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Welcome to
Ashland County, Ohio

History & Genealogy

Source:
A History of the Pioneer and Modern Times

of
Ashland County, Ohio
by H. S. Knapp
Publ: Philadelphia
by J. B. Lippincott & Co.
1863.
(Transcribed by Sharon Wick)

CHAPTER VII.
Montgomery Township
pg. 167

     THIS township was surveyed by Jonathan Cox, D. S. U. S., in 1807.  The same year the survey was duly platted and certified to Jared Mansfield, Surveyor-General of the United States.  As with the other townships in the county, so with Montgomery, at the time of the survey there was not a white family within its borders.

Population in 1820

704
"                "   1830 1530
"                "   1840 2445
"                "   1850 3192
"                "   1860 3501

     Montgomery was detached from Vermillion, and organized in 1816.  The records are incomplete.  Such as are in the hands of the present clerk, deemed of public interest, are subjoined: -

[Pg. 168] -

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1845

     Trustees:  Jonas H. Gierhart, Peter Thomas, and Leander Carter -
     Treasurer:  John Jacobs
    
Assessor:  Samuel Swineford
    
Clerk:  Lorin Andrews
    
Constables: Stephen Wolf and W. S. Vanarnam

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1846

     Trustees:  Peter Thomas, Leander Carter, and Jonas H. Gierhart -
     Treasurer:  John Jacobs
    
Assessor:  Samuel Swineford
    
Clerk:  Lorin Andrews
    
Constables: Stephen Wolf and C. S. Vanarnum

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1847

     Trustees:  Peter Thomas, Leander Carter, and Hugh McGuire
     Treasurer:  John Jacobs
    
Assessor:  Jonas H. Crouse
    
Clerk:  John A. McClusky
    
Constables: C. S. Vanarnam and Stephen Wolf

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1848

     Trustees:  Peter Thomas, David Bryte, and Burr Kellogg
     Clerk:  G. W. Hill
    
Treasurer: John Jacobs
    
Assessor:  John Jacobs
    
Treasurer:  Joonas H. Crouse
    
Constables: C. S. Vanarnam and Joseph B. Cowhick

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1850

     Trustees:  Peter Thomas, Burr Kellogg, and David Bryte
    
Clerk:  Orlow Smith
     Treasurer:  John Jacobs
    
Assessor:  Alanson Andrews
    
Constables: A. C. Swineford and Uriah Drumb.

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1851

     Trustees:  Peter Thomas, Burr Kellogg, and George W. Urie
     Clerk: Geo. W. Hill
     Treasurer: 
John Jacobs
    
Assessor:  John Tanyer
    
Constables: A. C. Swineford and R. Scott

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1852

     Trustees:  Hugh Burns, John Salley, and Stough -
    
Clerk: W. Ralston
     Treasurer:  John Jacobs
    
Assessor:  John Tanyer
     
Constables: John G. Brown and Merida Figley

[Pg. 169] -

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1853

     Trustees:  Hugh Burns, John Smalley, and Willet Skinner-
     Clerk:  Wm. Ralston
     Treasurer: 
John Jacobs
    
Assessor:  Andrew Sponsler
    
Constables: John G. Brown and A. C. Swineford

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1854

     [The record of this election does not appear in its proper place.  Geo. H. Parker acted as Township Clerk.]

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1855

     Trustees:  Philip Kosht, Leander Carter, and John Smally
     Treasurer:  John Jacobs
    
Assessor:  Andrew Sponsler
    
Constables: John Lauterbaugh and A. C. Swineford

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1856

     Trustees:  Geo. W. Urie, Peter Thomas, and Leander Carter -
     Treasurer:  John Jacobs
    
Clerk:  Wm. Willson
    
Constables: A. C. Swineford and M. M. Desenberg

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1857

     Trustees:  G. W. Urie, Leander Carter, and Isaac Gates -
     Assessor:  A. Sponsler
    
Clerk:  T. L. Arthur
    
Treasurer:  John Jacobs    
    
Constables: Henry Woods and A. C. Swineford

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1858

     Trustees:  Isaac Gates, G. W. Urie and H. Ames
     Clerk: T. L. Arthur -
     Treasurer:  John Jacobs
    
Assessor:  A. Sponsler
    
Constables: Henry Woods and Wm. Lash

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1859

     Trustees: Andrew Proudfit, Jacob Martin, and John Smalley
     Clerk: F. S. Jacobs
     Assessor: A. Sponsler
     Treasurer: F. S. Jacobs
     Constables=: A. C. Swineford

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1860

     Trustees: James McCool, A. Proudfit, and John Smalley
     Clerk: F. S. Jacobs
     Assessor: A. Sponsler
     Treasurer: John Jacobs
     Constables: A. C. Swinford adn Robert McMurray

[Pg. 170]

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1861

     Trustees: James McCool, Andrew Proudfit, and John Smalley
     Clerk: Wm. G. Heltman
     Assessor: A. Sponsler
     Treasurer: E. W. Wallack
     Constables: A. C. Swinford and H. G. Wood

ELECTION OF APRIL, 1862

     Trustees: Levi Somers, Moses Latta, and Geo. W. Urie
     Clerk: W. G. Heltman
     Assessor: A. Sponsler
     Treasurer: E. W. Wallack
     Constables: Amos Hilborn and John McNaull

CHURCHES

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN.

     There is a church of this denomination on the east line of the township, organized in 1838.  The present building is of brick, and will accommodate with seats a congregation of about three hundred and fifty persons.  Rev. Mr. Wolf had the first charge of the congregation.  A German Reformed clergyman, Rev. Adam Staump, also preached in the house a year or two after the erection of the church building.  Rev. William Gailbraith is the present pastor; Samuel Horn and Elish Worley, deacons.

GERMAN BAPTISTS

     The denomination of German Baptists, or Brethren, have three meeting-houses in the county, known as "The Ashland District," - the Ashland meeting-house, about one mile west of Orange, and Snowbarger's meeting-house, near Lafayette, Perry Township.  There is also another congregation, belonging to the same body, in the "Loudonville District," who

[Pg. 171]
are yet, however, without a church building.  The membership is the Ashland District amounts to about three hundred; and in the Loudonville District, of such as reside within this county, there are between twenty-five and fifty.
     The denomination has reached its present numbers in this county by assessions made it to by immigration and conversions which have chiefly occurred during the last ten years.  They are a thrifty, industrious, and staid people - unassuming in their manners, unostentatious in their dress, and of well-established integrity.  To correct a misunderstanding which prevails to some extent in regard to their peculiar tenets, we subjoin the "HISTORY OF THE GERMAN BAPTISTS OR BRETHREN. [By Rev. Philip Boyle, Uniontown, Maryland]  - The German Baptists, or Brethren, are a denomination of Christians who immigrated to this country from Germany, between the years 1718 and 1730; they are commonly called Dunkers; but they have assumed for themselves the name of 'Brethren,' on account of what Christ said to his disciples, Matt. xxiii.8, 'One is your master, even Christ, and all ye are brethren.'
     "The following account of these people has been extracted from a work called 'Materials towards a History of the American Baptists,' published in 1770, by Morgan Edwards, then Fellow of Rhode Island College/ and overseer of the Baptist church, in Philadelphia: -
     "Of the Germans in Pennsylvania who are commonly called Tunkers, to distinguish them from the Menonists; for both are styled Die Taufer, or Baptists.  They are called Tunkers in derision, which is as much as 'cops,' from tunken, to put a morsel in

[Pg. 172]
sauce; but as the term signifies dippers, they may rest content with their nickname.  They are also called Tumblers, from the manner in which they perform baptism, which is by putting the person head forward under water, (while kneeling,) so as to resemble the motion of the body in the act of tumbling.  The first appearance of these people in America was in the fall of the year, 1719, when about twenty families landed in Philadelphia, and dispersed themselves, some of Germantown, some to Skippack, some to Oley, some to Conestoga, and elsewhere.  This dispersion incapacitated them to meet in public worship, therefore they soon began to grow lukewarm in religion.  But in the year 1822, Baker, Gomery, and Gantzs, with the Franzs, visited their scattered brethren, which was attended with a great revival, insomuch that societies were formed wherever a number of families were within reach one of another.  But this lasted not above three years; they settled on their lees again; till about thirty families more of their persecuted brethren arrived in the fall of the year 1729, which both quickened them again and increased their number everywhere.  Those two companies had been members of one and the same church, which originated in Schwartzenan, in the year 1708, in Germany.  The first constituents were Alexander Mack and wife, John Kipin and wife, George Grevy, Andreas Bhony, Lucas Fetter, and Joanna Nethigum.  Being neighbors, they agreed together to read the Bible, and edify one another in the way they had been brought up, for as yet they did not know there were any Baptists in the world.  However, believer's baptism and a congregational church soon gained on them, insomuch that they were determined to obey

[Pg. 173]

MORE TO COME

[Pg. 174]

MORE TO COME

[Pg. 175]

MORE TO COME

[Pg. 176]

MORE TO COME

[Pg. 177]

MORE TO COME

[Pg. 178]

MORE TO COME

[Pg. 179]
lost, believing that he is able to save to the uttermost all that come unto God through a crucified Redeemer, who tasted death for every man, and was manifested to destroy the works of the devil.  And although it has herein been testified that they hold general redemption as a doctrine, still it is not preached among them in general, as an article of faith.  It has probably been held forth by those who felt themselves, as it were, lost in the love of God; and, perhaps, on this account, they have been charged with holding the sentiments of the Universalists, which they all deny.  They conceive it their duty to declare the whole counsel of God, and therefore they fell themselves bound to proclaim his threatenings and his judgments against the wicked and ungodly; yet in accordance with their general principles, which are love and goodwill, they are more frequently led to speak of the love and goodness of God toward the children of men."

---------------

REMINISCENCES OF THE PIONEERS OF MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP.

HENRY BAUGHMAN

JAMES BOOTS

SAMUEL BURNS. - 180

DANIEL CARTER - 181

HENRY GAMBLE* - 182

FRANCIS GRAHAM. - 183

JACOB H. GRUBB. - 194

 The First Schools.

     The first school in the town was taught by Therry-good Smith, in his cabin, which was situated on the second lot west of the present resident of Hugh Davis.  This was in 1824.
     In the year 1825, the school-house referred to by Mr. Slocum was erected on the lot now owned by Sarah Jones.  This school was taught by Chandler Foote.
     In 1826, the third school was taught in a cabin owned by Cullen Spaulding, which stood upon the lot now owned by Witwer, Myers & Co.  Mr. Fleming taught this school.
     At one or all of these schools, Mary Grubb, (now Mrs. Rice, ) Alexander Morehead, (brother-in-law of Abraham Holmes, ) Sarah Coonrod, and Lawrence Whitzel; Lorin and Mary, children of Alanson Andrews; Lucretia, Elizabeth and Thomas, children of John Smith; Mary Ann and John, children of John Smith; Mary Ann and John, children of Elias Bailey; Gideon, son of Ebenezer D. Nightingale; the

[Pg. 195]
children of John Herryman and of Mr. Holmes; Julia, Emery and Harrison, children of Seth B. Cook; Sarah, daughter of John Jones, and Jacob Keefer, grandson of Mr. Shaffer, were scholars in attendance.

Methodist Meetings.

     The Methodist meetings, in 1823, and for many years subsequent, were held at the residence of John Smith, whose house was upon the lot now occupied by Christopher Mykrants.

SAGE KELLOGG - Page 194

JOHN HOUGH - Page 195

JAMES KUYKENDALL. - 196

[Pg. 197]

Market Prices from 1817 to 1824.

     Salt - at Lake, per barrel, $25; Coffee - 50 cents per pound; Calico - 50 to 75 cents per yard; Powder - per pound, $2; Lead - per pound, 50 cents.
     Nearest mills at Wooster (Stibbs's,) and Owl Creek, below Mt. Vernon, thirty-seven miles from Ashland.
     Cows - $4 to 6; Wheat - per bushel, average 20 cents; Corn - per bushel, average 5 to 8 cents; Oats - per bushel, average 6 cents; Ginseng (dried) - per pounds, 25 cents; Deer Skin, (dried) - per pound, 12 cents.  No money - but "trade."
     Hunting, as will be observed, at this time was more profitable than cultivating the soil - the products of the forest being of more value than those of the fields.

HENRY MAIZE. - 197

 JOSEPH MARKLEY. - 198

HUGH McGUIRE. - 200

JOHN McNAULL. - 200

CHRISTIAN MILLER. - 200

CHRISTOPHER MYKRANTS. - 200

ANDREW PROUDFIT, SEN. - 202

MICHAEL RIDDLE. - 202

SAMUEL ROWLAND. - 203

JOSEPH SHEETS. - 203

WILLIAM SKILLING. - 204

PETER SWINEFORD - 205

ELIAS SLOCUM. - 205

[Pg. 206]

 

[Pg. 207]

 

 

From Black Rock to Uniontown.

     While the events above mentioned occurred, the families of Messrs. Slocum and Palmer remained

[Pg. 208]
at Black Rock; and, in January, sat out overland for their Western destination; and in the latter part of March, 1818, arrived at Uniontown - having been about eight weeks in accomplishing this part of the journey.
     Mr. Slocum, on his first visit, had purchased of George Butler one hundred and six acres in section 16, Montgomery Township, and jointly with Alanson Andrews and George W. Palmer, purchased of William Montgomery, the original proprietor of Uniontown, three acres on the south side of "Montgomery's Run," (a part of the ground being that upon which the dwellings of David Whiting, Jacob Hildebrand and the shop and dwelling of Mr. Desenburg are now situated.)  Upon this purchase they erected a patent distillery - being the first of that character in this section of the country.  Mr. Slocum's family removed to a cabin on section 16, which had been erected for them by Mr. Butler.  Upon this land Mr. Slocum

 

 

 

 

Ashland in 1817-18.

     The Hopewell, west of town one and a half miles was the only church building in the country nearer than Mansfield.
     The nearest physician and store were also at Mansfield.

[Pg. 209]
very stinted quantity of light was admitted through greased paper windows, and capable of seating very uncomfortably about fifteen or eighteen children, was erected in the vicinity of the present residence of Miss Sarah Jones.  Here the late Lorin Andrews and the elder children of Mr. Slocum and a few others learned the first rudiments of their education.

A Boy Lost.

     In the year 1820, a son of James Durfee, aged about eight years, whose family then resided in Jackson Township, near what was then the Wayne and Lorain County line, (being the farm now owned by John Buchanan,)  became lost in the woods.  The child was in charge of his uncle, David Souls, and had been placed to guard an opening in the fence.  A rain coming on, and becoming impatient by reason of the protracted absence of his uncle, it is supposed that the child undertook to find his way home, in which effort he became lost.  After a faithful search of about twelve days by the people of the whole neighborhood, aided by others from remote townships, the hope of recovering his body was abandoned.  Subsequently some remains of his hair, bones, and clothing were found in the forest, near the present town of Perrysburg, within a distance of two miles of his father's house.  These relics explained the little sufferer's fate.  His body, when either living or dead, had been attacked and devoured by wolves.

[Pg. 210]

How Justice was administered.

     It is no reproach to the first and most important officers of Montgomery Township that they were illiterate - unable even to read or write - as they had had little or no opportunities of education, having spent their boyhood in a wilderness that had never been reached by the schoolmaster.  It was, therefore, the fact with regard to Robert Newell, Esq., (one among the earliest of the settlers, and whose cabin was burned by the Indians during the war of 1812, as elsewhere related,) that he could neither read nor write, and of course never kept a docket.  So satisfactorily, however, and with such an even hand did he dispense justice, upon principles of strict equity rather than law, that his official acts were indorsed by a re-election.  Eloyd Eddy, his son-in-law, and Jacob Kline, elected as constables, were also equally illiterate.  In most cases, Squire Newell would refuse absolutely to issue summons, fixing up and enforcing on summary but equitable terms and settlement of issues among neighbors; but this could not always be done.  In one instance, Andrew Clark demanded summons on Martin Mason, for balance of pay claimed for constructing a mill-race, and the squire, after protracted efforts to bring the parties to a settlement, was unable longer to defer an "issue of summons."  Accordingly he called upon Constable Kline, and, presenting that "civil" functionary with a strong buckeye club, notified him that that was his authority for bringing Mason, dead or alive, into "Court," - to call upon said defendant, and if he showed any symptoms of unwillingness to obey the summons, he was to make such vigorous use of said club over the head and shoulders

[Pg. 211]
of defendant as would induce him to respond and accompany him.  Defendant, however, readily obeyed the summons, and the litigants appeared before his honor.  The squire demanded, first of the plaintiff, then to the defendant, a full statement from each of the matter at issue; which demand having been complied with by the statements of the parties, he gave judgment as follows:  "Mason shall pay to Clark two bushels of corn; Clark being a poor man, and having no horse, you, Mason, shall deliver the corn at his house.  Forever after this you are to be good friends and neighbors, and if either shall ever fail in the least particular to obey this order, I will have the offender before me and whip him within about 'a inch' of his life.  As for myself I charge no fees.  Not so with Constable Kline; his charge being q quart of whisky, which plaintiff and defendant will see is brought into Court as promptly as possible, for the use of all present."

Religious Sects and Political Parties.

     In the early days, there were no religious sects and political parties.  It was emphatically an "era of good feeling."  When word was given out that a preacher would hold a meeting at either a private or a public house, it was attended by all the neighbors, far and near - the men appearing often with their rifles, which would be stacked in a corner of the room - and no particular inquiry would be made as to what denomination the preacher belonged.  The clergymen, however, who mostly visited the country were Presbyterians and Baptists.  At this juncture of time, also, and up to the period of teh second contest between Adams and Jackson, in 1828, there were

[Pg. 212]
no party divisions.  The officers, county and township, generally received the unanimous support of the electors.  When there was anything like a contest, it was more on personal grounds, and determined more on the question of personal popularity, than any other.

Settlement of Montgomery Township, etc.

     The date of the settlement of Montgomery Township may be said to have commenced about the year 1818, the settlers prior to that time being very few in number.  From 1818 until about 1821, the township had received considerable accessions to its population.  Squire Newell was the largest landholder, he being the owner of one thousand acres; the next largest was a Mr. Lanterman, of Trumbull County, (father-in-law of Luther M. Pratt,)  who was the owner of about nine hundred acres, embracing what is now know as the "Tunker Settlement."  Under the laws of Congress in force at that time, no one could enter less than a quarter section, and very few of the original settlers entered more than that quantity.  These quarters were often divided and sometimes subdivided by the original purchasers, and sold to other settlers, which had a strong tendency to promote the density of the settlement, and develop the resources of the country.
     Mr. Slocum and his neighbors often spent six days in the week at attending cabin-raisings and log-rollings.  On some of these occasions, he would travel five and six miles distant from his home.  These gatherings had a powerful tendency to create and cement the ties of social friendship and every one considered it a point of honor to obey the invitation of a neighbor to attend a "raising" or "log-rolling."

[Pg. 213]
     The bears were the great enemy of the swine, but after they had become so far exterminated as to permit the introduction of hogs, the mast of the forest afforded them food in sufficient quantity to fatten, with the aid of very little or no corn.  The owners would kill them, as their wants required, by shooting in the woods.  This practice, as may be supposed, gave rise to some ill feeling and litigation, as men would sometimes mistake their neighbors' hogs for their own.  Deer and turkey were abundant in the forest.  No man who was the owner of a gun and understood its use, need be out of a supply of the best kind of wild animal food.  Since Mr. Slocum's residence in this country, he never knew a case of severe suffering for want of food.  There was always sufficient in the country, coarse though it may have been, to sustain life and health; and if a neighbor was in want, ample relief was promptly offered as soon as the circumstances became known.  Equality, fraternity, truth, and charity were virtues more honored in the observance than in later times.
     Mr. Slocum died at his residence in Ashland, on the 17th of April, 1862, at the age of eighty-two years.
     Michael Springer entered at the office, n Canton, the land upon which John Springer now resides, in Montgomery Township.   He also entered the quarter sections which George Swinevord and Austin Moherman at this time own and occupy.  He was a native of Pennsylvania.  The lands above mentioned were purchased for his children, whose names were, severally, Daniel, Sarah, John, Nancy, Michael, Elizabeth, Peter, Susan, William, Mary, and Mar-

[Pg. 214]
garet.  Mr. Springer, his son John, and son-in-law, Jacob Figley, (husband of Sarah,) came to the country in December, 1815.

GEORGE THOMAS.

DANIEL VANTILBURG.

ALANSON WALKER.

Prices of Live Stock in 1823-24.

     From the "Stray Book," now in the hands of J. A. McCluskey, Esq., and the first entry in which was made by J. Gallup, Esq., J. P., Jan. 25, 1823, a very correct idea of the value of live stock in Montgomery Township at that period may be gathered.
     On the twenty-ninth of that month, G. W. Palmer and Jonathan Markley were called upon to appraise two animals which had come into possession of John Smith as estrays.   A heifer supposed to be one year old was appraised at $4; and a hog supposed to be of the same age was appraised at $1.  Joel Luther and Joseph Sheets on the 27th of March, 1823, appraise a hog eighteen months, which had come to Alanson Andrews as a stray, at $1.75.  On the 17th July, 1824, Alanson Andrews and Henry Gamble appraise a horse, supposed to be thirteen yeas old, found upon the premises of Wm. Skilling, at $25.

END OF CHAPTER VII. - MONTGOMERY TWP.

----------------------
NOTES:
*
Since Deceased

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