject of our sketch being the oldest.
     E. T. C. Aldrich was born and reared on his father's farm, and in early manhood was engaged in teaching for seven years - teaching one school five years.  He remained on the home place with his father, assisting in the management of the farming operations until his father's death.  He still owns the homestead, which comprises 147 acres, and which, as already stated, joins the Garfield place on the east.  He has a general supervision of the operations of the farm, and at the same time conducts an insurance business in Mentor, representing two companies, the Phoenix and the Dwelling House of Boston.
     Mr. Aldrich was married May 29, 1851, to Emily Fisher, who was born in Chautauqua county, New York, July 19, 1829.  Her parents, Josiah and Caroline (Clark) Fisher, both natives of Vermont, emigrated to New York prior to their marriage.  Her father was a carpenter.  He was married a second time, and in 1853 went to Wisconsin, where he spent the closing years of his life and where he died.  Mr. and Mrs. Aldrich's children are as follows:  Frank W., born Feb. 8, 1853, was married in 1881 to Lena G. Taft; William F., born Sept. 29, 1857, is now a resident of North Dakota, engaged in the insurance business; and Mary C., who was married Aug. 29, 1890, to E. D. Barber, who is engaged in the insurance business at Wahpeton, North Dakota.  Each has received a good education, and Mrs. Barber was a teacher in Mentor for five years previous to her marriage.
     Politically, Mr. Aldrich is a Republican.  He has served as Trustee, member of the Town Council and Mayor of Mentor, and for seventeen years was a member of the school board.  He was a member of the Republican Congressional Convention of the old nineteenth district for eight years, and during that time became well acquainted with General Garfield.  That was before Garfield.  That was before Garfield moved to Mentor, four years previous to his election as president, and after his removal here Mr. Aldrich became intimately associated with the General, enjoying his confidence and friendship.  During the memorable campaign of 1880 Mr. Aldrich assisted in entertaining the thousands who came to see General Garfield, singly and in delegation, and had the pleasure of introducing many distinguished men to him.  Mrs. Aldrich is a Methodist.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 196
JOHN W. ALEXANDER

Source: Biographical history of Northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 ~ Page 313

ANSON ALGER came to Jefferson in 1839; was then about 21 years of age.  In 1842 he married Miss Eliza Bancroft; lived  in different places until 1846; he then bought a wilderness farm on the Dorset road about one-half mile southeast from the Court House.  They commenced living in a log house on their new farm, and with a good constitution, steady habits and persevering industry, in a few years he had his farm well improved and a good house and barn built.  They had one son and two daughters; their son enlisted in the Union Army in 1862, and died in the army with the small pox, while in Washington, D. C..  One of his daughters, Mrs. Thomas Fricker, is living in North Carolina; the other, Mrs. George Beckwith, is living in Jefferson.  His wife died early in the spring of 1868; he married Mrs. Diantha Brown, the last of December, 1868, and they moved into the house near the depot, where they live now.
Source:  Condensed History of Jefferson, Ashtabula Co., OH - Publ. Jefferson, O., J. A. Howells & Company - 1878 - Page 75
JAMES E. ALLEN, the efficient and popular Sheriff of Ashtabula county, Ohio, residing in Jefferson, was born in Norfolk, Connecticut, Nov. 12, 1844, and is a son of Russell and Annie (Fossett) Allen.  His father, a native of New York, was a cooper by trade.  He followed the westward tide of emigration to Trumbull county, Ohio, in 1857, moving thence to Ashtabula county in 1864, where he and his worthy wife passed the remainder of their days.
     The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and received a common-school education.  He early began to work out until he secured sufficient means a common-school education.  He early began to work out until he secured sufficient means to commence farming for himself, which he continued until 1876.  He then removed to Jefferson, where he entered the butcher business, but a short time later embarked in the livery business, which he successfully conducted for fourteen years.  During at these years his sturdy qualities of mind and heart had been making friends for him, and in 1887 he was appointed Deputy Sheriff of Ashtabula county, which position he held four years.  He then became candidate for Sheriff on the Republican ticket, to which office he was elected in 1890, and served the interests of the people so well that they re-elected him to the same position in 1892, for a second term of two years, which he is now filling.
     Mr. Allen was married in 1867, to Flora M., daughter of Sylvester and Eliza (Coleman) Ward, of Ashtabula county.  Mr. and Mrs. Allen have one son living, Ward, who is now Deputy Sheriff.
     Fraternally, Mr. Allen is a Master Mason and a member of the Knights of Pythias.  As a citizen and man he is intelligent, progressive and honorable and enjoys the highest regard of his fellow men.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 220
L. W. ALLEN, one of the progressive farmers and stockmen of Andover Township, was born at Colebrook, Ohio, April 21, 1873, and is the son of William E. and Sarah M. (Fobes) Allen.
     William E. Allen
was a native of Ashtabula County, born Dec. 24, 1833, and the son of Robert Allen.  He became a prosperous farmer and was a substantial citizen of his community.  Mr. Allen died Feb. 7, 1903, and his wife, who was born May 25, 1838, died in 1908.   They were the parents of 14 children, as follows:  Robert W., deceased; Ella M., lies at Colebrook, Ohio; Alice Gertrude, lives in Florida; Laura E., lives at Providence, R. I.; Rhoda A., deceased; William Edward, deceased; Frederick, Rhode Island; Emma, deceased; L. W., the subject of this sketch; John M., lives at Colebrook, Ohio; James Lyle, lives in Wayne Township, Ashtabula County; Edmund, Wayne Township; Bernice B. Blanchard, Wayne Center, and Jessie Dodge, Clintonville, Wis.
     L. W. Allen grew up on his father's farm and attended the district schools of Ashtabula County.  For several years he was engaged as a grocery clerk, and also followed the carpenter trade.  Mr. Allen has lived on his present farm in Andover Township for the past two years.  He has a well improved farm, which is equipped with excellent buildings and facilities for caring for the stock.
     On Nov. 18, 1901, Mr. Allen was married to Miss Elmina Elizabeth Dodge, a native of Wayne Township, Ashtabula County, born Sept. 14, 1882, and the daughter of Albert and Elizabeth Dodge.  To this union one son has been born, W. Edward, March 7, 1903, lives at home.
     Mr. Allen is a Republican and a member of the Congregational church.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page
RILEY G. ALLEN, now living retired in Dorset, has been a leading farmer and stockman of Ashtabula County for many years.  He was born in Ashtabula County, Nov. 19, 1845, and is a son of Joseph R. and Mary Anne (Robbins) Allen.
     Joseph R. Allen
was a native of Vermont and an early settler of Ashtabula County.   At an early date he located at Geneva, where he engaged in the merchandise business.  In 1854, during the gold rush to California, he went west with several families in covered wagons.  After an absence of 14 years, Mrs. Allen received word that a man by the name of Allen had died while returning from the coast.  Believing this man to be her husband, she later remarried, and upon her first husband's return, he also married again.  After a number of years, during which time their second husband and second wife had died, they were remarried.  Mr. and Mrs. Allen had three children: Henry L., deceased; Riley G., the subject of this sketch; and Dwight, deceased.
     Riley G. Allen was born at Geneva and has lived in Dorset Township since he was 12 years of age.  He made his home with an uncle, Marshall Conant, who owned a cooperage at Dorset.  Mr. Allen learned that trade in the days when barrel staves were made from the raw timber.  In 1880 he purchased 75 acres of land and later purchased 68 additional acres.  He now lives retired, having sold his land interests.  Mr. Allen cleared off heavy timber from his 75 acres and the 68 acres he reclaimed.  He and both of his sons were engaged in the pure bred Holstein cattle business for a number of years and their cattle was shipped to different states.
     During the Civil War Mr. Allen enlisted with Company D, 177th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was in service for ten months.
     Mr. Allen was united in marriage with Miss Cornelia Burr, who was the daughter of Austin Burr, one of Dorset's prominent pioneer citizens.  She died April 5, 1916.  To Mr. and Mrs. Allen five children were born, as follows:  Marshall, who died at the age of 18 years in a hospital at Massillon, Ohio; Coralie, died at the age of 13 years; Arthur lives at Dorset, married Pearl Prentice, and they had seven children, five now living; Inez M. Freda, Mildred, Arthur and Vera, two died in infancy; and Austin J., who lives in Dorset Township.  Austin J. Allen is a well known fur dealer and in 1922 purchased nearly $100,000 worth of furs.  He is also interested in the dairy business.  He was married to Miss Rachel Leiby and they have three children, Robert George, Marie Winifred and Austin J., Jr.
     Riley G. Allen
is a Republican, a member of the board of education, has served as  township trustee and a personal property assessor and also real estate.  He is an associate member of the Baptist church.  He is an interesting pioneer of the county and a highly respected citizen.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page
W. R. ALLEN came to Jefferson in 1848; married Lucy A. Loomis, daughter of David Loomis, in 1848; he read law with N. L. Chaffee, Esq., and was admitted to the bar in 1850.  In the spring of 1851 he commenced the book business, in rooms now occupied by Mr. Baldwin, for a store in the American Hotel.  In the fall he bought out the only Drug Store in town, and in the spring of 1852 moved into a building which stood where Judge Woodbury's law office now stands.  This old building is now used by McNutt & Bartholomew for a wagon shop.  In 1853 he built the west room of the store he now occupies.  After returning from the army he re-purchased his old store and built on the extensive east room.  Mr. Allen is now the oldest merchant in town, he has always been an active mover in educational interests and a liberal supporter of public improvements, of the town both socially and financially.  He has held the office of Mayor a number of years.
     When the war broke out in the spring of 1861, he sold his store and stock of goods to Canfield & Loomis and was to Kansas.  There he enlisted in the Third Kansas Regiment, Col. James Montgomery, and served as Captain of Company C, until the consolidation of the Third and Fourth regiments of that State, when he returned to Jefferson.
Source: Condensed History of Jefferson, Ashtabula Co., OH - Publ. Jefferson, O., J. A. Howells & Company - 1878 - Page 82
JEREMIAH ALLYN, of Conneaut, Ohio, came to this place from Connecticut, May 1, 1854, and was for several years engaged in the produce business. In 1868 he started the Allyn Garden on West Main street, with 100 feet front, which has since been enlarged to 1,200 feet on the same street.
     Mr. Allyn is a direct descendant of Hon. Matthew and Margaret Allyn, who came to America in 1632. He has an ancestry of which he may well be proud, and which, without a broken link in. the chain, is traced as follows:
     Hon. Matthew Allyn of Brampton, Devon county, England, son of Samuel Allyn of Chelmsford, Essex county, England, came with his older brothers, Samuel and Deacon Thomas, with the Braintree company to Charlestown, Massachusetts, in 1632. He was the largest landholder in Charlestown; in 1636 went to Hartford, Connecticut, and in 1638 removed to Windsor. He was Judge of General Court and was one of the grantees named in the charter granted to the Colony of Connecticut by King Charles II. in 1662. He died February 1, 1670 or 71.
     Captain Thomas Allyn, second son of Matthew and Margaret Allyn, was born in England; married Abigail, daughter of Rev. John Warham, October 21, 1658; died February 14, 1695.
     Hon. and Colonel Matthew Allyn, second son of Captain Thomas and Abigail Allyn, was born June 5, 1660; married Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Wolcott, Jr., January 5, 1686; her death occurred June 4, 1734, and his February 17, 1758.
Captain Thomas Allyn, first son of Matthew and Elizabeth Allyn, was born about 1686, and died December 11, 1738.
     Thomas Allyn, first son of Captain Thomas and Elizabeth Allyn, was born November 7, 1725; married Sarah Phelps, December 13, 1750; died November 17, 1781.
     Alexander Allyn, third son of Thomas and Sarah Allyn, was born October 14, 1757; married Mercy, daughter of Captain Sodace and Mercy (Humphrey) Wilcox of Simsbury, Connecticut. Her death occurred October 14, 1816, and his May 9, 1822.
Truman Allyn, second son of Alexander and Mercy Allyn, was born at Windsor, Connecticut, June 11, 1787; married Harriet, daughter of Eli and Athildred (Curtis) Case, December 17, 1807. She was born at Canton, Connecticut, December 23, 1788, and died April 6, 1845. He died June 3, 1849.
     Jeremiah Allyn, fourth son of Truman and Harriet Allyn, was born at Sunsbury, Connecticut, July 15, 1831; married Abbie A., daughter of Allen W. and Betsey (Wilder) Niles, November 20, 1855, at Conneaut, Ohio. She was born at Auburn, New York, August 28, 1836.
     Jeremiah and Abbie A. Allyn have one child, Millie Elizabeth Allyn, born at Conneaut, Ohio, October 15, 1860.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 312
WILLIAM M. ALLYN is a prosperous groceryman of Ashtabula.  He was born in Hartsgrove, Ashtabula County, March 12, 1902, and is a son of Frank and Alma (Rice) Allyn.
     Frank Allyn
was born at Rome, Ohio, in 1876, and his wife is a native of Des Moines, Iowa.  They live in Ashtabula, and are the parents of three children, as follows:  William M., the subject of this sketch; and Mabel and Irene, both students.
     William M. Allyn
has always lived in Ashtabula.  After attending the public schools he entered the employ of A. F. Day, where he remained one year.  He then was associated with C. N. Newlon for two years, after which he was employed in the Bunker Hill grocery for two years.  In June, 1923, Mr. Allyn engaged in business for himself at 325 Main Street, where he established an excellent trade.  The 22nd of September, 1924. Mr. Allyn sold his grocery store.  He has become manager of the  store for W. D. Ludwig.
     On April 2, 1924, Mr. Allyn was married to Miss Dorothy Gochneaur, born April 30, 1905, Denmark Township, daughter of Frank and Elizabeth (Brockett) Gochneaur, natives of Jefferson, Ohio, and Denmark Township.  They now reside on a farm in Denmark township.
     Mr. Allyn is a Republican and a member of the Harris Memorial Presbyterian Church.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page  528
H. J. ALWARD, pioneer business man of Conneaut, was born in Crawford County, Pa., June 29, 1850, and is the son of Benjamin and Sarah J. (McMillan) Alward.
     Benjamin Alward
was a native of New York, born in 1818.  He went to Pennsylvania in 1834 and became a prosperous farmer, and owned 700 aces of land.  Mr. Alward was a Democrat and a member of the Baptist Church.  He and his wife, now deceased. were the parents of the following children:  Cynthia Jane and Almeda, deceased;  H. J., the subject of this sketch; Anna, deceased; W. B., a farmer, lives in Pennsylvania; Alsinia, deceased; John D., a farmer, lies in Pennsylvania; Sarah and Joseph, deceased; Lilly, lives in Pennsylvania; Clark, deceased; and Gilbert A., a farmer, also lives in Pennsylvania.
     H. J. Alward spent his boyhood on his father's farm and received his education in the district schools of Crawford County, Pa.  He began life as a farmer in Pennsylvania and he became an extensive shipper of stock.  In 1893 he removed to Conneaut and engaged in the meat business at the corner of Main and Harbor streets.  After many business interests, Mr. Alward retired and went to Florida in 1918, but returned to Conneaut in December, 1921, and established his present meat business at 311 Harbor Street.  His son, Ralph, is in business with him.
     On Nov. 15, 1871, Mr. Alward was united in marriage to Miss Martha J. Gibson, a native of Erie County, Pa., and to this union the following children were born: Ralph; Theresa, married George McDonald, a railroad engineer, lives at Salina, Kan.; Pearl, a milliner, lives at Erie, Pa.; Forest, lives in New York City; and Blain, is a World War veteran, lives at Erie, Pa.  In 1904 Mr. Alward was married the second time to Miss Clara Hall, a native of Crawford County, Pa., and to this union one child was born, Marjorie, who died at the age of 11 years in 1917.  There are three grandchildren: P. J. Alward, deceased; Boyd McDonald; and Gale McDonald.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page 684
AUSTIN O. AMSDEN, a well known jeweler and progressive business man of Ashtabula, Ohio, was born in Ashtabula county, Jan. 9, 1836.  His remote ancestors came from the tight little isle of England, and settled in Massachusetts in Colonial times.  Abraham Amsden, his grandfather, was born near Boston, that State, where he was reared.  He married Submit Moss, and they had six sons and four daughters, with whom he started, in 1828, for the West, as Ohio was then called.  He settled in Saybrook township, Ashtabula county, that State, where he improved a farm on which he resided until his death.  Samuel Amsden, his son, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Windsor, Vermont, Oct. 20, 1799.  He was reared in the East, where he married.  Previous to his father's emigration to Ohio, in 1828, Samuel came with his family to Ashtabula county, of which he was a prominent resident for many years.  Abigail Hazelton, his wife, was the daughter of a well known and esteemed pioneer of this county.  This worthy couple had five sons and two daughters:  Laura, deceased; George W.; Eunice; Guilson A., deceased; Edwin; Austin O., whose name heads this sketch; and Lucius K.
    
The subject of this biography was reared on the home farm and received his education in the common schools of his vicinity.  When eighteen years of age, he went to Ashtabula, where he learned the jeweler's trade, which business he has followed in this place ever since.  In 1857 he had accumulated sufficient means by industry and economy, to start in business on his own account, but in 1859 sold out his interests, and for eighteen years thereafter worked for other parties.  In 1877 he again embarked in business for himself, and has since continued, the firm being now Amsden & Son, who do a large and lucrative trade in their line.
     In 1856 Mr. Amsden was married to Mary J. Dickinson, and estimable lady, daughter of Moses Dickinson, well and favorably known in this locality, and they have had six children, five now living: Mary Elizabeth, a student of music in New York city; Lewis A., a civil engineer, residing in Ashtabula; Arthur D., a watchmaker and graduated optician; Frederick H., died in 1885, aged eighteen; George S., a student at Harvard College; and Jay M., at home.
     In politics, Mr. Amsden is a Republican, and for the last nine years has served efficiently on the Board of Education, during much to advance educational interests.  Fraternally, he is a Royal Arch Mason, a Knight of Pythias, a member of the Eastern Star, of the Order of Elks, of the Pythian Sisters, Knights of Honor, and the Knights of Labor.  Both he and was are prominent members of the Reformed Episcopal Church, in the Reformed Episcopal church, in the cause of which they take an active interest.
     It is to such men that Ashtabula owes her present advanced position among the sister cities of Ohio, contributing as they have by their ability and worth to her growth and enterprise.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 387
GEORGE W. AMSDEN, a well-to-do and highly respected farmer of Ashtabula township, Ashtabula county, Ohio, was born in Vermont, June 25, 1825.  His early ancestors were English, who settled in Massachusetts in Colonial times.  His grandfather, Abraham Amsden, was born near Boston, that State, where he was reared.  He married Submit Moss, and they had six sons and daughters.  In 1828 he caught the infection of westward emigration, and with his family removed to Ashtabula county, Ohio, settling on land in Ashtabula township, where he resided until his death.  Samuel Amsden, his son, and father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Windsor, Vermont, Oct. 20, 1799.  His early life was passed in the East, where he married.  A short time previous to 1828, the date of his father's removal to the frontier of Ohio, Samuel emigrated with his family to Ashtabula county, where he settled on land which he successfully improved, and on which he resided for many years.  His wife, Abigail Hazelton, was the daughter of an early settler of Washington county, Vermont.  They had five sons and two daughters: Laura, deceased; George W., whose name heads this sketch; Eunice; Gilson A., deceased; Edwin, Austin O. and Lucius K.
    
The subject of this biography was but three years of age when his parents came to Ashtabula county, which has ever since been his home.  He was reared on the farm and attended the district schools.  He afterward learned carpentry, and on attaining his majority worked at that trade, being thus employed for fifteen years.  He then discontinued that occupation to engage in farming in Ashtabula township, and his practical knowledge gained in youth, his careful management, supplemented by a good amount of energy, caused him to be greatly prospered, and he is now justly numbered among the most substantial farmers of the county.
     In 1851 Mr. Amsden married Miss Emily A. Newell, an intelligent and amiable lady, who is a daughter of Harvey Newell, another early and prominent settler of this county.  They have one son and one daughter.  Mr. Amsden and his worthy wife are active members of the Reformed Episcopal Church, which receives much valuable aid from their hands.  He is deeply interested in the welfare of his county, the material and moral prosperity of which he has done much to advance, and justly takes precedence as an enterprising and public-spirited citizen.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 554
J. M. AMSDEN, general superintendent of the Ohio & Western Pennsylvania Dock Company at Ashtabula, is a representative citizen of his community.  He was born in Ashtabula, Oct. 5, 1876, and is a son of Austin O. and Mary (Dickinson) Amsden.
     Austin O. Amsden
was born in Vermont and came to Ashtabula in 1860.  He clerked in the jewelry store of Mr. Dickinson, in whose employ he remained for many years.  He died in 1914 at the age of 74 years and his wife, who was born at New Haven, Conn., died in December, 1921, at the age of 84 years.  Mr. and Mrs. Amsden celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1909.  They were the parents of the following children: Fred, who died at the age of 16 years; Mrs. Elizabeth Sawyer, lives in New York city; Lewis A., retired, lives in Ashtabula; Arthur D., lives in Pasadena, Cal.; Dr. George S., a prominent nerve specialist of Albany, N. Y., and Jay M., the subject of this sketch.
     Jay M. Amsden received his education in the public and high schools of Ashtabula and at the age of 16 years entered the employ of the M. A. Hanna Company.  In 1903 Mr. Amsden was made superintendent and on July 22, 1924, was made general superintendent of the company, including the lower lake docks.
     In 1900 Mr. Amsden was married to Miss Laura Gillette, of Indianapolis, and the daughter of Oscar Gillette.  Mr. and Mrs. Amsden have one child, Jane, born in 1907.
     Mr. Amsden is a Republican.  He is a member of the Reformed Episcopal Church of Ashtabula and a 32nd degree Mason.  He has served as president of the Chamber of Commerce and as president of the city council.  He is also a member of the Rotary Club of Ashtabula.  Mr. Amsden is well and favorably known in Ashtabula and takes an active interest in the affairs of his community.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page 572
P. C. AMSDEN came to Jefferson in 18137, a single man; a carriage maker by trade, he commenced work in a shop belonging to Thompson Wallace, (he, Wallace, used it for making a rude threshing machine; the citizens carried their grain there to have it threshed, the first machine that was introduced into this town.) -  It was on the lot where Mrs. Marr now lives.  Wallace built her house about 1840.  Mr. Amsden married Miss Mary Hubbard in 1839, and first settled on the lot now owned by J. C. Thompson, but sold it to Lynds Jones in 1841, and bought the lot south of said lot, and built the house and barn now owned by Rufus Hughton; he made the first carriage with eleptic springs owned in this town; it was made for George Brown, a merchant here at that time; he was one of the Town Council when the streets were opened in different parts of the village; and it had to be done almost by the physical force, as the early settlers had fenced in the greater part of the first surveyed streets in order that they could occupy the vacant lots adjoining theirs, and they thought that such improvements were very unnecessary invasions at that time.  So faithless were they that all the streets would ever be used, that I remember one man laid the foundation for a house directly across the street, but some one hinted to him that it might some time make him trouble, and he removed it before putting on the building.  I believed every street in town has more or less buildings on them.  Mr. Amsden has held the office of constable twenty-one years, and has been Deputy Sheriff twelve years; continued working at his trade.  In the spring of 1877 he was again elected constable.  He has taken the Sentinel since its first issue, now over forty-five years.
     My basket is nearly emptied of true stories, but I remember one little one.  About sixty years ago, when Captain Loomis lived in his log cabin, near the edge of Mill creek, a short distance east of the west Grist mill, and his mill stood a few feet from his house, towering high above it; a short distance above was the dam to hold the water for grinding.  One night, after there had been heavy rains and raised the water to such a high pressure, the dam gave way, and down came the water, carrying with it logs and whatever loose stuff came in its way.  But the Captain, fearing such a catastrophe, kept a little watch, and notifying his wife and children, they made their escape.  But the cabin door was no protection from the water and logs which came rushing in, and submerged the entire lower part of the house with water.  But happily it soon found its way out below, and did but little damage; only washing the floors and furniture.  It took much hard work to repair the dam and clear away the logs.
Source: Condensed History of Jefferson, Ashtabula Co., OH - Publ. Jefferson, O., J. A. Howells & Company - 1878 - Page 97
CARL A. ANDERSON is a substantial citizen of Conneaut.  He was born in Sweden, Jan. 1, 1858, and is the son of Andrew and Cecelia Anderson, both of whom are deceased.  There are two children in the Anderson family:  Peter, lives in Conneaut; and Carl A., the subject of this sketch.
     Carl A. Anderson was educated in Sweden and on May 3, 1883, emigrated to this country and settled in Conneaut.  He has been in the employ of the Nickel Plate Railroad as a machinist since May, 1883, and is among the company's most reliable employes.  The Anderson home is located at 238 Rockwell Street.
     In 1879 Mr. Anderson was married to Miss Christina Lagerwal, a native of Sweden and a daughter of Adolph and Louise Lagerwal, deceased.  To Mr. and Mrs. Anderson seven children have been born, as follows:  John, lives at Tacoma, Wash.; Henry A., at home; Mary, married Harry Morton, lives in Chicago; Edwin, at home, is a veteran of the World War, having been in the air service; George, deceased; Mabel, married Harland Sanford, lives at Amboy; and Geraldine, at home.  Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have two grandchildren, Raymond and Ruth Anderson.
     Mr. Anderson and his family are members of the Lutheran Church and he belongs to the Woodmen of the World and the Maccabees.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page 711
CHARLES W. ANDERSON, of the firm of C. W. Anderson & Son, Geneva, Ohio, was born at Girard, Pennsylvania, Sept. 3, 1841.  His parents Asa and Phila (Cass) Anderson, were natives of Chautauqua county, New York; the father was a Republican in his politics, a farm by occupation, and in his religious faith a Methodist; he was of Scotch descent, his great-grandfather being the first member of the family to emigrate from Scotland to America.  Charles W. spent his early life on the farm, and attended the common schools.
     When there was a call for men to take up arms in defence of the nation, he responded and for three years was in the service, a member of the Fifteenth Ohio Independent Light Artillery; he participated in thirty or more engagements without receiving a scratch, but, through exposure, lost his health and is now receiving a pension from the Government in recognition of his service.  He is an active member of the G. A. R.
     In 1887 he embarked in the milling business, under the firm name of C. W. Anderson & Son, and they have established a large and profitable trade.
     Mr. Anderson was married in June, 1861, to Lottie F. Tye, of Morgan township, Ashtabula Co.; she is a daughter of John and Mary Tye, who were born and reared at Northampton, England, emigrating to this country soon after their marriage.  Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have a family of three children:  John E., born July 4, 1863, is in business with his father; he married Cora McNutt, of Jefferson, Ashtabula county; Eugene M., was born Mar. 11, 1878; and Fred L., Sep. 13, 1879.  Politically, Mr. Anderson is identified with the Republican party; he is a Knight of Pythias, and he and his wife are active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He is a self-made man, and through his own perseverance and wise management has accumulated in competence.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 902
E. E. ANDERSON, a well known and highly esteemed citizen of Colebrook Township, who is engaged in farming and stock raising, was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, Jan. 25, 1854.  He is the son of J. D. and Mary (Roberts) Anderson. 
     J. D. Anderson
was a native of Beaver Falls, Pa., born in 1818.  He engaged in farming during his entire life and in 1861 located on a farm of 100 acres in Colebrook Township.  He died in 1904 and his wife, who was born in 1822, died at the age of 84 years. They were the parents of the following children: Joseph Warren, deceased; Albert, lived at Orwell, Ohio, is now deceased; E. E., the subject of this sketch; Allen, deceased; Charles, lives at Youngstown, Ohio; and Helen, deceased.
     E. E. Anderson, received his education in the schools of Colebrook, May 24, 1854, and a daughter of Corydon and Elizabeth Swain Herrington.  Mrs. Anderson had two brothers; W. T., who lives at Newcastle, Pa., and John, deceased.  To E. E. and Helen (Harrington) Anderson six children have been born: Beatrice, at home; Emma, lives in Ashtabula; John, at home; Corydon lives in Ashtabula.
     Mr. Anderson is a Republican and has served as township trustee and assessor.  He and his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and are widely known throughout the community.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page
G. S. ANDERSON

  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 789

DR. GEORGE S. ANDERSON, deceased, was a prominent physician and surgeon of Ashtabula County.  He was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, July 11, 1857, and was the son of George S. and Mary A. (Lintz) Anderson, natives of Ohio and the parents of the following children:  Frank, deceased; Dr. George S., the subject of this sketch; and Kate, wife of A. P. Pottenger, lives at Orlando, Fla.
     Dr. George S. Anderson was reared in Ohio and received his education in the district schools and at Pierpont Academy.  He was graduated from the medical school of Western Reserve University in 1884, and began the practice of his profession at Williamsfield, Ohio, where he remained five years, then removing to Andover.  Dr. Anderson underwent all the hardships of the country doctors, but by perseverance and hard work became a leading physician of the county.  He was a personal friend of Dr. Crile, well known surgeon of Cleveland.  In 1904 Dr. Anderson established a sanitorium, known as Dr. Anderson Original Hot Springs Bath House, at Andover, in which mineral baths were given.  This is now conducted by Dr. N. B. Osborn, Dr. Anderson's partner.
     Before he entered medical college, Dr. Anderson was married to Miss Lusetta Sterling, a native of Pennsylvania, who died in 1909.  To this union three children were born:  Darl C., Doctor of Chiropractic, lives at Warren, Ohio; Clyde, deceased; and Grace Cole, lives at Dallas, Texas.  On Sept. 18, 1912, Dr. Anderson was married to Miss Lillian Waldeck, a native of Warren, Ohio, born Nov. 19, 1872, and the daughter of John V. and Mary E. (Koehler) Waldeck, natives of Germany, and Warren, Ohio.  John V. Waldeck came to the United States when 13 years of age and grew to manhood in Ohio.  He was married in Warren, Ohio, and engaged in highway road contracting, and was also engaged at the same time in the coal and building supplies business at Warren, Ohio.
     Mr. Waldeck died May 23, 1910, and his wife lives at Warren, Ohio.  They were the parents of three children:  Mrs. Anderson; Grace A. Walwood, lives at Erie, Pa.; and John Fred, lives at Warren, Ohio.  To Dr. George S. and Lillian (Waldeck) Anderson one child was born, George S., who was born April 1, 1917.
     Mrs. Anderson is a member of the Eastern Star as was also her husband.  She is now conducting a drug store, known as Anderson's Pharmacy, at Andover, and she is also one-half owner of the Dr. Anderson Original Hot Springs Bath House at Andover in which she is associated with Dr. N. B. Osborn.  Mrs. Anderson is a member of the Mardi Club, and the Christ Episcopalian Church of Warren, Ohio. 
     Mr. Anderson died Jan. 12, 1924, and is buried at Andover.  He was an independent voter and was identified with the Masonic Lodge, and the Modern Woodmen of America.  He was a member of the Methodist Church was a representative citizen of Ashtabula County.
Source #1
GUST ANDERSON, well known building contractor of Ashtabula, and substantial citizen of Ashtabula County, was born in Sweden, May 20, 1871, the son of Andrew J. and Alice (Person) Anderson.
     Andrew J. Anderson
and his wife, now deceased, were natives of Sweden, where they spent their entire lives.  He was a carpenter by trade and died in 1909.  His wife died in 1904.  Mr. and Mrs. Anderson had eight children, as follows:  Peter; Hanna; Mary; John; Christian, married L. Larson; Gust, the subject of this sketch; August, deceased;  and Augusta, lives on the home place in Sweden.
     Gust Anderson was reared and educated in Sweden and came to the United States in 1891 and located at Ashtabula.  He later was employed on the farm of H. R. Holman and L. Fargo, and three years later entered the employ of a building contractor, Mr. Drumeller, of Ashtabula.  After Mr. Drumeller's death in 1914 Mr. Anderson purchased the business, which he has since conducted with success.  The place of business is located at 7-9 Spring Street.  Mr. Anderson is a reliable business man and is widely known.
     In 1898 Mr. Anderson was united in marriage with Miss Selma Josephine Anderson, also a native of Sweden, born in 1871 and the daughter of August and Anna (Anderson) Anderson.  Mr. Anderson died in Sweden and his wife and children came to this country in 1893 and located in Ashtabula.  There were 14 children in the Anderson family.   To Gust and Selma Josephine (Anderson) Anderson the following children have been born: Annie, supervisor of penmanship in a school at Warren, Pa.; Fritz, engaged in the contracting business with his father, married in 1923 to Miss Florence Davison; Algot, Alvar, Signi, Laurence and Laura, all at home.
     Mr. Anderson and his family are members of the Lutheran Church and are highly esteemed citizens of their community.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page
HARRY A. and WILLIAM H. ANDERSON, grocers, are progressive business men of Ashtabula.  They were born here and are the sons of Edward and Seiverina (Benson) Anderson.
     Edward Anderson
is a native of Sweden, born Oct. 12, 1851.  At the age of 18 years he came to the United States and located in Ashtabula, where he was employed on the docks for a number of years.  Later, he engaged in the coal business.  He is now retired.  Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have six sons, all of whom live in Ashtabula.  They are: J. A., a conductor, employed by the New York Central Railroad; Harry Andrew, was born April 20, 1891; William H., born Jan. 11, 1896, and George, employed in the grocery store of his brothers; Arthur, a twin brother of George employed by the New York Central Railroad; and Verne, employed by the Van Sweringen Company of Cleveland.
     The Anderson Brothers have always lived in Ashtabula.  They were educated in the public schools and in 1916 Harry A. and William H. engaged in the grocery and meat business at 430 Columbus Street, where they are now located.  They have a fine store and are dealers in high grade meats, groceries, cigars and candies.  The Andersons are ambitious men, whose success in life is practically assured.  They attribute their success to early business training, which was received in the offices of the Ashtabula Star-Beacon.  They and their brothers, began as carriers for this paper and had large routes, which gave them business experience of great value.
     Harry A. Anderson was united in marriage with Miss Ida Carlson, a native of Ashtabula, and to this union one daughter has been born, Virginia.  William H. is unmarried.
     In politics and Andersons are identified with the republican party.  They are members of the Swedish Lutheran Church of Ashtabula Harbor and rank among the excellent business men of the community.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page
PETER J. ANDERSON is an enterprising and well known citizen of Conneaut.  He was born in Sweden, June 24, 1854, and is the son of Andrew and Cecelia Anderson. 
     Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Anderson, now deceased, were the parents of the following children:  Peter J. the subject of this sketch; Carl, lives at Conneaut;  Hannah Marie, lives in Sweden; John deceased; Ida, the widow of Charles Smith, lives in Michigan; Esther, deceased; and one child died in infancy.
     Peter J. Anderson remained in his native land until in 1882 and upon his arrival in this country settled in McDonough, County, Ill., where he remained until 1885.  On April 2nd of that year he located at Conneaut, where he was employed as a farm hand for a short time.  He then entered the employ of the Nickel Plate Railroad and worked in various capacities for the railroad company for 30 years.  He was retired June 30, 1924.
     On Dec. 29, 1879, Mr. Anderson was married to Miss Charlotte Johnson, who was born in Sweden, Feb. 20, 1860.  She died April 30, 1893, leaving the following children:  Hulda, deceased; C. S. lives in Conneaut; John, lives in Cleveland; Viva, married W. B. Stevenson, lives in Conneaut; Mabel deceased; and one child died in infancy.  On Oct. 22, 1893, Mr. Anderson was married to Miss Augusta Johnson, a native of Sweden born April 18, 1872, and a daughter of John and Louise (Emerik) Johnson, both deceased.  Mr. and Mrs. Johnson were the parents of the following children:  Tilda, deceased; Mrs. Anderson; Gustave; and August, deceased; Frank, lives in Cleveland; Clara, married A. J. Phil, lives at Conneaut; and John, deceased.  To Peter J. and Augusta (Johnson) Anderson four children were born as follows:  Hulda, deceased; Louise, married Norman Amiden, lives at Conneaut; Pearl, lives in Cleveland; and Raymond, a student.
     Mr. Anderson and his family are members of the Lutheran Church.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page
BIRNEY M. ANDREWS, of North Sheffield, Ohio, is classed with the representative business men of his vicinity.  Of his life and ancestry we present the following brief review:
     Birney M. Andrews was born in Cherry Valley township, Ashtabula county, Ohio, in 1863, son of Philo and Melvina (Giddings) AndrewsPhilo Andrews, also a native of Cherry Valley township was born in 1831, and continued to reside there until the time of his death, Mar. 15, 1888.  By occupation he was a farmer; politically, a Republican.  The esteem in which he was held was evinced by his election to fill various official positions.  For a number of years he was Justice of the Peace and Township Trustee.  He was a man of strict integrity and was exemplary in his habits.  It was not only after his mortal remains were consigned to the elements from which they came that his praises were sounded, but also while he was living were his many virtues recognized.  His parents were Benoni and Betsey Andrews, natives of New York, who came to Wayne Township, Ashtabula county, Ohio, about 1803.  They settled an a large tract of timber land, being among the earliest pioneers of the township, and experienced all the labor incident to the developing of a farm in the wilderness.  They subsequently removed to Conneaut, where they lived the remainder of their lives.  The mother of Birney M., nee Melvina Giddings, was born in Wayne township, Ashtabula county, Ohio, in 1833, daughter of Marvin and Clara (Clark) Giddings.  Her father was a son of Joshua R. Giddings' half brother.  Mrs. Andrews was a devoted Christian woman, exemplifying her profession by her daily walk and conversation.  Her family were called to mourn her death Oct. 14, 1892.  Mr. and Mrs. Andrews had four children, namely: Lenora M., who resides in Andover, Ohio; Birney M.; Jessie F., who resides with her sister; and J. C., who is in business with his brother.
     The subject of our sketch remained a member of the home circle until he was twenty-four years of age.  He received a good English education, and at the age of seventeen began teaching, which occupation he continued until 1892. In 1887, with the proceeds of his work in the school room, he bought a farm and from that time until 1892 spent his summer in working on it.  That year  he engaged in the mercantile business, in which he has since continued.  He is a conservative business man.  Having by his own honest toil accumulated what he has, he looks well to the expenditure of the same.
     Mr. Andrews married, in 1886, Miss Alta Peebles, daughter of E. R. and Charlotte (Brockett) Peebles, natives of Ashtabula county.  She received her education at Grand River Institute and was for several years engaged in teaching.  They have one child, Ruth Pauline.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 570
HIAL ANDREWS, a farmer of Cherry Valley township, Ashtabula county, was born in Wayne township, this county, April 17, 1826, a son of Benoni Andrews, a native of Chautauqua county, New York.  The latter's father, Samuel Andrews, came to Ashtabula county, Ohio, in 1814, and was one of the pioneer settlers of Wayne township.  His death occurred here in 1843.  He was three times married, and Benoni was a son  by the first marriage.  The latter came to this county with his parents at the age of seventeen years, and in 1864 removed to where he died, at the age of sixty-eight years.  He was married at the age of twenty years, to Betsy Parmentrel, a native of Chautauqua county, New York.  Her father died at the age of ninety-seven years, and her mother was formerly a Miss Swift.  Mr. and Mrs. Andrews had ten children, nine of whom grew to years of maturity: Hial; Sally; Philo, deceased; Candace; Oliver, of Conneaut, Ashtabula County; Sylvia; Harrison, born in 1840; Sabra, of California; and Edd, deceased at the age of nineteen years.  The father was a farmer by occupation, and a Republican in his political views.  The mother, a member of the Baptist Church, died at the age of eighty-four years.
     Hial Andrews, our subject, came to his present place about forty years ago, then known as the J. H. Giddings farm, and consists of 135 acres of well-improved land.  He has 1,000 rock maple trees, and manufactures the best sugar in Ashtabula county.  He also has a good dairy, and a number of fine horses.  He was married in Trumbull county, Ohio, at the age of twenty-four years, to Sophronia Von, who was born and reared at Fowler, that county, a daughter of John and Betsy (Burr) Von, natives of Bridgeport, Connecticut, and both deceased in Trumbull county, Ohio.  Mr. and Mrs. Andrews have one daughter, Stella A., now the wife of James Tangdon.  They also have one daughter, Myrtle.  Our subject affiliates with the Republican party, and has served as Township Trustee, and as Assessor three years.  Socially he is a member of the A. F. & A. M., Gold Rule Lodge, No. 331.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 890
JOHN CALVIN ANDREWS, a prosperous and well-known farmer of Ashtabula county, was born in Wayne township, this county, Jan. 6, 1825, son of Deacon Calvin and Eliza (Crosby) Andrews.
    
The Andrews family is of English origin.  Some members of the family came to this country at a very early day and settled in Connecticut, and John C. Andrews is able to trace his ancestry back six generations.  His grandfather and other members of the family were soldiers in the Revolutionary war.  Grandfather Andrews reared three sons and one daughter, Calvin  remained at home until after his father's death.  Then he, too, came to this State, and settled in Wayne township, Ashtabula county.  He was married three days before he started for Ohio, and he and his bride journeyed in an ox wagon to their new home in what was then the far West.  That was about 1810.  In Wayne township they reared their family and spent the rest of their lives, his death occurring in 1864 and hers in 1886.  She was ninety-two at the time of her death.  Calvin Andrews was one of the founders of the First Congregational Church in his township being a Deacon in the same for forty years.  They had twelve children, seven of whom they raised the maturity, viz.:  Rosetta J., now Mrs. McMichael, Wayne township, Ashtabula county, Ohio; Eliza P., deceased; Jane C., deceased; Temperance, deceased; John Calvin, whose name heads this article; M. E., of Centralia, Kansas; and George Whitefield, D. D., Professor of Theology at Talladega College, Alabama.
     John C. Andrews was reared in his native township.  He was married in 1848 to Eunice C. Cook, daughter of John L. Cook, one of the very earliest settlers in Ashtabula county.  They have five children, all living and settled near them.  They are as follows: John Wells; Rollin R., a school-teacher at Ashtabula Harbor, Ohio; Felicia E., wife of Almon March, Denmark township, this county; Calvin C., a meat vender in this county; and Lyman L. a member o the home circle.
     Mr. Andrews lived in Wayne township until 1865, when he moved to his present location four miles east of Jefferson, where he has a fine farm of 300 acres.  He is a man of considerable prominence in this community, having filled all the township offices.  He is a stanch Republican.  He was reared in the Congregational Church, but is not now a member, being inclined to Spiritualism.  His wife is a Methodist.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 787
A. E. ANDRUS, who is successfully engaged in general farming and stock raising in Morgan township,, is a native of Ashtabula County.  He was born in Trumbull Township, Dec. 26, 1868, and is the son of John and Mary (Sprague) Andrus.
     John Andrus
was born in 1816 and came to this county from New York in the early days.  He was married in 1867 to Miss Mary Sprague, who was born in 1835 and died in 1912.  To this union two children were born:  A. E., the subject of this sketch; and one child died in infancy.
     A. E. Andrus grew up on his father's farm and received his education in the district schools.  He engage d in farming when he was 21 years old and now owns 225 acres of good farm land in Ashtabula County. Mr. Andrus specializes in dairy farming and raises pure bred Holstein cattle.
     Mr. Andrus was married to Miss Lenora Woodruff, a native of New Lyme Township, born Oct. 13, 1872, and the daughter of Nelson and Louisa (Peck) Woodruff.  Mr. and Mrs. Woodruff, deceased, were the parents of the following children:  Alice; Mrs. Andrus; Florence; Walter, lives in California; Lillian, lives in Ashtabula.  To Mr. and Mrs. Andrus four children have been born, as follows:  Adelbert T., born Feb. 6, 1904; Howard W., born Nov. 28, 1905, was graduated from Rich Creek High School in 1923; Mary E., born Nov. 24, 1908; and Evelyn Mildred, born Oct. 16, 1912.
     Mr. Andrus is an independent voter.  He and his family hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal churn was well are welcome from the known and citizens of their community.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page 930
C. W. APPLEBY, a well known and successful attorney of Conneaut has been engaged in the practice of his profession there since 1898.  He was born at Conneaut in March, 1877, and is the son of William W. and Ida J. (Wyles) Appleby.
     William W. Appleby
is a native of Conneaut and now lives retired at Elyria, Ohio.  He is the son of Capt. C. W. Appleby, one of the pioneer navigation men of the Great Lakes.  William W. Appleby at one time owned practically all of Conneaut.  He is a Republican and served as city clerk and councilman of Conneaut for a number of years.  Mrs. Appleby died in 1921.  They were the parents of the following children:  Mamie, died in infancy; C. W., the subject of this sketch; Harry, deceased; Fred, engaged with manufacturers of the Rollin Automobile of Cleveland; Frances, married Clyde Raufus, high school teacher at Elyria, Ohio; and Walter, deceased.
     C. W. Appleby has always lived in Conneaut.  After completing his high school course he entered Cornell University, and was graduated from the law department in the class of 1898.  He has practiced his profession in Conneaut continuously since that time.
     On Dec. 30, 1902, Mr. Appleby was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Thompson, a native of Conneaut and the daughter of Z. H. and Harriet (Rea) Thompson, the former a native of Ashtabula County and the latter of Pennsylvania.  Mr. Thompson was serving as president of the Conneaut Canning Company at the time of his death, in 1903.  His wife died in 1922.  They were the parents of two children:  Clayton A., lies in California; and Mrs. Appleby.  To Mr. and Mrs. Appleby have been born two children:  Frances Rea, a sophomore at Northwestern University; and Harrison, a student in New York.  Mrs. Appleby died Oct. 24, 1920.
     Mr
. Appleby is a Republican.  He is a capable man in his profession and is a citizen of high ideals.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page 1006

WILLIAM  W. APPLEBY, a real estate dealer of Conneaut, Ohio, and one of the prominent business men of the town, is descended from early settlers of this place.  Following is a brief sketch of his life, and also that of his father and of his uncle, Captain Calvin W. and Gilman Appleby:
     W. W. Appleby was born in Ashtabula county, Ohio, Dec. 14, 1839, son of Captain Calvin W. and Mary (Brown) Appleby.  His father was born in Bethlehem, New Hampshire, Aug. 17, 1808, and lived to be seventy-two years of age, dying Aug. 6, 1880, at Conneaut.  His mother, a native of Windsor, Lower Canada, was born Nov. 10, 1811, and died Apr. 16, 1872, at the same place.  This worthy couple had several children, only two of whom lived to adult years, and of those two W. W. is the older.  He was educated in the Conneaut Academy, and before he engaged in the real estate business he was employed as book-keeper and salesman.
     Mr. Appleby was married in Detroit, Michigan, in 1872, to Miss Ida J. Wiles, daughter of Francis R. Wiles.  Her father died in Detroit, of cholera, in 1854, when she was only two years old.  Mr. and Mrs. Appleby have four children: Calvin W., Frederick W., Walter R., and Fannie.  Mrs. Appleby is a member of the Episcopal Church, and is a lady of much culture and refinement.  Politically, Mr. Appleby affiliates with the Republican party.  He has served as a member of the City Council for four years.
     Captain Calvin W. Appleby and his older brother, Captain Gilman Appleby, were for many years prominent steamboat men on the great lakes.  They came to Conneaut at an early day with their stepfather, Major Samuel Blakeslee, and family, and were among the first settlers of the places.  Major Blakeslee was a well-known resident of Conneaut for many years, and at last died from the infirmary years, and at last died from the infirmities of extreme age.  He was at one time Worshipful Master of the Masonic Lodge of Conneaut.  He had two sons and three daughters, namely: Orville, a resident of Geneva Lake, Wisconsin; Chauncey, Chicago, Illinois; Harriet, wife of Frank Nettleton, of Kingsville; Eliza, wife of James H. Lake, Fredonia, New York; and Aurelia, wife of C. F. Levitt, of Conneaut.
     Captain Calvin W. Appleby’s first experience as boatman was on the Lady of the Lake.  He afterward ran on the packet J. G. King, the brig Lucy A. Blossom, and the steamers Indiana and Sultana.  The whole of his active life was spent on the lakes, and for many years he was one of the most popular commanders running between Buffalo and Chicago.  He was an intimate friend of Benjamin Wade and Joshua Giddings.  Mr. Wade was his attorney in one of the first suits the Captain ever had, the litigation concerning Conneaut Harbor.  This suit was with the Fords and Captain Appleby was the defendant.
     Captain Gilman Appleby, also a native of Bethlehem, New Hampshire, was born Aug. 29, 1806.  He built and commanded both the Sultana and the ill-fated Lady Elgin.  He also commanded the North America and the Constitution.  After he built and took command of the Lady Elgin, his brother became captain of the Sultana.  This vessel was described as the “Buffalo and Chicago steam packet Sultana,” and was used chiefly in carrying passengers.  The gangway to the Sultana (Like the gates to the upper sanctuary) was open night and day for the reception of the able sons of Ham, and the disembarking, too, if occasion required it, to insure the safety of such passengers on “the underground steamboat railway,” Captain Calvin himself being the captain conductor.  Many were the negroes carried safely over, and the Sultana could have carried as many more had opportunity offered.  The kind and large-hearted Captain was a man of wonderful expedients in providing ways and means to lend a helping hand to every one who was in trouble.  Gilman Appleby was commander of the famous Caroline at the time she was captured by the enemy, Dec. 20, 1837.  The fate of this vessel- how she was set on fire and allowed to drift over Niagara – is familiar to all readers of history.  The captain and crew escaped.
     These brothers, Gilman and Calvin were both self-made men, beginning their careers on small vessels and working and winning their way to promotion and the high positions they occupied.  Many were the times they distinguished themselves for their bravery.  Indeed, they were ready for every emergency.  In all their long experience they never lost a life nor did they ever have an accident.  Gilman was at one time commanding the North America on Lake Erie, and when near Dunkirk, New York, the vessel was caught in a heavy storm and was in danger of being dashed against the beach.  The Captain knew this would be certain death to all on board.  All the steam the vessel was allowed to carry was applied.  Still she was a danger.  Only one thing could save her.  Apply more steam.  But would the strength of her boiler admit this?  Taking the benefit of the doubt, and against the best judgment of the engineer, he held down the safety valve with his own weight, had more steam applied, and thus withstood the storm, landing his passengers safe in port.
Source #1 - Page 587

W. E. ARMSTRONG, justice of the peace at Austinburg, is a well known and highly respected citizen of Ashtabula County.  He was born at Gustavus, Ohio, Aug. 2, 1853, and is the son of Erastus H. and Julia (Falemsby) Armstrong.
     Erastus H. Armstrong
was a native of New York and died many years ago in Pennsylvania.  His wife, a native of Vermont, was later married to George Newton, who died in 1891.  She died in 1894.  There were five children in the Armstrong family as follows:  Nettie, John F., Lewis T., all deceased; W. E., the subject of this sketch; and Allison H., who lives at Geneva, Ohio.  By her second marriage Mrs. Newton had one son, Fred, who died in 1923.
     W. E. Armstrong spent his boyhood at Pierpont, in Ashtabula County, and at the age of 17 years began as a traveling salesman, selling a patented washing machine.  He later located at Jamestown, Pa., and from there came to Austinburg, where he farmed for two years.  He then became a thresher and after settling at Austinburg became engaged in the grocery and milling business.  After selling out this business, Mr. Armstrong was employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad as a stationary engineer for a number of years.  He is now custodian of the Austinburg schools and for a number of years has served as justice of the peace.
     Mr. Armstrong was united in marriage with Miss Estelle E. Armstrong, a native of Indiana, and the daughter of Zacheus Armstrong.  To Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong four children were born, as follows:  Reginald, died in 1906; Floyd D., lives in Ashtabula, where he is employed by the Hewins Paper & Twine Company; Donald D., lives at Geneva, Ohio; and Blanch, the wife of G. B. D. Owen, lives at Austinburg, Ohio, where Mr. Owen is postmaster.
     In politics Mr. Armstrong is identified with the Democratic party.  He has served as township committeeman for 25 years and on the Democratic county executive board for about 20 years.  He is a member of the Masonic lodge and is esteemed throughout the community as a reliable citizen.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page  822
ALFRED LOUIS ARNER, M. D. - Doctor Arner was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, May 23, 1848, son of George and Nancy J. (Atkinson) Arner both natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and New England origin, respectively.  They had left their home in the Keystone State a few years prior to the birth of the subject of this sketch, and, moving westward, settled in Trumbull county, Ohio.  Here the father was engaged in farming for a number of years, but later removed to Ashtabula county, where he now resides.  This worthy couple have three children, two sons and one daughter, all of whom occupy positions of honor in the world.
     The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, where he early acquired those hardy qualities which have gained for him success in his various occupations.  He was educated in the district schools of his vicinity and at Kingsville Academy, after which he followed a select course of study in the ancient and modern languages at Wallace German College, in Berea, Ohio.  On the completion of his studies, he accepted, in 1873, the superintendency of the Jefferson schools, in which capacity he continued to labor faithfully for ten years, until 1883.  His ambition, however, found itself restricted by the bounds of that occupation, and he thus began the study of medicine under the direction of Dr. Tuttle, of Jefferson, while still engaged in teaching.  After this Mr. Arner took a course at Bellevue Hospital Medical College in New York, at which he was graduated in 1888.  He then pursued a special course in the treatment of the eye and ear, under the celebrated Dr. Mittendorf.  In 1888 he settled in Jefferson, where he has since been successfully engaged in the practice of his profession, wining golden opinions for his great skill in the healing art.
     In 1877 the Doctor was married to Miss Orissa A., daughter of Harvey and Rachel Udall, a native of Portage county and a graduate of Hiram College, who was for a number of years a successful teacher in the Cleveland schools, after which he taught in Jefferson, in which city she met Dr. Arner, who was at that time engaged in teaching.  They have two interesting children, a son and daughter, Lucy and LouisMrs. Arner is a useful member of the Congregational Church, to which she renders much valuable aid.
     Fraternally, Dr. Arner affiliates with the Royal Arch Masons.  As a physician and man he is thorough, conscientious and able, and holds a deservedly high position in the regard of his community.
  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 181
 
HENRY M. ARNER, deceased, was one of Ashtabula County's successful farmers.  He was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, Jan. 1, 1845, and was the son of George and Nancy (Atkinson) Arner.
     George Arner
and his wife were natives of Trumbull county and removed to Ashtabula county in 1860., and located on a farm near Dorset.
     Henry M. Arner received his education in the old academy at Kingsville, Ohio, and engaged in farming during his entire life.  He and his father were prominent dairymen of the county and operated 277 acres of good farm land.  After his father's death, Mr. Arner continued farming on his farm of 165 acres.  In 1919 he retired and moved to Dorset where he died May 7, 1924.
     On Oct. 20, 1877, Mr. Arner was married at Andover, Ohio, to Miss Jennie Holcomb, the daughter of Hoel and Orilla (Jones) Holcomb, the former a native of Connecticut and the latter of Trumbull County, Ohio.  At the age of 14 years Mr. Holcomb came to Ohio making the trip from Connecticut by ox team.  He was a shoemaker by trade and was a prominent citizen of Andover, where he settled in 1839.  He died at the age of 75 years.  Mr. and Mrs. Holcomb were the parents of the following children:  Henry, Almina, and Albert, all deceased; Mrs. Arner; Mrs. Salva Clark, lives in California; James, lives in Illinois; and Everett, lives at Andover.  Mrs. Arner was reared and educated at Andover and taught school for seven terms before her marriage.  She taught at Pierpont, Andover, and Williamsfield, Ohio.  To Mr. and Mrs. Arner four children were born;  Charles Albert, who died in 1911; Alice, who died at the age of 28 years; Sabra, who lives in Cleveland; and Mrs. Ruth Stamey, with whom her mother lives.  Mrs. Arner's three daughters were all teachers.
     Mr. Arner was a member of the Methodist Church, served as school director, and was township trustee for more than 20 years.  He was industrious, earnest and sincere, and merited the high regard in which he was held by the community.
Source #2
GEORGE T. ARTHUR, who is successfully engaged in the hardware business of Conneaut, was born in Ontario, Canada, in 1869, and is the son of Charles and Louise (Traver) Arthur.
     Charles Arthur and his wife
, natives of Ontario, Canada, are now deceased.  Mrs. Arthur  died in Canada in 1870 and Mr. Arthur died at Conneaut in 1908.  George T., the subject of this sketch, was their only child.
     George T. Arthur received his education in Canada and came to this country in 1887, locating at Conneaut.  Since that time he has been engaged  in the hardware business in the same location on Main Street.  Mr. Arthur does a large volume of business and is widely known as a reliable business man.
     In 1897 Mr. Arthur was married to Miss Lillie Brown, natives of Ohio and early settlers of Missouri.  Dr. Brown served throughout the Civil war with an Ohio regiment.  He died in 1871, and his wife died in 1917.  Mrs. Arthur  has one brother, William, who is engaged in farming near Geneva, Ohio.  To George T. and Lillie (Brown) Arthur five children have been born: Louise, married Frank Spieldenner, a public accountant, lives in New York city; Marion, lives in Cleveland; James, in store with his father and has charge of the office; and Robert and Mabel.
     Mr. Arthur
is a Republican and has served as a member of the school board for a number of years.  He and his family are members of the Congregational Church.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page  579
DR. R. L. ASHLEY

  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 636

S. D. ASHLEY

  Source #1:  Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893 - Page 335

S. L. ASHLEY, a progressive farmer and stockman of Morgan Township and the owner of 325 acres of well improved and, is a native of Ashtabula County.  He was born in Richland Township, Feb. 16, 1852, and is a son of A. and Sarah Ashley.
     A. Ashley
was born in Richmond Township in 1827 and was a leading farmer of Ashtabula County during his life.  There were three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Ashley:  A. A., Sarah L., and S. L., the subject of this sketch.
     S. L. Ashley was reared on his father's farm and attended the district schools of Richland Township.  He has lived on his present farm in Morgan Township for twenty-seven years.  He is well known throughout the county as a dairy farmer and is a breeder of registered stock exclusively.
     On June 6, 1874, Mr. Ashley was married to Miss Sarah French, who was born in Pennsylvania, April 9, 1857, and died Nov. 17, 1920.  To this union six children were born, as follows:  Solomon B., born Aug. 12, 1876, lives at Kingsville, Ohio; Maud Parks, born July 23, 1879, lives at Ashtabula, and has six children, Ora, Ward, Hubert, Kenneth, Lawrence, and Paul; Claud, born Oct. 15, 1883, lives in Morgan Township, and has six children, Lloyd, George, Zoe, Berdette, Walter, and Elva; Floyd, born Dec. 18, 1895, lives at home, and has four children, Miriam, Lucille, Robert, and Salome; Florence, born Dec. 18, 1897, married Mr. Roth, and they have two children, Louise and Donald; and one child died in infancy.
     In politics Mr. Ashley is identified with the Republican party.  He is an excellent citizen and is widely known in Ashtabula County.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page - 1071
  DR. W. S. D. ASHLEY, well known veterinary surgeon of Ashtabula County, located in Richmond Township, was born on the farm where he now lives, Dec. 13, 1859, the son of S. D. and Eliza F. Ashley
     S. D. Ashley was a native of Richmond Township, born Dec. 13, 1822, and the son of Salmon and Ann Ashley, natives of Connecticut and early settlers of Ashtabula County.
     Salmon Ashley is a son of Elkna, son of Robert Ashley, son of Roger Ashley, who settled at Fort Ann, N. Y. in 1788.  He brought 400 acres of old John Kinsman for $1.25 per acre, with ten years to pay it without interest.  Black salts made from wood ashes was the only product that would bring money and not much of that.  Salmon Ashley, with his young wife, cleared a small spot and erected a one room log house, 12x18 feet.  They cleared the land as fast as they could, burning the timber to get rid of it.  The Indians were plentiful here but very friendly, and Ashley always fed them and was kind to them.  On one occasion when the other was cooking her venison for dinner, the bear skin which was hung up for a door. was brushed aside and in came a fierce, rough looking Indian hunter, who was lost and nearly starved.  He made motions to give him something to eat, and although Mrs. Ashley was very much frightened she gave him some corn bread, and hoe cake patties, made of unsifted meal ground in a hole  burned into a stump for a mortar and ground with a round stone, the only way to make meal then.  He ate very heartily as he had been lost two days, and when he finished eating he made his bow of thanks and departed.  In about three months this Indian came to the door with the saddle of a deer "hind quarters," and placed it upon the table.
     Tables were made of a log spit open, face up, and four legs driven into auger holes.  All chairs were made the same way.  There were no floors, only skins and pelts.  Mrs. Ashley used to go to Padanara to visit her parents, a distance of five miles, and she would go afoot, carrying a baby and leading another.  She often saw wild deer, bears, and wolves skulk across the road ahead of her.  Wild animals did not make an attack in the daytime.  On one occasion her old sow that had a litter of small pigs began to squeal about midnight, and the mother was alone with her three babies.  She knew that a bear was after her only hog and grabbing her ax as a weapon she ran to the log enclosure just in time to see a large bear brining the old sow over the top of the log pen.  He did not seem to be afraid but began eating the pig.  Mrs. Ashley threw clubs at him to scare him away but when he only growled she had to give up her task. Her husband came home in the night and when she told him of the bear killing the sow, he took his old flint-lock gun and just at daylight carefully surveyed the tree top where the bear had left the pig half covered by leaves.  When he spied Mr. Bear hidden, he brought him down with the first shot.  These are only a few of the many dangers that our grandparents underwent to clear our homes and rear their large families.
     S. D. Ashley taught school at Linesville, Pa., for 26 years and later studied law, being admitted to the bar in Cleveland in 1863.  He practiced law for 30 years and was justice of the peace for 16 years.  He was a Republican and a prominent member of the Masonic lodge.  To S. D. and Eliza F. Ashley seven children were born as follows:  Eugene, lives at Erie, Pa.; Alice J. Blood, lives in Los Angeles, Cal.; Dr. W. S. D., the subject of this sketch; Dr. Albert C., a physician, lives in Cleveland; Fred J., and F. B., live in Cleveland; and George B., deceased.
     Dr. W. S. D. Ashley received his education in the schools of Pierpont and after attending Kingsville College for three years, entered Ontario College in 1901, and was graduated from there in 1904.  Since that time Doctor Ashley has practiced his profession continuously in Richmond Township and he has an extensive practice throughout the county.
     On March 28, 1878, Doctor Ashley was married to Miss Hattie Follett, who died in 1898, leaving four children as follows:  Emily L., Frank B., and Howard, all deceased; and Mrs. E. H. Wood, lives in Ashtabula County, and she has two children, Sarah and Harriet.  on Nov. 20, 1913, Doctor Ashley was married to Mrs. Julia (Lisbon) Allen.
     Doctor Ashley
has served as notary public for 20 years and as justice of the peace for three years.  HE is a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he and his family are highly esteemed throughout Ashtabula County.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page  1088
THOMAS ASUNMAA, manager of the Co-operative Grocery Company of Ashtabula Harbor, is a progressive and enterprising citizen of Ashtabula County.  He was born in Finland, July 15, 1874, and is the son of Herman and Susanna Asunmaa.
     Herman Asunmaa,
who lives retired in Finland, ha been a farmer all his life.  His wife is deceased.  They were the parents of the following children: Andrew, lives in Ashtabula; John and Mary, who live in Finland; Thomas, the subject of this sketch; and several other children who are deceased.
     Thomas Asunmaa spent his boyhood in his native land and in 1891 came to this country and located at Ashtabula Harbor.  In 1906 he became connected with the Cooperative Grocery Company as manager.  This is one of the leading grocery stores of the Harbor and maintains a delivery system throughout the city.
     Mr. Asunmaa was married in 1897 to Miss Susanna Arkki, and to this union three children have been born, as follows: Selma, lives in Cleveland; Taano E., employed by the Pennsylvania R. R.; and W. H., a clerk in the Cooperative store.
     Mr. Asunmaa is a Republican, a member of the Finnish Lutheran church and belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page  555
OLIVER ATWELL came to Jefferson from the State of New York in1832, with his wife and two daughters.  He bought forty acres of land about one and one half miles south of the Court House.  The farm is now owned by Erastus Pritchard.  He built a log house on it, and commenced like other early settlers, with hard work, cutting down the forest and clearing off the land in order to obtain a livelihood from the soil for the family.  In 1842 he sold his farm to Anson Alger, and bought a piece of land about one half mile south of the Court House, and built a small frame house on it.  With the help of a very persevering, industrious wife, they procured means to build their present good house in 1846.  Mr. Atwell went to California in the early days of the land of gold, and brought home some of the precious metal.  He died in 1872; his widow still lives on the old homestead, her oldest daughter and grandson living with her.  The youngest daughter lives at Atlanta, Ga.
Source: Condensed History of Jefferson, Ashtabula Co., OH - Publ. Jefferson, O., J. A. Howells & Company - 1878 - Page 71

STEPHEN B. ATWOOD, Justice of the Peace, Notary Public, and an insurance representative, is one of the most highly respected citizens of Conneaut, Ohio.  Following is a brief sketch of his life:
    S. B. Atwood was born in Cortland county, New York, Feb. 27, 1820, son of Mills and Charlotte (Day) Atwood, both natives of the Empire State.  The father, a weaver by trade, passed his life and died in Columbia County, New York, at the age of eighty-three years.  The mother died in 1823.  She was a member of the Friends Church.  They had four children: David, Gideon, Stephen B., and Jane, all of whom have passed away save the subject of this sketch.
     Mr. Atwood was educated in Onondaga county, New York, and in Erie county, Pennsylvania, having resided at the latter place from 1837 until 1843.  The last named year he came to Conneaut and engaged in the harness and carriage business, continuing the same until 1878.  That hear he turned his attention to the granite business, and as traveling agent for the Ryegate Granite Works of Vermont, was on the road for five years.  In 1887 he was appointed Postmaster of Conneaut, which position he filled until 1891, when his commission expired.  As the incumbent of that office he rendered excellent service, giving entire satisfaction to all.  Since 1891 he has been engaged in the insurance business, and since 1892 has been a Justice of the Peace.
     He was married in Conneaut, Jan. 15, 1843, to Miss Charlotte E. Phillips, daughter of Gardner Phillips of Perrington, Monroe County, New York.  They had three children:  Edwin Gardner, Minnie C. and Lee C.
     Edwin G. Atwood
was associated with his father in the carriage business for many years, and was afterward and up to the time of his death in the employ of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad Company, as freight agent, being a man of excellent business qualifications.  He was a member of the Masonic Order and also of the I. O. O. F.  Of the last named lodge he was elected Noble Grand and his death occurred the very evening he would have been installed in office – Jan. 21, 1891.  He died at the age of forty-three years.  His wife, nee Marion Brown, a native of Scotland, is also deceased.  They left three children: Charlotte D.; William S., who is in the office of E. A. Miller¸ master mechanic of the Nickel Plate Railroad Company, at Conneaut; and Burt.
     Minnie C.
, the daughter of our subject, was engaged in teaching in Conneaut for several years, but at present presides over her father’s home.
     Lee C., is Deputy Postmaster of Conneaut, having occupied this position for nearly ten years, which circumstance in itself speaks well for his ability.
     S. B. Atwood has taken a deep interest in the moral and educational development of Conneaut.  He has served as Mayor of the city, for twenty-five years has been a member of the School Board, and has also held other minor offices in the city.  He is a member of the I. O. O. F., having filled all the chairs in the subordinate lodge.  He takes little active interest in politics, but votes with the Democratic party.
Source #1:
Biographical history of northeastern Ohio - Chicago:  Lewis Pub. Co.,  1893~ Page 328

CHARLES N. AUSTIN, who is the efficient and valued foreman of a department in the important manufacturing establishment of Dempster Company, at Beatrice, is a member of the honored pioneer family that was founded in Gage county nearly a decade before the admission of Nebraska to statehood, and adequate data concerning the family are given in the article dedicated, on other pages of this work, to his father, the late Homer B. Austin, who was one of the very first settlers in what is now the city of Beatrice.
     Charles N. Austin was born at Austinburg, Ashtabula County, Ohio, on the 21st of May, 1855, and his early education was received principally at Augusta and Galesburg, Illinois.  He was about two years old, however, when his parents, Homer B. and Mary A. (Dunbar) Austin came to the Nebraska Territory, in 1857, the father erecting a small cabin on the homestead claim which he entered near the present village of Pickrell and then turning his attention to breaking his land and developing a frontier farm, he having been one of the earliest settlers in the county.  Later he returned with his family to Ohio and for a number of years prior to returning to the west of the family home was maintained in Illinois.
     Charles N. Austin has been continuously a resident of Gage county since 1890 and for six years he was here employed in a leading nursery.  About 1895 he established his residence in Beatrice, and for virtually a score of years he has here been in the employ of the Dempster Company, with which representative industrial concern he now holds a responsible department foremanship, as previously intimated.
     On the 7th of March, 1876, was recorded the marriage of Mr. Austin to Miss Stella Hall, who was born at Seneca, Missouri, near the Oklahoma line, and who is the daughter of William G. and Margaret R. (Roberts) Hall, the former of whom was born near the historic old city of Vincennes, Indiana, from which state they came to Nebraska in 1887, here passing the remainder of their lives.  John A. Hall, a brother of Mrs. Austin, now resides in the city of San Francisco and is in the civil service department of government service.  He is a member of Company C. First Nebraska Volunteer Infantry, in the Spanish-American war, thereafter served two years in the regular army, in Alaska and Hawaii, and he has been a resident of San Francisco since the time of the great earthquake in that city.
     Concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Austin the following brief record is consistently entered: Harry A. is now a member of the American army preparing for service in the great world war and at the time of this writing, in the spring of 1918, he is with his command at Deming, New Mexico.  He enlisted in the Nebraska National Guard on the 28th of July, 1910, and in his present company he holds the office of first lieutenant.  He was married Jan. 2, 1918, to Miss Selena Brown, of Crab Orchard, Johnson county.  Louis  is a member of the class of 1919 in the Beatrice high school; Mary R. likewise is attending the public schools of Beatrice.
     In politics, Mr. Austin is aligned staunchly in the ranks of the Republican party, and he has been actively affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since May 28, 1876.  He has been specially active in the affairs of this admirable fraternal order and is past grand of his lodge.  He is identified also with the Woodmen of the World.  He has served twenty-two years as a member of the volunteer fire department of Beatrice and he and his wife are active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Gage County, Nebraska - Publ. Lincoln, Nebraska, Western Publishing and Engraving Company - 1918
B. F. AYRES, a leading farmer and stockman of Andover Township, is a member of one of the first families that settled in Ashtabula County.  He was born at Linesville, Pa., in 1848, and is the son of Eli and Adeline (Collemay) Ayers.
     Eli Ayers was born in Trenton, N. J., June 5, 1809, and died Sept. 9, 1885.  He was a farmer and at an early date settled at Linesville, Pa., where he reared his family of eight children, as follows:  Milton, Mary, Nelson and Arminda,  all deceased; B. F., the subject of this sketch; Naomi and Lavera, both deceased; and Wesley, who lives at Conneaut, Ohio.  Adeline (Collemay) Ayers was born in 1817 and died in 1862.  Mr. Ayers was later married to Mary Pennell, and to this union one child was born, Elmer Ayers, who now lives in Tennessee.
     B. F. Ayers attended school at Linesville, Pa., and when he was 16 years of age he settled at Andover, where he was employed in a cheese factory.  Four years later he engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which pursuit he has been successfully engaged since.  He owns 50 acres.
     On Aug. 27, 1870, Mr. Ayers was married to Miss Minnie Stillman, a native of Ohio, born June 23, 1851, and the daughter of Alva and Alma (Mack) Stillman, natives of Andover.  Mr. Stillman was born Feb. 21, 1825, and his wife was born April 2, 1826, both now deceased.  They were the parents of the following children:  Delbert, lives at Andover; Mrs. Ayers; and Eddie, deceased.  To B. F. and Minnie (Stillman) Ayers two children were born: Alma, wife of Roy Gove, born March 22, 1871, and she has three children:  Iven, Glenn, and George; and Howard E., born Jan. 30, 1875, died May 1, 1919.
     Politically, Mr. Ayers is a RepublicanThe Ayers family are well known and among the substantial citizens of the county.
Source #2 - History of Ashtabula County, Ohio - by Moina W. Large - Vol. I - 1924 - Page  795

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