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ALLEN COUNTY, OHIO
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ISAAC J. BABER, farmer, P. O. Lima, was born in German Township, Allen Co., Ohio, Oct. 6, 1842; son of James and Susan (McMullen) Baber, natives of Virginia and early settlers of this county.  Our subject received a limited common school education, and having been raised on a farm has naturally made farming the principal, occupation of his life.  He was united in marriage, Oct. 27, 1867, with Mary M. Thomas, of German Township, this county, and by her has eight children: William Brinton, James W., Franklin Orwood, Albert, Naoma, Margaret, Walter, and Isaac Jr.  Mr. Baber's sole possession when he started out for himself, at the age of twenty-one years, was a colt valued at $25.  He was fully determined to make the most of his opportunities, however, and now owns 121 acres of land, eight-five of which are under cultivation, proving him to have been an active man.  Mr. Baber was formerly a granger.  In his political views he is Democratic.  He is a consistent member of the Christian Union Church.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 561
G. W. BAILEY, farmer, P. O. Beaver Dam, was born in Rocking-ham County, Va., June 15, 1S84, son of William and Lydia (Neuschwander) Bailey, also natives of Virginia, of English and Irish descent, former a farmer. Our subject was reared on a farm, receiving a common school education. He settled in Richland Township, this county, and engaged successfully in farming. He was married, in 1852, to Malinda, daughter of Dr. Jacob Driver, and to this union were born twelve children. all of whom are now living: John P., an attorney at law in Ottawa, Ohio: P. R., a law student, now engaged in the insurance and loan business at Lima, Ohio; Mary, a teacher, wife of John Luke; Jacob W., a telegraph operator; Daniel M., a school teacher and general agent; Jennie, wife of A. G. Kenney; and Nancy E., Alice,  Charles, Sadie, Melvin and Edward at home. Mr. and    Mrs. Bailey take much interest in their children, four of whom received collegiate education, five teaching school. Mrs. Bailey is a member of the German Baptist Church. Our subject is an industrious man and now owns a well-improved farm in Richland Township, this county.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
JOHN N. BAILEY, lawyer, Spencerville, was born in Auglaize County, Ohio, September 3, 1839 ; eldest son of Christopher and Nancy (Noble) Bailey, natives of Virginia and Ohio, respectively, early settlers of Auglaize County, and who are still living on the old homestead. Our subject was raised on a farm and received a common school education. He was married, February 11, 1861, to Minerva Baber, who died in 1876, leaving to his care seven children: Mary A., Minnie M., Alice M., Emma J., Charles F., Lillian and Arthur N. His second marriage, which occurred November 20, 1879, was with Hannah Caldwell, of Darke County, Ohio. Early in life Mr. Bailey learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked as contractor, building railroad bridges, etc., till 1880. He read law more or less till that year, and then entered the law school at Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating in June, 1882. and immediately commenced practice at Spencerville. Although young in the profession, his success is such as usually attends years of hard labor. In addition to his practice Mr. Bailey owns a farm in Amanda Township, this county, consisting of 216 acres of land, and also other property in Spencer Township. His property is the result of his own efforts, and he is virtually a self-made man. He is master of Arcadia Lodge, No. 306, F. & A. M. He has been a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for nearly twenty-three years. Our subject is a stanch Republican, although not an office seeker. In the performance of his professional and business transactions he bears the reputation of being an honorable and upright man.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
JOHN N. BAILEY, one of the leading representative men of Ohio, is by profession a banker and an attorney at law.  He was born in Maulton township, Allen county, Ohio, though now a part of  Auglaize county, Sept. 3, 1839, and was the eldest of five sons born to Christopher and Nancy (Noble) Bailey.  His grandparents were natives of Virginia and of good old Quaker stock, their family dating back in church relations to the reign of King Charles II.  The father, Christopher Bailey, was born in Virginia in September, 1807, being the son of Thomas and Mary (Timberlake) Bailey, who were also natives of Virginia and of good old English stock.  The grandfather, Thomas Bailey, removed with the small family to Highland county, Ohio, in 1808,in which county they became pioneers and were interested in agricultural pursuits during the remainder of their days.  They experienced all the privations of pioneer life, and here, in the woods, reared their family and became first among the well-known and highly popular citizens of  the neighborhood.
     Christopher Bailey was scarcely a year old when his parents immigrated to Highland county, Ohio, where he was reared to manhood upon a farm, and received his education mainly in the subscription school of that day.  He early in life studied civil engineering, which profession he followed occasionally at local work, and also taught school during the winter seasons for several years.  He remained in Highland county, Ohio, until twenty-eight years of age (18350, when he migrated to Allen county, Ohio, and entered 160 acres of land in what was then Maulton township, but now belongs to Auglaize county.  Here he forged from the forest a good farm, upon which he lived and enjoyed many of the comforts and pleasures of this life, rearing his family to man and womanhood, and upon which he died.  He was one of the prominent men of his township and served in some of the minor offices, such as justice of the peace and town treasurer; politically he affiliated with the whig party.  He was reared by Quaker parents and adhered to their faith until middle age, when he joined the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he was a prominent worker until his death.  He was twice married, the first time choosing Miss Phebe Baker for his companion; she died a few years later, leaving two sons, viz.:  Jacob, now a resident of the state of Iowa, and Walter, deceased.  For his second companion he chose Miss Nancy Noble, who at that time was a resident of Mercer county, Ohio, having been born in Clinton county in Sept., 1815; by this marriage they became the parents of five sons, namely:  John N., the immediate subject of this sketch; Girard, a physician and farmer of Mercer County, and an ex-soldier of the Civil war, from which he was mustered out as captain; Joshua, also a soldier in the late year, a member of Company B, Ninety-ninth regiment, Ohio volunteer infantry, and was killed in battle in Saint Paris, Ky.; Greene, a farmer of Auglaize county, and Elisha, deceased in early manhood.  This old couple went hand in hand down life's journey, living to see their family all grown to manhood and established in life, the mother dying in 1888, and the father in the spring of 1891, having both been highly esteemed citizens wherever known.
     John N. Bailey, the subject of this sketch, remained at home on the farm until seventeen years of age, when he began working at the carpenter trade, and continued in this until twenty-four years of age - teaching meanwhile three winters - and in all doing a large amount of public work as bridge builder for railroad, etc.  About this time he began reading law, and in the winters of 1880-81-1-82, attended the Cincinnati School of law, graduating in 1882, in which year he began the practice of his profession in Spencerville, to which he has since given his entire attention.  He enjoys a large and lucrative practice - the largest, without doubt, in Allen county, outside of the city of Lima.  In 1891, in company with his son-in-law, Austin Britton, established the Farmers' Bank of Spencerville, which is now doing a large business, with Mr. Bailey as president and Mr. Britton as cashier.
     Mr. Bailey is also an extensive farmer, being the owner of 440 acres of good farmland in Spencer and Amanda townships, operated as stock farms.  Mr. Bailey, in 1889, made a trip to Europe, and he has otherwise traveled extensively and is an intelligent and trustworthy observer.  It has been his aim to keep himself in touch with the times and fully abreast with current events.  Politically he is a republican to the core, and desires nothing better than the republican party to interpret his political views.  He is a Mason, a member of Acadia lodge, No. 306, and a Knight of Pythias of Spencerville lodge, No. 251.  Mr. Bailey has been twice married, his first wife having been Miss Minerva Babber, who died at the age of thirty-six years, leaving seven children: Mary A., Minnie, Alice (deceased), Emma, Charles F., Lillian and Arthur H.  Mr. Bailey was married the second time, in 1879, to Mrs. Hannah Caldwell of Darke county.  The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and Mrs. Bailey is superintendent of a Sunday-school.  It would be fulsome to add more to this sketch.  A good wine needs no bush, so does a good man need no spoken praise.  His deeds are his best friends; his actions his stanchest champions.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 )
Ottawa Twp. -
OLIVER BAKER, dealer in carpets, etc., Lima, was born Apr. 29, 1842, in Massachusetts, of which State his parents, Sylvester and Sabra (Matthews) Baker, were also natives, the latter of whom is now a resident of Baltimore, Md.  Of their family only three members are now living: Martha R., now Mrs. C. Sears, in Baltimore, Md.; Edwin, in Tiffin, Ohio, and Oliver.  Our subject received his primary education in Massachusetts, and completed same in Providence, R. I.  He came to Ohio in 1864, settling in Cleveland, where he remained until 1870, when he went to Akron, Ohio, and there engaged in the carpet trade.  He subsequently returned to Cleveland; in 1874 went to Cincinnati, where he resided for about one year.  In 1879 Mr. Baker moved to Toledo, entering the firm of Baker, Sterling & Co., in the carpet business.  In 1882, he took charge of one of hte largest carpet departments in Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1884 came to Lima, where he keeps a large assortment of carpets, curtains, draperies and paper hangings.  Mr. Baker was married in 1864, to Mary E. Rice, of Ashby, Mass., and to this union have been born four children: Edwin R., Alice M., Sarah M. and Edith H.  Mr. BAker is a member of the Royal Arcanum and of the Legion of Honor.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page
A. BALMER, farmer and stock-raiser. P. O. Bluffton, is a native of Richland Township, this county, and was born March 9, 1S43. His parents, Peter and Mary (Stauffer) Balmer, natives of Switzerland, came to Wayne County, Ohio, and were there married. In 1849 they came to this county and settled on a farm here. They were parents of thirteen children, twelve of whom grew to manhood and womanhood, nine of whom are now living. Our subject, the fifth born, was reared on the farm, attended the school in Richland Township, and worked at the carpenter's trade. He was married, in 1870, to Miss Anna, daughter of David Beeler, by whom he had three children: Calvin, Amanda and Andrew. Mrs. Balmer died in 1875, and two years later our subject married Jennie Beeler. a cousin of his first wife and a daughter of John Beeler. To this union were born three children, two now living: Sarah and Ella. Both wives were of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Balmer are members of the German Reformed Church, in which he has served as deacon. Mr. Balmer is one of the trustees of Richland Township. In politics he is a Democrat.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
B. BALMER, farmer and stock-raiser, Bluffton, was born in Richland Township, this county, February 15, 1847; son of Peter and Mary Ann (Stauffer) Balmer, natives of Switzerland, and who were parents of thirteen children, twelve growing up, nine of whom are now living. Our subject, the seventh child, was reared on the farm, acquired a common school education, and learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked four years, farming, however, being the principal business of his life. He is the owner of eighty acres of land, on which he now resides. He was married in 1871 to Elizabeth Lugibihl, the fourth born in the family of nine children of John W. Lugibihl, a farmer, and an early settler of Allen County.   Her parents were German, and most of their family now reside in this county. To our subject and wife were born the following children: Emma, William, Peter and John. Mr. Balmer is a member of the German Reformed Church, his wife of the Mennonite Society. He has served as a school director. In politics he is a Democrat.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
REV. JOHN BARNHARD, retired minister and farmer, P. O. Richland, was born in Maryland, February 20, 1821, eldest son and second in the family of David (a farmer) and Margaret (Walker) Barnhard, who were of English and German descent. They raised two daughters and two sons. Our subject was reared on the farm, and, not having ever had the privilege of attending school, educated himself. He was married when twenty years old to Nancy Lambert, a native of Germany, where her parents were also born, and the children by this union were as follows : Melvin Z., Virgil F., Leonadas Q., Philena M., Sylvester W. (The first three named served in the Union Army during the war of the Rebellion.) They also raised and adopted John T. Huber, who is now a telegraph operator at Beaver Dam. Mrs. Barnhard died in i860, and in 1861 our subject married Amanda C. Jennings, by whom he has one child, John Williams Wesley. Mr. and Mrs. Barnhard are members of the Methodist Church. He has been a local preacher, and was engaged in farming for a number of years. He lived in Knox County, Ohio, from 1829 till he came to Allen County, in 1856, and has since resided here. He owns a well-improved farm in Richland Township, which he rents, however, and is now living a retired life on his property in Beaver Dam. In politics Mr. Barnhard is a Republican.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
JOHN A. BARR, a highly respected citizen of Beaver Dam, Allen county, and one of the veterans of the war of the Rebellion, was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, August 14, 1837.  He is descended from Irish ancestry, his grandfather having emigrated from Ireland, and settled in Tuscarawas county.  It is believed that his father, John Barr, was born in Tuscarawas county, and served as a soldier of the war of 1812-15, or, as it is sometimes called, the second war for independence.  He was married twice; first, to a Miss Baker, by whom he had three children:  Thomas, Hughes and Margaret.  After the death of his first wife he was married to a Miss Boone, who was born in Maryland, of German ancestry, Aug. 17, 1814, and died in Tuscarawas county, Jan. 9, 1859.  After this marriage he settled down in Tuscarawas county on 100 acres of land, and cleared it up from the woods, making of it a good farm.  To this second marriage there were born three children, one that died in infancy, and (Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 James and John A., the latter being the subject of this sketch.  Thomas, a son by his first wife, was in the Nineteenth regiment Michigan volunteer infantry, and served three years, being in the Atlanta campaign and being wounded near Marietta, Ga.
     John A. Barr, received in his youth the education common to boys of that day and age of the world.  When he was but two years of age his father died and he was reared among strangers.  He was living in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, when the war broke out, and was the first man in his company to enlist in the service of his country, becoming in private soldier in company B, Fifty-first regiment Ohio volunteer infantry, under Captain Woods, his term of enlistment being for three years or during the war.  He served in this company until he veteranized at Shell Mound, Tenn., Jan. 1, 1864, and continued in the service until honorably discharged as a corporal, Oct. 3, 1865, at Victoria, Tex.  During his period of service he participated in the following battles:  Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, and in most if not all of those of the Atlanta campaign, including Resaca, Burnt Hickory, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Jonesboro and Lovejoy Station, and many smaller battles and skirmishes too numerous to mention.  Afterward he was in the Fourth corps under Gen. Thomas, and fought at the battle of Franklin and that of Nashville, and then went to Texas, where he remained until honorably discharged.  He was always an active soldier, ready to perform any duty assigned him, was never captured by the enemy, and was never in the hospital..  He was in all the battles, skirmishes, marches, and campaigns in which his regiment was engaged, except the battle of Murfreesboro, when he was sick in his tent.  Always a faithful soldier, his duty was promptly and cheerfully performed.  His left eye was blinded early in the war, and the sight of this eye was later entirely destroyed.  He was promoted corporal for meritorious conduct near the close of his term of service.  After the war was over Mr. Barr returned to Tuscarawas county, Ohio, and not long afterward removed to Williams county, still later removing to Allen county, and was married at Beaver Dam, Aprl 26, 1883, to Mrs. Levina (Dilly) Murray, who was born August 14, 1855, and is a daughter of Jacob and Anna (Johnson) Dilly. 
     Jacob Dilly
was born in New Jersey July 15, 1809, of an old American family.  On Feb. 13, 1834, he was married in his native state, and moved to Ohio, settling in Tuscarawas county in 1837, and in the spring of 1855 he moved to Allen county.  The farm he purchased and cleared lies on the line of Monroe and Richland townships, and here he labored for years, making a good and comfortable home for himself and family.  In 1865 he removed to Beaver Dam and died when eighty-three years of age.  He and his wife were the parents of nine children, beside Mrs. Barr, as follows:   Margaret, Catherine, James, John, Leona A., and Aaron, and three that died in youth.  John and Aaron were soldiers in the Civil war, serving in an infantry regiment.  Mr. Dilly was a member of the Disciples' church at Beaver Dam, was a republican in politics, and a highly honored citizen.   
     Mr. and Mrs. Barr, soon after their marriage, settled at Beaver Dam and there he engaged in various kinds of employment for some years, such as farming, running a stationary engine, etc.  In politics he is a prohibitionist, and both are members of the Disciples' church.  They are the parents of two children, Sadie and MaryMr. Barr had been married, previous to her marriage with Mr. Barr, to George Murray, by who she had one child, Wilda.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 )
Ottawa Twp. -
GEORGE W. BASFORD, baker, Lima, was born Oct. 29, 1856, in the village of Jeromesville, Ashland Co., Ohio; son of George W. Basford and a grandson of George W. Basford, Sr., a native of Ireland, and who came to Ohio in a very early day, becoming one of the largest landholders of the State, and who at hsi death left his children and grandchildren well provided for.  The father of our subject has a family of five children: Napoleon O., Mary E., George W., John F. and Harry E.  Our subject was educated in Ashland County, Ohio.  He was united in marriage, Dec. 25, 1879, with Philira, daughter of James Leoffer, of that county.  To this union were born two children: Ethel and James CarlosMr. Basford came to Lima in October, 1884, and opened out in the bakery business.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 680
REV. DAVID P. BASINGER, minister and farmer, P. O. Bluffton, was born in Richland Township, this county, August 14, 1841. His parents, Christian, Jr., and Catherine (Lugibihl) Basinger, were natives of Germany, the father, a farmer by occupation, being a son of Christian Basinger, Sr., who came to America in 1824, settling in Virginia, where he lived for ten years, and then moved to this county, in 1836. Here the father of our subject lived, from the time he was nineteen years of age until his death, which occurred April 21, 1876. David P. was the eldest of twelve children, nine of whom attained maturity. He was reared on the farm, early attending the common schools but, later, academies in Findlay and Lima, and then taught school for six years in Allen and Putman Counties. He also worked at carpentering for a time. He was married in 1867, to Mrs. Barbara Amstutz, daughter of Peter Schumaker, an early settler and prominent farmer of this county (by her first marriage she had two children: Peter D., a school teacher, teaching German and English, and Abraham C., a farmer). To Mr. and Mrs. Basinger were born the following children: Nahum, Joel, Noah, Lydia, Julia, David and Reuben. Mr. Basinger was ordained a minister of the Reformed Mennonite Church, in 1882. He is an earnest and devoted follower of the Great Master, and allows no personal concern to stand between him and his duty to God. He has been also engaged in farming, during his life, and is owner of a well improved farm in Richland Township.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
JOHN C. BASINGER, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O Columbus Grove, Putman County, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, October 5. 1834; son of Christian and Catherine (Lugibihl) Basinger, natives of Germany, who came to America when young. His father, a farmer, who lived to the advanced age of eighty-five, died in 1882. They raised a family of fifteen children, of whom John C., the third, was reared on the farm, receiving his education in the schools of Richland Township, this county. Our subject has been a farmer all his life, and now owns a first-class farm in Rich-land Township, consisting of 160 acres, whereon he resides. He was married, in 1859, to Elizabeth Wixel, a native of Germany. Their children are Theophilus, Christian, Noah, Leah (deceased), and Caroline. They have an adopted daughter—Maggie Flatt. Mr. and Mrs. Basinger are members of the Mennonite Church.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
NOAH C. BASINGER, farmer and school teacher. P. O. Bluffton, of German descent, was born in Richland Township, this county, June 15, 1860, youngest son and twelfth in the family of Christian and Catherine (Lugibihl) Basinger. Our subject was reared on a farm in his native township and here obtained the rudiments of his education, subsequently attending the high schools at Bluffton and Ada, and Hayesville College. He then taught for several terms, but subsequently engaged in farming, which has been his principal occupation. Mr. Basinger owns a half interest in the farm, comprising 140 acres, where he and his brother Peter P. now reside. He is not a church member. In politics he usually votes the Democratic ticket.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
PETER P. BASINGER, farmer, P. O. Bluffton, was born on the farm where he now resides in Richland Township, this county, June 3, 1857; son of Christian, Jr., and Catherine (Lugibihl) Basinger, natives of Alsace, Germany (then belonging to France). Christian Basinger, Jr., a farmer by occupation, was born in 1817, and when seven years old, his parents came to America and settled on a farm in Virginia, where they remained for ten years, thence moved to Columbiana County, Ohio, and after a few years to this county. The family consisted of twelve children, nine of whom grew to manhood and womanhood. Our subject, the eleventh in the family, grew to maturity on the farm where he now resides, receiving his education in the township schools. He was married, in 1880. to Miss Mary Alice Lower, a daughter of Samuel Lower, a farmer, and Catherine (Baer), who were natives of Wayne County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Basinger have been blessed with three children: Catherine Olive. Samuel Alfred and Isadore. Our subject and wife are members of the Reformed Mennonite Church.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
SAMUEL BASSETT, farmer, P. O. Beaver Dam, was born in Allen County, Ohio, October 23, 1848, son of Lewis and Sarah (Edgecomb) Bassett, of English descent, and natives of New York and Ohio, respectively, the former of whom came to Alien County, Ohio, over half a century ago, and was a farmer all his life. They reared a family of eight children. Samuel, the eldest, was reared on the farm, receiving his education in this county, and early in life commenced to teach school. During the late civil war he enlisted in 1864, in Company I, Twenty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry; was engaged in the battle of Atlanta, and participated in other battles and skirmishes. He was discharged at the close of the struggle, and returning home worked at the carpenter's trade for a time, then commenced farming. He is now the owner of two farms. Mr. Bassett was married in 1868, to Mary, a daughter of D. L. Whip, a retired farmer of Beaver Dam, and to this union were born six children: Otis, Bossie, Sadie, Louise, Clarie and Samuel. Mr. Whip was born in Maryland, December 31, 1822, son of George and Sarah (Barnett) Whip, who were of German descent; he has been twice married, Mrs. Bassett being the fourth in a family of six children by his first wife; Mr. Whip's present wife's mother, aged eighty-five, and his own mother, aged eighty-six, are still living. Mr. and Mrs. Bassett are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in which he is class leader. In politics he is a Republican.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
J. T. BATES, proprietor of stone quarry, P. O. Bluffton, was born in Allen County, Ohio, April 27, 1837, son of Elijah and Nancy (Chandeler) Bates, natives of Virginia, the former of English descent, who had been a farmer all his life, and the latter of Irish descent. Our subject, the sixth in a family of eleven children, was reared on the farm, receiving his schooling in the log schoolhouse in Bath Township, this county, and worked on the farm until he was twenty-seven years old. He then went to Lima, Ohio, and worked by the day for a time. In 1874 he came to Bluffton, and opened a stone quarry, which he has conducted successfully to the present time. Mr. Bates was united in marriage in 1860,with Miss Susanna Bope, whose parents were Germans (her father, George Bope, was a farmer in Allen County). This union has been blessed with six children: William H. (a telegraph operator in Colorado, and who learned telegraphy at Blnffton under Myron Rounsavell, who is the agent here for the Lake Erie & Western Railroad), Tempa J., Nannie May, Elijah H, Bertha B. and John Earl. Mr. and Mrs. Bates are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a Republican in politics; has served as supervisor and township trustee of Rich-land.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
CURTIS BAXTER, one of the oldest and best known farmers of Marion township, Allen county, was born in Ross county, Ohio, Oct. 26, 1822.  His great-grandfather was a native of Ireland and an early settler of Pennsylvania.  SAMUEL BAXTER, the father of our subject, it is thought, was born in Knox county, Ohio, where he married Polly Boyd, who became the mother of three children - Sarah, Polly and John.  Polly (Boyd) Baxter died in Knox county, where he married, for his second wife, Keziah Cremean, daughter of Curtis Cremean, and to this union were born nine children, viz: Jane, James Maria, Samuel, Curtis, Smith, Rachael, David and Eliza, all of whom were born in Ross county, with the exception of Eliza, who was born in Allen county, Ohio, Samuel Baxter, in October, 1828, came to Allen county, and settled on the Auglaize river, in Amanda township, about seven miles south of the farm now occupied by our subject, Curtis Baxter.  The county was at that time an utter wilderness, and Mr. Baxter's life here was but brief, as he died two years after his arrival, leaving his widow with her large family to struggle with the adversities of life in the dense forest.  James, the eldest son, was at that time but fourteen years of age, and two years later the family moved to Huwey Run.
     Curtis Baxter came to Allen county with his parents, reaching Amanda township Oct. 29, 1828, and still has a vivid recollection of the wolves and other beasts of prey, as well as the abounding deer and other game that roamed the forests through which his elders had to cut their way to reach a site for the erection of a cabin, and he also has pleasant memories of the superabundance of fish that made their home in the waters of the Auglaize river.  The grist-mill was fifty miles away, and for daily use the pioneers ground their corn in household hand-mills.  An old fashioned log school-house, with split logs for seats and desks, and floors of clay or puncheons, was the temple of learning, and here Curtis received his limited educationAmid such scenes Mr. Baxter grew to manhood, but married early.  Jan. 8, 1843, he took to wife Miss Emily Johns, daughter of Griffith and Rachael Johns, who were the parents of thirteen children, viz:  Sarah, Emily, Ethan, Vienia, Jesse, Biah, Martha, Louisa, Palina, Meliss, Tamsa, Eliza, and one deceased.  The father lived to be over sixty years of age, and he and wife were members of the Methodist church.
     After marriage Mr. Baster settled on a farm of seventy-five acres in teh woods, which farm he later increased to 202 acres, but of this he disposed of thirty-five acres subsequently, retaining for his own use 167 acres.  On this homestead have been born in Mr. and Mrs. Baxter eleven children, viz:  Samuel M., Eliza J., John, William A. B., David E., Curtis T., Clarissa A., Elizabeth, Emily M., Charles and one child that died in infancy.  Curtis Baxter was a soldier in the late Civil war, serving in company A, Thirty-third Ohio volunteer infantry, for eight months; his son, Samuel M., was also a soldier and served for two years in McLaughton's squadron.  Curtis was enrolled September 22, 1864, at Lima, fought at Averysboro and Bentonville, N. C., having accompanied Sherman on his march to the sea, and was present at the grand review in Washington, D. C., in which city he was honorably discharged June 5, 1865.
     November 14, 1888, Mr. Baxter was united in marriage with his second wife, Cynthia E. Hawkins.  of his children by his first wife, Samuel M., deputy sheriff of Van Wert county, and also city marshal of Van Wert city, married Mary J. Miller, who became the mother of four children, and then died; for his second wife he married Ellen Cahill, but to this union no children have been born; Eliza J., is the wife of William J. Judkins and has six children; John married Jennie Hayden, of Iowa, and has two childrenWilliam A. B. married Sarah Dennis, and has three children; David E., mayor of Delphos, married Vida Morgan, and has one child; Curtis T. married Osie Westerfield, and has four child; Clarissa A. married James E. Wickham and has three children; Elizabeth married Charles Mollenhour and has five children; Emily M., married David Rosell, and has six children; Charles M., married Estella Brickstell, and has three children.
     Curtis Baxter is a highly respected citizen and has the full confidence of the people of his township, who he has served as trustee, constable, as a member of the board of infirmary directors, and as a member of the school board.  He is an ardent member of the Methodist church, in which he has filled the office of steward for many years, and his social standing is with the best families of Allen county, who have an enduring respect for him on account of his christian virtues and usefulness as a citizen, not to mentioned the esteem in which he is held as an ex-soldier.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 )
DAVID BAXTER, SR., a prominent farmer of Marion township, Allen county, Ohio, is a son of Samuel and Keziah (Cremean) Baxter, was born in Ross county April 28, 1828, and was about six months old when brought by his parents to Allen county.  By reference to the sketch of Curtis Baxter, which sketch precedes this biographical notice, the reader will find further details relating to the history of the Baxter family.  The opportunities afforded for an education in the pioneer days were somewhat meager and our subject was compelled to rest satisfied with the knowledge to be obtained in the old log school-house, but even that was sufficient for the requirements of frontier life.  The services of our subject were in demand as a woodsman and farmer and he was, at a very early day, given full employment in clearing away the forest and in bringing the soil into a state of productiveness, and he manfully devoted himself to the performance of these duties on the homestead until he was twenty-two years of age, when he married Miss Elizabeth Shock, daughter of Peter and Mary (Boyd) Shock.
     Peter Shock
was born in Allegheny county, Pa., in Feb., 1799, was married in his native state, and came to Allen county, Ohio, in 1846, settling in Amanda township on eighty acres of woodland.  He and wife are still living at the ages respectively of ninety-six and eighty-nine year, and are the parents of eleven children, viz: Levi, Elizabeth, Huldy, Carlisle, Mary A., George, Catherine, Sarah, Alvina, William  and Peter. The parents are members of the United Brethren church and are greatly venerated by their neighbors.
      After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Baxter settled on thirty-seven acres of woodland, which Mr. Baxter cleared up and brought to a fine state of cultivation, and added thereto until he became possessed of 213 acres, all of which he cleared from the timber as rapidly as he acquired it.  He has now a most beautiful residence, and his farm buildings are models of convenience and neatness.  To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Baxter have been born ten children, viz: Lewis, Simon P., William, Mary, James, Nelson, Franklin, Ulysses (who died at the age of ten years), Lester and Samuel, twins; Samuel died when six months old.  Mr. and Mrs. Baxter are consistent members of the Methodist church, in which Mr. Baxter has been a class leader for twelve or fifteen years; as to a member of the church he can count the years back to the number of forty-six; but he does not confine his pecuniary aide to the Methodist congregation alone, for he has contributed to the building fund of every church edifice within a radius of ten miles from his home.  In politics Mr. Baxter is a republican and has served as a member of the township school board; he takes great interest, indeed, in educational matters, and is equally ardent in his advocacy of good roads.  He is a most excellent farmer, is straightforward in all his dealings, and has the esteem of all the community in which he lives.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 )
DAVID E. BAXTER, Jr., mayor of the city of Delphos, Ohio, and one of the representative men of that city, is a native of Allen county, Ohio, having been born in Marion township, within five miles of Delphos, on the 29th day of April 1858, a son of Curtis and Emily (Johns) Baxter, of whom a full biography is given above.  While prominent in his neighborhood Curtis never south public office, the only position he ever held being that one of the first infirmary directors of Allen county.  He and his three brothers - James, David E., Sr., and Smith are the oldest living settlers of Allen county in point of time.  Emily Johns was also born in 1822 in Ross county, Ohio.  Her death occurred on March 4, 1887.  There were born to Curtis Baxter and wife seven sons and four daughters, one now deceased.
     David E. Baxter, the eighth child born to his parents, was reared on the farm in Marion township, and while a boy attended the common schools.  When about eighteen years of age he began teaching, which he continued for a period of twelve years, and during that time, in the intervals between the terms of his schools, Mr. Baxter himself attended school at Elida, Ohio, and at Valparaiso, Ind.  He began his political career in 1887, when he was nominated by the democratic party of Allen county for the state legislature, but was defeated at the election, his party being generally disrupted that year.  In 1888 he was elected as a democrat to the office of justice of the peace of Marion township, which office he holds at the present time, having been re-elected at the present time, having been re-elected twice in succession.  On June 30, 1888, he was appointed by President Cleveland post master at Delphos, and held that office nearly through President Harrison's administration.  His term of office as postmaster expiring on August 15, 1891, he accepted the position of assistant postmaster under C. P. Washburn, and held that position for three months.  In the spring of 1892, he was elected mayor of Delphos, and in 1894 was re-elected to that honorable position.  During Mayor Baxter's administration some of Delphos' most extensive street improvements have been made - the Minute Fire department inaugurated, water works system constructed and the telephone exchange established.  His administration has been singularly clean, energetic and satisfactory, winning for the mayor the high encomiums of his fellow-citizens.  Mayor Baxter has three times been a delegate from Allen county to the Ohio state conventions, taking a prominent part in all.
     Mayor Baxter is one of a company of citizens who are engaged in the development of oil and gas wells in the neighborhood of Delphos, the company having under lease 2,000 acres of lands.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the degree of knight templar, being a member of Shawnee commandery, No. 14, at Lima.  He is also a member of the I. O. O. F., of which he has filled all the chairs.  He is at present the worshipful master of Hope lodge, No. 214, F. & A. M., of Delphos.  He is also a member of the Improved Order of Red Men, and the Knights of Pythias.  In November of 1895 he was elected as representative to the grand lodge of I. O. O. F., from the twenty-sixth district.  Prior to Mayor Baxter's appointment as postmaster, he was a county school examiner for three months, which office he was compelled to resign upon entering upon the discharge of the duties of postmaster, but is at the present time examiner for the Delphos union schools.
     Mayor Baxter was married on December 23, 1884, to Miss Vida B. Morgan, who was born near Gomer, Allen county, and is the daughter of Thomas B. and Margaret Morgan.  To their union one son - Richard A. - has been born.  Mr. Baxter is now reading law, with the expectation of making it his future profession.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 )
Ottawa Twp. -
GEORGE M. BAXTER (deceased) was born Dec. 3, 1834, in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio; son of Samuel A. and Nancy M. (Mason) Baxter.  Samuel A. Baxter, a hatter and furrier by trade, came to Lancaster in an early day to take charge of a hat and fur store there, which he conducted for many years.  White thus employed he took up the study of law, under the preceptorship of ex-Gov. William Allen, and finished his studies at the Cincinnati Law School, subsequently becoming a prominent lawyer of Lima.  Our subject, also a graduate of the Cincinnati Law School, was admitted to the bar.  He was married in June, 1855, to Margaret C., daughter of William Chaney of Lima, and to this union were born four children (one now living): Fannie M., married to J. K. Brice, Aug. 30, 1880, died July 12, 1882; Alfred C. secretary Lima Gaslight Company, was married Jan. 7, 1885, to Carrie, daughter of B. C. Faurot, a banker and proprietor of the opera house; Medora and George.  Capt. George M. Baxter raised the first company of Zouaves of Lima, and, in 1862, went into the field where he served until 1864, then resigned on account of the death of his mother, and returned to Lima.  He died May 16, 1865.
(
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 681)
Jackson Twp. -
JAMES BAXTER, farmer, P. O. Allentown, was born Sept. 9, 1817, in Ross County, Ohio, son of Samuel and Keziah (Cremean) Baxter, former born in Knox County, Ohio, son of John and Sarah Baxter, both foreigners. Samuel Baxter had eleven children, those living are James; Curtis, in Marion Township, this county; Smith in German Township, this county; David, in Marion Township, this county; Eliza, wife of William Cochran, of Marion Township, this county.  The family came to Amanda Township, this county, in 1827, where they endured all the trials and hardships of pioneer life.  The father died about four years after his removal to this county.  Our subject being the eldest, manfully assumed the responsibility left by his father in providing for the family and clearing the farm, and for this reason he received but little education.  AT eighteen years of age he started out for himself, engaging in daily labors.  He was married, Apr. 20, 1837, to Melissa John who was born Jan. 10, 1820, in Ross County, Ohio, daughter of Griffith and Rachel (Miller) John, former a son of Abia and Martha John, born Sept. 6, 1795, died Feb. 20, 1856; latter a daughter of George and Sarah Miller, born Sept. 13, 1802, died June 23, 1862.  They were married Feb. 20, 1817.  To our subject and wife were born eleven children, four of whom died without issue.  Samuel, the second child, was born Apr. 16, 1839 (he was a corporal in Company I, Thirty-fourth Regiment, killed at Winchester, Va., in the battle between Gens. Sheridan and Early; he was married to Rachel Cremean, by whom he had three children).  Those living are Griffith J., in Coffey County, Kans.; Keziah, wife of William D. Poling, county auditor; David E., in Amanda Township, this county; Levi, in Amanda Township, this county; Eliza (wife of Otis Fraunfelter), of Bath Township, this county, and Rachel, at home, unmarried.  Mr. Baxter has held the office of township trustee for sixteen years and was for six years county infirmary director, arriving to these positions of honor by energy and close application to business.  The family are members of the Christian Church, in which our subject was elder.  He takes an active interest in the improvement of stock and farm products, and in the advancement of education and religion.  He has lived to see a beautiful and productive country developed from the once dense forest, and to see thirty-two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren around him.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 618)
JOHN F. BAXTER, member of the Delphos city council from the Fourth ward, was born in Marion township, Allen county, Ohio, Dec. 14, 1857.  He is the son of Samuel and Mary (Robbins) Baxter, both natives of Ohio and both deceased.  Our subject was reared on the farm in Allen county, and attended the district schools, securing a fair English education.  He remained on the farm until 1880 and then came to Delphos, and has resided here ever since.  His occupation has been chiefly that of a salesman in the dry goods business, having held positions with S. F. Shenk, H. J. Wolfhorst & Co., and other well-known firms.  He has always been a stanch republican in politics and has taken an active interest in public affairs.  He was the nominee of his party in the Fourth war for city councilman in the spring of 1895, and was elected by a majority of twenty-seven votes, which was an increase over the party's last majority, and the largest republican majority ever given for councilman by the ward.  In the council Mr. Baxter is one of the leading members.  he is chairman of  the claims committee, and is also on the committee on street light and police, and on the buildings and grounds.
     Mr. Baxter resides on the corner of West Third and Bredick streets, in the Fourth ward, Delphos, Van Wert county.  Mr. Baxter was married on Dec. 25, 1887, to Cora A. Smith, daughter of Casper Smith,  of Delphos.  Mr. Baxter is a member of the I. O. O. F., fraternally, and the National Union Insurance company.  Mrs. Baxter is a member of the Presbyterian church and of the Daughters of Rebecca.  For twelve years she has held a position as teacher in the Delphos public schools.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 )
Ottawa Twp. -
SAMUEL A. BAXTER (deceased), was born in Washington County, Md., Sept. 26, 1807; son of Samuel A. Baxter, of English descent, his ancestry being among the early settlers of Maryland and Virginia.  Our subject, a hatter and furrier by trade, was offered an opportunity to take charge of a hat store in Lancaster, Ohio, by a gentleman who met him while East guying goods.  He accepted this offer and immediately, in company with another young man, set out, having one horse which they rode alternately.  On arriving at his destination Mr. Baxter took charge of the business which he conducted many years, and eventually bought out.  During his residence in Lancaster, and while working at his trade, he commenced to study law under ex-Gov. William Medill.  In 1838 he removed to Lima, and opened a hat store, which he carried on most of the time till 1846, when he spent a winter attending the law school at Cincinnati, and was admitted to the bar in 1847.  Returning to Lima, he then commenced to practice his profession and soon became a prominent member of the bar.  He dealt largely in real estate, was enterprising, persevering, generously giving of his means to the poor and every good cause, and was foremost in every enterprise conducive to the improvement of Lima.  Mr. Baxter was married in 1833, to Miss Nancy, daughter of Henry Mason, by whom he has three children, two now living: Alfred C. and Samuel A.  Mrs. Baxter died in 1862, and our subject subsequently married Annie M., daughter of John Mason by which union there was one child - Nancy M.  S. A. Baxter, the third son, began the study of medicine under Dr. William H. Harper, of Lima, which he completed with Dr. J. Dawson of Columbus, Ohio.  He graduated at Cincinnati College, and began the practice of his profession in the army, in 1863, in the Eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, where he remained until the close of the war.  He then returned to Lima and after practicing for five years, retired from the profession to become the president of the First National Bank, a position he still fills.  He was married, in 1866, to Deborah, daughter of W. P. Ellison of Chicago, by whom he has three sons: Frank, Don and Clem.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 680
SAMUEL BAXTER

(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 )

German Twp. -
SMITH BAXTER, farmer; P. O. Elida, is a native of Ross County, Ohio, born Oct. 10, 1824; son of Samuel and Keziah (Cremean) Baxter, who were of English and Scotch descent, and who came from Ross County, Ohio, to this county in 1828, where the father soon afterward died, and where the mother died in 1853.  Of their family of nine children only five survive:  James, Curtis, Smith, David E. and Eliza.  Our subject was married, Mar. 29, 1845, to Miss Mary Cremean, of German Township, this county, a native of Ross County, Ohio, and daughter of William and Margaret (Miller) Cremean (both deceased) who came from Ross County, Ohio, to this county in 1839, and reared a family of eight children, all now living.  To Mr. and Mrs. Baxter were born the following children: Sarah E., James J., Elizabeth J., Rachel A., Samuel B., Mary M., Freemont W., Roxana M. and Flora T., all now living but Samuel and Roxana.  Mr. Baxter entered land in German Township in 1847, which he cleared and improved, and about ten years later went into general trading, continuing in same until about 1867, after which he confined himself to the lumber trade for several years, then operated his farm for a few years again, and in 1881 engaged in mercantile trade in Elida, Ohio, disposing of his business, there in 1883.  Since that date Mr. Baxter has been somewhat retired.  He has served in some of the township offices.  He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Mr. Baxter was a Democrat until 1852, since which time he has been a stanch Republican.
(
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 590)
JOHN M. BEARD, druggist, Spencerville, was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, February 3, 1848; son of Milo and Mary (Osburn) Beard, natives of Mahoning County, Ohio, latter of whom died in 1851; former still resides in Fort Wayne, Ind. Our subject's early life was spent on a farm. In 1865 he went with his parents to Allen County, Ind., and during 1866-67 he attended the school at Roanoke, Ind.. and the three following years at Fort Wayne, and Cleveland. Ohio. During twenty-four months of this time he engaged in teaching. He entered upon his business career as drug clerk, in the employ of T. M. Biddle, druggist, of Fort Wayne, with whom he remained seven years. He then engaged about four months with J. A. Tyler & Co., at the end of which time he purchased an interest in a drug store at Delphos. Van Wert Co., Ohio, in partnership with H. P. Eysenbach, and carried with him to his new place of business the best wishes of the community he had served so long as prescription clerk, and where he had gained the reputation of being a careful and efficient pharmacist. Remaining in Delphos over a year, he then removed to Spencerville and formed a partnership with Theo. Eysenbach, in the drug and hardware business; two years later the firm dissolved and divided the business, Mr. Baird retaining the drug department. On December 14, 1881, he was married to Miss Eva Brown, who was born in Delphos, Ohio, January, 18, I860, by whom he has one child, Lois, born February 28, 1883. At present Mr. Beard is township and corporation treasurer. He is a member of Summit City Lodge, No. 170, F. & A. M., of Fort Wayne; politically he is identified with the Democratic party.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
JAMES H. BEDFORD, farmer, P. O. Lima, was born in Warren Co., Ohio, Sept. 26, 1846; son of Samuel and Mary (Murray) Bedford, who settled in Bath Township, this county, in 1849.  He was married Dec. 19, 1876, to Catherine, daughter of Samuel and Susan (Rogers) Ditzler, of Perry Township, this county, in issue of this union is one child - Charles A.  Mr. and Mrs. Bedford are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Our subject has filled several of the minor offices of Perry Township where he located in 1881.  In politics he is a Republican.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
SAMUEL BEDFORD, farmer, P. O. Lima, was born in Philadelphia, Penn., Oct. 28, 1808, and is a son of Thomas and Jane Bedford.  He was reared in his native city, and came to Ohio in 1830, locating in Warren County, where he resided up to 1849, when he came to Bath Township, Allen County, settling on the farm where he now resides, all of which he cleared and improved himself.  He was a blacksmith by trade, which, in connection with his farm, he carried on up to 1884.  He was married Oct. 9, 1838, to Mary A., daughter of John and Sarah (Stewart) Murray of Warren County, Ohio.  The issue of this union was nine children: John (deceased), Sarah (wife of Milton Patrick), Mary E. (deceased), Milton D., James M., Margaret E. (wife of Lewis Brentlinger), William A., Samuel S. (deceased), and Isaac N.  In politics Mr. Bedford is a Republican.  He is a member of the Society of Friends, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
JOSEPH P. BENERDOM, farmer, P. O. Allentown, was born in Leesville, Va., Nov. 27, 1826, son of John and Mary (Carr) Benerdom, who were married in Virginia, moved to Ohio in 1834, settling in Carroll County, where they died a few years since.  Our subject came to this county in 1864, and settled in German Township, where he still resides.  He was married in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of William and Margaret (Junkins) Holms, who now reside in Hardin County, Ohio.  To this union have been born nine children: William, Mary, John, Charles, Margaret, Oby, Bertha, Thirsey and Ida, all now living but Mararet.  Mr. and Mrs. Benerdom are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Allentown, Ohio.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
GEORGE BENROTH, proprietor of saloon, Bluffton, was born in Germany, September 1, 1844; son of Charles and Anna (Scheller) Benroth, former by trade a cooper. Our subject received a good education in the common schools of Germany, and there learned the cabinet-making trade, at which he worked till he came to America, in 1865, settling at Bluffton. After engaging at his trade here for two years, he opened a furniture store which he carried on till 1881, when he sold out and commenced a saloon and lunch room business; he also sells tobacco, and has a good trade. Mr. Benroth was united in marriage, in 1867, with Miss Anna, daughter of Rev. Ulrich Steiner, a Mennonite minister; she is a native of Allen County, Ohio. This union has been blessed with eight children: Edward, Ferdinand, Rosa, Mary A., Pauline, Albert, Emma and Minnie. Mr. Benroth is a Democrat in politics.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
EDWARD R. BENTLEY, formerly and for some years the leading blacksmith and mechanic of Kalida, but since the fall of 1895 a resident of Bluffton, Ohio, was born May 8, 1866, in the last named place.  His parents were JAMES D. and Elizabeth (Fenton) Bentley, the former of whom was born in Youngstown, Mahoning county, Ohio, July 27, 1826.  James D. Bentley was one of five children born to John Bentley, of Irish parentage, and his wife, Margaret (Patent) Bentley.  He was educated in the common schools near his home, and early learned the trade of blacksmith.  When a young man he came with his parents in a wagon drawn by oxen to Bluffton, where they were among the early pioneers of that part of Allen county.  For some time he engaged in farming near Bluffton and afterward engaged in the huckster and trading business, spending several years of his life upon the road, employed by Abram Long.  After settling in Bluffton he engaged in smithing with Robert Cox, and was one of the first blacksmiths in the eastern part of Allen county.  For twenty years he successfully pursued his trade until failing eyesight compelled him to give it up.  He then again took to the road and sold one of the first sewing machines put upon the market.  He afterward engaged in contracting and building roads.  Having recovered his eyesight, he returned to the forge and opened a shop on the present site of the city building in Bluffton.  From that time he continued blacksmithing until old age compelled him to give up active work.  Along with his smithing he had engaged in farming to a limited extent.
     Jan. 1, 1830, he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Robert and Mary (McRea) Fenton, who was born in Mahoning county, Ohio, in 1831, of Irish parentage.  She was one of seven children, being the twin sister of John Fenton, of Bluffton.  She was also educated in the common schools of her native county, and when a child she came with her parents to Bluffton, where they were among the early pioneers of that part of Allen county, Ohio.  Eight children blessed this union, viz:  William P., ex-postmaster of Bluffton and now a successful livery man there; John M., ex-postmaster of Ada, Ohio, where he is now a grocer and farmer; Jeanie, the wife of Albert L. Clark, of Bluffton; Charles F., a painter of the same place; Minerva I., married to H. S. Martin, of lima, Ohio; Della, who resides in Bluffton; Frank, deceased; Edward R., the subject of our sketch.  Mr. and Mrs. Bentley were prominent members of the Methodist church, in the faith of which the wife died on Sept. 22, 1890.  The husband was a deacon in the church, and was also a charter member of the Bluffton lodge, No. 371, I. O. O. F., and member of the Rebecca Lodge No. 263, and was held in high esteem by its members.  Politically he was a stanch  supporter of the principles of the republican party, and was frequently elected by that party to local offices of the community.  He was charitable and benevolent, honored and respected by all.  His death occurred July 16, 1892.
     Edward R. Bentley was educated in the Bluffton union schools, and learned the blacksmithing trade of his father, with whom he worked for a number of years, and worked in various places in order to perfect himself in his chosen profession.  In 1891 he opened his shop in Kalida, where he enjoyed a large and profitable business.  On September 12, 1894, he married Lillian M. Bowman, who was born in Columbus Grove, Apr. 5, 1871, a daughter of Daniel B. and Martha J. (Galbreth) Bowman, and a member of the Methodist church.  Her father is a native of this county, and was born in 1853 of good old Irish ancestry; he was one of the twins born to Joseph and Clarissa (Bigum) Bowman, of Putnam county.  Her mother was born in Allen county, in 1854, her parents being William and Christina (Ahlefield) Galbreth, formerly of Allen county, but now living in Kalida.  To Mr. and Mrs. Bentley one child has been born, Leon D., born Aug. 6, 1895.  In the fall of 1895, as stated, Mr. Bentley found it to his advantage to remove to Bluffton, where he enjoys the respect of all who knew him.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 )
 
THOMAS J. BENTLEY, farmer and stock-raiser. Bluffton, was born in the eastern part of Ohio, July 14, 1822; son of John and Nancy (Patten) Bentley, of English descent. John Bentley, a native of Massachusetts and a farmer by occupation, died at the advanced age of ninety-two years. Mrs. Nancy Bentley, born in Maryland, died aged seventy-six years. During the last ten years of their lives they made their home with our subject. Thomas J., the fifth in a family of six children, was reared on the farm, receiving a limited education in the common schools of Ohio, and early in life learned wagon making at Youngstown, Ohio. In 1852 he came to Hancock County, subsequently returned to Allen County, and settled in Bluffton, where for four years he carried on a wagon shop. He then purchased a farm, and has since engaged successfully in agricultural pursuits, owning now 160 acres where he resides, in Rich land Township. In politics he is a Republican. Mr. Bentley has been twice married, first in 1845, to Miss Barbara Fusselman, by whom he had the following children: W. S., a farmer; Edward; Ella, wife of N. Carney: Rozelia: Agnes and H. G. Mrs. Bentley died in 1863, and in 1865 our subject was married to Mrs. Rachel M. Ault, of English descent, widow of Philip Ault, who was a member of the Fifty-seventh Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and lost his life in defense of his country. They were parents of seven children, all married: Nancy E., Rosanna, Matilda, Theodocia and R. S.; Elijah and "Wellington are deceased. Mrs. Bentley's grandfather served in the Revolutionary war. Her father, Elijah Perkins, a wealthy farmer, whose parents died when be was a child, has been very successful in business, possessing at one time 800 acres, and is at present owner of 600 acres of well-improved land in Richland Township; he is ninety-eight years old, and his wife ninety-two years.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
JOHN H. BERRYMAN. - In the case of the family whose history is here to be briefly traced, there were seven brothers, who came together from England to America.  These seven brothers were named, so far as their names can now be recalled, John, James, George, WILLIAM and Thomas - the names of two being lost.  Their emigration was made prior to the Revolutionary war, their settlement in this country was made in New Jersey.  From these seven brothers have sprung all the Berrymans in the United States, and they are now fond in all parts of the country.  From William have descended the Berrymans of Ohio.  William Berryman served in the Revolutionary war against the mother country, having felt her oppression before his abandonment of her some years before.  He reared his family in New Jersey, and it is presumed, though it is not known, that he died in that state.  He had one son, William, that emigrated to Virginia after the lose of the Revolutionary war, and settled near Wheeling.  Some time later  he removed to Montgomery county, Ohio, and located near Dayton, on a farm, upon which he lived some years, and then he removed to what is now Auglaize county, but before that county was organized.  In Logan township he entered 200 acres of land, upon which he lived the remainder of his days, dying in 1830, and being buried in the Amanda grave yard.  He was a soldier in the of 1812-15 from Virginia, in which state he married Miss Rachael Clauson, of New Jersey, shoe parents emigrated to Virginia when she was small, and by whom he had the following children: Thomas, who died in Allen county, Ohio; William, of Spencerville, Ohio; Russell, Ephraim, and John, deceased; Eliza, who married, for her first husband, Abraham Whetstone, and for her second, Henry Noble; Mattie, deceased wife of Samuel Whetstone; Mercy, deceased wife of Dye Sunderland, who settled in Amanda township in 1820, and Annie M., who married a Mr. Gregory.
     RUSSELL BERRYMAN was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, in 1815, and when seven years of age removed with his parents to Allen county.  during his boyhood days he spent much time with the Indians, making them his daily companions.  Under these circumstances it was perfectly natural for him to learn their language, and the Shawnee language became almost as familiar to him as his native tongue.  He was reared on the family homestead, and there spent the most of his life.  So far as politics was concerned he was a democrat, and took great interest in political and public affairs; but office was distasteful to him, and the only office he could ever be prevailed upon to accept was that of director of the infirmary.  He married Margaret Slain, of Virginia (now West Va.), she dying in 1846, the mother of the following children:  Cornelia, wife of Dr. E. A. Stockton, who died in Mexico; Ephraim, who died in Spencer township; Rosabel, wife of A. F. Blackburn, of Kansas; John H., of Lima, and James of Saint Mary's, Ohio.  For his second wife Russell Berryman married Elizabeth Whetstone, by whom he had the following children: Flora, wife of J. G. Miller; Mercy, deceased; Abraham, of Paulding county; Margaret, wife of Benjamin Shoppel, and Warren, of Saint Mary's Ohio.  the father of these children died Jan. 9, 1878, his widow surviving him.
     John H. Berryman, the immediate subject of this sketch, was born Aug. 19, 1843, on the old homestead, upon which he remained until he was twenty years of age, receiving in the meantime a good education in the common schools, which has been greatly extended and perfected by contract with the world.  From the age last mentioned for about three years he was engaged in various occupations, testing himself and testing the world, and in 1867 he settled down upon a farm in Shawnee township, upon which he lived some twelve or fourteen years.  In 1880 he purchased his present farm of 120 acres to which he has since added forty-two acres, so that at the present time his farm is comprised of 162 acres.  In 1891 he established his present dairy business, and in the winter of 1891-92 he established his dairy store in Lima.
     Politically Mr. Berryman is a democrat and he takes great interest in the success of his party.  He has served two terms as township trustee and has been several times a delegate to county and state conventions.  In 1896 he was a prominent candidate for nomination to congress at the hands of his party, showing the prominence of the position he holds in the estimation of his party friends.  In religious belief he is a Methodist, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Shawnee township.  Mr. Berryman was married March 12, 1868, to Miss Sallie Boyd, daughter of Abraham Boyd of Trumbull county, who emigrated from that county to Allen county in 1830.  to this marriage there have been born the following children: Myrtle, Margaret, John Russell, Mabel, deceased; Harriet, Robert and Waldo.  From the foregoing sketch it is manifest that John H. Berryman is a man of more than ordinary ability and enterprise, and he is in point of fact one of the most progressive and extensive farmers and dairymen in the northwestern part of the state, if not in the entire state.  To what extent his example has been contagious can not be fully stated, though it is doubtless true that his life has had a far-reaching influence upon young men who have had before them in his career a demonstration that independence and influence may be obtained, without going into any co-operative plans and schemes, in which the individuality of each member must necessarily be absorbed by and swallowed up in the community to which he may happen to belong.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 - Page 197 )
Shawnee Twp. -
JOHN H. BERRYMAN, farmer, P. O. Lima, was born in Logan Township, now a part of Auglaize County, Ohio, Aug. 19, 1843; son of Russell and MArgaret (Slain) Berryman.  His paternal grandfather was William Berryman a native of Ireland, who settled in Logan Township (then a part of this county) in 1823, where he died soon after.  His children were ten in number: Anna M., William, Ephraim, John, Russell, Thoams, Eliza, Martha, Emeline and Mercy; all now deceased except Eliza (Mrs. Henry Noble).  After the father's death the boys took hold of and cleared the farm, and the homestead afterward came into possession of Russell, the father of our subject, who resided there until his death; he died in 1879, at the age of sixty-three years; he was twice married,  his first wife being Margaret Slain, a native of Virginia, by whom he had five children: Cornelia (Mrs. E. A. Stocking), Ephraim, Rosabel (Mrs. A. F. Blackburn), John H. and James W.; his second wife was Elizaeth Whetstone, by whom he had twelve children, nine of whom grew to maturity: Flora (Mrs. John G. Miller), Abraham, Margaret (Mrs. L. Cochron), William, Russell, Rosetta (Mrs. William Mires), Mattie, Warren and Cora.  Our subject was reared on the old homestead in Logan Township, and received a common school education.  After he became of age he engaged in farming, and buying selling stock, and in 1867, he located in Shawnee Township, this county, purchasing the farm he now occupies in 1880.  Mr. Berryman was married, Mar. 12, 1868, to Sally C., daughter of Abraham and Maria B. (Hover) Boyd, who settled in Shawnee Township, this county, in 1837, locating on the farm now occupied by our subject, which they cleared and improved.  Mr. and Mrs. Boyd reared a family of four children: Henry E., Sally C., Margaret Ann (deceased, and Mary B. (Mrs. John W. Black).  Mrs. Berryman's maternal grandfather was Ezekiel Hover, a native of New Jersey, a commissary in the war of 1812.  He was a pioneer of Shawnee Township, this county, where he settled in 1832, having purchased a tract of land in the Shawnee reservation at the government sale.  To our subject and wife have been born five children:  Myrtle, Maggie, J. Russell, Hattie and Robert F.  Mr. and Mrs. Berryman are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He has filled several offices in the township.  In politics he is a Democrat.
(
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 784)
Spencer Twp. -
EPHRAIM BERYMAN, farmer, P. O. Spencerville, was born in Allen County, Ohio, Jan. 29, 1840, the eldest of six children born to Russel and Margaret (Slawer) Beryman.  Russel Beryman, a native of Montgomery County, Ohio, was but six years of age when brought to Shelby County, Ohio.  He was an influential farmer and stock dealer, and died July 9, 1879, his wife having preceded him May 9, 1848.  Our subject was reared on a farm; and his Educational advantages were limited to a few weeks each year in the common schools. He entered upon his career in life as a farmer, which he has made the principle occupation of his life, in connection with which he has done more or less trading in and handling of live stock. He was married December 5, 1861, to Deborah B. Blackburn, who was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, May 28, 1842, daughter of George and Charlotte (Weber) Blackburn, early settlers of Columbiana County. To this union eight children were born: Harley A., John G., Elbert S., George W., Alma M., David E., Ira P., and Flora E. Mr. Beryman purchased his farm in Spencer Township, in 1875, and removed to same three years later, since when he has added to his original purchase and now owns 120 acres of land situated on the Lima and Spencerville Pike, and which is considered one of the best farms in this locality. He has placed the same under a high state of cultivation, the result of many days of hard labor. His aim is to excel in the production and quality of his crops. Mr. Beryman was formerly a member of the Grange. He is a consistent adherent of the Baptist Church.
( Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 800)
Richland Twp. -
T. H. BIERY, butcher, Bluffton, was born August 16,1844, in Lehigh County, Penn.; son of John (a farmer) and May (Kimerer) Biery, who were natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent. Their family consisted of ten children, of whom T. H. is the youngest. Our subject received a common school education, and early learned butchering, in which business he has continued all his life. He came to Bluffton, this county, in 1875, and opened a butcher shop and meat market, and has continued here ever since, meeting with more than average success. He was married, in 186/, to Miss Sarah Wasser, a native of Hancock County, Ohio, and to this union were born eight children: William, Lew, Felix, James, John, Milton, Charles and Stillman. Mr. Biery is a member of the German Reformed Church, his wife of the Lutheran Church. In politics he is a Democrat.
( Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 757)
Auglaize Twp. -
A. C. BITLER, firm of Marriott & Bitler, merchants, Harrod.  This house established business at Harrod, in 1883.  They carry a general stock of about $3,500, and conduct a large and lucrative trade.  The subject of this sketch, junior member of the firm, was born in Schuylkill County, Penn., June 21, 1857, son of Samuel and Sarah Bitler, pioneers and residents of Auglaize County, Ohio.  Our subject came to this place ostensibly to enter mercantile trade, in which he has been very successful.  He was appointed postmaster at Harrod, April 1, 1884, succeeding G. W. Campbell, which position he has acceptably filled, and during his short residence in the place he has won many friends.  Mr. Bitler was married in Auglaize County, Ohio, in 188, to Miss Clara, daughter of William and Lydia Frasier.  Two children were born to this union, both now living: Isa M. and Elmira G.
( Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 570)
Richland Twp. -
PETER BIXEL, P. O. Bluffton, is a representative farmer, and was prominent among the early settlers of Allen County. He was born in Holmes County, Ohio, April 28, 1833; son of Peter and Fannie (Diller) Bixel, natives of France and Switzerland, respectively, and who came to America when young. They were married in Holmes County, and had a family of twelve children, of whom Peter is the fourth; they came to Allen County in 1845, and settled on a farm. Our subject received his education in the common schools of Putnam and Allen Counties, and wisely chose farming as his life occupation, as his father and grandfather had done before him. He has been very successful, and now owns 200 acres of well improved land. He was married, in 1856, to Miss Fannie Suter, a native of Putnam County, Ohio, and of French descent, and this union has been blessed with thirteen children, eleven of whom are now living: Christian, David, Maggie, Peter, Anna, Fannie, John, Mary, Elias, Samuel and Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. Bixel are members of the Mennonite Church, of Richland Township. Our subject takes a just pride in his children, and has carefully educated them. He has served ten years as school director of his township. In politics he is a Democrat.
( Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 758)
WILLIAM F. BLAIR, superintendent of the Orphan Home of Allen county, is a son of Dr. Brice and Rebecca (Perdue) Blair, the former of whom was a son of Brice Blair, the former of whom was a son of Brice Blair, of Bedford county, Pa.  The family belong to that famous race, Scotch-Irish, which has given to this country so many of its sturdy sons, among them the eighth president of the United States, Andrew Jackson, whose personality produced such a permanent effect upon the destiny of the Union.  The ancestors of Mr. Blair originally came from Ireland, and settled in Cumberland valley in Pennsylvania.
     Brice Blair, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was one of the early settlers of Bedford county, that state.  He married Agnes McCauley, who was born in Baltimore, Md., and to this union were born the following children:  John, Archibald, Edmund, James, Brice, Rebecca, Rachel, Mary, Susanna, Sarah, Elizabeth, NancyMr. McCauley, father of Mrs. Brice Blair, passed his life as a farmer in Bedford county, where he died in the present century.
     Dr. Blair, father of the subject, was born January 22, 1813, in Bedford county, Pa.  He read medicine with Dr. McPherson, of Tuscarawas county, coming to Ohio in 1835, and settling near New Albany, Tuscarawas county, practicing there until the fall of 1854, when he removed to Allen county, settling in Jackson township, where he purchased a farm of sixty acres of land.  Beside this small piece of land in Jackson township he also owned 240 acres in Auglaize township, and also 160 acres in Stark county, Ind., which he, however, purchased some time later, so that he was somewhat of a landed proprietor at one time.
     The farm in Jackson township he cleared up of its timber and improved as well as the one of Auglaize township, so that he found but little time to devote to his profession.  He died in Jackson township on his farm, March 10, 1876, widely known as a wide-awake, active, industrious and enterprising man.  Politically he was a democrat, and religiously a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, was a trustee of his church and took unusual interest in the work and success of the Sunday-school.  Dr. Blair was married in 1843.  His wife, born January 19, 1814, is a daughter of William Perdew, of Bedford county, Pa., and is still residing on the home farm in Jackson township, the father of the following children:  Nancy, Sarah, Mary, William and Rebecca.  By her marriage to Dr. Blair Rebecca became the mother of the following children:  John, of Auglaize township; Edward, of the same township; Martin, who died in 1876; Nathan P., of Auglaize township; Brice, of the same township; William F.; James H. (deceased), of Auglaize township; Nancy, widow of Isaac Heffner; Clara, wife of Harrison Heffner; Jennie (deceased), wife of John McCullough; Elizabeth, wife of Madill Fisher; and Mary, wife of David Applas, and Jessie Allen (deceased).
     William F. Blair was born October 23, 1849, in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, and was reared in Jackson township, Allen county.  His education was superior to that generally received by the young men of that time, as in addition to a good common-school training, he attended the high school at Lima, and Delaware college, and also the Western Normal university at Ada.  Besides all this he read medicine was his father; but nothwithstanding this preparation for the practice of one of the most useful of the professions, he preferred teaching school, for which he was eminently prepared.  He therefore taught in the public schools of Allen county for twenty years - in Jackson township, in Bath, in Auglaize and in Perry township, in all of which has he scholars who still pleasantly remember his work among them and for them.  In 1879, tired of the life of a pedagogue, he settled down upon his father's farm in Auglaize township, and became a general farmer he purchased a farm in Jackson township, supplying ample room for the exercise of any ability he might possess.  Upon this fine farm he was occupied in the way just mentioned for twelve years, and then he accepted a position with the Ohio Oil company, being engaged with them leasing land, etc., until 1893, when he was appointed to his present honorable position, that of superintendent of the Orphan's Home, Allen county, which he fills to the acceptance of all.  While he was a resident of Jackson township he was made a trustee thereof.  Politically Mr. Blair is a democrat, and he is a member of the county central committee.  Fraternally he is a member of Lima lodge, No. 91, K. of P.
     Mr. Blair was married in 1879, to Miss Rosetta E., daughter of W. H. Craig, of Jackson township, and has a family of children as follows: Luther C., Cliff, Harry, Ethel and Leah.   W. H. Craig, father of Mrs. Blair, is one of the progressive and substantial farmers of Jackson township.  He is of English decent on both sides of his family.  His great grandfather, George Craig, came from England and settled in Washington county, Pa., and it is believed he was a soldier in the Revolutionary war.  He died in Washington county in which county the grandfather of the subject's wife was born, was reared to manhood and was married to a Miss Pittinger.  After the death of his wife he moved westward, to Highland county, Ohio, in 1833, and was there among the pioneers.  He was always a farmer, did not remarry, and died in the last named county, being instantly killed while cutting down a wild cherry three, when working on the public road.
     Joseph Craig, his son, and the father of W. H. Craig, was born in Washington County, Pa.  He was about twenty years of age when his father came to Ohio, where Joseph married a Miss Charlotte Rains, daughter of George and Nancy Rains.  Joseph Craig and his wife Charlotte, were the parents of the following children:  George T.; William H.; Louisa, who died at the age of eighteen; Martha, wife of W. F. Straw; Nancy, wife of Frederick Bashore; Angeline, wife of Thomas Bashore; and John.  After their marriage the parents of these children lived for a number of years in Highland county, engaged in farming but in 1852 he removed to Jackson township, Allen county.  Upon his 160 acre farm he engaged in general farming and in raising stock.  He was an old-line whig, later a republican was township trustee, township treasurer, and a school teacher, besides being one of the early pioneers.  He died in 1872, his widow dying in February, 1881.
     William H. Craig, was born May 3, 1835, in Highland county, and was seventeen years of age when his parents removed into Allen county.  While he received a good education in his youth, yet he always preferred farming to any other calling, thereby showing excellent judgment.  Mr. Craig was married June 2, 1858, to Susan Hulliber, daughter of John and Mary (Keith) Hulliber, of Licking county, and has children as follows:  Rosetta E., wife of Mr. Blair; Mary C.; Iva C., deceased; Araminta L.; Nora O.; Walter W.  Mary C. is the wife of N. M. Boyd; Araminta L. is the wife of Clement Patterson; Nora O., is the wife of Percy A. Kershaw, a successful teacher of Jackson township, and a printer by trade.  Mr. Craig enlisted in April, 1862, in company d., One hundred and Sixty-first Ohio volunteer infantry, and campaigned in Maryland, the District of Columbia and Virginia doing considerable skirmishing near the capital, and was honorably discharged in September, 1862.  Immediately upon his marriage he settled on a farm of fertile land, well situated and well improved, which he has still more improved.  He is a strong republican, but has never cared for office, preferring to devote his time to his legitimate calling.  He is widely known and a highly respected citizen.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896)
Marion Twp. -
DAVID M. BLISS, one of the most prominent agriculturists of Marion township, Allen county, Ohio, is a son of a pioneer, and was born in Lima, the county seat of Allen county, July 17, 1845, of good old English Puritan descent paternally.
     Col. Lester Bliss, father of our subject is a punitive son of Knox (now Morrow) county, Ohio, and was born August 10, 1847, although is claimed by an elder sister that the place of his nativity was Cooperstown, N. Y.  Dr. David Bliss, father of Col. Bliss, was a practitioner at Cooperstown, N. Y., but was born in Connecticut of English Puritan ancestry.  He married Mary VanTress, of New York, of Holland descent.  Samuel Bliss, great grandfather of our subject and father of Dr. David Bliss, was a patriot in the war of the Revolution.  Dr. David Bliss was the pioneer physician of Sparta, Morrow county, Ohio, where he practiced until his death, which occurred in 1846, at the age of about sixty years, and where he also served as a justice of the peace.  He was the father of seven children, viz:  Dr. Morgan L., Maria, Mason, Mahala, Porter, Lester, and Mary A., all now deceased with the exception of the two last named.
     Col. Lester Bliss received a liberal education at Gambier (Knox county) and Granville (Licking county), Ohio and studied law in Mount Vernon, Ohio, under the Hon. Henry B. Curtis, a leading lawyer and a man of wealth - practiced his profession at Lima, Allen county, Ohio, until 1850, then removed to Delphos, where he continued in practice until the breaking out of the Civil war, in the meantime having been elected, by the democratic party, twice as prosecuting attorney of Allen county; also, in 1850, as the first mayor of Delphos, and in 1853 as a member of the state legislature; the same year he was also nominated for the office of lieutenant-governor of the state of Ohio, but withdrew his name from the ticket in order to accept the position of superintendent of the Ohio & Indiana railroad - an office he filled for several years.
     August 1, 1862, Lester Bliss enlisted at Delphos, in the One Hundred and Eighteenth Ohio volunteer infantry, and was at once appointed quartermaster, with the rank of major; one year latter was commissioned lieutenant-colonel and served with Burnside in the east, and was also at the siege of Knoxville, and in many minor engagements, and served until ill-health compelled him to resign his commission in 1865.  In 1863 he purchased his present farm, comprising 312 acres, on which he has resided since the close of the war, when he discontinued the practice of his profession, ill-health precluding its further continuance.  The first marriage of Col. Bliss took place, in 1844, to Miss Belinda hover, daughter of Emanuel and Carline (Adgate) Hover, and this union was blessed with two children - David M. and Lester L., of whom the latter was a soldier in the Civil war and died at Fort Scott, Kans.  the domestic happiness resulting from the first matrimonial alliance of Col. Bliss was of short duration only, as Mrs. Bliss was called away in 1848, and the second marriage of the colonel was with Miss Aldulia, daughter of William Curtis, the result of this union being one child only - Dr. Charles C. Bliss, of Delphos.  For thirty years Col. Bliss  has been a member of the Methodist church, in which he has filled all the major offices.  At the outset of his political career Mr. Bliss was a democrat, and at the outbreak of the war became a war democrat, and later on joined the republican party; he is a member of the G. A. R. post at Delphos, and has ever been an active factor in the affairs of the county, which he has guarded with the utmost care.
     David M. Bliss, the subject of this sketch received his preliminary education in the common schools of Delphos, and this was supplemented by an attendance for two years at the Wesleyan college of Delaware, Ohio; he then read law with his father, but never engaged in practice.  For two years he was in mercantile business at Delphos, and also conducted a newspaper at Sidney, Ohio, two years, and later a paper at Lima.  His first marriage was with Miss Mary A. Lytle, who died of consumption nine months after the wedding, and Mr. Bliss, in 1870, was joined in wedlock with Alice J. Neel, of Lima, Ohio - this union being blessed with three children, viz:  Lester L., Neel V. and Mary A.  In religion Mr. Bliss is a Methodist; in politics he is independent but has filled the office of justice of the peace and township trustee, and has been a member of the board of education for fifteen years.  He is a member of the K. of P. at Delphos and is well known throughout Allen county for his integrity and unswerving devotion to his word.  His skill as a farmer is universally recognized, and his social standing, with that of his family, is with the best circles in the township and county.
( Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 620)
Spencer Twp. -
JACOB BOOK, farmer, P. O. Spencerville, was born in Marion County, Ohio, July 24, 1844; son of John and Catherine (Epley) Book, natives of Germany, who were the parents of nine children of whom Jacob is sixth. John Book came to America in 1821, and located in Marion County, Ohio; he is now retired from active life, a resident of Van Wert County, Ohio; his wife died in 1878. Our subject was married, March 28, 1871, to Isabel Masters, who was born in Clermont County, Ohio, July 22, 1850, daughter of William and Malinda (Ross) Masters, of VanWert County. She has borne him six children: John F., Nancy C. (deceased), William H., deceased), James A., Joseph A. and Rosa E. (twins).   Mr. Book is one of of the most influential men of the township, and, as the appearance of his farm denotes, is a practical farmer. He aims to excel, and to produce and to have the best to sell. Having been reared on a farm, his educational advantages were necessarily limited to the common schools. Although not an office seeker he is a leader of the Democratic party in this vicinity; is an active member of Jennings Grange, No. 1320. He came to Spencer Township, with his parents in 1863, and in 1871 purchased the homestead where he still lives.
( Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 801)
Ottawa Twp. -
JOHN P. BOURQUIN, hotel keeper, Lima, was born July 9, 1845, in Loraine, France, son of Joseph Bourquin, who was the parent of three children: Julia, Joseph F. and John P.  Joseph Bourquin died in France, and in 1856, his widow and family came to America, locating at New York, being among the passengers on the last sailing vessel which sailed previous to the introduction of ocean steamers.  Our subject was educated in Wayne County, Ohio, and came to Lima, in 1865, working for R. Hughes, tinner and stove dealer.  Being of a speculative turn of mind.  Mr. Bourquin began trading in real estate and also opened a restaurant, which he now rents.  May 28, 1882, he bought the Bennett House of S. V. Bronnell, which he has rebuilt, remodeled, and refurnished, so that it is now one of the leading hotels of Lima.  He is an enterprising young man and a popular landlord.  Mr. Bourquin was united in marriage, Aug. 27, 1879, and has one child named Bonnie.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 681
Ottawa Twp. -
BYRON BOWERS, house painter, Lima, was born Dec. 16, 1841, in Lima, son of Abraham and Phebe (Neel) Bowers, natives of Pennsylvania, and who came to Ohio, settling in Wayne County.  Here they lived until 1834, when they moved to this county.  Abraham Bowers was a cabinet-maker and carpenter.  Of their family of twelve children, five are now living:  Andrew, James, Susan (Mrs. Morris), Lizzie (Mrs. Nye), and Byron.  Our subject was educated in Lima.  During the late war of the Rebellion, he enlisted, in 1861, in the three months' service, and the following year, 1862, re-enlisted and served three years in the One Hundred and Eighteenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  After his discharge he returned to Lima and resumed his trade, that of house painting.  Mr. Bowers was married, in 1868, to Nancy E., daughter of James W. Shockey, and by this union there is one child - Iva.  Mr. Bowers is a member of the I. O. O. F.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 681
Shawnee Twp. -
JOHN BOYD, farmer, P. O. Cridersville, Auglaize County, was born in Allegheny County, Penn., Nov. 4, 1807, son of Henry and Margaret (Beer) Boyd both natives of Pennsylvania and pioneers of Trumbull County, Ohio.  Our subject was reared in Trumbull County, Ohio, where he was educated in the common schools.  After he was eighteen years of age he began working on a farm by the month, and also engaged in teaming and teaching school until he was twenty-four years of age.  He was twice married, his first wife, to whom he was married Feb. 21, 1833, being Mary C., daughter of John and Rebecca (McKinney) Johnson, of Canfield, Ohio.  The issue of this union was two children, Rebecca J. (Mrs. James Robison, deceased), and John (deceased).  His present wife is Anna, daughter if Frederick and Christena (Hartzel) Lazarus, of Deerfield, Portage Co., Ohio, to whom he was married, Mar. 16, 1837, and by whom he has had four children: Frederick who died in the army during the late wary, at Bowling Green, Ky. a member of the Ninety-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Susan (Mrs. David E. Hover), Maria (Mrs. W. A. Wolf and Christiana (Mrs. George Tamplin).  After his first marriage Mr. Boyd settled in Berlin Township, Trumbull Co., Ohio, where he resided fourteen years; from there he went to Deerfield, Portage Co., Ohio, where he lived until 1854, when he came to this county, settling in Shawnee Township, on the farm he now owns and occupies, which he cleared and improved.  Mr. and Mrs. Boyd are members of the Presbyterian Church of Lima,  He has filled several of the minor offices of the township.  In politics he is a Republican.
( Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 785)
Shawnee Twp. -
DAVID M. BREESE, farmer, P. O. Lima, was born in Butler County, Ohio, Feb. 27, 1825, son of Griffith and Mary (Mowen) Breese, who settled in Shawnee Township, this county, in 1832, former a native of Wales, latter of Pennsylvania.  They were parents of six children: Nancy, George, John (killed while moving a house.), William D., David M. and Griffith.  Our subject was seven years of age when he came with his parents to this county, and was reared on the old homestead, a part of which he now owns and occupies, receiving a limited education in the country schools.  He was married Jan. 1, 1849, to Mary, daughter of Crane and Mary (Harper) Valentine, of Berrien County, Mich.  The issue of this union was three children: Mary E. (Mrs. Columbus Maltbie), George L. and Emmett (deceased).  Mr. Breese after his marriage located on Section 3, Shawnee Township, this county, on what is now known as the Shaffer farm, which he cleared and improved, and where he lived fourteen years.  In 1863 he moved to his present farm, a part of the old homestead originally entered by his father, where he has resided ever since.  He was in the 100 day's service during the late war of the Rebellion, enlisting in Company B.  One Hundred and Fifty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry; was at Washington, D. C., at the time of Gen. Early's raid, and was honorably discharged at the expiration of his term of service.  Mr. and Mrs. Breese are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He has been a F. & A. M. since 1862.  In politics he is a Republican.
(
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 787)

NOTE:  The following biography is very very hard to read.  Upon request, I will get a good copy to transcribe.  Sharon Wick)
G. ALVA BREESE, of Shawnee township, Allen county, Ohio is a great-grandson of John Breese, who was born probably about 1780?  John Breese had a son, Griffith, and Griffith Breese had a son, WILLIAM D., who was the father of G. Alva Breese, the subject of this sketch who was born December 26, 1859? 
     Most of the incidents of the life of William D. Breese are well remembered by his child.  He was reared on the old Griffith Breese homestead, and there received his education in the schools of his day, which were ___ so well supplied with teachers and apparatus as those of the present day.  Upon this old homestead he lived the greater part if not the whole of his life, which extended much beyond the ordinary ____ he dying in 189_?  William D. Breese was a ______ man in many ways and was _____ by his ____ friends with the offices of justice of the peace and treasurer of his township, holding the former for many years.  In politics he was a republican and labored earnestly and successfully for his party's prosperity.  He was a man of ideas, was a great reader, and was ______ well versed in law, his ______ as justice of the peace requiring him to read both general and ____ law.  In his religious convictions he was a Methodist and he was a member of the Shawnee Methodist Episcopal church, always living consistently with his ____ as a religious man.  William D. Breese married Miss Ellen Yoakam, daughter of Solomon and Ruth Yoakam, who were among the early settlers of Shawnee township.  Together marriage was born one son, G. Alva, the subject and they are both now deceased, lying in the cemetery at Shawnee.
     G. Alva Breese, the date of which birth has already been stated, was like his three distant ancestors whose names have been given, brought up in a farmers life.  His education was received in the common schools of the township in which he lived.  He has always followed the time-honored pursuit of his ancestors, that of agriculture, and to that industry as carried on by his father.   Mr. Breese has added the department of dairying, keeping at the present time nineteen cows.  In all he cultivates ___ acres of land.  In this calling he has met with abundant success, and by keeping for himself fully informed as to the improvements that are constantly being made, even in agriculture, he is enabled to keep abreast of the times and to make farming ____ profitable, but at the same time somewhat ____ve, a _____ which some people think it ____ ___sess.
     In politics Mr. Breese is a republican but is not ____ it his party ____ by any _____ of office.  His _____ does not ____ in that ____, although as for __ qualification is concerned of that there is no doubt.
     But he believes the post of honor is the private station.  Mr. Breese was married to Miss Iva John, daughter of Jehu John, of German township, who is a descendant from Welsh Quaker ancestry, and who was among the early settlers of Northumberland county, Pa.  To this marriage there have been born six children, four of whom are still living, viz:  Clifford E., Vida M., Don C. and Villa I.  Mr. Breese is descended from a long line of honorable ancestry, and is himself no discredit to their record.  He is upright and square in his dealings with men, and desires to see all men prosper.  Nothing in the shape of underhanded tricks or schemes find any countenance with him, felling convinced, as he does, that what is done is done forever, and can not be recalled.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 - Page 211)

GEORGE BREESE, of Shawnee township, Allen county, Ohio, the eldest son of Griffith Breese, was born Oct. 1, 1817, in Franklin county, Pa.  Griffith Breese was among the earliest settlers of Shawnee township, Allen county, Ohio, and was a son of John Breese, a native of Montgomeryshire, an inland county of Wales.  From Wales he came to the United States in 1800, his wife having previously died.  His children he brought with him.  So far as is known to his descendants his first permanent location was near Chambersburg, Pa., in Franklin county.  A few years later he came to Ohio, settling near Bellefontaine, in Logan county, where he lived until his death, in 1815.  His children were as follows:  Susan, who married Humphrey Evans, and who died in Cincinnati; Griffith; Mary, who married Evan Evans, and who died in Franklin county, Ky.; Robert, who married Lydia Henry, and lived and died in Logan county, Ohio, and John, who died in Pennsylvania.
     Griffith Breese was born in Wales in 1790, and coming, as has been intimated, to the United States in 1800, was reared in Pennsylvania.  He early learned the trades of mason and of weaver, working at the former in summer and at the latter in winter.  In company with Humphrey Evans and Evan Evans, his two brothers-in-law, he removed, in 1819, by way of the Ohio river, on flatboats, which they had purchased, to Cincinnati, Ohio, and thence he went to Butler county, Ohio, where he purchased eighty acres of land, upon which he carried on farming and also his trades of mason and weaver.  Here he remained until 1832, when he removed to Allen county, and lived in the Shawnee council house until January, 1833, at which time the sale of the reservation lands took place.  Of these reservation lands Griffith Breese purchased eighty acres in section No. 10, and an equal amount in each of sections Nos. 6 and 21, and kept on purchasing other tracts and parcels of land until before his death he owned 1,100 acres at once, all in Shawnee township, which he ultimately divided up among his children.  On the eighty acres in section No. 10 he settled, cleared it of its timber in part, erected a brick residence thereon, and lived upon it the remainder of his days, dying Nov. 2, 1848.
     Griffith Breese married Miss Mary L. Mowen, daughter of Lewis Mowen, of Franklin county, Pa.  She died in 1852.  The children born to this marriage were as follows: Nancy, who resides on the old homestead; George, of Shawnee township; John (deceased); William D.; David M., of Shawnee township, and Griffith, who is was a member of the Ninety-ninth Ohio volunteer infantry, and died from exposure while in the service of his country.  Mr. Breese was one of the most prominent men of his day in his township, and he took great interest in all matters pertaining to the development of his county's prosperity.  In the early days he was a democrat, and in later life a whig.  While not a member of any church, yet he favored the doctrines of the Baptist denomination, and was always upright and true in his conduct.  Public office he never sought nor desired, but he was always alive to the interests of the political party with which he indentified himself, and also was ready to further any movement promising to promote the public good.
     George Beese came with his parents to Ohio, and remained upon the homestead until after the death of his mother.  His education was such as the schools of that day afforded, which, supplemented by intercourse with the world, has always been sufficient for his necessities.  In 1856 he settled upon a portion of his father's land, in section No. 9, containing 160 acres, and in 1862 he removed to section No. 21, on 240 acres.  This latter farm he cleared and improved, making of it an excellent piece of property.  In 1865 he removed his house to section No. 16, on the same 240-acre tract, and he there engaged in farming until 1882, when he purchased his present farm in sections Nos. 6, and 16, where he is living, retired from active business.  At the time of his retirement from the active control of his property and busines he owned 320 acres of land, which he has divided up among his children.
     In 1855 Mr. Breese was married to Miss Sarah Yoakam, daughter of Solomon and Ruth Yoakam, of Shawnee township, and to this marriage have been born four children, viz:  Charles L., deceased; Mary E., wife of C. D. Strawbridge; Ina and John O.  Politically Mr. Breese is a republican, but cares not for office, the performance of his private duties having always been uppermost in his ambition.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and is a trustee of the church of which he is a member.  Mr. Breese is one of the original settlers of Shawnee township, and assisted in its organization.  He well remembers the Shawnee Indians, who were still living on their reservation when he came from the ____.  That they were dissatisfied with its sale is also one of the things he distingtly remembers and also that they spent considerable time in trying to re-organize it, which of course they ___ not do.  He has pleasant recollections of this tribe of red men, and says that they were honorable to a high degree, which is in accordance with when many early travelers among them and ____about them also ___.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 - Page 209)
(SHARON WICK'S NOTE:  The last paragraph of this biography was not copied correctly and was very very hard to read.)
Shawnee Twp. -
GEORGE BREESE, farmer, P. O. Lima, was born in Franklin County, Penn., Oct. 1, 1817, son of Griffith and Mary (Mowen) Breese, who settled on Section 10, Shawnee Township, this county, in 1832, where they lived one winter in the Indian Council House, afterward entering the land now owned by their sons, William D. and David M., which they cleared and improved, and where they lived and died.  The father was a native of Wales, the mother of Pennsylvania.  They reared a family of six children: Nancy, George, John (who was killed while moving a house by a hook flying and striking him on the head), William D., David M., and Griffith (who was a member of the Ninety-ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, during the late war, and died of disease contracted in the service before the expiration of his term).  Our subject, who was fifteen years of age when his parents settled in Shawnee Township, this county, received a limited education in the schools of his day, and resided with his parents until their death.  He was married Sept. 6, 1855, to Sarah, daughter of Solomon and Ruth (Carter) Yoakum, who settled in Shawnee township, this county, in 1842.  The issue of this union is four children: Charles L., Mary E. (Mrs. C. D. Strawbridge - have one child.  Cloyd E.), Ina and John O.  After his marriage Mr. Breese settled on Sections 9 and 16, Shawnee Township, this county, a part of which he drained and improved.  He afterward moved to Section 21, same township, on a farm of 160 acres, which he also cleared and improved and afterward brought an addition of 160 acres adjoining, on Section 16, and this he also cleared, and where he now resides in the fine residence built by him in 1881.  Mr. and Mrs. Breese and three children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he served as trustee for several years.  In politics he is a Republican.
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Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 785)
Marion Twp. -
THOMAS BREESE, farmer and stock-breeder, Delphos, Allen County, was born in North Wales, Mar. 15, 1835; son of Richard and Elizabeth (Rollands) Breese, former of whom died Nov. 20, 1875, aged seventy-three; latter Sept. 28, 1852, aged forty-eight years.  They came to America, landing at Philadelphia, and settled the same year on the farm, where the subject of this sketch now lives, there being only four acres, cleared out of the 160,, and for which Richard Breese paid $100 cash.  Here, before the father's death, they cleared about seventy acres, and endured the trials and hardships of pioneer life.  Richard Breese was a man of prominence in his township, a deacon in the Congregational Church many years.  He and his wife, were parents of seven children: Mary (wife of Joseph Watkins, in Sugar Creek Township, this county), Thomas, Ann (wife of John Morris, of Lima), Jane (wife of Evan Morgan, in Benton County, Ark.), Alice (single), Richard (deceased, leaving a family of three children in Delphos), Samuel R. (who enlisted in May 1861, in Company H, Thirty-second Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, going out as the first lieutenant, he was killed in the Battle of Harper's Ferry, in August, 1862, and had his death not occurred, he would have been promoted to lieutenant colonel in a few days).  Thomas Breese, the subject of this sketch, received a meager education; being the eldest son, his services were required in clearing up the farm.  He was married Sept. 6, 1861, to Martha Davis, a native of Montgomeryshire, Wales, born Sept. 10, 1842, daughter of Rev. James and Mary (Davis) Davis, who came to America in August, 1849, and settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, where the former preached for three years, in the Lawrence Street Congregational Church.  They then came to Gomer, this county, in 1853, where Mr. Davis preached eight years, thence moved to New York State, remaining two years, thence to Radnor, Ohio, where he preached eight years.  Rev. James Davis, was a son of Isaac and Sarah Davis he died in April, 1873.  His widow who is still living with Mr. Breeze, is a daughter of Richard and Margaret (Davis) Davis.  Rev. James Davis was the father of seven children, of whom three died without issue.  Those who had families were Sarah (deceased wife of John Thomas, leaving family in Van Wert County, Ohio), Bejamin (deceased, leaving family in Crawford County, Kans.), James (a business man in Sandusky City, has a family of three children), William (a merchant in Keokuk, Iowa, has a family of three children), and Martha (Mrs. Breese).  To our subject and wife, have been born six children: Emma born July 10, 1862; Samuel, born July 23, 1864; Mary (deceased at five years of age); James D., born January 31, 1874; Richard, born May 1, 1878, and Mary, born May 29, 1881.  The life of Mr. Breese has been spent chiefly on the farm which he now occupies.  He takes an active interest in all educational and religious matters.  The family are members of the Congregational Church.  In politics he is a Republican.
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Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 620)
Shawnee Twp. -
WILLIAM D. BREESE, farmer, P. O. Lima, was born in Butler County, Ohio, Apr. 30, 1822; son of Griffith and Mary (Mowen) Breese, former a native of Wales, latter of Franklin County, Penn.  His paternal grandfather was John Breese, a native of Wales, who came to America in 1798, settling in Champaign County, Ohio, in an early day, and whose children were Susan, Griffith, Robert, Mary and John (all new deceased).  Our subject's maternal grandfather was Lewis Mowen, a native of Pennsylvania.  William D. Breese came with his parents in 1832, to this county, where the latter entered land in Shawnee Township, a part of which is now occupied by our subject, and which, with the assistance of their sons, they cleared and improved.  Here the father died in 1848, at the age of fifty-eight, and the mother in March,,, 1853, at the age of sixty-two.  They had a family of six children:  Nancy, George, John (killed while moving a house), William D., David M., and Griffith (who died in the army October, 1862).  Our subject was reared in Shawnee Township, this county, from ten years of age, and has always resided on the old homestead.  He was married Mar. 15, 1859, to Ellen, daughter of Solomon and Ruth (Carter) Yoakum, who settled in Shawnee Township, this county, in 1842, and to this union was born one son, G. Alva (who was married Jan. 20, 1881, to Iva, daughter of Jehu and Mary (Clark) John, of Elida, Ohio, by whom he has three children: Clifford E., Julius C. and Vida M.  Mrs. Breese died in February, 1861, at the age of twenty-eight years; at the time of her death she was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Mr. Breese has served the township as justice of the peace one term, was township treasurer for several years and also township clerk.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  In politics he is a Republican.
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Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 786)
Shawnee Twp. -
WILLIAM H. BREESE, farmer, P. O. Lima, was born Sept. 12, 1848, in Shawnee Township, this county, on what is known as the old "Turkey Foot farm", and is a son of John and Emily (Valentine) Breese, the former a native of Butler County, Ohio, born Apr. 18, 1820; the latter a native of Champaign County, Ohio, Apr. 21, 1820.  His paternal grandparents were Griffith and Mary (Mowen) Breese, the former a native of Wales, and a son of John Breese, who immigrated to America in 1798; the latter a native of Pennsylvania, a daughter of Lewis Mowen.  Our subject's maternal grandparents were Crane and Mary (Harper) Valentine, who settled in Lima, Ohio, in 1832, when there were but ten houses in the place.  His maternal great-grandparents were William and Johanna (Crane) Valentine, natives of New Jersey and pioneers of Champaign County, Ohio.  Mrs. Mary (Harper) Valentine was a native of Virginia, a daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Cunningham) HarperJohn Breese, father of our subject, who was twelve years of age when his parents settled in Shawnee Township, this county, received a limited education in the schools of that time, and commenced the world for himself on what is known as the "Turkey Foot farm," this county, where he resided three years; in 1851, he removed to the farm now owned and occupied by Samuel Zurmehly, a part of which he cleared and improved, where he lived until 1863, when he located on the farm now occupied by our subject, and here he resided until his death, which was caused by being struck on the head with an iron hook while engaged in moving a building, Nov. 16, 1865, his death ensuing the day following; he was in the days' service in the One Hundred and Fifty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, during the late war of the Rebellion; he held several minor offices in Shawnee Township; in politics, he was a Republican; he was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Our subject is the only child of his parents, and was reared and educated in Shawnee Township, this county, where he has always resided.  He was marred Nov. 10, 1874, to Ida A., daughter of James A. and Isabel K. (Ferguson) Hower, of Shawnee Township, this county, and by her he has two children: Naamah B. and John E.  Mr. Breese is serving his first term as trustee of the township.  He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he is steward.  In politics, he is a Republican.
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Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 787)
Sugar Creek Twp. -
ABRAHAM BRENNEMAN, farmer, P. O. Lima, is a native of Rockingham County. Va.. born February 21. 1831; son of David and Catharine (Mover) Brenneman. who came from Virginia to Fairfield County, Ohio, and then, in 1847, to Allen County, where the latter died and the former still resides; they were the parents of twelve children, eleven of whom are now living. Our subject, who is the eldest, was married, August 21, 1856, to Miss Eliza Ward, of Monroe Township, this county, a native of German Township, this county, and daughter of William and Elizabeth (Ridenour) Ward, who were married in this county, and where Mrs. Ward died. Mr. Ward now resides in Perry Township, this county. To our subject and wife have been born eight children: Henrietta E., William C., Mary C, David W., Sarah A., Abraham P., Jacob B. and Frank H., all living except David W. and Abraham P. Mr. Brenneman followed carpentering for five or six years, and in 1856 purchased land in Monroe Township, this county, which he improved, and to which by industry and economy he added many acres, owning now 249 acres in Monroe Township, 320 in Sugar Creek Township, and 93 in Bath Township, all this county; also 160 acres in Paulding County, Ohio; in all 822. He came to Sugar Creek Township in 1877. Mrs. Brenneman is a member of the Christian Church. In politics he is a stanch Democrat.
( Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 817)  (See Next Biography below here)
ABRAHAM BRENNEMAN, one of the oldest settlers of Sugar Creek township, and one of the most successful and wealthy farmers in Allen county, comes from sturdy German ancestry.  His grandfather, MALACHI BRENNEMAN, was a farmer of the state of Virginia, and David Brenneman, son of Malachi, was the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Rockingham county, Va., May 14, 1805, 2as a farmer by occupation, was a well educated man, and was a member of the Christian church.  He married Miss Catherine Myers, who was born Jan. 15, 1809, in Shenandoah county, Va., she being the daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Crumpacker) Myers.  Mr. Brenneman moved to Fairfield county, Ohio, Oct. 1, 1842, and there rented land, and resided upon two different places for three ad a half years.  He then moved to Franklin county, where he remained one and a half years, and in 1847 finally removed to Allen county (then Putnam county), and settled in Monroe township.  His wife had some money and they together bought 110 acres of land, a little of which had been cleared by some former owner, or possibly, squatter.  With the assistance of his sons he cleared the rest of this land, and afterward bought eighty acres more, becoming one of the substantial and prosperous farmers of his day.  David Brenneman and his wife were the parents of twelve children, viz: Daniel F., Abraham, Elizabeth A., Samuel C., Rebecca J., Mary A., Sarah E., Lydia F., David D., John H., Jacob P. and Martha A.  Mr. Brenneman was a deacon in his church for many years, and Mrs. Brenneman was a member of the same church, and he assisted in building the first Christian church in Monroe township.  He was a democrat, and was honored by his fellow-citizens by being elected to the office of township trustee, but cared less for political affairs than for general matters of interest to all, such as religion, education and social progress.  He was a hard-working man, and reared his family to habits of industry, economy and honesty.  Sept. 4, 1892, he died at the age of eighty-seven years and four months.
     Abraham Brenneman, the subject of this sketch, was born Feb. 21, 1831, in Rockingham county, Va., was reared a farmer, and has followed that occupation with more than ordinary success all his life.  When he was about eleven years old his parents removed from Virginia to Fairfield county, Ohio, making the journey was wagon and horses.  This journey is still fresh in his memory.  Coming with his father in 1847 to Allen county, he here assisted in clearing the farm, and was educated, as were other boys of that day, in the common school.  On Aug. 21, 1856, he was married to Eliza Ward, born July 18, 1835, a daughter of WILLIAM and Elizabeth (Ridenour) WARD.
    
WILLIAM WARD was the grandson of an Englishman who came to America before the Revolutionary war, and fought in that war as an American soldier.  His name was William, and his son's name was William, bringing the name down to the father of Mrs. Brenneman, so that there were three generations of William Wards.  William Ward, father of Mrs. Brenneman, was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, July 1, 1810.  He and his wife were the parents of four children, viz: Sarah, Eliza, Mary A., and John H.  Their marriage occurred in 1833, and Mr. Ward died Oct. 12, 1894.  He was a member of the United Brethren church.  The first wife of Mr. Ward died when Mrs. Brenneman was six years old, that is, in 1841, and he was then married to Sarah Faustnaught, a widow, ńee Sarah Wright.   To this marriage there were born four children, viz:  George H., Marion, William and David.   After the death of his second wife he married Hanna Angus, by whom he had two children - Elizabeth and Leslie.
     Mr. and Mrs. Brenneman
, after their marriage, settled on 150 acres of land near Cairo, in Allen county, a portion of which belonged to his wife before her marriage.  Part of the town of Cairo is laid out on this land.  When he settled thereon but eight acres were cleared, but the remainder was cleared by him and was made into a good farm.  A good and pleasant house was erected by him, and also other buildings, and many other improvements were made.  In 1877 Mr. Brenneman bought his present farm, then containing 250 acres.  This farm was cleared and improved, and cost him $80 per acre, the total cost being $20,000.  This is one of the best farms in Allen county, together with its improvements.  Previously he had purchased, in Monroe township, 177½ acres, and in Monroe and Sugar Creek townships, 160 acres.  He had also 166 acres in Bath township, 185 acres in German township, and eighty acres in Paulding county; making in all 972 acres, all fine farming land.  This property, which is a good fortune in itself, he has acquired and accumulated by his own industry and good management, generally making sure of his investments beforehand, but notwithstanding all the care he has taken, he lost, by misfortune, some $15,000.
     Mr. Brenneman and his wife are the parents of eight children, viz: Henrietta, born Oct. 24, 1858 - died Oct. 20, 1887; William C., born Nov. 20, 1860; Mary C., born Feb. 2, 1863; David W., born
Mar. 31, 1865 - and died Oct. 15, 1868; Sarah A., born Jul. 20, 1867; Abraham P., born Mar. 7, 1870 - died Oct. 12, 1871; Jacob B., born Aug. 19, 1872, and Frank H., born Dec. 23, 1874.  Mr. and Mrs. Brenneman are members of the Christian church, and Mr. Brenneman has served his church as trustee.  In politics he is a democrat, but as the above brief sketch indicates, he has always cared less for politics than success in life as an agriculturists and as an accumulator of property.  His career and example forcibly illustrate the possibilities of American citizenship, teaching what may be accomplished by industry, economy, hard work and good judgment.
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(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 - Page 214) (See also, Biography above this one)
Marion Twp. -
DAVID BRENNEMAN, farmer and stock-breeder, P. O. Elida, was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, Nov. 28, 1840, son of Jacob and Caroline (Ogden) Brenneman lattter of whom was born in Hardy County, Va., July 12, 1819,  Jacob Brenneman was a native of Rockingham County, Va., son of Abraham and Magdalena (Shank) Brenneman natives of Pennsylvania, former born 1745, and died aged seventy years. Was twice married, and had in all sixteen children, the youngest of whom is the only survivor.  Jacob was also twice married to Mary Beery, who was born Nov. 20, 1802, and moved with her husband from Virginia to Fairfield County, Ohio, in 1828, where she died four years later.  Her children were John L., born Oct. 24, 1821, in Marion Township, this county; Abraham, born June 21, 1823, in Lancaster County, Ohio; Barbara, born June 7, 1824, wife of John Keller, in Branch County, Mich.; Isaac, born Sept. 25, 1825, in Adair County, Mo.; Elizabeth and Joseph.  Annie and Mary died young.  Jacob Brenneman, by his second wife, Caroline (Ogden) Brenneman, had the following named children: Catharine, born Mar. 8, 1838, widow of Abraham Friesuer (deceased), now wife of George Keckler, in Branch County, Mich.; David, born Nov. 28, 1840, in Fairfield County, Ohio; Jacob R., born May 18, 1843, a druggist in Elida; Rebecca, born Jan. 2, 1847, wife of Daniel F. Berry, in Branch, Mich.; Sarah A., born Nov. 10, 1849, wife of Thomas Wisher, in Van Wert County; William F., born Apr. 30, 1852, in Elida; Noah E., born Nov. 8, 1855, in Marion Township; Charles B., born July 12, 1862, in Blanchard, Isabelle Co., Mich.  Jacob Brenneman died Jan. 1, 1865, aged sixty-eight years, two months and twenty-five days.  David Brenneman received very limited educational advantages, remaining with his father upon the farm until Aug. 10, 1862, when he enlisted in Company A., One Hundred and Eighteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which he did valiant duty, participating in the siege of Knoxville, the battle of Resaca and Buzzard's Roost; under fire from Dalton to Atlanta, Ga.; at Salisbury, N. C., and in Sherman's march to the sea.  He was discharged June 20, 1865, never having been off duty a single day, was neither sick nor wounded during the whole time, but always in the front rank.  He was married, Sept. 27, 1866, to Phebe A. Lultz, who was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, Dec. 15, 1846, daughter of John and Sarah (Griffith) Lutz, former a native of Maryland, latter of Fairfield County.  By her he had four children; Laura A., born Oct. 10, 1867; Irwin E., born Aug. 28, 1869; Sarah E., born July 19, 1871; Stephen A., born Nov. 8, 1873.  David Brenneman has a valuable farm of 165 acres, secured principally by his own efforts.  He takes an active interest in the improvement of farm products, the advancement of education and religion.  He is a member of Mart Armstrong Post 202, G. A. R., at Lima.  The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
(
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 621)
DAVID BRENNEMAN, of Marion township, Allen county, Ohio, is a son of Jacob and Caroline (Ogden) Brenneman, and was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, Nov. 28, 1840.  He was brought to Allen county in September, 1853, by his parents, and was here reared to manhood.  Aug. 12, 1862, he enlisted in company A, One Hundred and Eighteenth Ohio volunteer infantry, to serve three years or during the war, and was honorably discharged at Knoxville, Tenn., June 20, 1865.  His regiment left Lima Sept. 12, 1862, and in Oct. of same year was engaged in guard duty on the Kentucky Central railroad; later, he was at the siege of Knoxville, and was twenty-one days and nights under fire; next had a hard fight at Mossy Creek, in Tennessee; then returned to Knoxville and was engaged in building pontoon boats until the spring of 1864, when he went on the Atlanta campaign, fighting at Resaca, Buzzard's Roost, Kenesaw Mountain, Snake Creek Gap, Peach Tree Creek, and at Atlanta.  After the fall of that city Mr. Brenneman was with Gen. Thomas in Tennessee, was at Strawberry Plains, Jonesboro, Morristown, and on to Salisbury, N. C.; was also at Lynchburg, Va., and several other points, doing good work in the engineer branch of the service until his final discharge.
     Returning from the war, Mr. Brenneman engaged in the saw mill business for four years, but in the meantime, Sept. 27, 1866, married Phebe A. Lutz, who was born Dec. 13, 1846, a daughter of John and Sarah A. (Griffith) Lutz.  John Lutz was of German descent and his wife of Welsh extraction.  The former was born in Perry county, Ohio, Jan. 13, 1820, a son of John Lutz, who was born in Maryland in 1787 and married Louise Leese, who was born Oct. 14, 1794.  To John and Louisa Lutz, the father of Mrs. Brenneman, was thrice married - first to Sarah A. Griffith, who was born Mar. 19, 1837, a daughter of David Griffith, who bore him four children; his second wife Elizabeth Miller,  who also became the mother of four children, and his third wife was Sarah Doner, who bore him four children, likewise.
     After his marriage, Mr. Brenneman located in Amanda township, Allen county, lived there four years, and then came to his present farm of 160 acres in Marion township.  There have been born to him four children, named Laura A., Irvin E., Sarah E. and Stephen A.  Mr. and Mrs. Brenneman are members of the Methodist church, and for nine years Mr. Benneman has been trustee in that body.  In politics he is independent, and has served as trustee of his township four years.  He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, belonging to Armstrong post, at Lima.  Of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Brenneman, Laura married David Williams, a farmer of Van Wert county, and is the mother of three children, named Groen Lenora, William David and Anna; Irvin married Ollie Kircofe, and is working on the home farm; Sarah E. is married to Albert Morris, a blacksmith in the Lake Erie & Western Railroad shops, at Lima.
     The Brenneman homestead was first settled by Christian Stukey, the deed having been signed by President Andrew Jackson, May 2, 1833.  The next owner was Daniel Conrad, and by him it was transferred to Jacob Brenneman in March, 1853.  It is now one of the finest farms in the township, is one of the oldest settled in the neighborhood, and Mr. Brenneman has cleared up the greater pat of it.  Mr. Brenneman relates many reminiscences of the Civil war, which are too voluminous for repetition in the sketch of this character.  He was a brave and faithful soldier, and his conduct in civil life ahs been such as to win the esteem and heartfelt regard of all who know him.  He is upright, public spirited, and generous in his impulses, and few citizens of Marion township stand in a better light before the public than he.
     The family originally were German Mennonites, who fled from persecution in Germany and sought shelter in the country where all religions and sects are given freedom to worship in their own way.  They were faithful followers of Menno Symons, and the founder of the branch of the family to which John L. Brenneman belongs was Abraham,  his grandfather, who was born about 1745, so that it was probable that the family first settled in southeastern Pennsylvania, some time prior to the Revolutionary war.  Abraham Brenneman first married a young lady named Maria, who was born about 1747, and died March 29, 1788, the mother of seven children, viz: Magdalene, born Dec. 6, 1770; Elizabeth, born Feb. 10, 1773; Malachi, born May 11, 1775; Francis, born Oct. 18, 1777; Barbara, born Jan. 13, 1780; Daniel, born Mar. 24, 1782, and Abraham, after the death of his first wife, married Magdalena Schenk, who was the mother of seven children, viz: Henry, John, Jacob, Catherine, Mary, David and Abraham.
     Abraham Brenneman
, when grown to manhood, left the home in Pennsylvania, and settled on a farm in Rockingham county, Va., where he prospered and reared his family, and there died Mar. 8, 1815, in his seventy-first year.  He was well remembered by many people of his latter day, as he was noted for his hospitality and liberality to all poor people; he always kept a large store of wheat on hands to give to the poor and needy, and many were those who could look to him as their benefactor.  He was honored and respected by all, and from him fourteen children have descended, of whom all grew to manhood and womanhood and raised families, excepting Catherine, who had no children.  All the Brenneman family who are settled in Allen county, except Christian Brenneman, who lives in Sugar Creek township, trace their descent back to this Abraham Brenneman, while Christian Brenneman traces his descent to a brother of Abraham.
     Jacob Brenneman
, the third son of Abraham, by his second wife, was the father of the subject of this sketch, and was born on the old homestead in Rockingham county, Va., Oct. 7, 1796, and married Mary, the daughter of John Berry.  After marriage he settled on the old homestead in Rockingham county and eight children were born to them, the four oldest of whom, John L.  Abraham, Barbara and Isaac, grew up the reared families; the four youngest died while quite young after moving to Ohio.  About 1828 Mr. Brenneman moved his family from the old home in Virginia to Fairfield county, Ohio, where he bought a farm of 120 acres of partly cleared land; this he improved and was prospering when his wife died, about October, 1832. In the fall of 1836 he married Caroline, the daughter of David and Rebecca (Frey) Ogden, who were natives of Virginia and of English descent.  By this marriage Mr. Brenneman had eight children, viz: Catherine, David, Jacob, Rebecca, Noah, William F. (deceased), Sarah A. and Charles B.
    
About September, 1853, Mr. Brenneman moved his family to Marion township, Allen county, and settled on a farm of 160 acres, a small part of which had been cleared.  He improved this land and made it his home the remainder of his life, dying Jan. 1, 1865, being in his sixty-ninth year.  He was a prosperous and very successful farmer, and a hard-working and honest man, and taught his children that hard work was honorable, and that they should be honest and upright in all things.  It may be well said that his word was as good as his bond.  He was a democrat in politics, and a faithful member of the Mennonite church, and was honored and respected by all who knew him.  (Source #1 - Page 212)
HON. CALVIN S. BRICE, one of Ohio's favorite and most distinguished sons, was born in Denmark, Marion (now Morrow) county, of the Buckeye state, Sept. 17, 1845, and is a son of William Kirkpatrick and Elizabeth (Stewart) Brice.  The father was descended from an old Maryland and Pennsylvania family, was a graduate of Hanover college and the Princeton Theological seminary, and was a clergyman of much note, while the mother, a lady of fine education and exemplary traits of character, was a native of Carrollton, Ohio.
     Calvin S. Brice, now United States senator from the great commonwealth of Ohio, obtained his early education in the common schools of his district, and this was supplemented by attendance at schools of a higher grade at Lima, and such was his native ability and industry that, at the early age of thirteen years, he was so far advanced that he was able to enter the preparatory department of Miami university, at Oxford, in his native state, where he studied one year, and then entered the freshman class.  To those who knew the man, when a young, red-haired boy, endeavoring to get an education at Miami university, his after life has always been a story of exceeding interest.  What wealth he may have has been earned through his own efforts, supplemented by a judgment and; business capacity rarely equaled. He inherited none of it. The only heritage that came to young Brice was a sound constitution, an active mind, a thorough brand of American pluck and grit, and an intelligent comprehen­sion of the way in which to put these to the best use. While at school his progress was marked, and he was looking forward to graduation, when there came a call that his patriotic impulses and the ardor of a true-hearted American boy would not permit him to ignore. When the call of the president came, young Brice, although but fifteen years of age, relinquished his studies, enlisted as a member of Capt. Dodd's University company, and in April, 1861, took his first lesson in military discipline at Camp Jackson, Columbus. In April, 1862, he was enrolled a member of company A, Eighty-sixth Ohio volunteer infantry, of which Prof. R. W. McFarland was captain, and served with the regiment during the summer of that year in West Virginia. Returning to the university, he resumed his studies, completed the regular course, and graduated in June, 1863.
     Mr. Brice then took charge of one of the public schools of Lima, and while so engaged acted for some time as deputy county auditor. He had already formed the purpose of devoting himself to the profession of law, and made use of such spare time as he could command in study until the spring of 1864, when the old impulse to make his power effective for the good of the Union cause led him to again return to the field. He recruited company E, One Hundred and Eightieth Ohio volunteer infantry, and as captain served in the First division of the Twenty-third corps in Tennessee, Georgia, and the Carolinas, until July, 1865. While still in the field he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel for meritorious services, but owing to the return of peace he was never mustered in under this commission. With the return of peace, Mr. Brice again devoted himself to what he felt was the real work of his life. He applied himself, with renewed activity and interest, to the study of law, subsequently entering the law department of the university of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and was admitted to practice by the state and the United States district and circuit courts at Cincinnati, in the spring of 1866.
     Associating himself with Mr. Irvine, he formed the law firm of Irvine & Brice, and began the practice of his chosen profession in Lima, where he remained more than ten years. As a member of this law firm Mr. Brice became connected with the legal department of the old Lake Erie & Louisville railroad. This was the beginning of the career of Mr. Brice as a railroad magnate. As one of the counsel for this road, he obtained an insight into the actual work of railroading and saw spread before him the opportunities which he subsequently grasped. He became interested in the road financially, modestly it is true, but his holdings gradually increased. His mind, capable of looking into the future, foreseeing what should be done and doing it at the right time, I saw where the money was being lost in the railroad business and where it should be made. Quick of conception and equally quick in execution, Mr. Brice recognized that the extension of systems and the opening up of new territory would enhance the property.
     This idea developed and resulted in the construction of the "Nickel Plate" railroad, a name given to the road in jest by Mr. Brice, and which he and his associates constructed parallel to the Lake Shore road. The Lake Shore had refused to make a satisfactory arrangement for taking care of the traffic turned over to it by the Lake Erie & Western, and its refusal led to the building of this new line from Chicago to Buffalo, which it was compelled to buy to get rid of the dangerous opposition that it gave promise of being. This operation opened the eyes of the eastern rail­road world to this rising genius of the west. His subsequent career as the moving spirit of large railroad interests and corporate investments is thoroughly familiar to the public.
     In politics, Mr. Brice has likewise been singularly fortunate. He stands today the leading politician in a great state, and one of the men of national prominence as a democrat, with courage to do what he believes to be right, and what the best interests of the whole people demand. He first came before the people in politics when he was named for the Tilden electoral ticket in 1876. He was also on the Cleveland electoral ticket in 1884, and was a delegate to the Saint Louis convention in 1888, where he was elected to represent Ohio on the national democratic committee, and he was made chairman of the campaign committee in the ensuing national campaign. At the death of M. William H. Barnum, in 1889, Mr. Brice was made chairman of the national committee, making a vigorous, but unsuccessful fight for the re-election of Mr. Cleveland. No man ever spent more of his time for the advancement of his party than did  Mr. Brice in that campaign, and it is notorious that no man ever spent more of his private means for the advancement of the cause of the ticket which he was championing.
     In January, 1890, Mr. Brice was elected by the legislature as a United States senator to succeed Hon. Henry B. Payne. In the senate Mr. Brice has not been compelled to serve the probationary period that usual falls to the lot of young members. He forged at once to the front and became an active and important figure in the councils of his party. On the troublesome questions growing out of the railroad system and transportation problems, his advice has been eagerly sought by statesmen of both parties. He devoted much time to the tariff question, and it was largely through his work that the party was able, so far as the senate was concerned, to agree upon a bill that consolidated the party vote in that body, and made it possible for the bill to be­come a law and tariff reform to be an assured fact. Mr. Brice will never be counted an orator. He is not gifted with rhetorical speech, but his short pithy five-minute speeches have condensed within them the essence of the subject upon which he speaks and drives a point home to his hearers in a way that im­presses itself upon the understanding. He has been a hard-working member and has reflected credit upon the state, which has honored him with a seat in the senate of the United States. The vast railroad interests with which Mr. Brice has been and is connected, have not prevented his active labor in other fields of invest­ment or development.  He organized and became president of the gaslight company at Lima; assumed a controlling interest in the First National Bank of Lima upon its incorporation, and has been the promoter of, or a large stockholder in, many of the manufacturing interests in that thriving place. He is also identified with the Chase National Bank of New York, and a leading spirit and director of the Southern Trust company. Contrary to an opinion expressed, Mr. Brice does not speculate in stocks. Purely speculative profits appear to have little charm for Mr. Brice, he rather preferring the fruits of a bold enterprise in his particular field wherein his many friends can share; and such is his prestige that the subscribers to such as are brought out by him are only limited by the amount of the subscription. As a trustee of the Miami university in Ohio, vice-president of the Ohio society in New York, vice-president of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity of New York, a member of the Manhattan, the Lotos, the Athletic, and other leading clubs, and in like position of a public or social character, Mr. Brice has proven himself a useful and campanionable man.
     Calvin S. Brice was most happily united in marriage September 9, 1869, at Lima, Ohio, with Miss C. Olivia Meily, and this union is blessed by the birth of three sons and two daughters.  Although engrossed in business and social affairs he never carries them into the quiet atmosphere of home. As soon as he turns from his office in the afternoon, by a wonderful power of self-control, he shakes off all business care, and goes happily to a home that is palatial in its appointments and restful in its luxury. There, environed by the tenderness of family ties, and delighted by the grace of culture and the beauty of art, Mr. Brice welcomes his friends to royal hospitality and most enjoyable entertainment.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896)
REV. WM. KIRKPATRICK BRICE, deceased, was born in Adams county,  Pa., near Gettysburg, November 12, 1812.
     Alexander and Margaret (Kearsley) Brice, his parents, moved to Springboro, Warren county, Ohio, in 1815.
     In 1830 he became a member of the Washington church, and having the ministry in view, soon began his studies at Walnut Hills at the opening of Lane seminary, which was then a classical as well as a theological school. In 1836 he graduated at Hanover college and at once went to the Princeton seminary, where he finished his course in 1841. He was licensed to preach, by the Second presbytery of New York, March 17, 1841, and began his ministry in the churches of Washington and Muddy Run, in Miami presbytery, serving them six months and then took charge of Canaan church in Marion presbytery, and in 1843 he was ordained and installed as pastor of Canaan church, also preaching as stated supply of Mount Gilead one-third of his time. In the beginning of the year 1849 he took charge of the Truro, Kalida and Ottawa churches in Putnam county, Ohio, and was installed as pastor of Truro in 1850. His labors at Truro were blessed, the church becoming self-supporting and growing to be one of the largest in the synod. Here he remained about twenty years, up to the time of his death. In 1869 he had an attack of pneumonia which left him with impaired lungs, from the effect of which he died July 19, 1870. In 1845 he married Elizabeth Stewart, of Carlton, Ohio, who died April 16,1852, leaving three children—Calvin S., William and James, the last named died in infancy.  William died in the spring of 1890. In 1854 Rev. Brice married Clementine Cunningham, of Lima, Ohio, who is still living, by whom he had four children— John K., Anna E. (Mrs. O. B. Selfridge, Jr.), Herbert L. and Mary, wife of Edward Ritchie, of Cincinnati, Ohio. By the first marriage of the Rev. William Kirkpatrick Brice, it will be perceived that he became the father of Ohio's eminent statesman and business prodigy, Calvin S. Brice, whose biography and portrait precede this sketch. |
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896)
HERBERT L. BRICE.—Among the most active and prominent young attorneys of Lima, Ohio, is Herbert L. Brice, a son of Rev. William K. and Clementine Brice. Mrs. Brice is a daughter of William Cunningham, a leading citizen of the same place. Herbert L. Brice, the subject of this sketch, was born near Columbus Grove, Ohio, April 9, 1865, and at the death of his father, which occurred when young Herbert was about five years of age; his mother settled in Lima, her present home. Here Mr. Brice obtained his early education in the public schools, remaining in these schools until he was fifteen years old, and in 1880 entered Oxford academy, where he prepared for Wooster university. Entering Princeton college in 1883, he pursued his studies there three years, and was graduated from that institution in 1886. Having already chosen his profession he at once entered Columbia Law school in New York city, and was admitted to the bar at Columbus, Ohio, in 1888. So careful and thorough had he always been in his school and college courses that he found himself prepared to immediately engage in the practice of his profession, and at once formed a partnership with S. S. Wheeler at Lima, Ohio, which partnership continues to the present time.  Politically Mr. Brice is a republican and has always taken great interest in the success of his party. He is also to some extent engaged in business, being at the present writing. president of the Lima Natural Gas company, and he is also a member of the B. P. O. E., No. 9, of Lima, Ohio. Few men in this part of Ohio have a brighter prospect before them than has Mr. Brice, who is thoroughly well qualified for any practice that may fall to his share. His social standing, it is needless to say, is co-equal with that of the most promi­nent citizens of the county, his ancestors, as. well as himself, having been quite eminent.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896)
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P. H. BROOKS, physician, Lima, was born near Oxford, Butler County, Ohio, Feb. 7, 1845.  His father, Kennedy Brooks, a native of Ireland, acquired a thorough education, and in early manhood left the land of his nativity to found a home among the liberty-loving people of America.  He was without means, and made his way to the wilds of Butler County, where he met and wedded Elizabeth H. Butler a native of Vermont, who proved a willing helpmeet and the foundation of his success.  She taught school with her first born in her arms, while he struggled manfully in clearing the forest land, and securing support.  In time he was enabled to purchase a small piece of land, and at the close of his life, in 1878, he left over 300 acres to his children, his companion having preceded him to the better world in 1865.  Kennedy Brooks was a man of strict religious principles and an expert mathematician.  His death was mourned by a large concourse of friends, especially the poor, to whom he had always extended aid aid and assistance.  He and his wife were parents of ten children, eight of whom were classical graduates.  The eldest, Andrew, is a teacher at Springfield, Ill.; Arpasia is teaching near Joplin, Mo.; Elizabeth S. is the head of private academy at Carthage, Mo.; Emily died at the age of seventeen just prior to graduating; Anthony, entered the naval service and died of heart disease at the siege of Vicksburg, in 1863; Robert, a physician at Carthage, Mo., served as a surgeon in the navy during the war of the Rebellion; Lucretia and Annie residing on the homestead; John, who was also a soldier during the civil war; and Peter H.  Our subject received his primary education in the district schools, and a collegiate classical course at the Miami University, graduating in the class of 1868.  His brother, Robert, was his preceptor in the study of medicine, and after two courses of lectures at the Miami Medical College of Cincinnati, began the practice of his profession at Paddy's Run, Butler County, Ohio, in 1872.  In 1877, he moved to this city where he has established a successful practice, and is one of the leading physicians.  The doctor joined the ranks of the Union Army in 1864, and served to the close of the war of the Rebellion.  He is a member of the Northwestern Ohio Medical Society, is widely known and highly respected.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 682
Ottawa Twp. -
JOHN F. BROTHERTON, attorney at law, Lima, was born in July 1844, in Piqua, Ohio, son of Jasper and Jane (Widney) Brotherton, came to Lima in October, 1865; was a graduate in the class of 1864, of the Weslyan University of Delaware, Ohio; was admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of Ohio in March, 1865; came to Lima in October of the same year (1865), and is now one of the leading members of the Lima bar.  He served as prosecuting attorney of Allen County from 1867 to 1871, and as city solicitor of Lima from 1881 to 1883, filling both of these offices with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the people.  He was united in marriage, in June, 1868, with Clara, daughter of the late T. K. Jacobs, and by this union five children were born, one son and four daughters, Cloyd, Mary, Bessie, Robert A. and Clara L.  Mr. Brotherton was at one time editor of the Miami County Democrat, and has engaged in other literary pursuits.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 682
JOSEPH BROWER, farmer. P. O. Elida, was born in Rockingham County, Va., February 16, 1827; son of John and Hannah (Miller) Brower, and brother of Daniel Brower, of German Township, this county. Our subject came to this county in 1844. He was married. August 9, 1849, to Miss Elizabeth Stephens, of this county, a native of Pittsburgh, Penn., born October 19, 1823. daughter of John and Rachel (Davis) Stephens, natives of Wales, and who came to America in 1820. settling in Pittsburgh, Penn., where they remained until 1835, then moved to this county, where they died. They were parents of five children, of whom two are now living: David and Elizabeth. To the union of our subject and wife have been born the following children: Rachel (deceased), Alonzo S., John S. (deceased), and Abraham L. Mr. Brower purchased property in Sugar Creek Township in 1848, and has improved many acres of land in the county. He has served his township in many of its offices —assessor, land appraiser, and justice of the peace. He and his wife are members of the U. B. Church. In politics he is a stanch Republican.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
A. BRYAN, M. D. and druggist, Spencerville, was born in Franklin County, Penn., April 21, 1828; son of John and Elizabeth (Kraig) Bryan, natives of Pennsylvania, and parents of eleven children. Our subject, the fourth in the family, received a common school and academic education, and after five years spent in reading medicine, he entered the medical schools of Philadelphia, Penn., graduating in 1867. He entered upon the practice of his chosen profession in Clermont, Penn.; soon after went to Elk County, remaining there till 1875, when he removed to Buffalo, N. Y. and graduated at the Medical University. He then spent about three years in practice in the oil regions. In 1879 he moved to Colorado, where he was interested in mining, at same time following his profession till 1883, when he went to Bloomfield, Ind., and engaged in the drug business a few months, but losing his stock by fire, and not being able to procure a suitable room in which to continue business, he came to Spencerville, purchasing a stock of drugs, which he has recently moved into a commodious room near the Keeth House, and here he carries on the drug business in connection with his duties as a physician. The doctor was married, in 1865, to Clara Holden, a native of Pennsylvania, who has borne him one son—Charles, born November 4, 1866. Politically Dr. Bryan is a Democrat.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
Ottawa Twp. -
CASPER F. BRYAN, attorney at law, Lima, was born Sept. 17, 1848, in Granville, Ohio, a town noted for its educational facilities, possessing a fine union school, two female colleges, and the Denison University (two of these schools are under the auspices of the Baptist, and the other under the Presbyterian Church).  Granville has a population of 1,000 or 1,200 souls, mostly of New England origin, who pride themselves on their neat and well-regulated town, where a pumpkin is said to have grown to its full size, undisturbed, on one of its side streets.  Our subject's father, Dr. E. F. Bryan, moved to Granville in 1830, and is one of its oldest physicians.  He was a student at Yale College, and studied medicine under the old school system.  After following his profession successfully for sixty years, he is now living a retired life.  The doctor was twice married, on the first occasion to Miss Julia Peck, who bore him four children: two sons, Charles Marshall and Casper F., and two daughters, Mary P., and Georgiana, of whom Casper F., is the only child living, the others having died in childhood.  Caspar F. received the benefit of the good schools and colleges of his native place, and in 1873 commenced the study of law with J. J. Bell, of London, Ohio, and was admitted to the bar at the district court of Greene County, Ohio, in March 1876.  He was married to same year (1876) to Miss Ella, daughter of Lynn and Margaret Crabb, of London, Ohio, and by this union there is one child, Grace W.  Mr. Bryan began the practice of law in Lima, in the fall of 1883, opening a law office in partnership with Albert G. Stewart; they are both members of the Presbyterian Church, at Lima.  Mr. Bryanis a member of the Knights of Pythias.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
MADISON BRYAN, city marshal of Delphos, and one of the well known citizens, is a native of Marion township, Allen county, Ohio, where he was born on August 26, 1852, is the son of Morgan and Sarah (Seatehrs) Bryan, deceased, both natives of Fairfield county, Ohio.  They were among the early settlers of Allen county, at the time of their coming Delphos being known as section No. 10.  They lived and died in Allen county, and of their twelve children ten are now living.
     Madison Bryan was reared on his father's farm in Allen county, and attended the country schools.  He left the farm in 1872, was elected city marshal of Delphos, for a term of two years; in 1895 he was re-elected for another term of two years, and is filling the office at the present time in a most efficient and satisfactory manner.  In politics, Mr. Bryan is a democrat, and is quite prominent in the councils of his party.  He is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity, and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church.  Mr. Bryan was married July 1, 1873, to Allie Lewis who was born in Van Wert county, Ohio, the daughter of Morgan Lewis, deceased.  To this union two children have been born, as follows: Arminta Gertrude and Nellie.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 - Page 217)
CHARLES F. BUEHLER, stoves and tinware, Spencerville. was born in Baden, Germany, November 4, 1853, youngest child of George and Anna Maria (Floesch) Buehler, and was brought to America by his parents when an infant. They located at New Bremen, Auglaize County, Ohio. Early in life our subject learned the trade of tinner, and since the age of fourteen has depended upon his own efforts. He came to Spencerville, January 14, 1875, and opened a tin store with a limited capital, but by industry and economy his trade steadily increased, and he was able to add continually to his stock, which is now complete. In addition to stoves and tinware he deals quite extensively in all kinds of hard and soft coal. Mr. Buehler was married, November 18, 1879, to Miss Katherine Schoenthaler, who was born in Philadelphia, Penn., March 22, 1855. She has borne him one son and one daughter—Frederick and Lillie. Mr. Buehler is a consistent member of the German Lutheran Church. He was formerly a member of the town council. Socially, he ranks high in the estimation of the community for his many good qualities.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
GEORGE BURKHART. - The Burkhart family had its origin in Germany, as its name implies.  It belongs therefore to that strong race of people, usually industrious, usually honest, usually able.  The influx of German blood into this country is exceedingly valuable to Americans, whose habits of life tend too much toward the production of a weakly and nervous race.  The eldest one of the family to whom it is deemed necessary in this biography to refer, was George Burkhart, a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, who died in his native land, aged sixty years.  He was married twice, and by his first marriage had one son, Michael, who emigrated to the United States and settled in Jackson county, Ohio.  By his second marriage he had two sons, George And Jacob, who came to this country and joined Michael in Jackson county in 1843.  Upon the arrival of the latter two brothers they found Michael engaged in the manufacture of matches, and not long after their arrival in this country all three brothers moved to Columbus, Ohio, where they all continued in the same industry for some six years.  Then, owing to the introduction of machinery into the manufacture of these useful little articles, they found themselves unable to compete with the more modern methods, and in 1847 they abandoned the field, permitted machinery to have its way, and purchased three eighty-acre tracts of land, all adjoining, each having the same quantity of land, and settled down as it seemed for life to the occupation of farming.  This land was in Noble township, Auglaize county, Ohio.  The trees they cut down mostly for the sake of clearing the land, but not feeling willing to sacrifice so much excellent timber, as many others did and still do, they engaged here again on the farms in making matches, thus converting at least a portion of their trees into value instead of into ashes.  Michael and his family still live in Auglaize county.  Jacob Burkhart with his family removed from Auglaize county and are scattered around the country, while George remained upon his farm, where he still resides.  He was married the first time in Germany, and his wife died in 1843.  For a second wife he married Catherine Miller, of Lancaster county, Ohio.  By his first wife he had two children: Henry, who died on the way to America; and George, who resides in Shawnee township, Allen county.  By his second marriage he had the following children: Frederick, Henry, William, Jacob, Caroline, wife of Lewis Bowsher, and Maggie, wife of John Fisher.
     George Burkhart
, the subject of this sketch, is the second son of George and Elizabeth (Treerginger) Burkhart, and was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Mar. 20, 1843.  With his father he came to the United States, and was reared upon the farm, with but little or no educational facilities, except such as he found at home around the family fireside, his father serving as his teacher as well as circumstances would permit; but with all that could be done he was compelled to rely mainly on his own efforts for such learning as he acquired, as he has since done for the wealth that he has acquired.  He is therefore a self-educated and a self-made man in every respect.  At an early age he began working away form home, in order that he might make a little money for himself.  Brought up in the woods as he was, it was but natural that he should be a skillful wood-chopper, for there is, or at least used to be, such a thing as skill in chopping wood, especially in cutting down a tree so as to have it fall precisely where it was desired to lie, and then also in chopping off a log, all of which is Greek to the modern farmer's boy.  When he was twenty-two years of age he purchased forty acres of land in section Nov. 22, which is a portion of his present farm, and upon this forty acres he settled down.  Here he erected a sorghum mill and engaged in making sorghum syrup, in which industry he has been engaged ever since.  His farm contains 121 acres of well-improved land, and the improvements thereon are among the best.  He has a fine residence and other good buildings, upon the former putting the first slate roof in the township.  MR. Burkhart's specialty is potatoes, of which tuber he raises on an average 3,000 bushels a year.   He is also engaged in breeding and raising stock, feeding all the produce of his fields, which he finds much more profitable than to sell grain, hay, etc., from his farm, for by this process he retains the fertilizers.  Besides these branches of industry Mr. Burkhart is also engaged in the production of oil.
     Mr. Burkhart, politically, is a democrat, and is always interested in his party's success, whether prospects are bright or gloomy.  He has served twice as township trustee.  At the first election there was but one scratched ticket against him, and at the second election, in 1892, there was none.  He is interested in educational matters, equally with politics, and has served as school director in his district.  At the present time he is a trustee of Lima college, and he was on the executive committee on organization.  He was also one of the building committee, and one of the first board of trustees. 
     Religiously Mr. Burkhart is a member of the Lutheran church, and has served as elder thereof and also as treasurer.  Mr. Burkhart has been married twice, his first wife having been Miss Mary Bowsher, daughter of Benjamin Bowsher, who died in 1876, leaving the following children:  Charles, Ida, Frank, William and Mary.  His second wife was Miss Emma Bowsher, daughter of Samuel Bowsher, by whom he has one child, viz: Francis, who was born in 1869, was educated first in the common schools, and afterward at the Western Normal university at Ada, and is a graduate therefrom.  He has taught school in county districts and in Lima college, and is at the present time secretary of the Lima College association. Politically he is a democrat, and in 1895 was elected justice of the peace of Shawnee township.  Mr. Burkhart is a strong believer in the education of the young, and has given his children the best education possible to him.  In every other way he is an enterprising, intelligent and progressive citizen.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 - Page 217)
Shawnee Twp. -
GEORGE BURKHART, farmer, P. O. Cridersville, Auglaize County, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Mar. 20, 1845, son of George and Elizabeth (Friesinger) Burkhart, who came to America in 1847, the former of whom settled in Auglaize County, Ohio, in 1850, and cleared and improved a farm in Noble Township, where he still resides; the latter died the year they came to America.  Our subject was reared in Noble Township, Auglaize County, from five years of age.  He never attended school, but his father taught him sufficient to enable him to read German.  He lived with his father until twenty-one years of age, when he started out for himself, and engaged in chopping for several years, until he had saved enough to purchase the farm he now occupies in Shawnee Township, this county, all of which he cleared and improved himself, and on which he built a fine residence in 1882.  Mr. Burkhart was married twice, his first wife being Mary, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Delong) Bowsher, who settled in Shawnee Township, this county, in 1836, and by this union have been born five children: Charlie, Ida, Frank, William and Mary.  The present wife of our subject is Emma, daughter of Samuel and Lydia (Wagner) Bowsher, who settled in Shawnee Township, this county, in 1851, and the issue of this union is one child - Francis.  Mr. and Mrs. Burkhart are members of the Lutheran Church.  In politics, he is a Democrat.
(
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Page 788)
THOMAS C. BURNS, dry goods merchant, Spencerville, was born in Ashland County, Ohio, May 17, 1843; son of John H. and Margaret (McClure) Burns, the former a native of Ohio, the latter of Pennsylvania. They had nine children, of whom Thomas C. is fourth. Our subject was raised on a farm, and received a common school education. He entered upon his career in life as a harness maker, an occupation he followed about two years.  He then engaged as clerk in a dry goods store at Perrysville, Ohio, where he remained about eleven years. In 1879 he removed to Spencerville, opened a dry goods store, in partnership with E. F. Veach, and has since continued in this line. From the commencement of his business career his trade has gradually increased, and his kind and obliging manners in attending to the wants of his many customers, as well as by his close attention to business, have gained for him hosts of friends. In order to better accommodate this trade the firm removed, in September, 1834, to their present commodious room, and their stock is as complete as any in the town. Mr. Burns was married, February 23, 1870, to Kate Castor, who was born in Vermont, July 25, 1850, by whom he has two children: Wade A. and John H. Mr. Burns is one of the present councilmen; was formerly a member of the I. O. O. F.: religiously he is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically he is a stanch Democrat.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
ENOS G. BURTON, M. D., of Lima, Allen county, Ohio, with his office in Kendall block, was born in Pickaway county, Ohio, April 14, 1846, and is of English-Scotch descent paternally, and maternally of German extraction.
     Thomas Burton, grandfather of the doctor, was an early pioneer of Pickaway county, was a substantial farmer, and married a Miss Cutler, of Scotch descent.  Their son, Luke D. Burton, father of the doctor, was born in Pickaway county in 1818 and was also a farmer.  He married Cynthia A. Hoffhines, who was born in Pickaway county Jan. 10, 1819, this union resulting in the birth of the following children in the order named:  William V., John H. and Sarah A., deceased; George W., Enos G., Edward T., Nelson J.; Luke, deceased.  In 1860 Luke D. Burton brought his family to Auglaize count and bought a farm in Douchequet township, which he cultivated until his death, which occurred in June, 1876.  He was a sincere member of the Lutheran church and in politics was a democrat, while as a citizen he was public spirited, generous and useful.  His widow is now a resident of Wapakoneta, Auglaize county, where she is passing the declining years of her life in peace and comfort.
    Dr. Enos G. Burton was reared on the farm until seventeen years of age, received a good academical education, and for six years followed the vocation of school-teaching.  He then read medicine under Dr. C. Berlin, of Wapakoneta, and then attended the Medical college at Cincinnati, Ohio, from which he graduated in September, 1871.  He immediately began the practice of his chosen profession at Westminster, where his skill and ability were quickly recognized and where he has met with success in his practice and a remunerative patronage seldom equaled in rural towns.  He is still an ardent student of the science and practice of medicine, and beside his well-assorted and well-stocked library of choice standard medical works, he subscribes for the best periodical literature devoted to the science of medicine and surgery, published either in America or Europe, and is thus enabled to keep abreast of the progress made in his profession from day to day and keep himself fully posted in its technology.
     The marriage of Dr. Burton took place May 18, 1875, to Miss Emma J. Brown, and to this felicitous union have been born the following children:  Greg E., deceased; Edna O., Elma V., Don M. and Helen H.  Of these Miss Edna O. has been, for the past six years, under the instruction of a noted local teacher of music in Lima and is already quite proficient in the art.  Fraternally Dr. Burton is a master Mason of lodge No. 205, at Lima, and is also chief ranger of tent No. 650, Independent Order of Foresters, of the same city.  In politics he is active as a democrat.
     MRS. EMMA J. (BROWN) BURTON was born in Logan county, Ohio, Dec. 6, 1856, graduated from the high school at Rushsylvania, and for two years was engaged in teaching.  The father of this accomplished lady was born in Petersburg, Va., Apr. 7, 1824, and a minister of the Methodist Protestant church all his useful life, and never attended a conference to which he did not devote all his salary.  He married Dec. 24, 1846, in Rushsylvania, Logan county, Ohio,  Miss Martha J. Blair, a native of Nicholas county, Ky., born June 19, 1825, the union resulting in the following children:  William U. (deceased), Henry M., John F. (deceased), Margaret A. (wife of Samuel McCoy), Emma J. (Mrs. Dr. Burton), and Marshall (deceased).  In 1860, Rev. Mr. Brown left Logan county and brought his family to Allen county and located in Westminster.  The reverend gentleman was a true patriot and entered the Union army as a private in company A, One Hundred and Eighty-first Ohio volunteer infantry, but was speedily promoted from the ranks to the chaplaincy of his regiment.  This service, however, ruined his health, producing an incipient consumption that culminated in his death some six or seven years later.  For eight years after locating in Westminster, the Rev. Mr. Brown filled a number of circuits in his ministerial capacity, and was called - the pious , good and faithful steward that he was - to meet the Master, August 25, 1873.  His venerated widow is still a resident of Westminster and is beloved by all who knew her or who remember her lamented husband - and none who knew him can ever forget him.
(Source#1:  A Portrait and biographical record of Allen & Van Wert Counties, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1896 - Page 218)
GEORGE S. BYERLY, farmer, P. O. Lima, was born in Rockingham Co., Va., Mar. 4, 1847, and is a son of David and Phebe Byerly.  From five years of age he was reared in Washington County, Tenn., where he received a common school education, and lived until 1861, when he came to Allen County and located in Bath Township.  In 1864 he settled on the farm he now occupies, on which he has made all the improvements in erecting buildings, etc.  He was married Nov. 4, 1862, to Sarah, daughter of Daniel and Polly (Leedy) Miller of Bath Twp., by whom he has had twelve children, ten now living: David, Mary, Daniel, Lalura, Jesse, Ellen, Oscar, William, Frederick and Chester.  Mr. and Mrs. Byerly are members of the German Baptist Church.  He has been a school director of Beth Township for twelve years; in politics he is a Republican.
Source:  History of Allen County, Ohio - Publ. Chicago: Warner i.e. Warner, Beers & Co., 1885
 

 

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